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A vital, timely text on the viruses that cause pandemics and how to face them, by the New York Times bestselling author of How Not to Die. From tuberculosis to bird flu and HIV to coronavirus, these infectious diseases share a common origin story: human interaction with animals. Otherwise known as zoonotic diseases for their passage from animals to humans, these pathogens— A vital, timely text on the viruses that cause pandemics and how to face them, by the New York Times bestselling author of How Not to Die. From tuberculosis to bird flu and HIV to coronavirus, these infectious diseases share a common origin story: human interaction with animals. Otherwise known as zoonotic diseases for their passage from animals to humans, these pathogens—both pre-existing ones and those newly identified—emerge and re-emerge throughout history, sparking epidemics and pandemics that have resulted in millions of deaths around the world. How did these diseases come about? And what—if anything—can we do to stop them and their fatal march into our countries, our homes, and our bodies? In How to Survive a Pandemic, Dr. Michael Greger, physician and internationally-recognized expert on public health issues, delves into the origins of some of the deadliest pathogens the world has ever seen. Tracing their evolution from the past until today, Dr. Greger spotlights emerging flu and coronaviruses as he examines where these pathogens originated, as well as the underlying conditions and significant human role that have exacerbated their lethal influence to large, and even global, levels. As the world grapples with the devastating impact of the novel coronavirus 2019, Dr. Greger reveals not only what we can do to protect ourselves and our loved ones during a pandemic, but also what human society must rectify to reduce the likelihood of even worse catastrophes in the future.


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A vital, timely text on the viruses that cause pandemics and how to face them, by the New York Times bestselling author of How Not to Die. From tuberculosis to bird flu and HIV to coronavirus, these infectious diseases share a common origin story: human interaction with animals. Otherwise known as zoonotic diseases for their passage from animals to humans, these pathogens— A vital, timely text on the viruses that cause pandemics and how to face them, by the New York Times bestselling author of How Not to Die. From tuberculosis to bird flu and HIV to coronavirus, these infectious diseases share a common origin story: human interaction with animals. Otherwise known as zoonotic diseases for their passage from animals to humans, these pathogens—both pre-existing ones and those newly identified—emerge and re-emerge throughout history, sparking epidemics and pandemics that have resulted in millions of deaths around the world. How did these diseases come about? And what—if anything—can we do to stop them and their fatal march into our countries, our homes, and our bodies? In How to Survive a Pandemic, Dr. Michael Greger, physician and internationally-recognized expert on public health issues, delves into the origins of some of the deadliest pathogens the world has ever seen. Tracing their evolution from the past until today, Dr. Greger spotlights emerging flu and coronaviruses as he examines where these pathogens originated, as well as the underlying conditions and significant human role that have exacerbated their lethal influence to large, and even global, levels. As the world grapples with the devastating impact of the novel coronavirus 2019, Dr. Greger reveals not only what we can do to protect ourselves and our loved ones during a pandemic, but also what human society must rectify to reduce the likelihood of even worse catastrophes in the future.

