counter create hit The Boondocks: Because I Know You Don't Read the Newspaper - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Boondocks: Because I Know You Don't Read the Newspaper

Availability: Ready to download

The Boondocks took the syndication world by storm. The notoriety landed Boondocks creator Aaron McGruder in publications ranging from Time magazine to People magazine which named him one of the "25 Most Intriguing People of '99." Centered around the experiences of two young African-American boys, Huey and Riley, who move from inner-city Chicago to the suburbs (or the "boon The Boondocks took the syndication world by storm. The notoriety landed Boondocks creator Aaron McGruder in publications ranging from Time magazine to People magazine which named him one of the "25 Most Intriguing People of '99." Centered around the experiences of two young African-American boys, Huey and Riley, who move from inner-city Chicago to the suburbs (or the "boondocks" to them), the strip fuses hip-hop sensibilities with Japanese anime-style drawings and a candid discussion of race. In this first collection of Boondocks cartoons, you'll discover the funny yet revealing combination of superb art and envelope-pushing content in one of the most unique strips ever.


Compare

The Boondocks took the syndication world by storm. The notoriety landed Boondocks creator Aaron McGruder in publications ranging from Time magazine to People magazine which named him one of the "25 Most Intriguing People of '99." Centered around the experiences of two young African-American boys, Huey and Riley, who move from inner-city Chicago to the suburbs (or the "boon The Boondocks took the syndication world by storm. The notoriety landed Boondocks creator Aaron McGruder in publications ranging from Time magazine to People magazine which named him one of the "25 Most Intriguing People of '99." Centered around the experiences of two young African-American boys, Huey and Riley, who move from inner-city Chicago to the suburbs (or the "boondocks" to them), the strip fuses hip-hop sensibilities with Japanese anime-style drawings and a candid discussion of race. In this first collection of Boondocks cartoons, you'll discover the funny yet revealing combination of superb art and envelope-pushing content in one of the most unique strips ever.

30 review for The Boondocks: Because I Know You Don't Read the Newspaper

  1. 5 out of 5

    Charles van Buren

    Witty and controversial with people from all over the political spectrum I am a man of the right rather than the left. Aaron McGruder is definitely a man of the left. However, I like his work because what he really is, is a pretty honest and very funny observer of American culture and politics. I most certainly don't always agree with him. For instance I don't believe that George Bush had anything to do with the 9/11 attacks. I do believe that when McGruder made that charge, he honestly believed Witty and controversial with people from all over the political spectrum I am a man of the right rather than the left. Aaron McGruder is definitely a man of the left. However, I like his work because what he really is, is a pretty honest and very funny observer of American culture and politics. I most certainly don't always agree with him. For instance I don't believe that George Bush had anything to do with the 9/11 attacks. I do believe that when McGruder made that charge, he honestly believed it. I would be very disappointed to discover that he was intellectually dishonest. Here is some dialogue from a recent comic strip, "I heard they're going to add bling-bling to the New Oxford English Dictionary." "It appears our ultimate revenge against the white man will be to make him as ignorant as he has made us." I wonder how many people and groups from all across the political spectrum that one annoyed.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    The Boondocks is one of those creative ideas that have graced multiple broadcasting outlets. There’s the television show, the Sunday comic strip, and the novel. I was first introduced to them in the Sunday papers. I’ll admit I only looked at the pictures, happy that there’s a “brown people” cartoon. (Don’t judge me. Hey, we were all young and oblivious once.) I watched one episode of this television show back when it first aired. It was a big deal at the time in my neighborhood, because very few The Boondocks is one of those creative ideas that have graced multiple broadcasting outlets. There’s the television show, the Sunday comic strip, and the novel. I was first introduced to them in the Sunday papers. I’ll admit I only looked at the pictures, happy that there’s a “brown people” cartoon. (Don’t judge me. Hey, we were all young and oblivious once.) I watched one episode of this television show back when it first aired. It was a big deal at the time in my neighborhood, because very few “all African American” portrayed cartoons were available. I absolutely despised Uncle Ruckus and the repeated use of the N-word. While there are episodes that are hilarious, I can’t help but wonder the morals behind the mockery. Recently a co-worker asked me if I’ve read the novels and offered to lend them to me. I was reluctant at first, but NOW I SEE! There is so much more then what’s on the surface. This installment of the series combines all the segments from the Sunday Paper. The title says it all. I took an African American studies course in High School; and this is reminiscent of that. This author fuses the sociology of black people with comedy 101. He found a way to create a character that’s representation of the most common generalization of personality’s psychological mechanics. It’s funny and sad at the same time. Funny because I can see many people I know depicted in the mannerisms of the fictional characters. It sad because it chastises ALL RACES at the same time; Yet many view this comic as “just a black thing”. The Boondocks is political cartoon tackling issues on religion, social, current events, and self reflection. The brutal harsh comedy may turn people away from the real message, but without the voices and antics, the moral can be found in the novels. I don’t agree with every strip or every episode, but the bold & brave bravado tenacity begs to be recognized. I look forward to reading the next novel; because this is the kind of controversial stuff too frowned upon to air on television.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sidik Fofana

