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The extraordinary true story of the first Girl Scout troop designated for homeless girls--from the homeless families it brought together in Queens, New York, to the amazing citywide and countrywide responses it sparked. Giselle Burgess, a young mother of five, and her children, along with others in the shelter, become the catalyst for Troop 6000. Having worked for the The extraordinary true story of the first Girl Scout troop designated for homeless girls--from the homeless families it brought together in Queens, New York, to the amazing citywide and countrywide responses it sparked. Giselle Burgess, a young mother of five, and her children, along with others in the shelter, become the catalyst for Troop 6000. Having worked for the Girl Scouts earlier on, Giselle knew that these girls, including her own daughters, needed something they could be a part of, where they didn't need to feel the shame or stigma of being homeless, but could instead develop skills and build a community that they could be proud of. New York Times journalist Nikita Stewart embedded with Troop 6000 for more than a year, at the peak of New York City's homelessness crisis in 2017, spending time with the girls and their families and witnessing both their triumphs and challenges. Stewart takes the reader with her as she paints intimate portraits of Giselle's family and the others whom she met along the way. Readers will feel an instant connection and express joy when a family finally moves out of the shelter and into a permanent home, as well as the pain of the day-to-day life of homelessness. And they will cheer when the girls sell their very first cookies. Ultimately, Troop 6000 puts a different face on homelessness. Stewart shows how shared experiences of poverty and hardship sparked the political will needed to create the troop that would expand from one shelter to fifteen in New York City and ultimately to other cities around the country. Also woven throughout the book is a history of the Girl Scouts, and how the organization has changed and adapted to fit the times, meeting the needs of girls from all walks of life. Troop 6000 is the ultimate story of how when we come together, we can improve our circumstances, find support and commonality, and experience joy, no matter how challenging life may be.


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The extraordinary true story of the first Girl Scout troop designated for homeless girls--from the homeless families it brought together in Queens, New York, to the amazing citywide and countrywide responses it sparked. Giselle Burgess, a young mother of five, and her children, along with others in the shelter, become the catalyst for Troop 6000. Having worked for the The extraordinary true story of the first Girl Scout troop designated for homeless girls--from the homeless families it brought together in Queens, New York, to the amazing citywide and countrywide responses it sparked. Giselle Burgess, a young mother of five, and her children, along with others in the shelter, become the catalyst for Troop 6000. Having worked for the Girl Scouts earlier on, Giselle knew that these girls, including her own daughters, needed something they could be a part of, where they didn't need to feel the shame or stigma of being homeless, but could instead develop skills and build a community that they could be proud of. New York Times journalist Nikita Stewart embedded with Troop 6000 for more than a year, at the peak of New York City's homelessness crisis in 2017, spending time with the girls and their families and witnessing both their triumphs and challenges. Stewart takes the reader with her as she paints intimate portraits of Giselle's family and the others whom she met along the way. Readers will feel an instant connection and express joy when a family finally moves out of the shelter and into a permanent home, as well as the pain of the day-to-day life of homelessness. And they will cheer when the girls sell their very first cookies. Ultimately, Troop 6000 puts a different face on homelessness. Stewart shows how shared experiences of poverty and hardship sparked the political will needed to create the troop that would expand from one shelter to fifteen in New York City and ultimately to other cities around the country. Also woven throughout the book is a history of the Girl Scouts, and how the organization has changed and adapted to fit the times, meeting the needs of girls from all walks of life. Troop 6000 is the ultimate story of how when we come together, we can improve our circumstances, find support and commonality, and experience joy, no matter how challenging life may be.

30 review for Troop 6000: The Girl Scout Troop That Began in a Shelter and Inspired the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Thank you #NetGalley for the free ARC in exchange for an honest review. This book will be released May 19th, 2020. When I saw that there was a girl scout Troup formed in a shelter, I was very interested to learn how it came about and how it stayed long enough to show just how special it was. This book discusses the family, especially the mom. It discusses homeless at great length. It gives numbers and it explains the very faulty system. It continues to circle back to the family. Usually when I re Thank you #NetGalley for the free ARC in exchange for an honest review. This book will be released May 19th, 2020. When I saw that there was a girl scout Troup formed in a shelter, I was very interested to learn how it came about and how it stayed long enough to show just how special it was. This book discusses the family, especially the mom. It discusses homeless at great length. It gives numbers and it explains the very faulty system. It continues to circle back to the family. Usually when I read even just an article, I feel the need to skim through parts, if not most of the article. This was a full book and I didn't find myself skimming through any of it. It's written in such a way that you just want to keep on reading. And it's not a slow read as many factual books can be. I'm not sure which is the more important thing that the author wants to tech the reader. The Girl Scouts is a great organization. Or the system that NYS has to help the homeless and the working poor is incredibly flawed.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Carr

