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An award-winning journalist’s extraordinary account of being kidnapped and tortured in Syria by al Qaeda for two years—a revelatory memoir about war, human nature, and endurance that’s “the best of the genre, profound, poetic, and sorrowful” (The Atlantic). In 2012, American journalist Theo Padnos, fluent in Arabic, Russian, German, and French, traveled to a Turkish border An award-winning journalist’s extraordinary account of being kidnapped and tortured in Syria by al Qaeda for two years—a revelatory memoir about war, human nature, and endurance that’s “the best of the genre, profound, poetic, and sorrowful” (The Atlantic). In 2012, American journalist Theo Padnos, fluent in Arabic, Russian, German, and French, traveled to a Turkish border town to write and report on the Syrian civil war. One afternoon in October, while walking through an olive grove, he met three young Syrians—who turned out to be al Qaeda operatives—and they captured him and kept him prisoner for nearly two years. On his first day, in the first of many prisons, Padnos was given a blindfold—a grime-stained scrap of fabric—that was his only possession throughout his horrific ordeal. Now, Padnos recounts his time in captivity in Syria, where he was frequently tortured at the hands of the al Qaeda affiliate, Jebhat al Nusra. We learn not only about Padnos’s harrowing experience, but we also get a firsthand account of life in a Syrian village, the nature of Islamic prisons, how captors interrogate someone suspected of being CIA, the ways that Islamic fighters shift identities and drift back and forth through the veil of Western civilization, and much more. No other journalist has lived among terrorists for as long as Theo has—and survived. As a resident of thirteen separate prisons in every part of rebel-occupied Syria, Theo witnessed a society adrift amid a steady stream of bombings, executions, torture, prayer, fasting, and exhibitions, all staged by the terrorists. Living within this tide of violence changed not only his personal identity but also profoundly altered his understanding of how to live. Offering fascinating, unprecedented insight into the state of Syria today, Blindfold is “a triumph of the human spirit” (The New York Times Book Review)—combining the emotional power of a captive’s memoir with a journalist’s account of a culture and a nation in conflict that is as urgent and important as ever.


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An award-winning journalist’s extraordinary account of being kidnapped and tortured in Syria by al Qaeda for two years—a revelatory memoir about war, human nature, and endurance that’s “the best of the genre, profound, poetic, and sorrowful” (The Atlantic). In 2012, American journalist Theo Padnos, fluent in Arabic, Russian, German, and French, traveled to a Turkish border An award-winning journalist’s extraordinary account of being kidnapped and tortured in Syria by al Qaeda for two years—a revelatory memoir about war, human nature, and endurance that’s “the best of the genre, profound, poetic, and sorrowful” (The Atlantic). In 2012, American journalist Theo Padnos, fluent in Arabic, Russian, German, and French, traveled to a Turkish border town to write and report on the Syrian civil war. One afternoon in October, while walking through an olive grove, he met three young Syrians—who turned out to be al Qaeda operatives—and they captured him and kept him prisoner for nearly two years. On his first day, in the first of many prisons, Padnos was given a blindfold—a grime-stained scrap of fabric—that was his only possession throughout his horrific ordeal. Now, Padnos recounts his time in captivity in Syria, where he was frequently tortured at the hands of the al Qaeda affiliate, Jebhat al Nusra. We learn not only about Padnos’s harrowing experience, but we also get a firsthand account of life in a Syrian village, the nature of Islamic prisons, how captors interrogate someone suspected of being CIA, the ways that Islamic fighters shift identities and drift back and forth through the veil of Western civilization, and much more. No other journalist has lived among terrorists for as long as Theo has—and survived. As a resident of thirteen separate prisons in every part of rebel-occupied Syria, Theo witnessed a society adrift amid a steady stream of bombings, executions, torture, prayer, fasting, and exhibitions, all staged by the terrorists. Living within this tide of violence changed not only his personal identity but also profoundly altered his understanding of how to live. Offering fascinating, unprecedented insight into the state of Syria today, Blindfold is “a triumph of the human spirit” (The New York Times Book Review)—combining the emotional power of a captive’s memoir with a journalist’s account of a culture and a nation in conflict that is as urgent and important as ever.

