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‘The real significance of this book lies in the fact that it tells us more about the everyday life of black South Africans. It delves into the essence of black family life and the secret anguish of family members who often battle to cope.’ – Niq MhlongoA secret torment for some, a proud responsibility for others, ‘black tax’ is a daily reality for thousands of black South ‘The real significance of this book lies in the fact that it tells us more about the everyday life of black South Africans. It delves into the essence of black family life and the secret anguish of family members who often battle to cope.’ – Niq MhlongoA secret torment for some, a proud responsibility for others, ‘black tax’ is a daily reality for thousands of black South Africans. In this thought-provoking and moving anthology, a provocative range of voices share their deeply personal stories.With the majority of black South Africans still living in poverty today, many black middle-class households are connected to working-class or jobless homes. Some believe supporting family members is an undeniable part of African culture and question whether it should even be labelled as a kind of tax.Others point to the financial pressure it places on black students and professionals, who, as a consequence, struggle to build their own wealth. Many feel they are taking over what is essentially a government responsibility.The contributions also investigate the historical roots of black tax, the concept of the black family and the black middle class.In giving voice to so many different perspectives, Black Tax hopes to start a dialogue on this widespread social phenomenon.


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‘The real significance of this book lies in the fact that it tells us more about the everyday life of black South Africans. It delves into the essence of black family life and the secret anguish of family members who often battle to cope.’ – Niq MhlongoA secret torment for some, a proud responsibility for others, ‘black tax’ is a daily reality for thousands of black South ‘The real significance of this book lies in the fact that it tells us more about the everyday life of black South Africans. It delves into the essence of black family life and the secret anguish of family members who often battle to cope.’ – Niq MhlongoA secret torment for some, a proud responsibility for others, ‘black tax’ is a daily reality for thousands of black South Africans. In this thought-provoking and moving anthology, a provocative range of voices share their deeply personal stories.With the majority of black South Africans still living in poverty today, many black middle-class households are connected to working-class or jobless homes. Some believe supporting family members is an undeniable part of African culture and question whether it should even be labelled as a kind of tax.Others point to the financial pressure it places on black students and professionals, who, as a consequence, struggle to build their own wealth. Many feel they are taking over what is essentially a government responsibility.The contributions also investigate the historical roots of black tax, the concept of the black family and the black middle class.In giving voice to so many different perspectives, Black Tax hopes to start a dialogue on this widespread social phenomenon.

30 review for Black Tax: Burden or Ubuntu?

