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Latona of the Vitelliae, mage of Spirit and Fire, is eager to wield her newfound empowerment on behalf of the citizens of Aven--but societal forces conspire to keep her from exercising her gifts, even when the resurgence of a banished cult plots the city's ruin. To combat this threat, Latona must ally with Fracture mage Vibia, the distrustful sister of Sempronius Tarren. Wh Latona of the Vitelliae, mage of Spirit and Fire, is eager to wield her newfound empowerment on behalf of the citizens of Aven--but societal forces conspire to keep her from exercising her gifts, even when the resurgence of a banished cult plots the city's ruin. To combat this threat, Latona must ally with Fracture mage Vibia, the distrustful sister of Sempronius Tarren. While Latona struggles to defend their home, Sempronius leads soldiers through wartorn provinces to lift the siege of Toletum, where Latona's brother Gaius is hemmed in by supernatural forces. Sempronius must contend not only with the war-king Ekialde and his sorcerers, but with the machinations of political rivals and the temptations of his own soul, ever-susceptible to the darker side of ambition. Though separated by many miles soon after their love affair began, Latona and Sempronius are united by passion as they strive to protect Aven and build its glorious future.


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Latona of the Vitelliae, mage of Spirit and Fire, is eager to wield her newfound empowerment on behalf of the citizens of Aven--but societal forces conspire to keep her from exercising her gifts, even when the resurgence of a banished cult plots the city's ruin. To combat this threat, Latona must ally with Fracture mage Vibia, the distrustful sister of Sempronius Tarren. Wh Latona of the Vitelliae, mage of Spirit and Fire, is eager to wield her newfound empowerment on behalf of the citizens of Aven--but societal forces conspire to keep her from exercising her gifts, even when the resurgence of a banished cult plots the city's ruin. To combat this threat, Latona must ally with Fracture mage Vibia, the distrustful sister of Sempronius Tarren. While Latona struggles to defend their home, Sempronius leads soldiers through wartorn provinces to lift the siege of Toletum, where Latona's brother Gaius is hemmed in by supernatural forces. Sempronius must contend not only with the war-king Ekialde and his sorcerers, but with the machinations of political rivals and the temptations of his own soul, ever-susceptible to the darker side of ambition. Though separated by many miles soon after their love affair began, Latona and Sempronius are united by passion as they strive to protect Aven and build its glorious future.