30 review for Blindfold: A Memoir of Capture, Torture, and Enlightenment

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris Riley

    By the time I was 50 pages in I just wasn’t buying what was sold to me, except that he was actually kidnapped, so I decided to watch some interviews on YouTube and do a little research on this guy. First off, he is NOT AN AWARD WINNING journalist. He just won some award for being the most interesting guy in a documentary, which considering the fact that one of the other nominees was IGGY POP, means that it was NOT an award for journalism, which is false advertising and just pathetic, which is wh By the time I was 50 pages in I just wasn’t buying what was sold to me, except that he was actually kidnapped, so I decided to watch some interviews on YouTube and do a little research on this guy. First off, he is NOT AN AWARD WINNING journalist. He just won some award for being the most interesting guy in a documentary, which considering the fact that one of the other nominees was IGGY POP, means that it was NOT an award for journalism, which is false advertising and just pathetic, which is why I’m giving him 2 stars, instead of one. The second star is out of pity. I bought this book hoping to learn something about Al Qaeda, but the only thing I learned is that Amazon lets you return Kindle purchases within 7 days.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chuck_Les

    3.5 Stars. This was a difficult read. The descriptions of physical torture and the psychological torture of confinement and solitude were often draining. Even worse, for me, was the opening section leading up to his capture. Like in a horror movie where you helplessly watch a character walking into the house, it is almost excrutiating to read every step that leads Padnos toward his ultimate torment. To his credit, he does not sugarcoat the ignorance and arrogance that led him to Syria. If anythi 3.5 Stars. This was a difficult read. The descriptions of physical torture and the psychological torture of confinement and solitude were often draining. Even worse, for me, was the opening section leading up to his capture. Like in a horror movie where you helplessly watch a character walking into the house, it is almost excrutiating to read every step that leads Padnos toward his ultimate torment. To his credit, he does not sugarcoat the ignorance and arrogance that led him to Syria. If anything he downplays the nobler motivations that played a role in his desire to go to Syria to depict the plight of the Syrian civilians in the midst of the devastating civil war. That being said, there is a certain hubris in his conviction that he will be the one to capture that plight. And both in his depiction of his journalistic efforts and explicitly in his later reflections while in captivity he shows a good deal of self awareness and insight into his own motivations and shortcomings. Another strength of the book was in his depiction of the personalities of his tormenters and his relationships with them. Without falling into "Stockholm syndrome" cliches, he shows with admirable nuance the variety of guards, soldiers and torturers he encountered-- from fanatical children, to young men easily distracted by stories of American women, to outright sadists. Also insightful was his depiction of his relationships with his fellow captives. There is great irony in his relatively positive relationship with the jihadist who had attempted to join ISIS and his horrendous relationship with the American photographer who regales him with his ideas for screenplays. At times this borders on the humorous, but it gets at the psychological truth that the quality of relationships are more often based on personality than morality. A person might philosophically believe you deserve to be killed and yet still be a better cellmate than someone who is just a garden-variety asshole. I did feel that the book was a bit long. Some judicious editing would have strengthened the book's emotional impact. Also there wasnt as much analysis of the broader conflict in Syria as I might have hoped. Still this was a moving and psychologically insightful memoir.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Bashford

    The author spends most of the book complaining that the major news outlets wouldn't hire him...after reading this, it's not entirely hard to understand why. It's not bad if you have an existing understanding of the Syrian conflict, but requires a fair amount of external research otherwise. My main complaint was the pacing - after spending a third of the book describing how he got kidnapped, he spent TWO PAGES describing how he was released and came home. The end. It was fairly bizarre. The author spends most of the book complaining that the major news outlets wouldn't hire him...after reading this, it's not entirely hard to understand why. It's not bad if you have an existing understanding of the Syrian conflict, but requires a fair amount of external research otherwise. My main complaint was the pacing - after spending a third of the book describing how he got kidnapped, he spent TWO PAGES describing how he was released and came home. The end. It was fairly bizarre.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Kiley | memoirs.of.a.booknerd