    The histories of the troop leaders, the drive for their families and the girls in the shelters they themselves lived is an inspiration. When you have so little yet strive to give back and lead is amazing. I learned a lot about Girl Scouts, I was one yet didn't fully grasp all that it entails while reading this book. Now I want a Thin Mint.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    When I saw the description of TROOP 6000, a true story about a Girl Scout troop formed in a hotel being used as a homeless shelter in New York City, my interest was piqued. My first job out of college was a local newspaper reporter, and hotel homelessness was a hot button issue I covered a lot. I wasn't aware this story was all over the news a few years back, but what started as a New York Times feature ended up getting nationwide coverage across media channels. The book - written by journalist When I saw the description of TROOP 6000, a true story about a Girl Scout troop formed in a hotel being used as a homeless shelter in New York City, my interest was piqued. My first job out of college was a local newspaper reporter, and hotel homelessness was a hot button issue I covered a lot. I wasn't aware this story was all over the news a few years back, but what started as a New York Times feature ended up getting nationwide coverage across media channels. The book - written by journalist Nikita Stewart, who originally broke the story in the Times - read like a newspaper article, and the former journalist in me appreciated how well executed it was. It includes a little bit fo Girl Scout history, some alarming stats about homelessness in NYC, but more than that, it's a story of hope, hard work, and dedication - and some amazing people who are changing the world for the better, despite their own hard cirumstances. If you're looking for an uplifting story, TROOP 6000 is definitely one to check out. Thanks Random House and Netgalley for the complimentary copy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jane Miller

    #Troop6000 #NetGalley Girl Scouting began in the United States in March 1912.. Since then Girl Scouts have been instrumental in helping millions of girls explore their potential, take on leadership roles, seek challenges and learn from set backs, identify and solve problems in the community, while forming and maintaining healthy relationships. At the core of their existence is the intent to make the world a better place while respecting themselves and others. There is a high probability that a f #Troop6000 #NetGalley Girl Scouting began in the United States in March 1912.. Since then Girl Scouts have been instrumental in helping millions of girls explore their potential, take on leadership roles, seek challenges and learn from set backs, identify and solve problems in the community, while forming and maintaining healthy relationships. At the core of their existence is the intent to make the world a better place while respecting themselves and others. There is a high probability that a future president will one day talk of lessons she learned in scouting. Unfortunately membership and additional programs fees have presented many from joining. Fortunately this was not the case for Hailey and Karina Burgess. They were able to join a troop that subsidized their dues and special programs. This was only the start of a future that no one could have seen coming. Over time their mom became a troop leader and passionately committed to the cause. After losing her job in a dentist's office Giselle Burgess was lucky enough to get a job as a Community Development Specialist in Queens. The rest of her life was falling apart though and she was forced to move into a homeless center. While living there she worked tirelessly to make life as normal as possible for her family. But life in a shelter was filled with frustration, inhumanity and shame for the adults and children living there. Giselle Burgess decided that starting a Girl Scout troop at the shelter would help by giving the girls who joined a way to escape the day to day boredom. Author Nikita Stewert does an excellent job of sharing the often rocky adventure started with Troop 6000 at the Sleep Inn in Queens. We are there as the girls in the troop grow personally in ways that they, their families and parts of society never imagined possible. We are there as Giselle with the determination of her "girls" , support of her friends, family, other volunteers, members of the Girl Scout council, and at least one local community leader bring Troop 6000 to other homeless shelters.. This story is an inspiration to others and a reminder of how together we all can achieve more. I recommend this book to anyone looking for a heart warming story of the power of love and community. I recommend this book to anyone wondering how we can begin to mend a broken system. I recommend this book to anyone who needs to be reminded that homeless people deserve better, they deserve to be respected as people first.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Luanne Ollivier

