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Love Is the Way: Holding on to Hope in Troubling Times

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Walk the path of love with one of the warmest, most beloved spiritual leaders of our time, and learn how to put faith into action. As the descendant of slaves and the son of a civil rights activist, Bishop Michael Curry's life illustrates massive changes in our times. Much of the world met Bishop Curry when he delivered his sermon on the redemptive power of love at the Walk the path of love with one of the warmest, most beloved spiritual leaders of our time, and learn how to put faith into action. As the descendant of slaves and the son of a civil rights activist, Bishop Michael Curry's life illustrates massive changes in our times. Much of the world met Bishop Curry when he delivered his sermon on the redemptive power of love at the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle at Windsor Castle. Here, he expands on his message of hope in an inspirational road map for living the way of love, illuminated with moving lessons from his own life. Through the prism of his faith, ancestry, and personal journey, Love Is the Way shows us how America came this far and, more important, how to go a whole lot further. The way of love is essential for addressing the seemingly insurmountable challenges facing the world today: poverty, racism, selfishness, deep ideological divisions, competing claims to speak for God. This book will lead readers to discover the gifts they need in order to live the way of love: deep reservoirs of hope and resilience, simple wisdom, the discipline of nonviolence, and unshakable regard for human dignity.


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Walk the path of love with one of the warmest, most beloved spiritual leaders of our time, and learn how to put faith into action. As the descendant of slaves and the son of a civil rights activist, Bishop Michael Curry's life illustrates massive changes in our times. Much of the world met Bishop Curry when he delivered his sermon on the redemptive power of love at the Walk the path of love with one of the warmest, most beloved spiritual leaders of our time, and learn how to put faith into action. As the descendant of slaves and the son of a civil rights activist, Bishop Michael Curry's life illustrates massive changes in our times. Much of the world met Bishop Curry when he delivered his sermon on the redemptive power of love at the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle at Windsor Castle. Here, he expands on his message of hope in an inspirational road map for living the way of love, illuminated with moving lessons from his own life. Through the prism of his faith, ancestry, and personal journey, Love Is the Way shows us how America came this far and, more important, how to go a whole lot further. The way of love is essential for addressing the seemingly insurmountable challenges facing the world today: poverty, racism, selfishness, deep ideological divisions, competing claims to speak for God. This book will lead readers to discover the gifts they need in order to live the way of love: deep reservoirs of hope and resilience, simple wisdom, the discipline of nonviolence, and unshakable regard for human dignity.

30 review for Love Is the Way: Holding on to Hope in Troubling Times

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jane-allison E.

    Listened to it all in one day because I could not stop, and I plan on playing it on repeat. Strength, courage, compassion, wit, and grace. Preach!

  2. 4 out of 5

    J Adele LaCombe

    I don't remember how this book ended up in my loan section on Libby but I'd delighted it did. His wisdom pours out of him. And in a time when there is so much anger, hate and venom this book was full of hope, love and solutions. One quote that stood out with me "I noticed something, while some people were upset ad expressing that, a majority were supportive or politely silent. There is very often a sensible center, a silent of quiet majority who are being drowned out by the loudest most extreme I don't remember how this book ended up in my loan section on Libby but I'd delighted it did. His wisdom pours out of him. And in a time when there is so much anger, hate and venom this book was full of hope, love and solutions. One quote that stood out with me "I noticed something, while some people were upset ad expressing that, a majority were supportive or politely silent. There is very often a sensible center, a silent of quiet majority who are being drowned out by the loudest most extreme voices but they are there, many simply waiting for the angry to exhaust themselves. They listen patiently waiting for a deeper wisdom to emerge." If you're stressed out by the Pandemic, or the election this book is worth getting. I appreciate his words, and thoughts.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ben Williams

    If you don’t know Bishop Michael Curry, now is the time to discover him. This book is what the world needs in our current time of fear and division. Filled with hope and stories of love, my soul is lifted and I am thankful for Bishop Curry’s unique storytelling energy. By the way, the writing is masterful. Read this!!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Rice

    I needed this book so much. This year has been full of exquisitely painful and unexpected transitions and endings, but it's also been filled with peeling off layers of who I was become that didn't suit me anymore. In Love is the Way, I was reminded of how profoundly my life ethos and mission had been driven by love years ago, and how far I've moved away from that without meaning to. Bishop Curry's words broke me open in the gentlest of ways to welcome love back into my view of the world and my r I needed this book so much. This year has been full of exquisitely painful and unexpected transitions and endings, but it's also been filled with peeling off layers of who I was become that didn't suit me anymore. In Love is the Way, I was reminded of how profoundly my life ethos and mission had been driven by love years ago, and how far I've moved away from that without meaning to. Bishop Curry's words broke me open in the gentlest of ways to welcome love back into my view of the world and my role in it. I am grateful, hopeful, and internally crying through grief and joy. If faith has ever been a part of your life, whether or not you practice any religion now, this is a must read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katsmewsings