  1. 5 out of 5

    Claire Hondo

    Book Review: Black Tax Burden or Ubuntu??? The untold feelings of black culture-Black Tax the good, the bad and the ugly It took me a week to read this because I had so many mixed feelings towards this topic. I understand it from all its angles. "The thing is, many people, regardless of their race or background, support their families, but the difference lies in whether its a choice. Some choose to help, others have to" i think this brings out the clear definition of the black tax culture, were y Book Review: Black Tax Burden or Ubuntu??? The untold feelings of black culture-Black Tax the good, the bad and the ugly It took me a week to read this because I had so many mixed feelings towards this topic. I understand it from all its angles. "The thing is, many people, regardless of their race or background, support their families, but the difference lies in whether its a choice. Some choose to help, others have to" i think this brings out the clear definition of the black tax culture, were you have to give back to your family because you the first one who succeeded in tertiary and have a job(doesn't matter if it's well paying or not) after they sacrificed sending you to school(despite the fact that u where on NSFAS or CADET its their money used🤷🏾‍♀️). I feel this one here is a form of abuse seriously, wasn't it your right to send your kids to school, did they beg to be born vele so because you spent your money on them you want it back. Some people fail to even progress in their lives because they have been drilled mentally that "once you work you need to take care of us, after all, we are doing for you" such that the moment even when you wanna spend so much on yourself you are scared because you have to send back most of it to your parents back home and some are never satisfied they keep wanting more. My problem with those folks is till when, when is your "greedy money sucking culture" full so that that child can buy a house, a car and even start a family for themselves. I know of a friend who is scared to get married cause in his words "I don't wanna bring my wife to be into trouble, I know we will end up fighting because of all these black tax and sacrifices I make" 🤷🏾‍♀️🤦🏾‍♀️. The thing with black culture is- no meeting is held and you are told that you need to take care of such and such NO it is just assumed that now you are working we expect our bills paid, bags of groceries and no appreciation comes your way angazi🤦🏾‍♀️ Then the other side of it it's choosing to help out back home, a personal choice. This right here is not a form of "black tax" in my books but "family upliftment". A way to give back to your parents as a thank you for becoming the professional you are and helping at home. Taking care of siblings or relative's fees, they know they can count on you when approached to help out-Ubuntu. Being blessed with so much so as to be a blessing to others in ur family. Doing it out of love and not cohesion. The sad thing about black tax is it comes with emotional and psychological pain/tax. When you can't get a job no matter your educational level and you remember you are the savior at ur home it kinda gets to you, you start getting anxious and easily drown into depression. Also that mentality of black tax being drilled in u from primary to adulthood" oooh he is gonna b the doctor in the family", "she is gonna build me that house, buy me that car, etc" its already seeded in you that you have a responsibility awaiting you which comes with so much uncertainty as well. You are scared of talking about it with your family for the fear of being judged as an ungrateful someone/attention seeker(as this generation is often labeled by the elders- it is said we feel responsibilities are burdens and we cry foul lol😂😂😂🤦🏾‍♀️) I say we know our value and we know when not to be abused🤷🏾‍♀️ No, I am not against taking care of my family responsibilities-"black tax" I am just against slakers and abusers of this system who just wanna live of the efforts of others with thinking of what they can do to add more value to themselves and the family. The moment we continue this mentality of consumption without investment we ain't gonna get rid of this Black tax at all. The problem also with this 21st century generation- the millennials- is they are entitled they know what they want and what the don't, so you will expect them to take up the family responsibility but they will tell you a point-blank NO- I want to live my life and enjoy my money and you can't force them🤷🏾‍♀️ I think its good we have this "Black Tax Talk" movement, it will help on how to change for coming generations and talking also help ease the mental burden of it. Well done to all the authors who contributed to a wonderful, relevant topic of discussion for this generation!!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zinhle Ngidi

    As an over 40 black female in this country, everything touched in this book, I have experienced. From accepting not to get what you want because you are over 10 kids in one household and there is one or two people working to support all of you, receiving assistance from distant relatives and some community members as you are on your way to fulfill your dreams, working and having to look back and support home, getting married and having to look back and support home. This is all what as a black p As an over 40 black female in this country, everything touched in this book, I have experienced. From accepting not to get what you want because you are over 10 kids in one household and there is one or two people working to support all of you, receiving assistance from distant relatives and some community members as you are on your way to fulfill your dreams, working and having to look back and support home, getting married and having to look back and support home. This is all what as a black person you go through and expected of you as you succeed in life. In the book there are so many authors who have similar experiences and more of this so called “black tax”. It was such a relief to know that most authors in their arguments share my views- if you not helping them who will? Angithi izandla ziyagezana? Black tax has no gender and also there are those family members who would abuse this “burden or ubuntu”. Now the problem is how do we find isibindi to cut them off without feeling guilty. Can you sleep with a full stomach while your relative is hungry? What I also appreciated in these essays/ contributions in this book is looking at the fact that “black tax” is not something that just cropped up now that it has a name. It has been there. These can be traced back from 17th century when settlers came and forced our people out of their land to work for them, in the process introduced taxes that forced them to work and support those who are at home in order to pay for those taxes in a monetary form. They forced a state of dependency and it grew with time. The authors also opened my eyes that this black tax issue is not just in a monetary form but it is an endless list of things we are forced to do as part of supporting our relatives and community at large including our tollgates (those that when we go to the villages will ask for those R20 or a bottle yengudu ne luz ka gwayi, etc). It is funny because we never view such, as black tax but you know if you do not do them will be labelled somehow. A very interesting read that will take you back to the time, that somehow will make you angry at what you have been through as well, how it might have been demanded from you but be rest assured, be it you call it a burden or ubuntu it has an impact on our financial status. I loved what one of the contributors wrote in this book which I found it to be our reality- while we have such educational system that produces employees rather than employers we must forget because as an employee we get just enough to cover our debts and extend a hand to our relatives it has nothing to do with growing our generational wealth like what whites did in the past. We live from hand to mouth. Financial education is non existent. Thank you Niq and the team of authors for sharing and for giving different views on this subject. Maybe as people read these essays/articles will learn and start coming up with ways of accepting this “tax” that it does exist but find a long term plan not to avoid it but coming up with fresh ideas of how to take their communities out of poverty for good. Handing them money on monthly basis is not helping you or them but we need sustainable actions and be creative at how we address this elephant and cut the cycle of poverty. By the way, thanks again for exposing so much talent from all the selected contributors of this book. We are now spoiled for choice as there are so many books that I will now search for based on what has been shared about them in the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Letlhogonolo Mokgoroane