    I am drawn to non fiction that informs me, teaches me and opens my eyes. Troop 6000 by Nikita Stewart is one of those books. It's hard to see the subtitle on the cover but it reads 'The Girl Scout Troop That Began in a Shelter and Inspired the World'. Giselle Burgess worked a full time job to provide for her five children. Rising rent, spiralling bills and health issues had her falling behind and finally.....homeless. She became one of the 60,000 people that are housed in one of New York City's ho I am drawn to non fiction that informs me, teaches me and opens my eyes. Troop 6000 by Nikita Stewart is one of those books. It's hard to see the subtitle on the cover but it reads 'The Girl Scout Troop That Began in a Shelter and Inspired the World'. Giselle Burgess worked a full time job to provide for her five children. Rising rent, spiralling bills and health issues had her falling behind and finally.....homeless. She became one of the 60,000 people that are housed in one of New York City's homeless. shelters daily. She and her five children lived for a year in a room at a Sleep Inn in Queens. Two beds, six people, one bathroom, no kitchen. Curfews, sign in and out procedures, rude 'resident care' staff and more. Giselle had worked for the Girl Scouts of America in the past and came up with an amazing idea - a Girl Scout Troop in the shelter. The ideas, ideals and community would help out not just the children living in the shelter but their parents as well. Giselle is a force of nature. She made connections, weathered uncertainty, overcame adversity and kept on trying. And Troop 6000 was born. Investigative report Nikita Stewart wrote a story for The New York Times and that led to support, networking - and other troops. She followed the members of the original troop and the leaders for a year. I became so immersed in the story of this group of women - their strength and determination. And that of the girls as well. I chose to listen to Troop 6000. The reader was Robin Miles. She did a fantastic job of bringing this story to life. I find that listening to a book immerses me in a story more. This time for sure - I felt like I was part of the conversation. Miles has a pleasant voice, easy to listen to, well enunciated. She captured the tenor of the book well. "Troop 6000 is both the intimate story of one group of girls who find pride and community with one another, and the larger story of how, when we come together, we can find support and commonality and experience joy and success, no matter how challenging life may be."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    An inspiring book about overcoming hopelessness with self determination , Giselle who is a mother of five , cannot keep up with her rent and is evicted from her apartment. Her and her children, living in impoverished circumstances are bounced from one shelter to another. This Goodreads giveaway really showed the impact on the girls when as homeless and being denied much consideration by the system ,they find growing self esteem and care for each other when they enroll as girl scouts. Giselle ini An inspiring book about overcoming hopelessness with self determination , Giselle who is a mother of five , cannot keep up with her rent and is evicted from her apartment. Her and her children, living in impoverished circumstances are bounced from one shelter to another. This Goodreads giveaway really showed the impact on the girls when as homeless and being denied much consideration by the system ,they find growing self esteem and care for each other when they enroll as girl scouts. Giselle initiates and implement s this program for all sheltered girls throughout NY,in the homeless system of PATH, which has a profound effect on their lives for good. There are a number of people who help her get this started but though sheer determination and despair over her daughters and her neighbors girls,she manages to encourage others to rise up and get involved. I was amazed to learn the statistics of homelessness in ny city alone and also saddened to see the way these people live and are treated by others.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Every man, woman and young adult needs to read this book. Every person who looks down at the homeless needs to be educated as to their plight. They are not in this situation because they want to be. Many work and work hard but just can't seen to get a break at times. Many self admit that some of the problems they have were brought upon themselves but they're trying to hard to rectify that. Does this make them a bad person or evil. Absolutely not. What Gisele Burgess has done for herself and more Every man, woman and young adult needs to read this book. Every person who looks down at the homeless needs to be educated as to their plight. They are not in this situation because they want to be. Many work and work hard but just can't seen to get a break at times. Many self admit that some of the problems they have were brought upon themselves but they're trying to hard to rectify that. Does this make them a bad person or evil. Absolutely not. What Gisele Burgess has done for herself and more importantly her children and young girls is phenomenal. And she did all this while being homeless, getting a new and stable home and by overcoming serious health issues. Many kudos to Gisele, the Girl Scouts of America and all of the other homeless women and David too! Best of luck and keep up the great work!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    Troop 6000 by Nikita Stewart is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early June. It becomes highly emotive as the real world and big city creeps into the scouts' idyllic roles and intent to gain skills and badges, but the books is ultimately written second-person and directed downward, ala "And that made Suzie feel sad." I was expecting something different, albeit still wholesome and motivated, just from another comparatively level perspective.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sheri S.