    A lovely message, an important message. But not overly well written. Which I think would have helped me enjoy it bit more. As it was..I liked the book, as I like him, and couldn’t agree more, that the transformative power of love is the true way forward.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid Strelka

    One of the best books I have ever read! Bishop Curry writes from his heart, telling the stories that have shaped his faith and journey. He addresses everything from segregation, dreams for the future, political unrest, division as a nation, immigration and ties them all together with love. I honestly cried during several chapters, especially Ch. 11 which is solely about politics and our political climate today. In his words “you need to shift the conversation to higher ground-above and beyond th One of the best books I have ever read! Bishop Curry writes from his heart, telling the stories that have shaped his faith and journey. He addresses everything from segregation, dreams for the future, political unrest, division as a nation, immigration and ties them all together with love. I honestly cried during several chapters, especially Ch. 11 which is solely about politics and our political climate today. In his words “you need to shift the conversation to higher ground-above and beyond the politics, and the issues as the players have defined them. Instead we search for values and principles that we share. In that higher moral and spiritual ground, we may find genuine common ground. When we wade back into the issues, it’s from a different perspective and place.” If we all read this book the world would be a very different place!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I love this man. He is one of my favorite humans. Bishop Curry is the leader of the Episcopal Church, and came to national prominence when he delivered the sermon at the wedding of Prince Harry and Megan Markle. I am pretty much in love with the Episcopalians-- Barbara Brown Taylor, Marcus J. Borg, Sara Miles (who wrote Take This Bread: A Radical Conversion, Rachel Held Evans, and others. I also like the English Anglicans as well. They, literally, have the best churches. I used to feel guilty ab I love this man. He is one of my favorite humans. Bishop Curry is the leader of the Episcopal Church, and came to national prominence when he delivered the sermon at the wedding of Prince Harry and Megan Markle. I am pretty much in love with the Episcopalians-- Barbara Brown Taylor, Marcus J. Borg, Sara Miles (who wrote Take This Bread: A Radical Conversion, Rachel Held Evans, and others. I also like the English Anglicans as well. They, literally, have the best churches. I used to feel guilty about crushing on the Episcopalians since, as a person who was raised Catholic--and Irish Catholic in particular--I have a certain...animosity toward the English, who were unpleasant to the Irish for centuries. But after coming to a deeper understanding of the sickness of Irish Catholicism, I no longer choose one side over the other. With that said, the Episcopal Church is dying in the United States, and its competition--the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA)--is tiny and angry. So this particular branch of Christianity may not live long, which is tragic. I find the combination of high church and liberal theology to be very compelling. That's just me, though. In any event, Bishop Curry's whole jam is love. Just that. Love. Love your neighbor as yourself. As you love each other so you love me. God is love. Love is the answer, no matter what the question is. Love makes us turn outward instead of inward. Love is like little seeds that sprout into gardens that we man never know or see. I am because we are. We must love each other or die. Stuff like that. Simple and beautiful. Christianity 101, and such a remarkable departure from the miserable "Jesus is my Republican capitalist gun-daddy" of current American evangelicalism. I stopped going to church some time ago, more out of a sense resignation than a loss of desire. I actually like going to church, and having the traditions and community of Christianity as a part of my life. Now I feel myself being drawn back to these paths again, and if I do make the leap, it will be to the Episcopalians. This is a lovely, uplifting book from a wonderful human being. Highly recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    William Burruss