    Blindfold by Theo Padnos chronicles the real-life story of American journalist, Theo Padnos, who was kidnapped and tortured by al Qaeda affiliate Jebhat al Nusra for two years before being set free. Given the graphic nature of stories such as these (⚠️TW: torture, violence, terrorism) I’m careful in those I pick up, wanting to make sure it will add something to my understanding of the conflict rather than being a gratuitous read, and this book does offer a unique perspective to others I’ve read. Blindfold by Theo Padnos chronicles the real-life story of American journalist, Theo Padnos, who was kidnapped and tortured by al Qaeda affiliate Jebhat al Nusra for two years before being set free. Given the graphic nature of stories such as these (⚠️TW: torture, violence, terrorism) I’m careful in those I pick up, wanting to make sure it will add something to my understanding of the conflict rather than being a gratuitous read, and this book does offer a unique perspective to others I’ve read. Theo’s account combines his personal experience with political background on the conflict itself and is unique in that it does shed some light into the mindset of his captors and how they come to be embroiled in this cycle of terrorism. I’ve seen some reviews criticize this empathy, but I would say it came across as more of a balanced account of the reality of this conflict told with a journalist’s eye. That being said, the back and forth between personal experience and political knowledge did slow the pace of the book down considerably, which made it harder to get through. Similarly, although recounting the sequence of events he endured, Theo does not share much of his own emotional experience of the ordeal. I fully recognize that Theo does not owe this to anyone – it is his lived experience and this trauma is his to unpack in whatever way is comfortable for him – but when reading a memoir, one expects an inside look in to the experience and with this story missing much of that piece, it felt very factual and detached which again contributed to it being a bit harder to get through. I would recommend this book for anyone who is interested in a novel perspective of this conflict and ordeals such as these, but would recommend tempering your expectation in terms of the amount of personal disclosure you’re expecting from this memoir. Thank you @simonschusterca @scribnerbooks for my #gifted copy!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Milena Frank

    Some of the author's descriptions of his ordeals are deeply moving. But there is a nervous, almost neurotic quality to the book's constant firings of personal and political musings. Many reflections are very repetitive, especially his depictions of himself as a 'dumb American' in the first part of the book. I also missed real depth on his re-entry into his old world and reunification with his mother. Had it not been for a human interest in his captivity and release, I would have struggled to get Some of the author's descriptions of his ordeals are deeply moving. But there is a nervous, almost neurotic quality to the book's constant firings of personal and political musings. Many reflections are very repetitive, especially his depictions of himself as a 'dumb American' in the first part of the book. I also missed real depth on his re-entry into his old world and reunification with his mother. Had it not been for a human interest in his captivity and release, I would have struggled to get through this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Priscilla

    I found this book very difficult to read, however, unable to put it down because of my association with soldiers with whom I worked in the US ARMY. It is only a miracle that Mr. Padnos, in my opinion, survived in the most difficult and inhumane conditions anyone should suffer. It has its surprises and anticipations but filled with information that I am happy to see someone other than a military member clearly release what goes on in their every day life. Thank you, Sir, for a well-written, true I found this book very difficult to read, however, unable to put it down because of my association with soldiers with whom I worked in the US ARMY. It is only a miracle that Mr. Padnos, in my opinion, survived in the most difficult and inhumane conditions anyone should suffer. It has its surprises and anticipations but filled with information that I am happy to see someone other than a military member clearly release what goes on in their every day life. Thank you, Sir, for a well-written, true and informative book of horror, and mostly your ability to have the strength to survive.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Reece Willis

    A well written and descriptive account of an extremely harrowing ordeal. Theo Padnos has not only produced an excellent insight into what it was like from a psychological perspective, but also provides the reader with expert knowledge of his surroundings and the political situations that brought him to the point of capture. Reading Blindfold will make you feel like you're by his side every step of the way. A well written and descriptive account of an extremely harrowing ordeal. Theo Padnos has not only produced an excellent insight into what it was like from a psychological perspective, but also provides the reader with expert knowledge of his surroundings and the political situations that brought him to the point of capture. Reading Blindfold will make you feel like you're by his side every step of the way.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Caroline David

    Wow, Theo Padnos shares his very personal story as a hostage in Syria. I was completely shocked by how he was captured and who did the capturing. His ability to tell this story, which is no doubt very hard to share, is unrivaled and I loved hearing from him.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    A hostage in Syria for two years, the author does a magnificent job describing his kidnapping, imprisonment and his insights into caliphate lives. Beautifully written, it is an eye-opening account of the psychology and motivations of some of the Middle East.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erin Matson