    'The real significance of this book lies in the fact that it tells us more about the everyday life of black South Africans. It delves into the essence of black family life and the secret anguish of family members who often battle to cope.' –@niq.mhlongo This anthology brings together a diverse choir of voices that sing at different tempos about Black Tax. It is a rich hymn of the myriad ways in which we experience the song of Black Tax. The melodies of these pages have Voices writing about Black T 'The real significance of this book lies in the fact that it tells us more about the everyday life of black South Africans. It delves into the essence of black family life and the secret anguish of family members who often battle to cope.' –@niq.mhlongo This anthology brings together a diverse choir of voices that sing at different tempos about Black Tax. It is a rich hymn of the myriad ways in which we experience the song of Black Tax. The melodies of these pages have Voices writing about Black Tax a burden holding us back, while others write about it, not a burden but a responsibility of uplifting. There are voices that argue that the term Black Tax is a misnomer, disallowing us from focusing on the real issue of the legacy of apartheid. The book is honest, often emotional and generous in its offerings. A necessary addition to the South African literary canon. This book will spark lots of conversation.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chiseke Chiteta

    An interesting read. I came to know about this book through a Zambian book readers 'club' Twitter account. Every week, someone runs the account (what is called curating) and poses different questions about books and all. Though this book is written in the context of South Africa, as a Zambian I could relate with the various essays in the book. I believe every other African would relate as there is a similarity in cultures. This is an interesting topic and I am glad someone thought of putting it u An interesting read. I came to know about this book through a Zambian book readers 'club' Twitter account. Every week, someone runs the account (what is called curating) and poses different questions about books and all. Though this book is written in the context of South Africa, as a Zambian I could relate with the various essays in the book. I believe every other African would relate as there is a similarity in cultures. This is an interesting topic and I am glad someone thought of putting it up in a book. We cannot run away from this and various solutions have been suggested in the book. To all those who took their time in contributing essays to this book, well done.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rolland Simpi Motaung

    Great books that will make one angry, sad and proud all at once Angry due to the realization of how ego drives some people to feel entitled to be given credit all the time, how they are entitled to your salary and even your soul Sad, because we live in a socioeconomic context that has broken apart family structures and communal notions of helping one another, instead we have turned to be individualistic, arrogant and egoistic. Proud, that some people have been (still are) rooted in ubuntu/humility Great books that will make one angry, sad and proud all at once Angry due to the realization of how ego drives some people to feel entitled to be given credit all the time, how they are entitled to your salary and even your soul Sad, because we live in a socioeconomic context that has broken apart family structures and communal notions of helping one another, instead we have turned to be individualistic, arrogant and egoistic. Proud, that some people have been (still are) rooted in ubuntu/humility, love, compassion and selflessness. Where ego plays no part, where there is no entitlement to be credited for your efforts, where the aim is to see people around you happy and successful in their lives #ReadingLiberates #BlackTax