    As an Episcopalian, I would love to introduce you to, The Most Reverend Michael B. Curry. From what I can tell we are about the same age. We both have southern roots and stories. We love soul food and great literature. We lived in the inner city, and we were both created by the same God. The question is, and what the book is about, is LOVE, and yes how people who love deal with differences. I have never met Reverend Curry, but what I like in his writing is the fact that he does not come across a As an Episcopalian, I would love to introduce you to, The Most Reverend Michael B. Curry. From what I can tell we are about the same age. We both have southern roots and stories. We love soul food and great literature. We lived in the inner city, and we were both created by the same God. The question is, and what the book is about, is LOVE, and yes how people who love deal with differences. I have never met Reverend Curry, but what I like in his writing is the fact that he does not come across as some stuffy preacher. Episcopalians have had a few. If he were one of my black college buddies, he’d be called the Most Reverend Right-On Michael B. Curry. Yes, he’s black, and I’m white, and I believe that Love, the type of Love he speaks about is the same Love that Jesus preaches: “Love your God, Love your neighbor, and Love Yourself.” For me, this book is autobiographical and biographical. It is autobiographical because you learn how Michael Curry lived through the sixties and seventies and evolved to become The Most Reverend, and it is biographical because those were my times and I saw much of the same things through different eyes, the eyes of the young white teenager challenging his parents during the time of school integration. Being the leader of the US Episcopal Church comes with many challenges. Michael tells many stories about how his journey got him to this position. He starts by telling how he became an Episcopalian when most blacks were Baptist. Another, more like a liberal arts lecture pertaining to the many Greek words for love: eros, philia, and agape, which show up in the Greek Bible. He ends with two stories that concern his ministry with the American Indians and the government taking of their land at Standing Rock, and his advocacy of gay marriage. Jesus was tested when he was asked what is the greatest commandment. There were many laws he could have chosen, but he chose to Love your God and to Love your neighbor. Amen.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erin Isgett

    This was the perfect book for me to read as one year closed and another opened. I'd listened to (and loved!) Bishop Curry's interview on Brené Brown's "Unlocking Us" podcast, and immediately requested his book from the library. I'd highly recommend it. Here are a few of my favorite excerpts: "We're living, right now, in a world built on selfishness, indifference, and even hatred, and it doesn't look good. What does it get us? Mass shootings, the murder of innocents. Brutal dictatorships. The supp This was the perfect book for me to read as one year closed and another opened. I'd listened to (and loved!) Bishop Curry's interview on Brené Brown's "Unlocking Us" podcast, and immediately requested his book from the library. I'd highly recommend it. Here are a few of my favorite excerpts: "We're living, right now, in a world built on selfishness, indifference, and even hatred, and it doesn't look good. What does it get us? Mass shootings, the murder of innocents. Brutal dictatorships. The suppression of ethnic and religious minorities. The mistreatment of refugees. The rise of racism, anti-Semitism, nationalistic nativism, and xenophobia. Fear begins to rule our lives. People are hurting and hating others because they are different. We have wars and rumors of wars. We have an earth that has been exploited to a crisis point, despite the fact that, to quote a protest sign I saw recently, 'mass extinction is bad for profit.' "What it all adds up to is just that: mutually assured destruction. Now that's insanity. Suddenly a world built on love starts to look like the sane one... "Love is God's way, the moral way, but it's also the only thing that works. It's the rare moment where idealism actually overlaps with pragmatism. People don't think of Jesus as a strategist, but he was a leader who successfully built what was essentially a radical equal rights movement within a brutal empire. You don't do that without being a master strategist. When he said, 'Love those who curse you' in the Sermon on the Mount, his famous call for nonviolence, he wasn't just speaking about what kind of behavior his father preferred. He was offering a how-to guide on changing a negative situation into a positive one." *** "These events would help shape my new office's priorities, which we summarized as *evangelism,* *racial reconciliation,* and *care of God's creation.* *Evangelism* is a word with a lot of baggage that to me simply means modeling Jesus's love in our daily lives and finding opportunities as a church to share that love. *Racial reconciliation* means healing the wounds that divide and separate us as children of God. And *care of God's creation* means helping to heal the planet from destruction and harm. These were all one with the foundational mission of the church: to follow the way of Jesus and his love to foster a loving, liberating, and life-giving relationship with God, with each other as children of God, and indeed with all God's creation. Therein is the work of building God's beloved community. That's e pluribus unum for real." *** "When Jesus talked about love, he was talking about a commitment and a way of life. Emotions come and go. But when Jesus of Nazareth tells the parable of the Good Samaritan, the love he's demonstrating is a determination and a commitment to do what is best and right and good, as well as you can figure it out, for the other. Jesus didn't say, 'like your enemies.' Because you don't have to like them--you only have to love them. You've got to keep your commitment to seek the common good, and figure out what 'good' looks like for each relationship, even the ones with people you'd rather not have over for dinner. "In the United States and in the world, we have different cultures, different politics, different experiences that have shaped our beliefs. But if we can establish that we're working toward some common good, whether we like each other or not, then we can be brothers and sisters even when we want to fight like hell. Let's all stop worrying about whether we like each other and choose to believe instead that we're capable of doing good together. That doesn't solve all our problems, not by far, but it at least gets us in the starting gate. It gets us unstuck. It's how human beings can live together in profound difference. It's the start of an e pluribus unum that's safe for everybody. "Later in 2016, when Donald Trump was elected, the Washington National Cathedral prepared to host the Inaugural Prayer Service, a nonpartisan practice that goes back decades. But this time, there were many good folk who seriously questioned whether the service should be held. My answer was a resounding yes. During the election, we had learned things about the president-elect that created great concern and worry. To pray for him could bring pain to many. "And yet if love is your purpose, that was exactly the time to pray, for the president and the nation. It was and still is the time to double down on prayer. Because prayer, real prayer, is both contemplative and active. Quietly, we pray for the president. But then there's the active side of prayer, as we live the truth of 'love your neighbor as yourself.' Part of that is working for a good, just, humane, and loving society. That means getting on our knees for the president, and it *also* means standing on our feet and marching in the streets. It means praying through participation in the life of our government and society. Through caring for others. Through working for policies and laws that reflect Jesus's call to love your neighbor, to do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Through fashioning a civic order that reflects goodness, justice, and compassion, and the very heart and dream of God for all God's children and God's creation."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Craig Amason