    Currently, it seems like society is beginning to confront myths and stereotypes with regards to diverse people groups. In this book, myths associated with homelessness are addressed through the story of Troop 6000, which began in a homeless shelter. The book follows the story of Gisselle Burgess and her five children and their struggles with homelessness. Burgess is bumped from place to place but finds stability for herself and her girls through her connection with the Girl Scouts organization. Currently, it seems like society is beginning to confront myths and stereotypes with regards to diverse people groups. In this book, myths associated with homelessness are addressed through the story of Troop 6000, which began in a homeless shelter. The book follows the story of Gisselle Burgess and her five children and their struggles with homelessness. Burgess is bumped from place to place but finds stability for herself and her girls through her connection with the Girl Scouts organization. She helps establish Troop 6000 and because of that girls experiencing homelessness are provided with many positive opportunities to learn about the world around them. (I learned a lot about the Girl Scout organization itself by reading this book!)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I received this ARC in a Goodreads Giveaway. Thank You! I have very mixed feelings about this book. The author certainly had a point of view and sold it in a subtle way. Also, the writing seemed aimed at an eighth grade level. There is nothing wrong with that, but I think the book's message is for an adult, not a middle schooler. The idea that homeless girls can benefit from belonging to Girl Scouts is a very important one. Based on personal information, however, I wonder whether the older girls I received this ARC in a Goodreads Giveaway. Thank You! I have very mixed feelings about this book. The author certainly had a point of view and sold it in a subtle way. Also, the writing seemed aimed at an eighth grade level. There is nothing wrong with that, but I think the book's message is for an adult, not a middle schooler. The idea that homeless girls can benefit from belonging to Girl Scouts is a very important one. Based on personal information, however, I wonder whether the older girls in particular will be able to escape the dangerous lure of the street and not fall into the sad pitfalls that befall so many poor young people. I hope that in future these girls -- and the author -- will consider the amount of money and time donated to this troop in hope that there would be a success story. I was surprised that was not acknowledged. The many perks and trips and patches were financed by someone. And my last question is: What about boys? But, as a former girl scout volunteer, I am heartened by the story and hope the New York Council is but the first to offer programming to homeless girls.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katra

    This is an inspiring story of a woman, her daughters, and a movement to give meaning and direction in difficult circumstances. From an almost anti-scouter, to an unwilling leader, to devotee, to crusader, Giselle Burgess has affected the lives of hundreds of young women, much of the time being homeless herself and battling illness, red-tape, and prejudice. We need more Giselles.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Giammona