    SIX WORD REVIEW: A very dangerous cartoon, good sir.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Barclay

    Cindy, do you know if there were slaves in America during Independence Day? I think there were... but then Will Smith you know, that black guy from “Wild, Wild West” He, like, killed the aliens and totally saved the day! So everything’s fine now. I love reading books that piss off white people. If you do too, look no further to this brilliant work of satire. I started re-watching season one of the show on Hulu, so I was curious to see if the comic origins were merely drafts of episodes, or Cindy, do you know if there were slaves in America during Independence Day? I think there were... but then Will Smith you know, that black guy from “Wild, Wild West” He, like, killed the aliens and totally saved the day! So everything’s fine now. I love reading books that piss off white people. If you do too, look no further to this brilliant work of satire. I started re-watching season one of the show on Hulu, so I was curious to see if the comic origins were merely drafts of episodes, or a refreshing complement to the show. It’s definitely the latter. I think reading The Boondocks should be as popular and required to read as Calvin and Hobbes. Obviously, not for the same reasons, but as far as artistic integrity in the comic-strip medium goes: this is definitely up there. Although the comic is more family-friendly, Aaron McGruder doesn’t dial the edginess back at all. The comic strips are even more politically charged than the show itself, which is a daunting accomplishment to say the least. If you love the show, definitely check this out. If you don’t love the show, then you’re either stupid, white, or both (most likely both), but still, check this out. A

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    The Book I read was The Boondocks by Aaron McGruder and the book was overall pretty good. The book was about two kids that left chicago and go live with their grandpa in a good neighborhood but the kids didn’t want to leave because they left all their friends and family. One of the kids Huey Freeman which is the intelligent one does very good in school and is very polite to everybody but the other brother Riley Freeman is a bad ass he doesn’t listen at all and does very bad in school. In the boo The Book I read was The Boondocks by Aaron McGruder and the book was overall pretty good. The book was about two kids that left chicago and go live with their grandpa in a good neighborhood but the kids didn’t want to leave because they left all their friends and family. One of the kids Huey Freeman which is the intelligent one does very good in school and is very polite to everybody but the other brother Riley Freeman is a bad ass he doesn’t listen at all and does very bad in school. In the book the boondocks it shows a lot of graphic stuff like shooting guns and cussing a lot and fighting. It is funny because it’s a comic book but I would recommend this book to kids over 15 because they are mature at that age but adult could read this any time because they will understand the stuff in the book and the jokes as well because they got some rated R type jokes. Overall the book was pretty good it was only like 100 pages so I read it really fast I would want to read the other books they have on this topic but I can’t find them but I will keep looking.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    McGruder is an absolute genius, a fresh voice in as many frames and sub genres as you can put him - not afraid to say what is on his mind regardless of the stake of his image, brand, or position in any of the communities he seems to be a member of. But perhaps what is most interesting about reading this book of strips again is their position in 2014. The collected works in this book are mainly from the beginning of Boondocks, where we are learning the characters and universe that they live in - a McGruder is an absolute genius, a fresh voice in as many frames and sub genres as you can put him - not afraid to say what is on his mind regardless of the stake of his image, brand, or position in any of the communities he seems to be a member of. But perhaps what is most interesting about reading this book of strips again is their position in 2014. The collected works in this book are mainly from the beginning of Boondocks, where we are learning the characters and universe that they live in - a hyper-consumer pre-9/11, pre-Trayvon, pre-Ferguson America. It is shockingly accurate and shockingly brutal in its assessment of race, our education system, entertainment, values, and the variety of philosophies on all accounts. Simply put, when I first read these I was entertained and shocked at the material that I would find in the Boston Phoenix (or was it the Dig? Or which free publication?), but then today I recognize even more deeply its importance, its message, and the beauty of the almost naive approach to many of the issues that are surprisingly still dogging and terrorizing us around every corner in the United States. The eighteen year old me in 1999 would certainly not believe what I told him about what happened through 2014. But his sharp and biting social satire is needed on the gigantic national scale that he has so desperately tried to perfect in creating the comic strip. Banned, revived, transmuted, ‘trans-mediaed,’ and remixed, his work is one of the most important and visionary works in revisiting, reinterpreting, and refining our culture from what it is into what it should be. The strips located in its pages do not hold anything back. Brilliant work by a fearless genius that holds up a decade and a half later.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This was the first Boondocks book that I owed. I really enjoy Aaron McGruder and his illustrations. Witty, sarcastic, intelligent, political, and critical while entertaining and educational. I remember I even wrote the date in my planner to when the first cartoon episode hit cartoon network. I still can't get over the voices to the characters and prefer the comic strip though both are enjoyable, in my opinion. This was the first Boondocks book that I owed. I really enjoy Aaron McGruder and his illustrations. Witty, sarcastic, intelligent, political, and critical while entertaining and educational. I remember I even wrote the date in my planner to when the first cartoon episode hit cartoon network. I still can't get over the voices to the characters and prefer the comic strip though both are enjoyable, in my opinion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tama Wise