    I discovered this book because Brene Brown had Bishop Curry on her podcast in late September to talk about it. I greatly admire Curry, who is the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, of which I am a member. Coming from humble beginnings and growing up without a mother, who died when he was a young boy (he still refers to her as Mommy), Bishop Curry rose up through the ranks of the church to become the first African-American to hold its top position. In recent years, Curry has become more ou I discovered this book because Brene Brown had Bishop Curry on her podcast in late September to talk about it. I greatly admire Curry, who is the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, of which I am a member. Coming from humble beginnings and growing up without a mother, who died when he was a young boy (he still refers to her as Mommy), Bishop Curry rose up through the ranks of the church to become the first African-American to hold its top position. In recent years, Curry has become more outspoken on the most crucial and controversial issues of our time, and his thinking on some of those issues has evolved even since becoming the Presiding Bishop, namely on same-sex marriage. As an African-American religious leader, there may be an expectation that Bishop Curry would always lean as left as possible on issues of race, but based on his book, I'm not so sure. For example, I suspect that some of his ideas about love and hope in these troubling times will not exactly resonate with the more passionate leaders of Black Lives Matter. I also imagine that the best way forward is somewhere between boiling activism and his emphasis on love, respect, and nonviolence. One of Bishop Curry's most admirable qualities is his understanding of human nature, where there are no flawless heroes. He has a strong belief that God works miracles in spite of the shortcomings of even the most honorable people, including Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcom X, Bobby Kennedy, and Nelson Mandela. He is charmingly self-deprecating, funny, sensitive, and extremely practical. He also includes enough of his own life journey to help the reader understand his perspective and appreciate the obstacles he has overcome to get where he is today. He has definitely paid his dues. This is one of those books that is best as an audio version with Bishop Curry reading it. His inflections and soothing tone effectively transmit the love and hope he espouses in the text. There are plenty of books available today to let us know how bad our situation is, here and around the world. And, maybe Bishop Curry's book tends to lean toward idealism and even wishful thinking at times, but it is definitely an oasis for our troubling times.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marianna

    What an opportune time to read this.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ginny Pennekamp

    I’ve recently learned the term “glide path” - a way to provide means for someone who won’t listen to you to find their way to the truth, and Bishop Curry’s book is a nice guide to how to create “guide paths” in your life to help you and those around you see truth and fairness and justice and diversity.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Bishop Curry sent me a signed edition of his book (which I will always cherish), but we heard that it was better to listen to him reading it. And we weren't disappointed! Love is definitely the Way! My husband and I liked it so much that we are going to offer it as a book study for our Diocese during Eastertide. Bishop Curry sent me a signed edition of his book (which I will always cherish), but we heard that it was better to listen to him reading it. And we weren't disappointed! Love is definitely the Way! My husband and I liked it so much that we are going to offer it as a book study for our Diocese during Eastertide.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Royce

    This is an important book right now. In a time when so many are clinging to anger and despair, this is a book of hope and love. In it, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry outlines love as a practice and a stance that we all can take to truly listen to others. He reminds us that we don't need to like everyone, but it is vital to our collective survival to love everyone. This is a book of comfort when so many of us are in need of just that. I highly recommend it! This is an important book right now. In a time when so many are clinging to anger and despair, this is a book of hope and love. In it, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry outlines love as a practice and a stance that we all can take to truly listen to others. He reminds us that we don't need to like everyone, but it is vital to our collective survival to love everyone. This is a book of comfort when so many of us are in need of just that. I highly recommend it!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jan Gates

