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A Common-Sense Guide to Living Rich….Instead of Dying Rich Imagine if by the time you died, you did everything you were told to. You worked hard, saved your money, and looked forward to financial freedom when you retired.   The only thing you wasted along the way was…your life.   Die with Zero presents a startling new and provocative philosophy as well as practical guide on A Common-Sense Guide to Living Rich….Instead of Dying Rich Imagine if by the time you died, you did everything you were told to. You worked hard, saved your money, and looked forward to financial freedom when you retired.   The only thing you wasted along the way was…your life.   Die with Zero presents a startling new and provocative philosophy as well as practical guide on how to get the most out of your money—and out of your life. It’s intended for those who place lifelong memorable experiences far ahead of simply making and accumulating money for one’s so-called Golden Years.   In short, Bill Perkins wants to rescue you from over-saving and under-living. Regardless of your age, Die with Zero will teach you Perkins’ plan for optimizing your life, stage by stage, so you’re fully engaged and enjoying what you’ve worked and saved for.   You’ll discover how to maximize your lifetime memorable moments with “experience bucketing,” how to convert your earnings into priceless memories by following your “net worth curve,” and find out how to navigate whether to invest in, or delay, a meaningful adventure based on your “spend curve” and “personal interest rate.”   Using his own life experiences as well as the inspiring stories and cautionary tales of others—and drawing on eye-opening insights about time, money, and happiness from psychological science and behavioral finance —Perkins makes a timely, convincing, and contrarian case for living large.


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A Common-Sense Guide to Living Rich….Instead of Dying Rich Imagine if by the time you died, you did everything you were told to. You worked hard, saved your money, and looked forward to financial freedom when you retired.   The only thing you wasted along the way was…your life.   Die with Zero presents a startling new and provocative philosophy as well as practical guide on A Common-Sense Guide to Living Rich….Instead of Dying Rich Imagine if by the time you died, you did everything you were told to. You worked hard, saved your money, and looked forward to financial freedom when you retired.   The only thing you wasted along the way was…your life.   Die with Zero presents a startling new and provocative philosophy as well as practical guide on how to get the most out of your money—and out of your life. It’s intended for those who place lifelong memorable experiences far ahead of simply making and accumulating money for one’s so-called Golden Years.   In short, Bill Perkins wants to rescue you from over-saving and under-living. Regardless of your age, Die with Zero will teach you Perkins’ plan for optimizing your life, stage by stage, so you’re fully engaged and enjoying what you’ve worked and saved for.   You’ll discover how to maximize your lifetime memorable moments with “experience bucketing,” how to convert your earnings into priceless memories by following your “net worth curve,” and find out how to navigate whether to invest in, or delay, a meaningful adventure based on your “spend curve” and “personal interest rate.”   Using his own life experiences as well as the inspiring stories and cautionary tales of others—and drawing on eye-opening insights about time, money, and happiness from psychological science and behavioral finance —Perkins makes a timely, convincing, and contrarian case for living large.

30 review for Die with Zero: Getting All You Can from Your Money and Your Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Heuer

    Like many books of this genre, it could stand to be more concise, but it does offer a provocative reassessment of typical thinking around saving, spending, retirement, inheritance, etc. For most, it will not be simple to put the thinking here into practice. Nonetheless, the book will ask you some challenging questions about how you want your life to unfold, and encourage you to live each year you have deliberately.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Murray

    Just finished this book. I think this is one of those books everyone should read. Bill offers a unique and thought provoking look at savings, money and overall life. The idea is to not die with money. Why would you ? You can't take it to the grave and your kids and charities would benefit from it sooner rather than later. A must read for everyone

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lin

    This book gave me a new perspective. Instilled the importance of spending more time on experiences than making money. Your life is measured by your experiences. Those most of his tips are meant for people who are already wealthy and have extra money to spend the general ideas he mentions can apply to anyone. Take more chances when you’re younger because you can. Spend more money when you’re younger because as you grow older the amount of money you make will generally increase. Don’t let work sto This book gave me a new perspective. Instilled the importance of spending more time on experiences than making money. Your life is measured by your experiences. Those most of his tips are meant for people who are already wealthy and have extra money to spend the general ideas he mentions can apply to anyone. Take more chances when you’re younger because you can. Spend more money when you’re younger because as you grow older the amount of money you make will generally increase. Don’t let work stop you from spending time with friends and family and from preventing you from doing the things you’ve always wanted to do that you’ve probably put off several times already. A nice reminder of what’s important. :)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jen Juenke