55 review for Give Way to Night

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    *copy from publisher in exchange for a review* Give Way To Night is the second in Cass Morris’ “Aven Cycle”, the first of which I enjoyed immensely back when it came out. It combines a secondary world, alternate Roman Republic, lavishly furnished with rich detail, with some eye-popping magic and some fantastic characters. The tl;dr is that if any of those sound like something you’d enjoy, then this is a series you should already be reading. Frankly, I’d suggest you pick it up anyway, because the *copy from publisher in exchange for a review* Give Way To Night is the second in Cass Morris’ “Aven Cycle”, the first of which I enjoyed immensely back when it came out. It combines a secondary world, alternate Roman Republic, lavishly furnished with rich detail, with some eye-popping magic and some fantastic characters. The tl;dr is that if any of those sound like something you’d enjoy, then this is a series you should already be reading. Frankly, I’d suggest you pick it up anyway, because the series is delightful, all the way from its closely observed Roman social mores, to the viscerally realised battle scenes, and back around to cut-throat politics, intermingled with warm friendships to make you smile, and romance to sear the heart, there’s something for everyone here. Aven sits at the centre of its world. Rome, but one step to the left, Aven is a republic on the rise. Its senate believes they’re at the centre of the world. And why wouldn’t they? Aven’s gods - Juno, Mars, a familiar pantheon - clearly favour them. Aven is on the cusp of authority over much of the known world. And the city lives and breathes that truth. The question in that world, in the marble halls of the forum and the grime of the Suburra, is what that truth means. Whether the city should expand its influence, bring more of the world under its aegis, and accept change as a consequence alongside trade and wealth - or whether to shut itself away, isolate itself in the name of purity, hold fast to what it has, and let the rest of the world fend for itself. It’s an issue of identity which feels very contemporary, even embedded in the systems, institutions and personalities of an alternate Rome. From street to street, from Senate hall to darkened forest, Aven and its world are real, living, breathing places. The author really manages to capture a sense of place- -from the bustling urban metropolis of Aven, with its marble lined hallways and decrepit tenement blocks, to the isolated farms and small villages that drive an agrarian economy, to the wild lands beyond the reach of the legions, where unpleasant spirits and inimical tribes hold sway under lowering boughs. Even as the Aventine are our Roman analogues, still we see other perspectives - in both their allies and their enemies, both of whom clash not only in terms of arms, but culturally with the Aven; indeed, their unwillingness to assimilate, and the struggle of some tribes to assert their own identity (albeit with, er, unpleasant blood magic) is part of what drives the conflict for the story. This clash of ideology and identity is combined with an interest in the liminal spaces - the borders where changes can be made. Socially, yes - in the tribes that ally with the Aventine, and the Aventines that see the role of their city as part of a wider world, but also in a more concrete fashion; this is a world of gods, of magic, of mysticism and active spirits, as much as blood and iron. Incidentally, there’s rather a lot of that. The legions of Aven are on the march, coming to the aid of their allies in not-Spain. When the tribes and the legions meet, it’s often messy - and the battles are wonderful set pieces of tactics, magic and adrenaline. The crash of blood-fuelled berserkers again a shield wall thunders off the page. The world changes as we turn those pages, and the stakes are at once extremely high, and extremely personal. The visceral energy of combat is matched by the mystery and intrigue of investigations into a magical conspiracy at the highest levels of the Aventine seat of power. That strand is a compelling blend of mystery and magic, of betrayals, divided loyalties and stunning revelations. The characterisation is top notch. Latona of the Vitelliae remains our central protagonist, a woman who is slowly coming out from under the shadow of her own trauma. Latona is growing more aware of her own strengths now, less willing to accept the word of others, to shrink into her own self. Instead, she’s reaching out to others, making connections and constructing a self of her own, one which is shaped by her past, perhaps, but not defined by it. Latona is clever, articulate, and above all, good - a heroine who does the right thing for the right reasons, or at least tries to. Watching her slowly unfurl, build a self confidence backed by actions, is a pure joy. That she kicks arse, holding fire and friendship in one hand, and spirit and righteousness in the other, is great too. Every time she appears on the page, Latona is a joy - and that she does so in the company of her family dynamics, likewise. We can see her speaking with her sisters, working through relationships shaped by year, and struggling with a failing marriage, as well as a father who isn’t quite sure who she really is. This is a woman who has lived a life, and her life is a thing all its own, of texture, weight, sorrow and joy. Part of Latona’s changes is her budding romance with Sempronius, the general currently leading legions into a maelstrom of blood magic and madness. Sempronius remains fun to watch, as he shuffles pieces around like they’re on a chessboard, parts of his agenda still uinclear, but his essential humanity and decency still very much visible. If he seems pale beside the pure energy of the Vitelliae women, that is not to his detriment - the Vitelliae each bring a presence to the page, and make for a wonderful read. Which is what I’d say about this story of conspiracy, murder, epic battles and marvellous, mysterious magic. It’s a wonderful read, and you should definitely give it a try.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Helena of Eretz ✰

    I received this complimentary ARC from the publisher, in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for the arc, but I shan't be reviewing this, since I barely managed to finish the first book. I received this complimentary ARC from the publisher, in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for the arc, but I shan't be reviewing this, since I barely managed to finish the first book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Noah

    What a phenomenal Sophomore outing for the trilogy! Fans who enjoyed the I, Claudius meets Game of Thrones of From Unseen Fire are going to love the continued evolution of favorite characters. Morris continues to juggle multiple POV voices with compassion and distinction.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Booktastically Amazing

    Pfft, I did NOT add it (only) for the cover. Of course, I didn't. *scoff* I would never do that. Pfft, I did NOT add it (only) for the cover. Of course, I didn't. *scoff* I would never do that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lara Lillibridge