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ferdinand

    This book gets repetitive very quickly. I was on page 106 and thought but if this book doesn’t change gears I might not finish it. The cover asks the question is black tax a burden or Ubuntu yet most, if not all the essays (all 26 of them) are geared towards it being “Ubuntu” with no one giving an OPPOSING VIEW of its burdensome nature (with people having committed suicide as a result of carrying the burden of BLACK TAX) and how new ways can be sought to try and uplift the black family. It shoul This book gets repetitive very quickly. I was on page 106 and thought but if this book doesn’t change gears I might not finish it. The cover asks the question is black tax a burden or Ubuntu yet most, if not all the essays (all 26 of them) are geared towards it being “Ubuntu” with no one giving an OPPOSING VIEW of its burdensome nature (with people having committed suicide as a result of carrying the burden of BLACK TAX) and how new ways can be sought to try and uplift the black family. It should have rather been called, BLACK TAX: A SOUTH AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE. Most authors are PRO BLACK TAX (In as much as they have a problem with calling it that) because they are beneficiaries of that said tax through their parents and different family members. No one is giving a counter argument so it feels like you are reading essays that are compounding just one truth (supported by various life experiences and lessons, whether it be spiritual, ancestors, upbringing, etc). I would recommend it for the essays, but it’s not a balanced approach to the question of whether BLACK TAX is a burden or Ubuntu. However if you are a black South African, this book adds nothing to the conversation of black tax (you live it daily, so why read about it, right?), it just shares the different departure points that lead to the same endpoint where everyone is paying BLACK TAX (whether willingly or obligatory. RATING: 3/5 (Just cause the essays are so well written, technically it’s a 2) • • A notable mention on as essay that stood out for me was one by Bongani Kona titled “The cycle will not be unbound”. It’s beautifully written and I shed a tear reading it, honestly a great essay if there ever was one. 😊 A quote that stood out reads “Love is work. And sometimes that work is hard.” Lidumalingani’s essay “sacrificing the self for the whole” and Chwayita Ngamlana’s “Hypothetically peaking” are a breath of fresh air. • •

  7. 4 out of 5

    M. R Phora

    I find the coinage of term "black tax" offensive, it's Ubuntu and basis of black culture. However the concept needs a thorough planning for black economy's sake. I find the coinage of term "black tax" offensive, it's Ubuntu and basis of black culture. However the concept needs a thorough planning for black economy's sake.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sipho

    A collection of reflections from various South African writers and artists on the notion of "black tax". While the definition of that term may differ slightly, the general consensus is that black tax refers to the monetary (or sometimes non-monetary) support that is rendered by the black working class to less well off family members. I guess the "tax" part intimates that often this is seen as an obligation and a necessary corollary of the legacy of colonialism and apartheid. The book felt like a A collection of reflections from various South African writers and artists on the notion of "black tax". While the definition of that term may differ slightly, the general consensus is that black tax refers to the monetary (or sometimes non-monetary) support that is rendered by the black working class to less well off family members. I guess the "tax" part intimates that often this is seen as an obligation and a necessary corollary of the legacy of colonialism and apartheid. The book felt like a family meeting. The stories of people's upbringings and current situations are heart-wrenching, but familiar. As a Zimbabwean living in "the diaspora", I could relate to the tension and worry about the welfare of parents and younger siblings. Although the views of the contributors differ, most draw the distinction between family support and exploitation. But ultimately, being able to have a conversation about "black tax" is a privilege. Whether you're complaining about it being a burden or accepting it as an honourable duty, that its a pertinent topic means that you are in a financial position better than most, regardless of how meagre your contributions may be.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Baatile