    This is, I think purposefully, an irritating read. That is, paradoxically, its strongest part. Theo Padnos thought he had a great, soaring story. He romanticized everything he saw. Instead he was captured and tortured.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Desmond

    Read this as an extended stoic meditation. Padnos really spent a good deal of time bumbling around in Syria, and I appreciated that he was humble enough to say he really got himself into that mess. I felt like the enlightenment aspect of the book could have been expanded.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Stenquist

    A riveting book of capture, survival and overcoming that is a must read. Pick up a copy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joan Mitchell

    An eye opening account of the civil war in Syria and a revealing of the religious feelings that fuel the combatants hatred of those with different beliefs and outlooks.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sally Bruggeman

    Couldn’t put it down! What a unique and interesting story! I loved the writing and I learned a lot. Thanks for such a good read!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    The torture and abuse Theo Padnos receives from his captors is unrelenting and often hard to read. The months and months of torture that are followed by small acts of human kindness begin to feel wearying after two hundred pages, and this is not a slam on the author. I'm sure the weariness I felt is nothing compared to what Padnos and other prisoners have felt during their subjection to long-term imprisonment. But the part of the title that took the longest for me to begin to understand was "Enl The torture and abuse Theo Padnos receives from his captors is unrelenting and often hard to read. The months and months of torture that are followed by small acts of human kindness begin to feel wearying after two hundred pages, and this is not a slam on the author. I'm sure the weariness I felt is nothing compared to what Padnos and other prisoners have felt during their subjection to long-term imprisonment. But the part of the title that took the longest for me to begin to understand was "Enlightenment." How could he possibly arrive at enlightenment after two years of constant abuse at the hands of sadistic jihadists who thought of him and treated him as an animal? What could come from this? I think I had a tentative answer to this that came from two elements of Padnos' tale toward the end as he details the torture less and begins to reflect on the dreams of his jailers who are abusing their hostage American. The first comes when he is given paper and pen with which to write, and he begins to tell a story of a girl he names Gypsy who lives in the area of Vermont he is from. This is all a fiction, but as he is tortured, he relates the tale of her own abduction, rape, and torture. At first, this seemed sadistic on his part, though I saw his writing as an attempt to try to understand it. The second element, alongside this novel of abduction, rape, and murder he is telling as happening in his home state--he seems to get solace out of thinking of his home--comes as he begins to understand his jailers' dream of a Caliphate. Their dream of being freed from the abuse of the Assad Regime and other abusers as they realize a new Syria of Muslim unity and love is one that he begins to reflect on and think about. When he is freed and he is home (not a spoiler since we know he lived to tell this story), his initial impressions of home are of the abusive novel he was writing and of the girl Gypsy being violated and the violence that could come to his home in Vermont. But as he finds himself more at home, he begins to long for the dream of belonging to a safe country where he lives, where all can participate freely and fully. I don't know, but I think this is a vision we may not think about too much, and it may only come to those who have suffered as much as this author has.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ruby

    "My feeling that I was about to die allowed me to see. In a prison cell, at the very end of your allotment of days, you are in a little eagle's nest, a thousand feet above the surface of the earth. You can see everything. Why do the living struggle and sweat, you wonder, when all they really need to do is to live?" "My theory of travel, which I had devloped in libraries in America during graduate school, was that travel allowed you to slip into lives you might have lived but hadn't yet had the ti "My feeling that I was about to die allowed me to see. In a prison cell, at the very end of your allotment of days, you are in a little eagle's nest, a thousand feet above the surface of the earth. You can see everything. Why do the living struggle and sweat, you wonder, when all they really need to do is to live?" "My theory of travel, which I had devloped in libraries in America during graduate school, was that travel allowed you to slip into lives you might have lived but hadn't yet had the time. TO give your old life the slip, you had to learn to east as foreigners ate, to speak the languages they spoke, and to pray as they prayed. The more totally you gave yourself to them, the further you could see into the lives of others." "It seems to me now that, as the billion dollars in covert aid the Obama adminstration approved for the Syrian resistance in the spring of the 2013 began to flood into Syria, some of the rebel commanders, feeling themselves buoyed by newfound alliances, lost interest in making deals with the Syrian government. Perhaps the guns that began to tumble into the rebel's hands then had the effect of bringing out their will to kill. Perhaps they hadn't been much interested in making a deal in the first place. Now new, richer deals beckoned on the horizon." "If a destabilizing power were to establish itself here at home, I thought, my fellow citizens would live through a moment of shock, as I had done in Syria. But they were a robust lot. They were much stronger than they knew. In the fullness of time, they would gather themselves together. They would pitch themselves into the fray. Probably, they would come through it all with an enhanced appreciation of life. Had not some such awakening of the spirit occured to me after my ordeal in Syria?"