    Many may remember Bishop Curry as the preacher at the royal wedding in 2018. I never watched that but recently listened to it. As an Episcopalian I know him as our leader and recently listened him to him on an excellent podcast with Brene Brown’s Unlocking Us. Curry is from my neck of the woods. Born and raised in Buffalo NY, he attended Hobart and William Smith college in Geneva as an undergraduate. He is very down to earth,relatable and offers excellent biblical and historical perspectives on Many may remember Bishop Curry as the preacher at the royal wedding in 2018. I never watched that but recently listened to it. As an Episcopalian I know him as our leader and recently listened him to him on an excellent podcast with Brene Brown’s Unlocking Us. Curry is from my neck of the woods. Born and raised in Buffalo NY, he attended Hobart and William Smith college in Geneva as an undergraduate. He is very down to earth,relatable and offers excellent biblical and historical perspectives on how we can all live together peacefully in these challenging times. It all starts with us and it all starts with love-for ourselves for one another, for those who think and are like us as well as those who are different. Inspiring read whether you are religious or not.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey

    Didn't connect with it. Didn't connect with it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dan Connors

    As a religious skeptic, I tend to look at preachers, bishops, and popes with caution. They are both politicians and healers, salesmen and counselors, interpreters of the words of Jesus Christ yet bound by the expectations of the people who pay their salaries. These men see us at our best during weddings, and at our worst during funerals and hospital visits. We count on them to both inspire and comfort us, but they are human beings just like us, and far from heavenly ambassadors. So it was with As a religious skeptic, I tend to look at preachers, bishops, and popes with caution. They are both politicians and healers, salesmen and counselors, interpreters of the words of Jesus Christ yet bound by the expectations of the people who pay their salaries. These men see us at our best during weddings, and at our worst during funerals and hospital visits. We count on them to both inspire and comfort us, but they are human beings just like us, and far from heavenly ambassadors. So it was with great caution that I took on Bishop Curry's new book, Love is the Way. I have seen him on television, and he has become a celebrity as the first black head of the Episcopal Church, presiding over the wedding of prince Harry and Megan Markle, as well as the funerals of John McCain and George Bush. Curry has a way with words, and this book on the power of love shows me that his heart is in the right place. The Episcopal Church is far from America's biggest church, currently ranking at 14th with maybe 1% of the population. Mainline Protestant churches have taken a beating over the past few decades, as has the Catholic Church, and it was nice to see something different than the typical entreaties to give your life over to someone who died 2000 years ago while giving your money to people who are very much still alive. Love is the Way is sort of an autobiography, detailing personal stories from Bishop Curry on how he lost his mother at a young age, and how the community came to help his family in that difficult time. He tells of his days in a small, mostly black church in Ohio, moving to an inner city church in Baltimore, and then to a larger responsibility as bishop of North Carolina. His churches, especially the one in Baltimore, were in poor areas, and he tells of efforts he and his flock made to reach out to the community at large. He is now the chief presiding officer over the entire American church, and has a unique perch as a religious leader. This book is mostly about love- specifically agape love, which is the love for others, society, and the world. He brings in stories about how love has transformed other lives, referencing John Lewis, Martin Luther King, Desmond Tutu, and Dolly Parton. Love builds and hate destroys, and he devotes several chapters to the second theme of his book- holding on to hope in difficult times. He uses King's words especially to describe the hope that comes to us through our dreams during the darkest times of history. With those dreams we can move onward in dark times towards love and justice. We may not live to see the fruits of all our efforts, but by planting seeds of love early and often, progress is inevitable. The two most fascinating stories he tells involve the 2003 split in the church on gay marriage, and the 2016 uprising by the Sioux nation in Standing Rock, North Dakota. The idea of gay marriage had been opposed by the Episcopal Church and its parent organization, the Anglican Communion, since their inception. Marriage was between a man and a woman, period. But starting in 2000, an Episcopal Bishop in New Hampshire broke with tradition and came out as gay, wanting to perform same-sex marriages. For nearly a decade this change threatened to split up the church, and Bishop Curry tells of his own personal transformation on the issue, and how he was able to use love, foot washing, and understanding to get the rest of his church to come around. Foot washing, it turns out, is an effective way to get people on your side. Jesus used it with his disciples, and it has been used famously by Gandhi, Mister Rogers, and religious people of all types. Apparently the skin-on-skin contact, combined with the healing properties of water transform human relationships and make possible love, humility, and communication. The Standing Rock Reservation in the Dakotas is one of the largest in America and was the site of a huge protest in 2016 over the Dakota Access Pipeline. The pipeline was opposed by Native Americans because it crossed into their sacred lands and also threatened their water supply. Bishop Curry was one of many religious leaders who came to the reservation that year to join in the protests, and his descriptions of the event show how loving and respectful the Native Americans were during the entire standoff. "Water is Life", was their motto, and even though they lost and the pipeline eventually went through when President Trump took office, they were able to bring together a large network of people from remote tribes and religious traditions to spread love and ideas. The best idea from the book has to do with something called truth force and deep listening. Bishop Curry worries a lot about how polarized America has become, and encourages people to build bridges, not walls, because at our core we are all decent, loving children of God. To get to that core and away from the things that divides us, he proposes beginning every debate with the following question: "For this issue, what is the story of your life that brought you to that conclusion?" By focusing on personal stories, and not rumors, social media, or talking points, we can get to the heart of what is bothering people and find more common ground. Love is the Way meanders a bit and doesn't always come to the point, but it's an interesting point of view from someone who has seen a lot, and reflected deeply on all of it. I am hoping that Bishop Curry's newly found celebrity status doesn't ruin his spirit, but we shall see. I take the words of religious leaders with a grain of salt, and judge them more by their actions than their interpretations of ancient scriptures. To me, love is what life is about, and God is a concept that our tiny minds can't properly understand. Unfortunately, we live in troubling times, and any reminders to love our neighbors are always welcome.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Heneghan