    I enjoyed this book because so many of the stories are very relatable. There are some parts of the book that left me frustrated like when some of the authors used the essays to discuss if black tax should be called that, that the name had a negative connotation. I felt like that was an unnecessary argument to have because they should have rather used their essays to discuss whether it was a burden or ubuntu, as the title of the book suggests... even if it was called white tax, or family tax, or I enjoyed this book because so many of the stories are very relatable. There are some parts of the book that left me frustrated like when some of the authors used the essays to discuss if black tax should be called that, that the name had a negative connotation. I felt like that was an unnecessary argument to have because they should have rather used their essays to discuss whether it was a burden or ubuntu, as the title of the book suggests... even if it was called white tax, or family tax, or poverty relief scheme, or if it had no name; it would still exist and the purpose of the book is not to discuss its name, but the purpose is to discuss its impact. That is why I felt some essays missed the mark. Overall most of the essays made me think of black tax as both a burden and ubuntu, by showing me the impact of it on both the givers and the receivers of black tax. Some essays made me think of black tax as neither a burden or ubuntu, but rather just a thing that exists, and it exists differently for every individual... the experience is unique to each author, as it burdens some and it is a source of pride for others... Another thing I wished the authors had discussed was how black tax could be viewed as a way to redistribute wealth, however, living in a capitalist and society like South Africa, wealth redistribution is not desirable. I would have also enjoyed more takes on the impact of black tax on the Mental health of both the givers and the recipients. Overall, I enjoyed the different perspectives of each author, my favourite essay was ‘Hypothetically peaking’ by Chwayita Ngamlana. It was just very relatable for me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karabo

    The book is a collection of essays from different authors relating/regarding the 'Black tax' topic and what each person thinks of it basically. Each author has a story to tell and each story even though somewhat similar in motive to many others, are unique to each family/individual. Some would believe it to be a burden while others would see it as a continuation of a legacy to keep the African family going. It's ubuntu to some and a burden to others. Some authors are also recipients of said blac The book is a collection of essays from different authors relating/regarding the 'Black tax' topic and what each person thinks of it basically. Each author has a story to tell and each story even though somewhat similar in motive to many others, are unique to each family/individual. Some would believe it to be a burden while others would see it as a continuation of a legacy to keep the African family going. It's ubuntu to some and a burden to others. Some authors are also recipients of said black tax and like most recipients they also would have to contribute back by helping the next generation after them etc. The stories were entertaining and I treated them as short stories because each somewhat became such. You get an in-depth understanding of where they come from with their arguments. Black tax, though the word is somewhat unfair to the course is what almost every black person/family goes through. We need the one successful individual to help pull us out of the pit of poverty and into the world of possibilities. It's an investment you hope would be a success but at times it isn't but that doesn't mean you should keep investing in others. It is who we are as a black nation. Ubuntu.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Grieve

    An interesting and important piece of social commentary and discourse on the South African phenomenon known as "black tax". As a middle class, white South African who was interested in learning more about this topic I found it extremely enlightening to read about this phenomenon in more detail. It's a discussion we've been having in South Africa for a long time, and even though I thought myself relatively educated on the topic, I still learned so much while reading this book. You should see all m An interesting and important piece of social commentary and discourse on the South African phenomenon known as "black tax". As a middle class, white South African who was interested in learning more about this topic I found it extremely enlightening to read about this phenomenon in more detail. It's a discussion we've been having in South Africa for a long time, and even though I thought myself relatively educated on the topic, I still learned so much while reading this book. You should see all my notes that I've made and sections I have highlighted. It's been a great eye opener, especially running a graduate program that is predominantly African Black. I feel like I have more insight into the some of the struggles and pressures which my grads and juniors are dealing with but don't always share in the corporate space. It creates more empathy when interacting with people, which we need in the business sector. My only critique was that the book was centered largely around those who were in the media and arts fields. It would have been great to get a sense of how professionals (I.e. doctors, accountants, lawyers, consultants, etc.) experience black tax. A little more variety in the group of essays would have added even more colour to this topic.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rirhandzu Rissenga