    Rating: 5/5 Stars I absolutely adored this book. Reader, if you don’t know me, I work for Girl Scouts, myself, just across the river from where this story took place. Troop 6000 is like “folklore” in our council and I adored finally getting to hear the whole story. I personally work with the Girl Scouts in our council who are generally labeled as “underprivileged” and this book gave me the fuel I needed to continue my passion for this job! This book tugged on my heartstrings and made me often s Rating: 5/5 Stars I absolutely adored this book. Reader, if you don’t know me, I work for Girl Scouts, myself, just across the river from where this story took place. Troop 6000 is like “folklore” in our council and I adored finally getting to hear the whole story. I personally work with the Girl Scouts in our council who are generally labeled as “underprivileged” and this book gave me the fuel I needed to continue my passion for this job! This book tugged on my heartstrings and made me often smile. This story relates to so many people who struggle, especially in city areas, with making ends meet, even while having a good job. Plot: Troop 6000 tells the story of a mother and her three daughters (six children total), navigating the struggles of finding reliable/affordable housing in NYC until they are eventually homeless. While dealing with these struggles, the daughters continue on in the Girl Scouts and the mother as an Assistant Troop Leader. This is a story of hardships, Girl Scouting, and how to make it in the world even when you feel like you’re constantly being dragged back down. I would recommend this to anyone wondering what Girl Scouts “really do”, is involved in the Girl Scouts organization, or is feeling down on themselves and needs a pick me up. This book will be published on May 19, 2020. I will definitely be headed to the store to pick up a copy and urge you to as well! Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Troop 6000 is a fact based history of a Girl Scout troop which began in a homeless/crisis shelter in NYC and the woman behind its genesis. Released 19th May 2020 by Penguin/Random House on their Ballantine imprint, it's 288 pages and available in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats. It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interacti Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Troop 6000 is a fact based history of a Girl Scout troop which began in a homeless/crisis shelter in NYC and the woman behind its genesis. Released 19th May 2020 by Penguin/Random House on their Ballantine imprint, it's 288 pages and available in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats. It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately. This is a gripping and well told story about homelessness in the larger metropolitan areas of the USA (NYC specifically), interwoven with information about the Girl Scouts, and presented with an unflinching look at poverty, self-worth, and childhood. It's a potent cocktail and I wound up reading way past my bedtime on this one. In addition to the biographical details about troop leader Giselle (who is mom to 3 of the girl scouts in the book) and the girls themselves, there is a fair bit of indepth information about generational poverty in the USA and ways the system is heavily weighted against success and escape. We're seeing even more clearly, with the current economic and pandemic crisis how metropolitan areas are being hit harder and more severely than the suburban and rural areas. I was rooting for these girls and adults all the way through the book. Parts were heartwrenchingly sad to read. I also felt a lot of anger and bewilderment over a system which has the capacity to care humanely for its most vulnerable and chooses not to do so (although New York does a better job than most). The writing is simple and direct. It's written in third person narrative as stories arranged roughly chronologically. I read it straight through, as a novel, but it would also be a superlative support text for a classroom setting for related subjects: sociology, childhood development, race and gender studies, etc. Four stars. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Relena_reads

    Every book about organizations is, at its core, a book about people, but the title of this book did not prepare me for how much this would be a story about a very small handful of people. This is really the story of the family who founded Troop 6000--in the audiobook version 2+ hours is their story before the Troop is ever mentioned. Don't get me wrong, I like these people. But, if you're looking for an idea of how to replicate this programming or even policy changes to advocate for in your own Every book about organizations is, at its core, a book about people, but the title of this book did not prepare me for how much this would be a story about a very small handful of people. This is really the story of the family who founded Troop 6000--in the audiobook version 2+ hours is their story before the Troop is ever mentioned. Don't get me wrong, I like these people. But, if you're looking for an idea of how to replicate this programming or even policy changes to advocate for in your own community? This isn't going to provide that. Some of the strongest segments of the book were the explanations of the truly unique circumstances of the shelter system in New York, which requires the city to house families--while providing numerous loopholes to shirk that duty. There is an incredibly brief comparison to Nashville's system--which sounded much closer to the national norm--and the attempt of Nashville's scouting authorities to get a Troop 6000 of their own off the ground. However, this divergent troop is never pursued. We return quickly to the girls we already know. Similarly, there are glimpses into the offshoot Troop 6000 branches in NYC, but the characters who could give us insight into how people not as quick to navigate the system as our OGs is also abandoned. A book needs to have a core, but the one that this book choose wasn't the one I thought its title implied. I did have a great deal of nostalgia for my own scouting days as I was listening, but couldn't help going back to all of facts about the wealth of its founder being derived from human enslavement that the book discussed as backdrop for a visit to her house. There seemed to be no confrontation of that by the girls and their leaders. It was one of many times that the book seemed to ask "Should the Girl Scouts be doing more to confront their legacy and current material conditions?", before walking away to a cheerier subject matter.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Walsh