    WOW! Ok, as part of the FIRE (Financial Independence Retire Early) Movement, I was eagerly awaiting to read this book. I grew up in extreme poverty. I am a saver due to the circumstances in which I was raised. I have a VERY HARD time spending money. Its gotten a bit better and the author argues that I should spend money on experiences and end my life with ZERO money in the bank. Its a great idea and made me think alot about aging, gift giving, and money in a new way. I really liked that he had re WOW! Ok, as part of the FIRE (Financial Independence Retire Early) Movement, I was eagerly awaiting to read this book. I grew up in extreme poverty. I am a saver due to the circumstances in which I was raised. I have a VERY HARD time spending money. Its gotten a bit better and the author argues that I should spend money on experiences and end my life with ZERO money in the bank. Its a great idea and made me think alot about aging, gift giving, and money in a new way. I really liked that he had referenced Vicki Robin's book, Your Money or Your Life, which this book feels like a continuation of. With Ms. Robin's book, I felt that it was overly preachy, while this authors book was about the experiences, the memories that harvest interest, and doing what you love. I thought the graphs were spot on, especially the health and diminishing returns. I have to say that for the most part I agreed with everything that the author wrote. Couple of things I did not agree with is not to save money in your early working life and to take on a "moderate' amount of debt early in life. While I understand where the author was coming from, saying you will get more from the experiences then saving the money....I CRINGED INSIDE. People need to save money, especially Americans. Further, don't get into debt. Save money for things you need, make debt the last thing you resort to and you will have a better, more optional life. Overall a great financial book that doesn't necessarily tell you the numbers of retirement, but more the emotional response to get out and make memories.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Juan David Vargas Quiceno

    Es un libro fácil de leer, lleno de verdades que nadie quiere escuchar, y que nadie quiere que le digan, pero que no por eso dejan de ser verdades. Lo mejor es que no se queda allí, sino que profundiza e intenta ser una guía con múltiples alternativas para conseguir un objetivo de vida: vivir. Solo podemos jugar una partida en la vida: trabajar incansablemente y NO disfrutar el fruto de este trabajo es, en una palabra, estúpido. Ganar dinero solo tiene un objetivo: gastarlo. Como sea, pero gastarlo Es un libro fácil de leer, lleno de verdades que nadie quiere escuchar, y que nadie quiere que le digan, pero que no por eso dejan de ser verdades. Lo mejor es que no se queda allí, sino que profundiza e intenta ser una guía con múltiples alternativas para conseguir un objetivo de vida: vivir. Solo podemos jugar una partida en la vida: trabajar incansablemente y NO disfrutar el fruto de este trabajo es, en una palabra, estúpido. Ganar dinero solo tiene un objetivo: gastarlo. Como sea, pero gastarlo. Nadie sabe como hacer feliz a nadie, pero ciertamente si nos detenemos a pensar, vamos a encontrar como hacernos felices a nosotros mismos. En resumen, un libro sencillo, nada complejo, que reta a pensar distinto, y que puede cambiar la vida de más de un adicto al trabajo.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Byron Snapp

    Many parts of this book are really for those that are already doing at least fairly well saving money towards their retirement, but the two things I got most out of this book are actually the ones that would apply to even those with less retirement savings. 1) The experience/memory dividend. Basically the idea that great experiences can bring you joy again later reminiscing over the experience. Over time those little amounts of additional joy can actually sometimes even be greater than the origin Many parts of this book are really for those that are already doing at least fairly well saving money towards their retirement, but the two things I got most out of this book are actually the ones that would apply to even those with less retirement savings. 1) The experience/memory dividend. Basically the idea that great experiences can bring you joy again later reminiscing over the experience. Over time those little amounts of additional joy can actually sometimes even be greater than the original experience. 2) Really sitting down at a young (or youngish) age and coming up with essentially a lifetime bucket list. Placing each of those bucket list items on a timeline in a grouping of 5 years to plan out when would ideally be the best time to do those experiences to get the most enjoyment out of them if money wasn't an issue. Obviously in the end money is often a factor for many of these items, but I felt doing it this way really helped prioritize some of the items that would depreciate in the amount of enjoyment experienced the longer we waited to do those activities.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Miguel