    A smart, layered read, with strong female characters, GIVE WAY TO NIGHT is incredibly rich with visual and sensory details and filled with political intrigue. The historical fantasy is so well-grounded in factual detail that it seems entirely plausible. One thing I love is the idea that you can be tough and fierce and still wear gorgeous flowing fabrics. The romance is realistically complicated, and I cheered on Latona in moving from a “small and sad” world to one in which she felt she mattered, A smart, layered read, with strong female characters, GIVE WAY TO NIGHT is incredibly rich with visual and sensory details and filled with political intrigue. The historical fantasy is so well-grounded in factual detail that it seems entirely plausible. One thing I love is the idea that you can be tough and fierce and still wear gorgeous flowing fabrics. The romance is realistically complicated, and I cheered on Latona in moving from a “small and sad” world to one in which she felt she mattered, and that struggle of being powerful in one regard, and yet inside, not being the person people think you are was very real and something I don’t see enough of in literature. We aren’t always strong in all aspects of our lives. While Latona is officially my favorite, Alhena is a very close second. As in the first book, the strength of the sisters’ bond is so refreshing and vital. As a woman, the connection to moon bleeding and magic was such an unexpected and empowering thought—the idea that it is not shame but power…wow. It’s such an intrinsically feminist book while being a suspenseful action-packed story. Yet, with the taut suspense and swirling magic, there are funny moments as well. It is truly an intelligent read with an ending that will leave you chomping for book three. Please let it come quickly!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anne Morgan

    In Give Way To Night, book two of Cass Morris' fantastic Aven Cycle series, Morris weaves together the continuing trials of Latona, Sempronius, and their families. In Aven, Morris' fantasy version of ancient Rome, Latona is beginning to step out of the shadows and assert her identity, developing her magical abilities and confidence. On the other side of the continent her brother Gaius is trying to withstand a siege by the war-king Ekialde, who is using dark magics to destroy those who stand agai In Give Way To Night, book two of Cass Morris' fantastic Aven Cycle series, Morris weaves together the continuing trials of Latona, Sempronius, and their families. In Aven, Morris' fantasy version of ancient Rome, Latona is beginning to step out of the shadows and assert her identity, developing her magical abilities and confidence. On the other side of the continent her brother Gaius is trying to withstand a siege by the war-king Ekialde, who is using dark magics to destroy those who stand against him. Attempting to rescue Gaius, Sempronius is leading three legions of troops to lift the siege and runs into the dark magic himself. Coincidentally (or not), Latona is discovering similar dark magic in Aven, and she and her allies are the only ones willing to root it out. Latona continues as the main character in Night, and she is in some ways more sure of herself while in other ways more conflicted than before. Thanks to Sempronius' support she now believes in her talents, and is willing to not only continue experimenting with her abilities but using them. She has a sense of duty that rivals any soldier, but sees her duty as standing for the citizens who need assistance through magic. Interestingly, although we got rid of the Dictator Ocella in the beginning of the first book, his shadow continues to be felt throughout this book. The reader gets more of an idea of what happened to individual citizens, like Latona, here. I appreciated how some characters like Vibia, who thought she knew Latona because of rumors, discover how wrong they were and who the person behind the rumors truly is. Night is full of strong female characters who are continuing to discover and use their strength here: Vibia, Aula, and Alhena all get more page time and are wonderful to get to know further. If you haven't read Cass Morris' first book, From Unseen Fire, you are missing out on a fantastic new voice in the fantasy realm. Give Way To Night proves that she intends to continue writing intricate plots, with layers upon layers of political, personal, and magical threads woven together into a brilliant whole. Her world building skills only develop further here, with detailed descriptions that make the reader feel as if they are marching with Sempronius' armies, or walking Aven's streets with Aula and Latona. Morris has clearly done a lot of careful research to bring ancient Rome to life and clearly thought carefully about what she wants to change for her own world, and the end result is nothing short of spectacular. While a reader could pick up Give Way To Night without having read From Unseen Fire, it would definitely be helpful to have read Fire first to get to know some of the characters and their conflicts from the beginning. Readers should also be warned that Night ends on a cliff hanger, leaving us more desperate than usual to read the next book and discover how Morris will get her characters through the problems she's gotten them into. Unlike many sequels, Give Way to Night stands equal to From Unseen Fire and will charm fantasy lovers completely.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    This is a slow burn fantasy. Each culture was so well though out and the magic system was truly amazing. One really should take ones time with as binge reading really makes things go over your head. I liked each women strong never did it make women who liked traditional feminine things as things pathetic as contemptable. Cliffhanger ending but I am okay with that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barb Lie