    Troop 6000 is about a homeless woman, Giselle, and her family, living in NYC, and the hardships that they faced living in an area where the minimum wage doesn't cover the cost of living. Giselle's two older daughters were at one point heavily involved with the Girl Scouts, and when the family is forced to move to the Sleep Inn, a temporary housing facility, Giselle strikes up an idea of starting their own Girl Scout Troop in the hotel. This thought doesn't come with setbacks--rules for living at Troop 6000 is about a homeless woman, Giselle, and her family, living in NYC, and the hardships that they faced living in an area where the minimum wage doesn't cover the cost of living. Giselle's two older daughters were at one point heavily involved with the Girl Scouts, and when the family is forced to move to the Sleep Inn, a temporary housing facility, Giselle strikes up an idea of starting their own Girl Scout Troop in the hotel. This thought doesn't come with setbacks--rules for living at the Sleep Inn were numerous, and there was a lot of red tape to cut through. Giselle never gave up though, and what started out as a small gathering of girls, turned into a full-fledged troop that gained such notoriety, that they even appeared on talk shows such as The View and Jimmy Fallon. This nonfiction book was an eye-opening read for me. It truly signifies that you can't tell who is homeless and who isn't, and that most of the time, homeless people are just trying to earn a living and provide for their family. It was hard reading about the homeless situation in NYC, a city known for its glitz and glammer. Not everyone lives similar lives, and Giselle was able to find a bright spot out of an otherwise tough situation. Troop 6000 also made me nostalgic for my childhood. I was never a Girl Scout, but after reading this book, feel like I missed out on something special. I usually turn a blind eye to the Girl Scout troops when I see them selling cookies, but having read a little bit more of the great things that they do (not that I ever doubted this), I will certainly be purchasing tons of cookies when I see them back out!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    This was available via the library and was excited to read it. I think I had read one article about the Troop so was interested in learning more about them via this book. Stewart takes the reader through the journey of the formation of the troop and their struggles and tribulations of dealing with homelessness, navigating the system as well as being a Girl Scout. I have to say, I was a little disappointed. Maybe because I wasn't in the right mood for the book plus I think it was mismarketed: it's This was available via the library and was excited to read it. I think I had read one article about the Troop so was interested in learning more about them via this book. Stewart takes the reader through the journey of the formation of the troop and their struggles and tribulations of dealing with homelessness, navigating the system as well as being a Girl Scout. I have to say, I was a little disappointed. Maybe because I wasn't in the right mood for the book plus I think it was mismarketed: it's a little less about Troop 6000 itself and more about the homelessness they experienced. I didn't really feel I got to know the girls better (which can vary depending on how you feel as they are minors) and also didn't get a sense of more of what it was like to be a GS while experiencing this. It was interesting to read more about how they dealt with homelessness, the system, how difficult it can be to navigate it and to get out. In some place like New York in particular is going to be tricky to navigate so it was insightful. Overall, though, it wasn't for me. Stewart is a journalist and while as a chronicle of the Troop it was interesting but as a book overall it had more to be desired. It probably would have better for a magazine long read or something that runs in the Sunday edition of a newspaper. It might be for you, or a Girl Scout you know. Recommend the library but it could be a good pick up for the right person.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Giselle Burgess is a warrior in disguise: from battling cancer to facing homelessness, going through divorces to raising her four kids. Nikita Stewart’s Troop 6000 follows Giselle’s journey of starting a girl scout troop while overcoming the harsh realities that life throws at her. Stewart’s use of character development portrays the trials and tribulations in the life of Giselle, her kids, and many others who are impoverished. Through this character development, the reader gets a closer look at Giselle Burgess is a warrior in disguise: from battling cancer to facing homelessness, going through divorces to raising her four kids. Nikita Stewart’s Troop 6000 follows Giselle’s journey of starting a girl scout troop while overcoming the harsh realities that life throws at her. Stewart’s use of character development portrays the trials and tribulations in the life of Giselle, her kids, and many others who are impoverished. Through this character development, the reader gets a closer look at Giselle and her kids’ life, and it shows that they were once embarrassed of homelessness, but then they embraced it and started a program for many people in their same situation. The conflicts in this book really kept the reader flipping pages. As mentioned earlier, life smacks Giselle in the face with one thing after another, including cancer and homelessness. Troop 6000 is written from third person omniscient point of view. From this point of view, the reader is able to see the impact of homelessness from a young child’s perspective to a grown woman’s. This book is enjoyable for anyone and everyone, especially nonfiction lovers who like to read inspirational tales.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Holly Dowell