30 review for How to Survive a Pandemic

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dr Appu Sasidharan

    "Pandemic is not a word to use lightly or carelessly. It is a word that, if misused, can cause unreasonable fear, or unjustified acceptance that the fight is over, leading to unnecessary suffering and death." I must warn you initially itself that even though this is a very informative book, it is also a terrifying book to read. It has touched every aspect of the current COVID - 19 pandemic (many of which we have not even heard about.) It also discusses SAARS and other earlier pandemics. I m sha "Pandemic is not a word to use lightly or carelessly. It is a word that, if misused, can cause unreasonable fear, or unjustified acceptance that the fight is over, leading to unnecessary suffering and death." I must warn you initially itself that even though this is a very informative book, it is also a terrifying book to read. It has touched every aspect of the current COVID - 19 pandemic (many of which we have not even heard about.) It also discusses SAARS and other earlier pandemics. I m sharing some essential information from this book here. Worst Pandemic is coming Do you think that you just saw the worst you can see in your life during the current pandemic? Dr Michaael Greger warns us that a bigger pandemic than the current one is about to happen soon if we are not too careful with our health and preventive measures. With COVID - 19, the toilet paper supply had been Wiped, but the food supply was not fully affected in many countries. In a more severe pandemic expected to happen in the future, not only will be the grocery stores be empty, but we might also lose water, power and phone services. World economic forum stimulation suggests that the internet will shut down within 2-4 days. Many of the world cities like Chicago won’t have chlorine for than 5-7 days that they use to purify the water supply. The crumbling of the critical infrastructure will be due to rampant absenteeism. Billions will fall sick, and billions more will be afraid to go to work. This will lead to a total economic collapse. WHO vs CDC The WHO and CDC have conflicting guidelines as to what health care workers should wear during the routine care of patients during the COVID - 19. The CDC, along with its European counterparts, recommends respirators whereas WHO suggests that surgical masks are sufficient. The part of the WHOs reluctance to endorse N95 may be due out of the sensitivity due to the global scarcity of N95. The underlying dynamics of COVID - 19 remains unknown. So it is impossible to say which recommendation is right with any certainty Social scapegoating According to John M. Barry (author of the Great Influenza), “The 1918 pandemic did not, in general, follow any pattern of race and class antagonism. In epidemiological terms, there was a correlation between population density and hence class and deaths. But the disease struck down everywhere and everyone almost similarly.” Dr Michael Greger, in this book, has something different to say regarding the same topic. According to Dr Greger, the 1918 pandemic was fodder for racists and antisemites. In Baltimore, under Jim Crowe segregation, the hospitals were closed to African Americans at their moment of the greatest need. Once the pandemic passed the Baltimore officials then defended these cities poor public health performance by attributing the cities elevated mortality rate to its proportion of black residents. The Poles blamed the Jews who they told are a particular enemy to order and cleanliness. As reviewed in New England Journal of Medicine, this was sadly neither the first nor the last of the social scapegoating that is one of the most common and the ugly conductive features of the epidemics in human society. Victims of infectious diseases are blamed and shunned to this day. In SAARS epidemics, people of Chinese descend were denied access to the middle school in New Jersey. Some of the employees of the company who fell prey to the first anthrax case were doubly victimised. Family Physicians refused to see them, and their kids were turned away from schools. COVID - 19 saved more lives than it killed Are you Surprised reading this? Well, It's true, even though it happened only in very few countries around the world. Dr Greger is explaining this aspect of the virus too in this book. Lockdowns around the world, enforced to slow the spread of Covid-19, have also visibly reduced air pollution. How many lives have been saved as a result of reduced pollution? A new study has quantified that : An estimated 12,125 deaths were prevented during countrywide ban on traffic mobility between February 10 and March 14 in one country. The study found that this is higher than the lives lost to the pandemic — 4,633 as of May 4 in the same country. The paper was published in ‘Lancet Planetary Health’. This way of having clean air through massive quarantine and travel restrictions is not sustainable and likely to be only temporary for a short period of time. This book is overloaded with information (probably more than that which you can digest). But in my opinion, we all must read this book and implement the preventive measures Dr Greger has discussed to prevent the severe Pandemic that might happen in the future. The only negative I can say about this book is that I was not able to get a physical copy of it as the physical book is not printed yet. (According to amazon.com it will be released only on August 18, 2020). So until then, we will have to settle down for either an ebook or an audiobook. I am sure that I will buy the printed physical book too to reread it as soon as it is released. I can undoubtedly say to everyone that this is a must-read book. Thank you so much, Dr Greger, for doing extensive research and releasing your book amid this pandemic and giving us one of the best books about COVID -19. There is no better way to finish this review than using the amazing pearls of wisdom shared by Olawale Daniel. “COVID-19 offers us a great opportunity for individual and collective recession. It is time to go back to the drawing board and rewrite the next phase of our existence. The upcoming generation has to read about how we fought this pandemic with or without vaccines in order to overcome similar situations during their times.”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    What a book to read during a mild pandemic, COVID-19. Mild? Well, yes, as a matter of fact there are some really terrible pandemics waiting in the wings with death rates over 50%. We thought this one was bad just wait until H5N1 learns how to pass human to human. I was really shocked and kept awake at nights by my fears while reading this book. The world community is NOT prepared to deal with a pandemic that will probably kill over half of humanity. How do we prevent this calamity from happening What a book to read during a mild pandemic, COVID-19. Mild? Well, yes, as a matter of fact there are some really terrible pandemics waiting in the wings with death rates over 50%. We thought this one was bad just wait until H5N1 learns how to pass human to human. I was really shocked and kept awake at nights by my fears while reading this book. The world community is NOT prepared to deal with a pandemic that will probably kill over half of humanity. How do we prevent this calamity from happening is, first read this book, then become an activist. The current pandemic is with us because a zoonotic virus leaped from species to species until it figured out how to leap to human beings. It is believed it came from pangolins that were sold live in a wet market, a market where live animals are kept to be slaughtered. LISTEN TO ME, SOMEONE KILLED AND ATE A PANGOLIN! Each virus that afflicts humanity came to us from the animal kingdom. I know the world is not ready to give up the nasty habit of consuming meat, but you might have to think about eating less of it and paying more for it. Raising animals for human consumption is bad for the animals and it's bad for the planet. I don't want to get into specifics here, but it's all laid out in the book, WHICH EVERYONE SHOULD READ. Dr. Greger explains in dense detail where diseases come from, how they change and why we have so many right now. It all has to do with our love of meat. He proves that we are not ready for THE NEXT BIG PANDEMIC, I mean, we weren't ready for the one we're in now. Addtionally he lays out what we have to do personally and as a world to prepare for the next big one. Finally he tempts us with the idea of a world without pandemics and how that could happen. Read this book, you will gain knowledge and knowledge is power. By the way, don't expect the meat industry to police themselves here is a jaw-dropping quote from the end of the book, “The executive editor of Poultry magazine put the trade-off this way in an editorial: ‘The prospect of a virulent flu to which we have absolutely no resistance is frightening. However, to me, the threat is much greater to the poultry industry. I’m not as worried about the U.S. human population dying from bird flu as I am that there will be no chicken to eat.’”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    3.5 stars: Some great content and inspiring thoughts in there: especially on the fact that the current Covid-19 is way less serious than a human H5N1 outbreak would be and how mass chicken production is a big issue in that regard. That being said, the content is not presented in a concise enough manner for my taste. Too many repetitions of the same and same arguments again and again, I would give it 4.5 stars if the book was half the length. As a result and in combination with the author’s imho no 3.5 stars: Some great content and inspiring thoughts in there: especially on the fact that the current Covid-19 is way less serious than a human H5N1 outbreak would be and how mass chicken production is a big issue in that regard. That being said, the content is not presented in a concise enough manner for my taste. Too many repetitions of the same and same arguments again and again, I would give it 4.5 stars if the book was half the length. As a result and in combination with the author’s imho not very audiobook-friendly voice, it’s not a very pleasant audiobook to listen to.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebe

    How to Survive a Pandemic is the second book I've read by Michael Greger. He seems to research everything thoroughly (literally half this book is just references), writes about scary subjects without inducing panic, and makes complicated science easy to understand. I assumed this book in particular was going to be about practical tips for surviving a pandemic. And given this is the author of How Not to Die, I figured some of it would be specifically about dietary things you can do to boost your i How to Survive a Pandemic is the second book I've read by Michael Greger. He seems to research everything thoroughly (literally half this book is just references), writes about scary subjects without inducing panic, and makes complicated science easy to understand. I assumed this book in particular was going to be about practical tips for surviving a pandemic. And given this is the author of How Not to Die, I figured some of it would be specifically about dietary things you can do to boost your immune system. There was some of that in there, but to my surprise, the vast majority of the book is about the things humans do that create dangerous conditions for virus mutation: the dangers of bushmeat, deforestation, the wild pet trade, and especially factory farming. As a vegan, I've done my fair share of research on factory farming, but I had never looked at it from Greger's angle, namely that factory farming is bad for human health. Factory farm practices like massive antibiotic use and super-crowded, stressful conditions make your average industrial-scale chicken farm a giant lab for antibiotic-resistant bugs and dangerous zoonotic viruses like COVID-19, SARS, & H5N1. Greger argues persuasively that these chicken farms make it much more likely that we will see more viruses emerging with pandemic potential. Although this is interesting at first, Greger is obviously very into the topic and needed an editor to rein him in. The factory farming stuff gets so repetitive and detailed that even those interested in the topic might feel tempted to skip ahead. On top of that, there's nothing the average reader can do about the problems Greger presents. It's good to be educated on these issues, but that's not why I picked up this book and probably not why you picked it up, either. If you're hoping to get Greger's take on national and international preparedness for pandemics as well as what the individual can do to prepare and to help at a community level, that starts in Part III and was the most immediately relevant section of the book. Greger presents some really interesting history about the 1918 pandemic and critiques modern-day responses to pandemics and close calls. He provides advice like how to make your own hand sanitizer and what supplies to keep stocked in your house. At the end we even get a post-apocalyptic description of what the world might be like if we ever came down with a Category 5 pandemic (COVID is a Category 2-3). I'd recommend skimming the chicken farming stuff once you feel it start to get repetitive, then reading the book starting at around 37%/Part III.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Trace Nichols