    My priors on this had low expectations but I was pleasantly surprised to hear the ideas that Perkins discussed regarding one’s wealth (or lack there-of) management over a lifetime and how to try to optimize spending vs. saving. As opposed to the FIRE doctrine of maintaining a SWR (safe withdraw rate) of 2 to 4%, Perkins suggests that one should instead be less conservative and aim to have just enough to last one’s lifetime. (Note, for him this equates to 0.7 x Annual Spending x # Yrs Til Death.) My priors on this had low expectations but I was pleasantly surprised to hear the ideas that Perkins discussed regarding one’s wealth (or lack there-of) management over a lifetime and how to try to optimize spending vs. saving. As opposed to the FIRE doctrine of maintaining a SWR (safe withdraw rate) of 2 to 4%, Perkins suggests that one should instead be less conservative and aim to have just enough to last one’s lifetime. (Note, for him this equates to 0.7 x Annual Spending x # Yrs Til Death.) It’s an interesting approach and in the hands of someone with very steady spending patterns this might just work, but for the bulk of people this seems like a disaster waiting to happen in the event of unforeseen life events and generally inability to stick to budgets. Perhaps this wouldn’t be so bad for someone who has a backup such as certain familial inheritance. It also seems to pour a bit of gasoline on the fire that is the low savings rate for Americans in general.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Seifried

    A light easy read that I listened to as an audiobook (a little over 5 hours). I enjoyed hearing about the authors experience with money and feel that he offers a different perspective on some of the commonly held philosophies. However, I’d be concerned for anyone who takes his advice literally and think there is a healthy financial balance between what he suggests and more commonly held beliefs. (Reminder that with the power of compound interest it’s important to save in your early working caree A light easy read that I listened to as an audiobook (a little over 5 hours). I enjoyed hearing about the authors experience with money and feel that he offers a different perspective on some of the commonly held philosophies. However, I’d be concerned for anyone who takes his advice literally and think there is a healthy financial balance between what he suggests and more commonly held beliefs. (Reminder that with the power of compound interest it’s important to save in your early working career... people who only start saving later on can never catch up). As a thought exercise (not an investment strategy!) there are some good perspectives. The idea that you should spend on experiences when you can (and are healthy enough to enjoy them!) is something I’ve thought about a lot but haven’t been able to articulate in the same way. It’s a good read for someone looking for a counter-balance to traditional financial advice and being conscious about spend and when (particularly liked the points about gifting and donations), and a good thought experiment in planning life experiences... but please, still make sure you’re stocking that savings account!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Smith

    This book was recommended to me by the most unlikely of sources, so I had to take a look. I found Die With Zero to be thought provoking and contrarian in a really great way. I've had rich conversations about the concepts in this book with both family and friends - I can say that the ideas are interesting enough and broad enough to engage a ton of different people. At a bare minimum, this book is worth a read just for the thought experiments it'll put you through. You may not agree with everythin This book was recommended to me by the most unlikely of sources, so I had to take a look. I found Die With Zero to be thought provoking and contrarian in a really great way. I've had rich conversations about the concepts in this book with both family and friends - I can say that the ideas are interesting enough and broad enough to engage a ton of different people. At a bare minimum, this book is worth a read just for the thought experiments it'll put you through. You may not agree with everything, but I'd say it's 100% worth considering the thoughts that the author presents in a concise and conversational way.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ramsey