    Ostensibly about the launch of Troop 6000 in NYC’s shelter system, this book chronicles the journey of Giselle Burgess, the mom-turned-Girl-Scout-leader who dreamed up the idea. Ultimately, this book is about how challenging life is as a homeless family in New York. The Girl Scouts provide the backdrop and an ultimate source of comfort/empowerment, but I found the cohesive thread to be the repeated injustices and indignities faced by Giselle and her family. So many of her set backs were due to t Ostensibly about the launch of Troop 6000 in NYC’s shelter system, this book chronicles the journey of Giselle Burgess, the mom-turned-Girl-Scout-leader who dreamed up the idea. Ultimately, this book is about how challenging life is as a homeless family in New York. The Girl Scouts provide the backdrop and an ultimate source of comfort/empowerment, but I found the cohesive thread to be the repeated injustices and indignities faced by Giselle and her family. So many of her set backs were due to the shelter system; in fact, I got the impression that her homelessness was exacerbated rather than helped by the hoops and bureaucracy presented by social services. At times it was hard to read because you just knew something else would go wrong right at momentum was building. ⁣ ⁣ Giselle’s drive and resilience is beyond admirable and the story of Troop 6000 is worth reading. It gave me a new understanding of homelessness experience in my city and the importance of empowering our girls. ⁣ Thanks to Netgalley and Ballantine Books for the advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. ⁣

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan Burlew

    Giselle Burgess is an amazing woman! This book tells about her bringing Girl Scouts to homeless shelters in New York City. Giselle is a mother of five who becomes homeless. Three of her daughters had recently joined the Girl Scouts. The family is placed in a motel room. Imagine a parent and five children living in one room! There are no facilities for cooking. They are given packaged meals to microwave in a downstairs room. They are basically treated like dirt and stuck in their rooms. Giselle t Giselle Burgess is an amazing woman! This book tells about her bringing Girl Scouts to homeless shelters in New York City. Giselle is a mother of five who becomes homeless. Three of her daughters had recently joined the Girl Scouts. The family is placed in a motel room. Imagine a parent and five children living in one room! There are no facilities for cooking. They are given packaged meals to microwave in a downstairs room. They are basically treated like dirt and stuck in their rooms. Giselle tries to continue bringing the girls to Scouts although is is tricky. She thinks about starting a troop at the shelter. She had recently started working for the Girl Scout Counsel. After overcoming many obstacles she starts a small group. Little by little they grow and are able to start scouts at other shelters. The fact that she does all this while working full time and caring for her children is incredible! I learned that there are many misconceptions about being homeless. I hope that some of the "not in my back yard" people read this and learn some compassion. I highly recommend reading this book and sharing it with others.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Thank you Netgalley and Random House/Ballantine Books for this advanced readers copy of Troop 6000, an inspiring true story of the first Girl Scout troop founded for and by girls living in a shelter in Queens, New York, and the amazing, nationwide response that it sparked. Troop 6000 tells the story of Giselle, a single mother of five who suffers from epilepsy who one day finds her family homeless in New York City. I am an ardent supporter of the Girl Scout program and I found myself nodding thro Thank you Netgalley and Random House/Ballantine Books for this advanced readers copy of Troop 6000, an inspiring true story of the first Girl Scout troop founded for and by girls living in a shelter in Queens, New York, and the amazing, nationwide response that it sparked. Troop 6000 tells the story of Giselle, a single mother of five who suffers from epilepsy who one day finds her family homeless in New York City. I am an ardent supporter of the Girl Scout program and I found myself nodding throughout this book as both the girls AND the adult volunteers found themself become progressively more confident and passionate about making the world a better place, despite the harrowing world of homelessness they live in. What I am fortunate to not know about is homelessness. This book educated me about the growing homeless situation that NYC experiences, and the life of those trying to navigate the shelter system while trying to get on their feet again. This is a fast, inspiring and educational read that I enjoyed. I highly recommend it, especially for those wanting to learn more about Girl Scouts and/or homelessness.