    I, like many, heard of Reverend Bishop Curry after he did the wedding ceremony for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. He was so refreshing and I loved his message. So when I saw he was appearing on Brene Brown’s podcast, I had to listen. I found myself weeping at several points during the podcast and felt like his message of love is what we need more than anything during this very divisive time in the world. So I quickly ordered his new book and couldn’t wait to dig in. This book is exceeded all of I, like many, heard of Reverend Bishop Curry after he did the wedding ceremony for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. He was so refreshing and I loved his message. So when I saw he was appearing on Brene Brown’s podcast, I had to listen. I found myself weeping at several points during the podcast and felt like his message of love is what we need more than anything during this very divisive time in the world. So I quickly ordered his new book and couldn’t wait to dig in. This book is exceeded all of my expectations. I have so many pages rabbit eared that I don’t know where to start. I also would think that anyone even if you were not particularly religious could learn a lot from this Bishop. A few important take aways for me despite the fact that basically underlined the whole book. Love needs a bigger definition than one we have in the English language. Doing unto others as to ourselves is the kind of love Rev. Bishop Curry is talking about. To love is not to agree. “But maybe agreeing to love is the greatest agreement. And the only one that ultimately matters, because it makes a future possible.” Having a conversation with people with disagree with is becoming harder and harder with how isolated we are to our own viewpoint. Charles Robinson using this question to discuss polarizing issues. “For a particular issue, what is the story of your life that brought you to that conclusion?” After the person answers he has other reflect on these personal stories. “This exchange of stories created a communion of spirits. Suddenly there is a context for healing, and the possibility of relationship between the people who were accustomed to interacting with their hackles up.” This book gives me hope on the possibilities in a time and era when that is daunting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    This book has been a wonderful reminder of love’s power in the midst of the hubbub of the end of the election campaign and the process of learning the election results. While I grew up in the church and even spent several years working in the church, I find myself more and more frustrated by the church in recent years. Because I have changed. And I can no longer uncritically accept what I'm told. And so, I have no patience for preaching and writing which assumes that because I am present or becau This book has been a wonderful reminder of love’s power in the midst of the hubbub of the end of the election campaign and the process of learning the election results. While I grew up in the church and even spent several years working in the church, I find myself more and more frustrated by the church in recent years. Because I have changed. And I can no longer uncritically accept what I'm told. And so, I have no patience for preaching and writing which assumes that because I am present or because I am reading, I accept A, and therefore the preacher or author feels free to hang B, C, and D, on A. In some cases, it is so thorough that, if one doesn't accept A as a given, the rest of it is irrelevant. And… I can feel very invisible, when the entire sermon or book never actually meets me where I am. I don't know whether Curry escaped that, or whether it is just that he hung this book on some of what still remains in my belief: that God is love, whatever God may be. I also appreciated that this wasn't some inaccessible appeal to the Bible, but weaved throughout with the effects of love on his life, from Curry's childhood through the present. I don't know whether I could say I learned much from it, but it was a very pleasant hug of a book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lucinda