    Really enjoyed this short book on how to think about financial matters with respect to life fulfillment. The ideas explored by Mr. Perkins resonated with me as someone who has at times been restrictive with my lifestyle to an unnecessary degree in the name of saving for the far distant future. I can understand how this book will turn away a good chunk of people for a lack of understanding the ideas presented. While appealing to a wide audience, I think it’s most useful for those of us who alread Really enjoyed this short book on how to think about financial matters with respect to life fulfillment. The ideas explored by Mr. Perkins resonated with me as someone who has at times been restrictive with my lifestyle to an unnecessary degree in the name of saving for the far distant future. I can understand how this book will turn away a good chunk of people for a lack of understanding the ideas presented. While appealing to a wide audience, I think it’s most useful for those of us who already have a good handle on the basics of personal finance and are relatively satisfied with our overall trajectory, but desire to take more risks and live a little more passionately. The book provides several tools and mental models to encourage maximizing your experiences in the here and now. I very much agree with the repeated emphasis on not excessively delaying our wants because the time horizon can be much shorter than expected. The data cited by the author supports his argument quite convincingly that many are overestimating their ultimate target and delaying gratification too much rather than not enough (contrary to common belief.) Overall, the book was great. The only minor nitpick I have is I would have actually liked to have more content, even if it resulted in a higher page count and lessened readability. I came away feeling like the book was over-edited in places. All that said, this was generally a sensible and provocative read that will have some insight for most interested in the genre.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Johnson

    I sought out his book after hearing Bill Perkins interviewed by James Altucher. Some people aren't good about saving for retirement. But some of us are. The question Perkins answers is "At what point can you stop saving and start spending?" He thoroughly defends the "why" and shows you how to customize a plan to do it that fits your own values. I think this book, whether you buy into his Die With Zero philosophy or not, is a super-important reminder of why we earn money: to have the most and best I sought out his book after hearing Bill Perkins interviewed by James Altucher. Some people aren't good about saving for retirement. But some of us are. The question Perkins answers is "At what point can you stop saving and start spending?" He thoroughly defends the "why" and shows you how to customize a plan to do it that fits your own values. I think this book, whether you buy into his Die With Zero philosophy or not, is a super-important reminder of why we earn money: to have the most and best life experiences we can. Some of those experiences cost money, some don't. Instead of coasting on autopilot, we can be intentional about what we want to get out of this short life and do something about it. Bill Perkins and I totally agree: Life is too precious to get to the end of it and have regrets that could have been avoided. I highly, highly recommend this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Smith

    DNF This came in a bundle from my library based off my check-out history. I read a lot and generally grab 4-6 books at a time at the library. Therefore, it isn't uncommon for me to take chances on books that I'm not sure will be good. Case in point, personal finance. At a minimum I say 90% of all PF books are pure trash, likely closer to 97-98%. That's because money is emotional which makes it unique to each person ergo nearly impossible to write about. Anyway, this book... any PF book I read, the DNF This came in a bundle from my library based off my check-out history. I read a lot and generally grab 4-6 books at a time at the library. Therefore, it isn't uncommon for me to take chances on books that I'm not sure will be good. Case in point, personal finance. At a minimum I say 90% of all PF books are pure trash, likely closer to 97-98%. That's because money is emotional which makes it unique to each person ergo nearly impossible to write about. Anyway, this book... any PF book I read, the moment they mention kicking the latte they immediately lose all credibility and I close the book. That's what happened here. So unoriginal, untrue etc etc.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    I am well into retirement and read this expecting it to offer practical financial advice on how we should handle our finances for the rest of our lives but it's geared more for younger people who are still working. I did cull a few bits of advice that gave me more ideas on how we should be handling our finances but I mostly skimmed it as much didn't pertain to the way we are living, especially if this virus is around for a few more years. Thanks to the publisher for the advance digital reading co I am well into retirement and read this expecting it to offer practical financial advice on how we should handle our finances for the rest of our lives but it's geared more for younger people who are still working. I did cull a few bits of advice that gave me more ideas on how we should be handling our finances but I mostly skimmed it as much didn't pertain to the way we are living, especially if this virus is around for a few more years. Thanks to the publisher for the advance digital reading copy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matt MacFarlane

    The majority of people don’t save enough for retirement, but this is about the problem of doing the opposite, working too much and not realizing the benefit of what you earn. The author’s premise is a unique and insightful idea. There are many actionable themes: focusing on your health, spending while you are able to have certain experiences, taking career risks when you’re young. If you’ve experienced success in your career, I’m sure this book will get you to start thinking about the experience The majority of people don’t save enough for retirement, but this is about the problem of doing the opposite, working too much and not realizing the benefit of what you earn. The author’s premise is a unique and insightful idea. There are many actionable themes: focusing on your health, spending while you are able to have certain experiences, taking career risks when you’re young. If you’ve experienced success in your career, I’m sure this book will get you to start thinking about the experiences you passed on because they seemed expensive at the time.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dean