    I could relate so much with the stories that most people shared in this book. The key takeaway from the book is the definition around black tax and most contributors really said that to actually give it such a term of “black tax” sounds so wrong some referred to it as Ubuntu, Compassion, helping other family members out of poverty, the art of investing. I liked what Niq Mhlongo suggested we should call it “family upliftment” because to most of us that’s the only form to help each other out of po I could relate so much with the stories that most people shared in this book. The key takeaway from the book is the definition around black tax and most contributors really said that to actually give it such a term of “black tax” sounds so wrong some referred to it as Ubuntu, Compassion, helping other family members out of poverty, the art of investing. I liked what Niq Mhlongo suggested we should call it “family upliftment” because to most of us that’s the only form to help each other out of poverty and to a better life. The are others who also highlighted that helping family members is also abused by some relative who are not planning to change their lives but will keep on milking the person that is supporting them which is the most unfortunate part. I have noticed that the contributors in the book a creatives i.e. writers, journalist etc.. 🤔 and wondered that if they had interviewed different professionals like Auditors, Lawyers, Doctors... would the opinion with their essays turned to have a different view or the outcome would not necessarily change🤷‍♀️

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tsholo Molopyane

    Growing up I thought I had it really tough ....then I read this book and realize that some of my fellow black people have had it harder and against all odds they managed to make something of themselves. This book left me with mixed emotions...inspired, extremely angry at the challenges that black people still encounter in this day and age, grateful that God has blessed me so I can be a blessing to some of my family members. Not sure of the wording black tax but it is infuriating when some of our Growing up I thought I had it really tough ....then I read this book and realize that some of my fellow black people have had it harder and against all odds they managed to make something of themselves. This book left me with mixed emotions...inspired, extremely angry at the challenges that black people still encounter in this day and age, grateful that God has blessed me so I can be a blessing to some of my family members. Not sure of the wording black tax but it is infuriating when some of our family members feel entitled to our hard earned monies...when they DECIDE that the help you give is not enough if you can still afford to go on holidays....but I shall continue to help where I can remembering some of the words from one of the authors that ‘ I don’t have to set myself on fire in order for people to feel warm’

  14. 5 out of 5

    Magda w RPA

    This is a very important book about a very important issue. I appreciate how many points of view and thoughts are collected in it. I feel that it allows an outsider understand better the lives of many black South Africans. To be fair I was completely ignorant of the issue until a friend of mine mentioned she “still sends money home” and explained what it meant. This book’s opened my eyes to the fact how many South Africans are dealing with this issue and how different their own feelings about it This is a very important book about a very important issue. I appreciate how many points of view and thoughts are collected in it. I feel that it allows an outsider understand better the lives of many black South Africans. To be fair I was completely ignorant of the issue until a friend of mine mentioned she “still sends money home” and explained what it meant. This book’s opened my eyes to the fact how many South Africans are dealing with this issue and how different their own feelings about it are. There’s some excellent writing in this compilation, for sure. In some essays the writing is noticeably weaker, though and I felt unsure about what the author was really trying to say. Regardless of the writing itself, all stories were thought-provoking and personal. All in all, I feel it’s a must read for anyone living in South Africa or trying to understand this country.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Glen Oliver

    Audience: South Africans, Economists, Humanitarians, and Historians. The Good: Heartfelt contributions from various authors giving the reader a deeper insight into the complex issue of "Black Tax" i.e. the unwritten social arrangement whereby many black South Africans are required by conscience and tradition to put the needs of their extended families ahead of their own personal aspirations. The Bad: The quality of the prose varies widely from chapter to chapter and makes one feel that the editing Audience: South Africans, Economists, Humanitarians, and Historians. The Good: Heartfelt contributions from various authors giving the reader a deeper insight into the complex issue of "Black Tax" i.e. the unwritten social arrangement whereby many black South Africans are required by conscience and tradition to put the needs of their extended families ahead of their own personal aspirations. The Bad: The quality of the prose varies widely from chapter to chapter and makes one feel that the editing could have been a bit tighter. The Ugly: Poverty and inequality in South Africa as a result of colonialism, apartheid, and present day governmental corruption and ineptitude. Verdict: Required reading for all South Africans (black and white)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lungi Manzini