    The comic strip that kicked up so much fuss that it got banned from most newspapers. And all just for keeping it real! Think Peanuts meets the ghetto, and you have the adventures of brothers Riley and Huey, two black kids who move into middle class white America.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shacoria

    Absolutely hilarious. I love the boondocks. I love the cartoon and the tv show. I can't wait for season 4 of the show to finally premiere. Huey and Uncle Ruckus are definitely my favorite characters. Absolutely hilarious. I love the boondocks. I love the cartoon and the tv show. I can't wait for season 4 of the show to finally premiere. Huey and Uncle Ruckus are definitely my favorite characters.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Fox

    Fantastic first collection of comics. The Boondocks remains one of the best strips out there, and it's easy to see how it gained that reputation from the first collection alone. Aaron McGruder fearlessly dives into issues that other writers wouldn't dare touch with a ten foot pole. Race and biracial identity, politics and religion - nothing is sacred and all are addressed through the measured idealism and cynicism of Huey Freeman and his erstwhile brother Riley. I fell in love with the televisio Fantastic first collection of comics. The Boondocks remains one of the best strips out there, and it's easy to see how it gained that reputation from the first collection alone. Aaron McGruder fearlessly dives into issues that other writers wouldn't dare touch with a ten foot pole. Race and biracial identity, politics and religion - nothing is sacred and all are addressed through the measured idealism and cynicism of Huey Freeman and his erstwhile brother Riley. I fell in love with the television show, but honestly the comics are even better. It's amazing what McGruder can accomplish in only four panels. This collection was laugh out loud funny, while also making me think and consider perspectives I'd previously not been exposed to. I'm happy to call these comics a must read and can't wait to tackle more of the collections as time goes on. For an overview I'd recommend A Right to be Hostile, but there's nothing wrong with the more completionist approach...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I think I first read The Boondocks in high school, not that long after these strips were first published in newspapers. Rereading this volume as an adult brought back a ton of memories. I recently saw an exhibit at a local museum about the Black Panther Party and even though I knew that I didn't know that history, I had the nagging feeling that I had heard many of the names before. I think those activists were among the many pop culture references that I missed when I first read The Boondocks. A I think I first read The Boondocks in high school, not that long after these strips were first published in newspapers. Rereading this volume as an adult brought back a ton of memories. I recently saw an exhibit at a local museum about the Black Panther Party and even though I knew that I didn't know that history, I had the nagging feeling that I had heard many of the names before. I think those activists were among the many pop culture references that I missed when I first read The Boondocks. Anyway, after all these years, I still love this comic.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I used to love watching this show when I was younger. After I heard the creator put out a few more strips recently, I decided to check out the originals, because I never had before. This was so funny. Laughter is medicine and it cheered me up a little bit while I was feeling low. The parts with Jazmine hit me right in the childhood. I want to read the other books, but I would also love to see more of this series set in the world of 2019. It's still so relevant. I really hope they put more stuff I used to love watching this show when I was younger. After I heard the creator put out a few more strips recently, I decided to check out the originals, because I never had before. This was so funny. Laughter is medicine and it cheered me up a little bit while I was feeling low. The parts with Jazmine hit me right in the childhood. I want to read the other books, but I would also love to see more of this series set in the world of 2019. It's still so relevant. I really hope they put more stuff out in the near future.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Israel