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Kreps

    Very introspective book. I never questioned the author's honesty, but I did want he hear more what he learned and how his perspective changed. I know being held captive for two years had a big impact on him. He makes himself look so naive at the beginning, but he very rarely goes back and judges or evaluates what happened and why. It's clear that he foolishly put his safety in the hands of people with malicious intent, but I don't know if he really regrets it or would behave differently today. I Very introspective book. I never questioned the author's honesty, but I did want he hear more what he learned and how his perspective changed. I know being held captive for two years had a big impact on him. He makes himself look so naive at the beginning, but he very rarely goes back and judges or evaluates what happened and why. It's clear that he foolishly put his safety in the hands of people with malicious intent, but I don't know if he really regrets it or would behave differently today. I got the sense that he was a trusting person and he liked being a trusting person. He wants to make friends. He wants to see the humanity in people. Throughout his captivity, he tries to connect with his jailers, the villagers, his fellow captives. It's not clear why. Is it his nature? Was it to convince someone to help him get free? Are they manipulating him or he them? Maybe these are unanswerable questions, but they just don't get asked or addressed, and I really would have liked to have heard that. What I understood clearly by the end was that he was understandably traumatized. Other than that, I'm not sure how his world view changed at all. I want to know how, today, he balances his trusting nature with protecting himself. If he is still curious about the people of Syria. If he still wants to be a journalist. That said, the book did an excellent job giving a first person view of his experience. I just wanted a little more.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Liz Davidson

    Parts of this book were fascinating. Padnos has insights about participants in extremist groups in Syria that ring very true to me. I think he is also very honest about the range of emotions he experienced during his confinement, including a seemingly improbable fondness for his captors that alternates with incredible rage. At times, though, this book is incredibly frustrating. Padnos is very honest about the mistakes that led to his abduction, but he goes about it slowly, and waiting for the in Parts of this book were fascinating. Padnos has insights about participants in extremist groups in Syria that ring very true to me. I think he is also very honest about the range of emotions he experienced during his confinement, including a seemingly improbable fondness for his captors that alternates with incredible rage. At times, though, this book is incredibly frustrating. Padnos is very honest about the mistakes that led to his abduction, but he goes about it slowly, and waiting for the inevitable to happen is agonizing—especially because some of the warning signs he describes are very clear. I almost quit the book before getting to any actually interesting insights. Other parts are a bit repetitive, although I suppose two years of confinement was very repetitive. I know that he and Matt Schrier have differing accounts of their time as cellmates (I might need to look at Schrier's account next). Overall, this is a worthwhile read if you can stomach descriptions of torture.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Roussell

    I really liked this book. Honest and self-critical, the author takes a look at how and why he got captured and taken prisoner. And then instead of just gorily describing the torture or just railing against his captors, he really takes you on a journey through his own thoughts and emotions through the years of imprisonment. I walked away with a better understanding of the psychology of the al Nusra, al Qaeda, and other extremist terrorist groups and with a really interesting and compelling story I really liked this book. Honest and self-critical, the author takes a look at how and why he got captured and taken prisoner. And then instead of just gorily describing the torture or just railing against his captors, he really takes you on a journey through his own thoughts and emotions through the years of imprisonment. I walked away with a better understanding of the psychology of the al Nusra, al Qaeda, and other extremist terrorist groups and with a really interesting and compelling story of exactly you get through an ordeal like that. He’s clearly a unique person with a very unique set of experiences and I was fascinated throughout the book. The book wasn’t for some sort of plot-driven thriller, it was instead driven by the psychology of an intense and terrifying situation. There is a little repetition in it but I still think it added to the story line. Highly recommend!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cathleen