    Just what we need/I needed right now. Bishop Curry uses stories from his own life and people he's met along the way to illustrate how we can all walk in the Way of Love. With plenty of Bible quotations (for those who need them) as well as the wise words of those who have walked before us, Love is the Way addresses 12 of the most frequently asked questions about choosing Love as the Way. They range from the basics ("What is This Thing Called Love?"), to the surprising ("What Desmond Tutu and Doll Just what we need/I needed right now. Bishop Curry uses stories from his own life and people he's met along the way to illustrate how we can all walk in the Way of Love. With plenty of Bible quotations (for those who need them) as well as the wise words of those who have walked before us, Love is the Way addresses 12 of the most frequently asked questions about choosing Love as the Way. They range from the basics ("What is This Thing Called Love?"), to the surprising ("What Desmond Tutu and Dolly Parton Have in Common"), to the challenging ("The Real E Pluibus Unum"). The book ends with a guide on how to implement "Love in Action" in our daily lives. My only criticism is based on my surprise that of all the names that he dropped along the way (Harry and Meghan get several nods), he never mentions Rev. William J. Barber II (of Moral Mondays, Repairers of the Breach, and the Poor People's Campaign) who is also doing similar work. Even one example from those projects would have helped to illustrate how this can be done.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    What I expected was a devotional book. What I got was a series of interesting and personal meditations on social justice, inclusivity, and spirituality. Bishop Curry's experiences and ruminations make for especially interesting and challenging reading for those of us who grew up in a more evangelical tradition, but will be valuable for anyone who is doing the work of reconciling their personal, spiritual, and political lives. The last bit that covers the tensions between the American Episcopal c What I expected was a devotional book. What I got was a series of interesting and personal meditations on social justice, inclusivity, and spirituality. Bishop Curry's experiences and ruminations make for especially interesting and challenging reading for those of us who grew up in a more evangelical tradition, but will be valuable for anyone who is doing the work of reconciling their personal, spiritual, and political lives. The last bit that covers the tensions between the American Episcopal church and the larger Anglican community were especially welcome, as they demonstrate a good model for how to work constructively together with others with whom one may have deeply different ideologies and convictions -- a skill that seems especially critical for us all to cultivate in these times when charged rhetoric is easy to come by and mutual understanding scarce.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kiersten

    I was really hoping that this book would be a quick, inspiring read, but it was more of a thoughtful, slow read and really, a bit of a memoir. As much as I love the Episcopal church and what they stand for, I still find myself wrestling with some of the biblical allegory presented in literal ways. The later chapters in the book were more interesting to me--especially as they pertained to Curry's conflict between the church's positions and living God's inclusive love. In a time in which we are so I was really hoping that this book would be a quick, inspiring read, but it was more of a thoughtful, slow read and really, a bit of a memoir. As much as I love the Episcopal church and what they stand for, I still find myself wrestling with some of the biblical allegory presented in literal ways. The later chapters in the book were more interesting to me--especially as they pertained to Curry's conflict between the church's positions and living God's inclusive love. In a time in which we are so divided on every front, and a time in which people are called to fight against every manner of offense in the name of justice, Curry's call for unity in brotherhood (even at the expense of immediate justice) is a bold proposition, and one that will be hard to embrace, even if it means that we might make better, inclusive progress forward. There is valuable insight here.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David R

    Very general read that is light on theology and more on quotes from the Bible and major figures of notoriety within an attempt to weave a theme about what the Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop calls “the way of love” in the context of today’s socio-political discourse and challenges of global economy. Although chapters deal with different themes, these chapters are almost sermon vignettes. He incorrectly identifies The Rev Elizabeth Eaton as the Presiding Bishop of the “Lutheran Church”. There a Very general read that is light on theology and more on quotes from the Bible and major figures of notoriety within an attempt to weave a theme about what the Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop calls “the way of love” in the context of today’s socio-political discourse and challenges of global economy. Although chapters deal with different themes, these chapters are almost sermon vignettes. He incorrectly identifies The Rev Elizabeth Eaton as the Presiding Bishop of the “Lutheran Church”. There are, in fact, several Lutheran denominations in the USA with different theological views; Eaton leads the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). But perhaps that can be attributed to poor editing and fact checking.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Heather Bottoms

    A hopeful, honest, encouraging book about living a life of love that moves past your own personal bubble. With his trademark enthusiasm and compassion, Curry urges a return to love as a unifying force, building on shared values and working towards the common good for all people. It is also part memoir as Curry uses personal experiences from his own life to illustrate the principles he discusses. He tells of his upbringing, losing his mother at a young age, and becoming the first African American A hopeful, honest, encouraging book about living a life of love that moves past your own personal bubble. With his trademark enthusiasm and compassion, Curry urges a return to love as a unifying force, building on shared values and working towards the common good for all people. It is also part memoir as Curry uses personal experiences from his own life to illustrate the principles he discusses. He tells of his upbringing, losing his mother at a young age, and becoming the first African American presiding bishop of the Episcopal church. He is candid about his joys and failures as he continues to learn the lessons of which he writes.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey A. Tooke