    I'm just now getting around to reading this, and I loved every panel of it. Sadly, some of the stereotypes it pokes fun of still exist today, but provides some excellent satire of race relations in the suburbs (particularly in this case, between white people and black people). A solid recommendation for people who like satirical works and want to explore this series. Looking forward to reading more in this series. I'm just now getting around to reading this, and I loved every panel of it. Sadly, some of the stereotypes it pokes fun of still exist today, but provides some excellent satire of race relations in the suburbs (particularly in this case, between white people and black people). A solid recommendation for people who like satirical works and want to explore this series. Looking forward to reading more in this series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maria Motley-Arnold

    A collection of Aaron McGuder's The Boondocks comics. Grandpa Freeman moves his two grandsons Huey and Riley to the small town of Woodcrest from the South Side of Chicago and it's a culture shock for the boys and the neighborhood. Full of humor and witty social commentary from revolutionary in training Huey and commentary on black culture from Riley. Still holds up 20 years later. A collection of Aaron McGuder's The Boondocks comics. Grandpa Freeman moves his two grandsons Huey and Riley to the small town of Woodcrest from the South Side of Chicago and it's a culture shock for the boys and the neighborhood. Full of humor and witty social commentary from revolutionary in training Huey and commentary on black culture from Riley. Still holds up 20 years later.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Colin Loberg

    I haven’t closely followed newspaper comics in years but it’s amazing this A) got made and B) became as huge as it did. Using three positive pull quotes alongside a scathing personal attack from the BET founder on the back cover makes me smile every time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Takes some time to find it’s feet and full of dated references that probably weren’t that funny when they were relevant. But when the satire works, it’s really funny.

  17. 4 out of 5

    shantanique

    Great laugh I am happy I finally made time to read this book. It was Great laugh and an easy read. I will buy more work from him.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ren

    Best thing to read in a pandemic... so funny

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kinda

    Witty and cunning in every detail🔥💯

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marc

    The Boondocks: Because I Know You Don't Read the Newspaper is a satirical comedy in comic book form. It follows a young, political radical named Huey Freeman and his brother Riley, who have just moved from inner-city Chicago to an upscale suburban community with their grandfather. Huey and Riley cope with never being outside the city, much less surrounded by white people who are equally as ignorant to the Freeman's "blackness." They befriend a biracial girl named Jazmine, who is also new to the The Boondocks: Because I Know You Don't Read the Newspaper is a satirical comedy in comic book form. It follows a young, political radical named Huey Freeman and his brother Riley, who have just moved from inner-city Chicago to an upscale suburban community with their grandfather. Huey and Riley cope with never being outside the city, much less surrounded by white people who are equally as ignorant to the Freeman's "blackness." They befriend a biracial girl named Jazmine, who is also new to the neighborhood and struggles with her racial identity (which Huey takes upon himself to tell her that she is just as black as he is.) The brothers terrorize the neighborhood with delinquent acts of vandalism and the spreading of Huey's black nationalist banter for the sake of not losing their hard, inner-city identity.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    on the best graphic novel list for teens- created by librarians at DC Public Library in Washington. NOt really a graphic novel, its a publication of the comic strips published in the newspaper. This is the story of two elemenary school boys who move from Chicago's south side to an all white suburb. Think Calvin and Hobbes with social justice themes. It was a great read- not too many social studies themes- would be more useful in an inquires course. There is one great cartoon on pg 94 about world on the best graphic novel list for teens- created by librarians at DC Public Library in Washington. NOt really a graphic novel, its a publication of the comic strips published in the newspaper. This is the story of two elemenary school boys who move from Chicago's south side to an all white suburb. Think Calvin and Hobbes with social justice themes. It was a great read- not too many social studies themes- would be more useful in an inquires course. There is one great cartoon on pg 94 about world history not being important because it dosn't recognize the contributions of non-europeans- there is another cartoon on pg 95 that deals with Eurocentrism in history class.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David