    Wow is this timely... particularly because the author wrote this book amidst a global pandemic. Chock FULL of information, this read is truly educational. It covers not on the history of viruses, pathogens, origins, et al. ... it also delves deep into preventative measures, vaccines, the agricultural industry and its part in virus creation and transmission, general animal advocacy, government response, and what is to come. Smart and scary all at once, but better to be informed than hiding under Wow is this timely... particularly because the author wrote this book amidst a global pandemic. Chock FULL of information, this read is truly educational. It covers not on the history of viruses, pathogens, origins, et al. ... it also delves deep into preventative measures, vaccines, the agricultural industry and its part in virus creation and transmission, general animal advocacy, government response, and what is to come. Smart and scary all at once, but better to be informed than hiding under a rock.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rootul Patel

    Best book of 2020. Actionable personal takeaways: - Use 60%+ alcohol based hand sanitizer because humans (including myself) can't be trusted to wash their hands properly. If hands are visibly soiled, wash with water & soap for 20+ seconds. - Don't bring poultry into the house. Humans can't be trusted to handle it correctly considering 92% of poultry is contaminated with fecal matter and spread it to kitchen counters, utensils, dish towels, etc. before cooking the chicken. Do not wash chicken prior Best book of 2020. Actionable personal takeaways: - Use 60%+ alcohol based hand sanitizer because humans (including myself) can't be trusted to wash their hands properly. If hands are visibly soiled, wash with water & soap for 20+ seconds. - Don't bring poultry into the house. Humans can't be trusted to handle it correctly considering 92% of poultry is contaminated with fecal matter and spread it to kitchen counters, utensils, dish towels, etc. before cooking the chicken. Do not wash chicken prior to cooking it. Use a meat thermometer. Most people are cooking chicken unsafely (hence the high # of food poisoning cases in the US). - Close the toilet seat before flushing. Flushing with the toilet seat open can aerosolize a plume of up to 145,000 droplets of toilet water into the air. Global takeaways: - We should enforce serious regulation on wet markets to reduce the risk of novel zoonotic virus formation or (more plausibly) a universal ban on them. Same goes for the bushmeat trade. - The next pandemic will likely be avian influenza (H5N1) and we should be terrified of it. - Industrial poultry production practices (i.e. overcrowding chicken sheds, overuse of antibiotics, lack of sunlight, etc.) are exacerbating the risk of developing a pandemic causing virus in chickens that has the potential to infect humans. The U.S. and China have particularly unsafe poultry farming practices because the private sector has been left unchecked whereas most European countries haver safer regulations and policies.