    Almost gave it 1. But perhaps this book is fine but just not for me. I think the content would have made a very nice 2 column op-ed piece but not a particularly useful book. I'm not sure the collection of amusingly self congratulatory anecdotes heavily slanted by survivorship bias is really going to change the minds of its target audience. I think there are more useful resources out there to try and convince people that they really don't need to over save for their retirements.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eric Regaspi

    The author seems to be reading my mind. Engineers typically think in terms of strategic maximization, return on investment, and project timelines. This book also considered psychology, health, and accumulation of life experiences as major factors in the life equation. Money is the means, not the end goal. This idea to "Die with Zero" will probably only resonant with a small, select audience, which luckily I happened to be a part of...I hope you are, too.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lynee

    The message in this book resonated with me, especially the discussions about health, experiences and life energy. It really is a more of a life enhancing book than a financial one. However as the author notes in the first chapter, this book (especially when discussing money) is probably best suited to the to upper middle class and higher earners. But the overall message about memories and how we spend our lives is applicable to all audiences.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Montessahall Montessahall

    This is the book I needed to read at this time in my life. Reading it was more of an affirmation than new information as I have always intended to die broke. I read this book from the perspective of a frequent international leisure traveler to discover something that would pertain to fulfilling this life approach during a global pandemic. Overall, I urge anyone who either loves or care about a workaholic to give them this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sanford Chee

    On the James Altucher Show https://podcasts.apple.com/sg/podcast... The purpose of $ is for the acquisition of experiences. Delayed gratification vs investing in experiences now & building up your memory dividend. Related: FIRE, 4-hr work week, Vagabonding On the James Altucher Show https://podcasts.apple.com/sg/podcast... The purpose of $ is for the acquisition of experiences. Delayed gratification vs investing in experiences now & building up your memory dividend. Related: FIRE, 4-hr work week, Vagabonding

  20. 4 out of 5

    Russ

    Meh, written for young people - those least likely to read it or follow the advice.

  21. 5 out of 5

    PWRL

    SM

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Santiago

    I like books that gives me a different advice from all the others and this one does just that. Helps me focus on spending more money today instead of saving it all for tomorrow.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    I quite enjoyed this book. The main concept is: You have a certain amount of life energy. You can use it to make money (work) but most people worry too much about running out of money before they die, and thus overcompensate and spend too much time working, not enough time enjoying life. That is a tricky thing to balance: none of us want to spend the end of our lives destitute. Another concept that is really hitting home with me is the idea to start early. Two reasons hit home: one is experiences I quite enjoyed this book. The main concept is: You have a certain amount of life energy. You can use it to make money (work) but most people worry too much about running out of money before they die, and thus overcompensate and spend too much time working, not enough time enjoying life. That is a tricky thing to balance: none of us want to spend the end of our lives destitute. Another concept that is really hitting home with me is the idea to start early. Two reasons hit home: one is experiences are like an investment you can relive through memories. The earlier you have those experiences, the more you can relive them, so the more they are worth. The second is there are some experiences we can only have when we are young. My Mom is making that clear to me right now. She is still enjoying life, but she doesn't like to travel anymore. She doesn't even enjoying going outside when the air temperature is above 85. I'm struggling with that last one right now. There are typically two reasons people spend too much of their lives saving money rather than enjoying it while they can. 1. They want to leave money to their kids. He says "OK, but then why do they have to wait for you to die? It does them more good to have that money before they die. Give them some now and tell them not to expect an inheritance." 2. They are afraid of running out of money. He says: Look into annuities. Annuities are awful investments because they aren't really investments, they are insurance. Annuities are insurance that you will never run out of money. Again, they aren't good investments, but if you are worried about running out of money before you die, you should look into them. There are great ideas in this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Deepak Bassi

    I just reviewed Die with Zero by Bill Perkins. #DiewithZero #NetGalley. I found the book a quick one to read. I took a few lessons that I will apply. The chapters all have summaries which I found to be useful. I do like some concepts, others did not apply to me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Glick

  26. 4 out of 5

    Renée

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vince Sarubbi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Terri

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