    Give Way to Night by Cass Morris is the 2nd book in her Aven Cycle series. This is an epic fantasy that takes place in Aven, with an Ancient Rome background, where they worship the Roman Deity. The story is filled with magic, intrigue, history and romance. Give Way To Night was a good story, but I did have mixed feelings, which I will note later in my review. Latona, our heroine in the first book, continues to be the main character in this story. Lataona is the middle sister of the Vitelliae fami Give Way to Night by Cass Morris is the 2nd book in her Aven Cycle series. This is an epic fantasy that takes place in Aven, with an Ancient Rome background, where they worship the Roman Deity. The story is filled with magic, intrigue, history and romance. Give Way To Night was a good story, but I did have mixed feelings, which I will note later in my review. Latona, our heroine in the first book, continues to be the main character in this story. Lataona is the middle sister of the Vitelliae family that is highly respected in Aven. She continues to learn more about her mage Spirit and Fire powers. Latona is in a loveless marriage forced by her father, but she is loyal & very close to her sisters. I really loved Latona, and her two sisters, Aula and Alhena, and how strong all three women truly were. It was great when Latona was able to work with Vibia and Merula, who I thought were also great. Sempronius Tarren, continues to be our hero, and is out in the field with his men to try and find out who is trying to destroy Aven, especially with strange supernatural attacks. Tarren is a very powerful shadow mage. What follows is an exciting adventure that will put Latona and the other ladies in dangerous situations a number of number times. Tarren will also have his hands full trying fight the unknown enemy and save his soldiers. There were a number of villians that both Latona & Vibia came up against, as well as Tarren’s soldiers fight against. I loved everything about Latona, Vibia, Aula, Merula and their chapters. I thought Tarren’s chapters were good, but all the other chapters were tedious, with too much details and slow reading, causing me to lose interest, pushing along to get back to Latona and the ladies. As much as I enjoyed the story revolving around Aven, Latona, her family, Tarren, supporters, I did have some feelings about the rest. I thought the other chapters with various villians/political members over done with so much details, I ended up skipping much of it. Overall, Give Way to Night was a good story, with some very good characters. There is a cliffhanger, which makes me want to read the final book; however, I am still on the fence, as this was a huge book, with so many details and characters, I did get lost a number of times along the way. Barb The Reading Cafe

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mariya T

    I greatly enjoyed reading the continuation of the Aven cycle. The story picks up shortly where book one left off and it was a pleasure to "reunite" with all my favorite characters. While I missed the interactions between Sempronius and Latona, I liked the unlikely friendship that developed between Vibia and Latona. Those two characters are so different in personality yet, united by a single purpose, grow to appreciate one another. In the second book, we also become better acquainted with the you I greatly enjoyed reading the continuation of the Aven cycle. The story picks up shortly where book one left off and it was a pleasure to "reunite" with all my favorite characters. While I missed the interactions between Sempronius and Latona, I liked the unlikely friendship that developed between Vibia and Latona. Those two characters are so different in personality yet, united by a single purpose, grow to appreciate one another. In the second book, we also become better acquainted with the youngest of the Vitelli sisters, Alhena. I'm glad that her character was fleshed out more as I felt in the last book that she sometimes came across as one dimensional playing the role of the baby sister everybody needed to protect. Seeing her budding friendship with Tilla develop into something more was unexpected, but I'm curious to see what the outcome for the two of them will be. Book two definitely had a darker tone than book one with the Discordian sect becoming more prominent and causing difficulties for Latona and her circle. We also begin to discover how widespread their influence is. Latona definitely places her trust, albeit briefly, in the wrong person and it comes back to haunt her. I have to say that I'm interested to see how Vibia and the others tackle the situation that arises at the very end of the book and what Sempronius will do once he finds out about it. I'm a sucker for happy endings so while I enjoyed the events of this book, the darker tone of this book has me concerned. I really hope that Cass Morris doesn't follow in the footsteps of George RR Martin and kill/permanently injury my favorite characters. Regardless of how the author chooses to end the Aven cylcle, I'm looking forward to reading the continuation/conclusion (?) of this reimagining of Ancient Rome when it is released