  7. 4 out of 5

    George Jacobs

    How to Survive a Pandemic by Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, Published by Bluebird Books for Life, 2020. Currently, Dr Michael Greger devotes his considerable energies to the NutritionFacts.org non-profit constellation of website, social media, books, talks, and videos, which focuses on the impact of food on health. However, for How to Survive a Pandemic, he returns to his roots as an infectious disease specialist. For instance, his third book, before his best-selling How Not to Die and How Not To D How to Survive a Pandemic by Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, Published by Bluebird Books for Life, 2020. Currently, Dr Michael Greger devotes his considerable energies to the NutritionFacts.org non-profit constellation of website, social media, books, talks, and videos, which focuses on the impact of food on health. However, for How to Survive a Pandemic, he returns to his roots as an infectious disease specialist. For instance, his third book, before his best-selling How Not to Die and How Not To Diet, was Bird Flu: A Virus of Our Own Hatching. How to Survive a Pandemic has six parts. The clear message of Part I, Storm Gathering, is that humans greatly underestimate the impact of viruses. We mistakenly view diseases such as the flu as mere inconveniences. To make this point, Dr Greger opens with a quote from Dr William Osler, a distinguished medical educator of the early 20th century: “Humanity has three great enemies: fever, famine and war; of these by far the greatest, by far the most terrible, is fever.” Dr Greger delivers a chilling account of the horrors of the so-called Spanish Flu of 1918-1919, which appears to have actually begun when a virus on a chicken farm in the U.S. infected troops who spread the disease elsewhere when they were transported to Europe to fight in World War I. While 20 million soldiers and civilians died in that war, at least 50 million perished from the disease. Yet, which is featured in the history books? Until COVID-19, had you ever heard of the world’s worst medical catastrophe ever, a pandemic that would be more accurately called the “Chicken Flu/U.S. Flu of 1918-1919”? Part II of How to Survive a Pandemic – When Animal Viruses Strike - continues the theme of humanity greatly underestimating the deadly force of infectious diseases. “In 1948, the U.S. Secretary of State pronounced that the conquest of all infectious diseases was imminent. Twenty years later, victory was declared by the U.S. Surgeon General: ‘The war against disease has been won.’” No such declaration of victory has been made lately. In fact, since 2012, more scientific journal articles have been published on emerging diseases than were published in the previous 100 years. And, almost all of these diseases have come from the animal world. That’s the past bad news. The future bad news is that there appear to be many more animal diseases capable of jumping to humans. Dr Greger quotes a WHO expert as stating, “If you look at the animal kingdom—from goats, sheep, camels, poultry, all fish, just about any animal you can name—they [each] have probably 30 or 40 major diseases. So the possibility for exposure is huge.” Part III of How to Survive a Pandemic - Pandemic Preparedness - asks whether once a virus of pandemic potential has emerged, can it be stopped? The answer is Yes, on paper, a pandemic can be stopped, but not in the real world. Dr Greger quotes a leading pandemic expert from the northern U.S. state of Minnesota, Dr Michael Osterholm, “We have as much chance of stopping a pandemic as we would of putting a curtain around Minnesota and keeping out winter.” Part IV of the book is Surviving the COVID-19 Pandemic. First, some background. Three features of recent pandemic viruses that make them so deadly and enable them to spread so easily are, first, they are new to humans, so we have not built immunity. Second, they spread via our respiratory tract. Third, they spread before their hosts exhibit symptoms, so people with the virus are already spreading the virus before anyone knows they have it. As to when, how, and if COVID-19 will ever go away, Dr Greger cautions that the virus is already mutating, and who knows where that might lead. The fifth of the book’s six parts turns toward the future: Surviving the Next Pandemic. This part ends with a dire warning by WHO expert Klaus Stöhr, “The objective of pandemic preparedness can only be damage control. There will be death and destruction.” On a more positive note, Dr Greger offers detailed and, as is his wont, well explained, lists of what we can do in advance of the next pandemic, a disaster Dr Greger sees as inevitable. These lists include the food and other supplies people will need, as well as the behaviors to follow, with hand cleanliness, with soap and water or with hand sanitizer, at the top of the list. During the current COVID-19 pandemic, as with previous contagions, part of preparation should include working towards equality. Examples of inequality include (a) during the 1918 pandemic, hospitals in the U.S. city of Baltimore were closed to African Americans, and (b) during the current contagion, billions of people lack even the basic clean water needed to wash their hands. The book’s final part is Preventing Future Pandemics. Dr Greger’s view is that we cannot prevent humanity being visited by more pandemics; all we can do is to try to make those pandemics less severe by preventing superstrains. How? Dr Greger quotes Hippocrates: “Extreme remedies are most appropriate for extreme diseases.” In the modern context, the extreme diseases are pandemics and the “extreme” remedy that Dr Greger suggests involves stopping our horrendous interference in the lives of non-human animals, in particular using them for food. Fortunately, recent years have seen an explosion of meat alternatives, with such products now being produced even by the same companies which slaughter animals. I’m a big fan of Dr Greger and the large, impressive team at NutritionFacts.org. One suggestion to Dr Greger is to make his books, etc. even less U.S.-centric. While I don’t doubt that the majority of his readers will be in the U.S., people these days are trying hard to appreciate that the lives of others different from themselves – whether the differences involve race, religion, nationality, sex, sexual preference, species, etc. – do matter. This appreciation promotes interest in learning about the lives of others.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    This is a massive book. But half of it is citing references. So how to survive? Don’t get it in the first place. Gee thanks. He says you could self isolate, but then points out how missionaries on Alaska isolated during the 1918 pandemic only to have an infected mailman come and spread the disease that kill off almost everyone. Even if you get Covid he talks about a couple and how the cancer patient wife was able to avoid the worst of Covid, but her husband who was in good health did not. So it’ This is a massive book. But half of it is citing references. So how to survive? Don’t get it in the first place. Gee thanks. He says you could self isolate, but then points out how missionaries on Alaska isolated during the 1918 pandemic only to have an infected mailman come and spread the disease that kill off almost everyone. Even if you get Covid he talks about a couple and how the cancer patient wife was able to avoid the worst of Covid, but her husband who was in good health did not. So it’s all a crap shoot. The author also says we have more to worry about with bird flu type diseases than anything else. And the next pandemic can be so much worse than Covid. Wut? And I thought I was so much superior for eating chicken over other meats. But apparently the factory farming of poultry is just a ticking time bomb for humans. He really nailed his point over that, that I was like “okay, already! No chicken!” So we really need to as a society see the value in reducing our meat intake... by at least half in order to save millions of lives. Not a fun or hopeful book. So my plan for surviving Covid is basically the same as before I read the book. Isolate in my bedroom with Gatorade.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Abbey