    So this is kept in the Children's section at my public library. At first I thought "what is this doing here?" because I've seen the cartoon which is rated TV-MA or whatever. The humour is pretty similar but the striking difference is that while in the TV series they say the n-word in pretty much every episode, there's no "bad words" in the comic strip, except for the occasional exclamation which is totally bleeped out. I don't see a problem with kids reading this. Some of Huey's ideas might go ov So this is kept in the Children's section at my public library. At first I thought "what is this doing here?" because I've seen the cartoon which is rated TV-MA or whatever. The humour is pretty similar but the striking difference is that while in the TV series they say the n-word in pretty much every episode, there's no "bad words" in the comic strip, except for the occasional exclamation which is totally bleeped out. I don't see a problem with kids reading this. Some of Huey's ideas might go over the heads of kids who aren't looking for an intellectual experience, I'd say it's good for pretty much all ages. Aaron McGruder is hilarious.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christoph Blake

    The Boondocks is about the lives of people who live in the little town of Woodcrest. This book features a young intelligent African-American named Huey, his brother Riley, and his grandfather Mr. Freeman. This book also features a young mulatto girl named Jazmine and her parents. This book talks about the personalities the characters. It also talks about the Freeman's living adjustments from Chicago to Woodcrest. The one thing I don't understand about this book is how the book title relates to t The Boondocks is about the lives of people who live in the little town of Woodcrest. This book features a young intelligent African-American named Huey, his brother Riley, and his grandfather Mr. Freeman. This book also features a young mulatto girl named Jazmine and her parents. This book talks about the personalities the characters. It also talks about the Freeman's living adjustments from Chicago to Woodcrest. The one thing I don't understand about this book is how the book title relates to the books or the characters. Overall, this is a "good read" for kids ages 12+. This age group will understand the book better than younger kids.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    This is how I truly enjoy the Boondocks. The story lines on television do cover good topics, but theres nothing like the freedom of print and ink. Theres just nothing like it! Aaron McGruder is a great story teller and historian and uses a very beautiful kaleidoscope of characters to weave his stories. Just read, and laugh, and learn.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I want to live at the corner of Wu-Tang and Buckshot! I like this book the best because there's a lot of Riley Escobar in it. Huey talking about current issues funny, but I liked it better when it was more character-based. I want to live at the corner of Wu-Tang and Buckshot! I like this book the best because there's a lot of Riley Escobar in it. Huey talking about current issues funny, but I liked it better when it was more character-based.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Belay

    The Boondocks cleverly packs in social commentary, laughs, and a great storyline seamlessly. It's one of those books that will have you laughing even while discussing some of the most controversial of topics. Best of all, it allows you to decide who is right for yourself. A must read. The Boondocks cleverly packs in social commentary, laughs, and a great storyline seamlessly. It's one of those books that will have you laughing even while discussing some of the most controversial of topics. Best of all, it allows you to decide who is right for yourself. A must read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diz

    Boondocks was a fun comic strip with a point of view not often represented in newspaper comics. These strips were a lot of fun to read. The only downside is that the strip often focused on current events, so some of the jokes about Y2K and Star Wars Episode 1 will feel a little dated.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    The Boondocks is my favorite comic strip. I love satirical polictical commentary. Thank you. However, I think McGruder's weird about mixed-race issues, which is unfortunate. The Boondocks is my favorite comic strip. I love satirical polictical commentary. Thank you. However, I think McGruder's weird about mixed-race issues, which is unfortunate.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maria Noel

    Just as hilarious and eye-opening as the cartoon.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thanh bui

    the whole comic strip is hilarious and made me go buy the dvd collection of season 1...still funny, but not as funny as the comic strips

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.