    Black tax (Burden or Ubuntu) This is a collection of opinions about black tax/family responsibility from various authors and journalists. The authors give their inputs on the history of black tax, question the negative connotations associated with the term ‘black tax’ and touch on the negative impacts of black tax on the middle class. The book is quite personal as the authors talk about their family dynamics and challenges along the way. I have my opinions about this topic, which I often refer t Black tax (Burden or Ubuntu) This is a collection of opinions about black tax/family responsibility from various authors and journalists. The authors give their inputs on the history of black tax, question the negative connotations associated with the term ‘black tax’ and touch on the negative impacts of black tax on the middle class. The book is quite personal as the authors talk about their family dynamics and challenges along the way. I have my opinions about this topic, which I often refer to it as Ubuntu rather than black tax but choose not to share. I would however like to state that I believe there should be a tax benefit associated with black tax/family responsibility.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paul Lloyd

    This is a book well worth reading on many levels. It gives insight into the good and the bad aspects of "Black Tax"/ "Family responsibility". How it is used effectively and how it is abused. Split up into several different stories it is easy and interesting to read. With all these insights and understanding Niq also includes a small section about each author. In particular other literature they have written which has inspired me to read more of their books and more about these intriguing authors This is a book well worth reading on many levels. It gives insight into the good and the bad aspects of "Black Tax"/ "Family responsibility". How it is used effectively and how it is abused. Split up into several different stories it is easy and interesting to read. With all these insights and understanding Niq also includes a small section about each author. In particular other literature they have written which has inspired me to read more of their books and more about these intriguing authors. The solutions to the problems though are difficult and my hope is that we will gain the wisdom to overcome and succeed. This book helps.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Silindile Mncwabe

    It’s an interesting read to say the least it has a lot of stories that most black people can relate to one way or another. The book gets monotonous after a while. It does touch on a subject that is highly debatable “black tax” and it’s a conversation starter as you find yourself debating with the writers in the book and anyone who’s read the book. I’d recommend it for people to read it really is interesting to see the take on this from different point of views and black people from all walks of It’s an interesting read to say the least it has a lot of stories that most black people can relate to one way or another. The book gets monotonous after a while. It does touch on a subject that is highly debatable “black tax” and it’s a conversation starter as you find yourself debating with the writers in the book and anyone who’s read the book. I’d recommend it for people to read it really is interesting to see the take on this from different point of views and black people from all walks of life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Blessing

    I would call it a mini 'Black Bible' understanding all things African..... understanding the African social construct. How did we get here? Why are we here? When did we get here? Whose fault is it? What happens next? While so many events from the essays resonate with me on a personal level, some arguments roused a shift in my perspective on this notion of 'Black Tax'. It is not the same for everyone, although it affects and influences our everyday lives, relatively, irrespective of whether we ch I would call it a mini 'Black Bible' understanding all things African..... understanding the African social construct. How did we get here? Why are we here? When did we get here? Whose fault is it? What happens next? While so many events from the essays resonate with me on a personal level, some arguments roused a shift in my perspective on this notion of 'Black Tax'. It is not the same for everyone, although it affects and influences our everyday lives, relatively, irrespective of whether we choose to call it a responsibility or burden.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Megan Kelosiwang

    I found this book a little repetitive but I did enjoy all the stories of black tax and people’s individual thoughts on the issue, although no one had a definitive view. One of those grey areas in society. My husband was very definite when I joked about our son renovating our house ‘black tax stops with me!’.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rhulani Netshivhera