    I don't think I'll ever be able to eat poultry again without thinking of all the bird shit on it. So gross. I feel like I am careful when cooking meat but now I just want to bleach my entire kitchen. Even if we had a vaccine the virus mutates so effectively that the vaccine is rendered useless. And if we could produce a vaccine in 8 months the current capacity to produce the vaccine would only provide enough for 14% of the population to become vaccinated. Most of the current viral diseases are cau I don't think I'll ever be able to eat poultry again without thinking of all the bird shit on it. So gross. I feel like I am careful when cooking meat but now I just want to bleach my entire kitchen. Even if we had a vaccine the virus mutates so effectively that the vaccine is rendered useless. And if we could produce a vaccine in 8 months the current capacity to produce the vaccine would only provide enough for 14% of the population to become vaccinated. Most of the current viral diseases are caused by the domestication of animals. "Birth in the barnyard" And meat consumption seems to be a big issue in our country. Gross gross gross! Public health and food safety funding is low on the list for our government.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Facts, not fear. Excellent audiobook! This was a very informative and interesting read regarding COVID-19 and pandemics overall - was refreshing to read about FACTS and studies, rather than just hearing the media's take and inciting fear to the public.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Camila Burne

    The references chapter is almost as long as the book itself - it's filled with 3605 links to other studies and articles that explain how mild this current covid pandemic is, and how dangerous other animal spread diseases will be in the future. Great quarantine reading :)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Edward Laauwen

    A re-hashing of stuff that everybody knows written in a way some people might think is "funny". It feels like your dentist has written a book about the joys of drilling...THAT kind of "funny". Too many irrelevant references, bigoted opinions and pseudo-scientific musings for my taste.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Really interesting and while scary- did not send me into a panic. Factory farming facts are horrible and depressing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Haidong Song

    Good information and discussion on impact of food production and supply chain's impact on influenza, some useful tips on personal protection

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tai Tai

    readers will be tempted to go vegan. yes, please

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ștefania Ioana Chiorean

    Decent information about Pandemics, good practices and healthy living. I would expected more certainty, more tips and how to combat it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chun Wong

  18. 4 out of 5

    Clare Quinlan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Frank

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Elizabeth

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  22. 4 out of 5

    Zuzanna

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carri Watts

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Johnson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Prakhar Shukla

  27. 4 out of 5

    Skip Slone

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

  29. 4 out of 5

    Youupdatessite

  30. 4 out of 5

    Graham

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