    Inspiring and informative I loved the personal narrative style which gave us a peek into the life, thinking and spirituality of the author, the current presiding Bishop if the Episcopal Church. I am fascinated by his easy and personal way of bringing the Way of Love to life in his life, his preaching and his writing. It was also very interesting to see his role and impact to help bring the Episcopal Church through a very challenging time as it explored the role of GLBT members and clergy. I recom Inspiring and informative I loved the personal narrative style which gave us a peek into the life, thinking and spirituality of the author, the current presiding Bishop if the Episcopal Church. I am fascinated by his easy and personal way of bringing the Way of Love to life in his life, his preaching and his writing. It was also very interesting to see his role and impact to help bring the Episcopal Church through a very challenging time as it explored the role of GLBT members and clergy. I recommend this book to anyone looking for a light hearted yet profound book on living one's values and making love the center of their life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Davis

    This book is a collection of stories from the Bishops life and others reminding us of how much better off we all would be if we focused on actively loving each other, focusing on the positive - our shared values, and caring for the world around us and all of God’s gifts, especially his other children. It is filled with numerous inspiring reminders and suggestions. He preaches without being preachy. He shines light on the way forward while not dictating rules. He is one of those people that exude This book is a collection of stories from the Bishops life and others reminding us of how much better off we all would be if we focused on actively loving each other, focusing on the positive - our shared values, and caring for the world around us and all of God’s gifts, especially his other children. It is filled with numerous inspiring reminders and suggestions. He preaches without being preachy. He shines light on the way forward while not dictating rules. He is one of those people that exudes warmth and love. Much better to spend time reading and reflecting on his message than doomscrolling.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Roy Shores

    I needed a read like this one at this time of my life. Michael B. Curry is like-ably intelligent... humbly so. He has a rare educator's gift of presenting complex and applicable ideas in the consumable form of homespun wisdom. A not too preachy preacher. I admire and respect any man who speaks expertly on a subject not just to hear himself speak... but rather, because he so sincerely believes and lives in what he is talking about. This book is now on my phone in Audible format. I will revisit it I needed a read like this one at this time of my life. Michael B. Curry is like-ably intelligent... humbly so. He has a rare educator's gift of presenting complex and applicable ideas in the consumable form of homespun wisdom. A not too preachy preacher. I admire and respect any man who speaks expertly on a subject not just to hear himself speak... but rather, because he so sincerely believes and lives in what he is talking about. This book is now on my phone in Audible format. I will revisit it now and then like an old college friend.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Mcbroom

    I can't express how much I adore this gentleman! At one time he was affiliated with my local Espiscopal Church and took a higher position. I truly miss him as his replacement is pardon my French a real asshat, and does not care about the importance of human interaction as Dear Bishop Curry does. Bishop Curry writes of his childhood and about postivity, love , and acceptance in this divided world. And as always I love how he interposes pop culture in with the religion! I can't express how much I adore this gentleman! At one time he was affiliated with my local Espiscopal Church and took a higher position. I truly miss him as his replacement is pardon my French a real asshat, and does not care about the importance of human interaction as Dear Bishop Curry does. Bishop Curry writes of his childhood and about postivity, love , and acceptance in this divided world. And as always I love how he interposes pop culture in with the religion!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sydnie McConnell

    I loved reading this book. I heard Bishop Curry on Brene Brown's podcast (and hadn't really made the connection that it was the same guy from the royal wedding...) and loved his stories, particularly about how his family made its way to the Episcopal church. As I read it, I thought so much of my grandparents, and of an ancestor who was an Episcopal minister; and wishing I could chat with them all about our family stories and what I was reading. It's really just a lovely book! I loved reading this book. I heard Bishop Curry on Brene Brown's podcast (and hadn't really made the connection that it was the same guy from the royal wedding...) and loved his stories, particularly about how his family made its way to the Episcopal church. As I read it, I thought so much of my grandparents, and of an ancestor who was an Episcopal minister; and wishing I could chat with them all about our family stories and what I was reading. It's really just a lovely book!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Labeth Nall

    Bishop Curry writes with true humanity, weaving his own experiences from childhood through adulthood of loss, joy, struggle and success. His compassion for others and also for himself is inspiring. Because I'm facing a significant physical struggle now, his personal story in chapter 9 gave me a boost of hopefulness. I highly recommend this well-written book as an aid to not only get through hard times, but to grow in compassion and love in the process. Bishop Curry writes with true humanity, weaving his own experiences from childhood through adulthood of loss, joy, struggle and success. His compassion for others and also for himself is inspiring. Because I'm facing a significant physical struggle now, his personal story in chapter 9 gave me a boost of hopefulness. I highly recommend this well-written book as an aid to not only get through hard times, but to grow in compassion and love in the process.

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