    A memoir of an American man’s imprisonment in Syria, which is quite detached and unemotional in spite of or because of the difficulties of his situation. His matter-of-fact tone, his command of the Arabic language, and his knowledge of the political situation enabled him to share insights that are interesting; however, this memoir seems to be missing his personal experience in a large way. How much a traumatized person wants to reveal about his darkest struggles is absolutely a personal decision A memoir of an American man’s imprisonment in Syria, which is quite detached and unemotional in spite of or because of the difficulties of his situation. His matter-of-fact tone, his command of the Arabic language, and his knowledge of the political situation enabled him to share insights that are interesting; however, this memoir seems to be missing his personal experience in a large way. How much a traumatized person wants to reveal about his darkest struggles is absolutely a personal decision, yet why write a memoir if you are not willing to share? His inclusion of a violent piece of fiction he was writing during the last six months of his captivity seemed a strange addendum and for me, did little to advance the story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jane Comer

    With cavalier attitude of a twenty something Theo ventures into Syria with the idea of writing an article about the people living along the Turkish-Syrian border. He is immediately captured by the Jabhat al-Nusra, an arm of al Qaeda in Syria. Moved from house to storefronts, etc. in the course of his 22 month capture, he endures starvation, darkness, torture, and isolation. The memoir captures details of the various jailors and fellow captives. It is more descriptive than emotional, and there ar With cavalier attitude of a twenty something Theo ventures into Syria with the idea of writing an article about the people living along the Turkish-Syrian border. He is immediately captured by the Jabhat al-Nusra, an arm of al Qaeda in Syria. Moved from house to storefronts, etc. in the course of his 22 month capture, he endures starvation, darkness, torture, and isolation. The memoir captures details of the various jailors and fellow captives. It is more descriptive than emotional, and there are practically no details about how/why he was finally released. His ability to speak Arabic fluently and his knowledge of Islam enable him to survive his ordeal.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Excellent book! This story humbled me in many ways! The story flows very well and gives an inside look at what it was/is like in Syria, especially during the conflict in recent years. The author is very detailed in his experience and gives the feeling that you (the reader) are a fly on the wall during his imprisonment.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Youp

    3.5 out of 5 stars. While the writing and subject matter is far from bad, I expected something more exciting from a two-year-kidnapping. There is some torture, some threatening, some conversations with the captors, but nothing particularly memorable or shocking. Furthermore, the torture and enlightenment parts are kept to a minimal. Not a bad book, but far from great.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    A rather unbelievable memoir of the capture, imprisonment, torture, and eventual release of an American journalist in Syria. it is beyond comprehension how Padnos could have remained so calm - almost serene - in the midst of the chaos that his life became for two years. I felt like I was missing the anger and disillusionment that surely must have been present.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kristy Hurst

    Padnos experienced things most of us cannot even imagine. His resilience brought him through. This memoir gives you a peek inside what happened to him in Syria and is incredibly well written. It was an honor to read an advance uncorrected copy that I won in a giveaway on Goodreads.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris Reath

    Could have been great, but needed a better editor. Enthralled by some parts. Bored to tears by others. I guess this was the point? He pretty much seemed to recall everything, and it was not all shocking. It was a lot of lived boredom.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dee

    Foolish unsuccessful freelance journalist decides to visit Syria and gets captured, imprisoned and tortured until his cousins and mom raise enough cash to ransom him and he finally gets the fame he wanted by writing this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    A hard to read book because of it's harrowing and frightening content but worth the read even with the graphic content. How can a humans be so evil to capture and torture? I will never understand. I am amazed that the Mr. Padnos could write his story but I am glad. A hard to read book because of it's harrowing and frightening content but worth the read even with the graphic content. How can a humans be so evil to capture and torture? I will never understand. I am amazed that the Mr. Padnos could write his story but I am glad.

  29. 4 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    E

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Next time you think you're having a bad day... Incredible story of an American journalist captured during the war in Syria. He remains a prisoner for 2 years. This is his story. Next time you think you're having a bad day... Incredible story of an American journalist captured during the war in Syria. He remains a prisoner for 2 years. This is his story.

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