  10. 4 out of 5

    Henry Lazarus

    Cass Morris returns to her version of the Roman Republic were some people have magical abilities. From Unseen Fire (paper) introduced us to Latona of the Vitelliae a mage of fire and spirit, and Senator Sempronius Tarren who is hiding his abilities. They had to work together to save Aven (Rome) from revolt and foul sorcery. Give Way to Night (hard from DAW) sees Sempronius leading troops in Iberia against tribal mages releasing evil spirits who have laid siege to an Aven Legion at Toletum. Laton Cass Morris returns to her version of the Roman Republic were some people have magical abilities. From Unseen Fire (paper) introduced us to Latona of the Vitelliae a mage of fire and spirit, and Senator Sempronius Tarren who is hiding his abilities. They had to work together to save Aven (Rome) from revolt and foul sorcery. Give Way to Night (hard from DAW) sees Sempronius leading troops in Iberia against tribal mages releasing evil spirits who have laid siege to an Aven Legion at Toletum. Latona and friends are facing similar discordant magic in Aven created by mages who wish to use disorder so that the populace will want order returned. Unfortunately a third tale is required to finish the story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Annie M

    Give Way to Night picks up the pace after the slower buildup of From Unseen Fire. Circumstances have become more dire in both Iberia and Aven as dark magics threaten our protagonists. My favorite part was the opportunity to spend more time with characters like Alhena and Vibia Sempronia, who played much smaller roles in the first book. While the Aven Cycle is historical fantasy rather than fiction, Morris has clearly done her research. Her Aven effortlessly incorporates details of Ancient Roman Give Way to Night picks up the pace after the slower buildup of From Unseen Fire. Circumstances have become more dire in both Iberia and Aven as dark magics threaten our protagonists. My favorite part was the opportunity to spend more time with characters like Alhena and Vibia Sempronia, who played much smaller roles in the first book. While the Aven Cycle is historical fantasy rather than fiction, Morris has clearly done her research. Her Aven effortlessly incorporates details of Ancient Roman culture without distracting the reader. The Aven Cycle offers rich fantasy that takes its time. These books should be enjoyed slowly, not binge read. Otherwise you might miss the detailed worldbuilding and Morris’s lush prose. I eagerly anticipate the next journey back to Aven!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Cordova

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Stillson

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kari Blackmoore

  15. 4 out of 5

    Theanticharles007

  16. 5 out of 5

    DellyPar

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dianne Freeman

  18. 5 out of 5

    K Saju

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erika

  20. 5 out of 5

    Meerkatmarcato

  21. 5 out of 5

    Miriam

  22. 4 out of 5

    Grace

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  25. 4 out of 5

    Witchwood

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lavenderwalk

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jedipagan

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jummai

  33. 4 out of 5

    Elthie

  34. 5 out of 5

    Fernanda FloMe

  35. 5 out of 5

    Shanara Bennett

  36. 5 out of 5

    Sky

  37. 5 out of 5

    Gaia

  38. 5 out of 5

    Karyme Avalos

  39. 5 out of 5

    Funny

  40. 5 out of 5

    Lara

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  42. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  43. 4 out of 5

    Jesheckah

  44. 5 out of 5

    Witchwood

  45. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  46. 5 out of 5

    HC

  47. 5 out of 5

    John Mendez

  48. 4 out of 5

    Aoloda

  49. 4 out of 5

    Bea Jennings

  50. 5 out of 5

    Beckie

  51. 4 out of 5

    Annie June

  52. 4 out of 5

    Maddie O.

  53. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  54. 5 out of 5

    Rixana

  55. 5 out of 5

    Aleina Markham

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