    It was worth reading this book about "Black Tax/ Family responsibilities that some young adult go through. It really is interesting to see the take on this from different point of views and black people from all walks of life. It was worth reading this book about "Black Tax/ Family responsibilities that some young adult go through. It really is interesting to see the take on this from different point of views and black people from all walks of life.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dora Okeyo

    What is Black Tax? Is it a burden or ubuntu- an ode to the community, the ties that bind us and shape us? I love that the author tackled this through essays. There's nothing better than talking about something as getting everyone to share their experience using their own voice and words... What is Black Tax? Is it a burden or ubuntu- an ode to the community, the ties that bind us and shape us? I love that the author tackled this through essays. There's nothing better than talking about something as getting everyone to share their experience using their own voice and words...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mable

    Very insightful. Reading the stories from different people about black tax showed me that the trend is similar with an underlying theme of poverty. I agreed with some thoughts and disagreed with others, which still is okay. Thanks for sharing your stories.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Uetuzemburukisa

    Thought provoking ❤️

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

    Good book. Highlights through a number of short true stories Black Tax across all types of black families.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Natalia

    "Being poor means you have to always explain your situation to people" Lovely contributions from black South Africans on stories that often go unheard of. "Being poor means you have to always explain your situation to people" Lovely contributions from black South Africans on stories that often go unheard of.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Godfrey

    Still missing some hard critique, but I still give high five to the brave ones that did try. I know too well from first hand its hydra faces. Do you see a hellish setback or a fruitful blessing?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Luzuka

    The more stories we explore, the more we understand the depths of colonisations’ impact on society. Black Tax is a concept that should it exist. Helping out family shouldn’t be a burden. But the far reaching tentacles of racism structures turns kindness into duty into expectations into burdens. From pay disparities, to education barriers, to location disadvantages, there are a myriad of ways in which the black body is kept down and out. This collection of essays on people’s personal experiences wa The more stories we explore, the more we understand the depths of colonisations’ impact on society. Black Tax is a concept that should it exist. Helping out family shouldn’t be a burden. But the far reaching tentacles of racism structures turns kindness into duty into expectations into burdens. From pay disparities, to education barriers, to location disadvantages, there are a myriad of ways in which the black body is kept down and out. This collection of essays on people’s personal experiences was enlightening, however it became repetitive whenever they explained / defined black tax and it’s origins. I’d have preferred the essays to be strictly the authors’ personal experiences and the definitions to have been covered up front once. However, as overall I found myself learning about things that I’d never considered such as why STEM subjects remain inaccessible to the vast majority of this country- an issue of affordability rather than capacity; I felt that this book was an important read if you just skim over the definitions in the essays that included them.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sibusiso

    This book was beautiful and important. There’s a lot we do and responsibilities that we carry as blacks, without thinking. It really challenged me to be more aware of some of the implications of my blackness that have become part and parcel of it but are a unique aspect of it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shantalie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. An interesting and thought-provoking book. It was good to get a bunch of different perspectives on a complex issue. I don't think the concept of 'Black Tax' is unique to South Africa or even Africa in general. You see similar trends in many places. But the stories in the book do give some useful insights into the real-life struggles people face - both in terms of pleasing their families (broadly defined), their employers and then trying to fit in in new social circles too. And as awful as 'Black An interesting and thought-provoking book. It was good to get a bunch of different perspectives on a complex issue. I don't think the concept of 'Black Tax' is unique to South Africa or even Africa in general. You see similar trends in many places. But the stories in the book do give some useful insights into the real-life struggles people face - both in terms of pleasing their families (broadly defined), their employers and then trying to fit in in new social circles too. And as awful as 'Black Tax' might be, and it's probably easy for outsiders to say people should cut off their overly-dependant family members, I suppose the fate of ending with no support for yourself is also pretty grim. Definitely think its worth a read - might make us all a little less judgmental.

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