  21. 4 out of 5

    D.J. Mitchell

    Thank you to Netgalley, Random House, and Nikita Stewart for sharing the story of Girl Scout Troop 6000. This is an honest review of a tremendous book. Up front, I confess a devotion to the Girl Scout organization. I was a Girl Scout, was blessed with an energetic and selfless leader, and am convinced the Girl Scout organization impacted my development in only positive ways. As an adult, I have served on our local council’s Board, and remain a steadfast fan. Troop 6000 is as much a story about Thank you to Netgalley, Random House, and Nikita Stewart for sharing the story of Girl Scout Troop 6000. This is an honest review of a tremendous book. Up front, I confess a devotion to the Girl Scout organization. I was a Girl Scout, was blessed with an energetic and selfless leader, and am convinced the Girl Scout organization impacted my development in only positive ways. As an adult, I have served on our local council’s Board, and remain a steadfast fan. Troop 6000 is as much a story about homelessness as it is about the Girl Scout Troop that began in a homeless shelter. It is as much a tribute to the tenacity, ingenuity, and courage of Giselle Burgess, Troop 6000’s fearless first leader, as it is an expose of the New York City shelter system. Troop 6000 puts a face on the homeless—the sweet innocent face of a Girl Scout—and depicts the hurdles a homeless parent must overcome to provide healthy life experiences for her children. Last but not least, Stewart’s book spotlights the attributes of the Girl Scouts. The Girl Scout Promise includes a pledge to help people “at all times.” Troop 6000 testifies to the goodness of the Girl Scouts, who despite their need in this instance to be helped themselves, fulfilled the promise of service to their community. Again, thank you Random House and Nikita Stewart for telling us about Troop 6000. You earned five stars. There are not enough stars in the heavens for the Girl Scouts. They earned all the stars in the sky.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I’d give this book a solid 4.5 stars, mainly because it told a powerful story that made sure to remain real, recognize both positive and negative effects of newfound fame, and revealing the importance of doing good while staying humble enough to acknowledge one cannot change everything for everyone. The author is a thorough researcher and you feel like you get a powerful look into a variety of people’s lives with an outlook of empathy and understanding, even admitting possible flaws. While there I’d give this book a solid 4.5 stars, mainly because it told a powerful story that made sure to remain real, recognize both positive and negative effects of newfound fame, and revealing the importance of doing good while staying humble enough to acknowledge one cannot change everything for everyone. The author is a thorough researcher and you feel like you get a powerful look into a variety of people’s lives with an outlook of empathy and understanding, even admitting possible flaws. While there were hints of a political leading, nothing was outlandish. I really felt like I wanted to not only hug the girls of Troop 6000, but I hoped by reading these pages to spend some time with them and get to know more Girl Scouts, little girls, and people in my community. Oh, I must add, I teared up several times, and I don’t remember the last time that happened.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cara Group

    I received this book as an ARC, thanks to Random House & Netgalley. This review is my honest opinion of this book. What an amazing and insightful book. This story follows Troop 6000, the Girl Scout troop for Girls in shelters in NYC. I had been introduced to this through the NY TIMES article on this topic and it was fascinating to learn more about the amazing people who made this happen. I didn’t know that Giselle, the founder of Troop 6000, was also homeless at the time of founding. Girl scouting I received this book as an ARC, thanks to Random House & Netgalley. This review is my honest opinion of this book. What an amazing and insightful book. This story follows Troop 6000, the Girl Scout troop for Girls in shelters in NYC. I had been introduced to this through the NY TIMES article on this topic and it was fascinating to learn more about the amazing people who made this happen. I didn’t know that Giselle, the founder of Troop 6000, was also homeless at the time of founding. Girl scouting is such an important and valuable program and one of the things I love about it is the the philanthropic & community service that is at the core. I was a Girl Scout and believe that I learned valuable skills - and am proud to be an alum of an organization that is doing this amazing work to build up girls of all socioeconomic classes. I highly recommend this book as an essay not just on girl scouting, but also on homelessness.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Heffron

    Anyone who was a Girl Scout should read this book, including current leaders and older Scouts. In addition to reminding us what a privilege it is to be part of a movement that truly empowers girls of all ages and all demographics, it examines the vicious cycle of poverty and housing insecurity. At a time when many people are looking to educate themselves about what it means to be a person of color in our country, for those of us leading Girl Scouts it's a must read. I also like that although it' Anyone who was a Girl Scout should read this book, including current leaders and older Scouts. In addition to reminding us what a privilege it is to be part of a movement that truly empowers girls of all ages and all demographics, it examines the vicious cycle of poverty and housing insecurity. At a time when many people are looking to educate themselves about what it means to be a person of color in our country, for those of us leading Girl Scouts it's a must read. I also like that although it's not an easy story to read, the book follows the ups and downs of one particular family, and it leaves the reader with hope and in awe of the human spirit. I plan to have my 11th grade troop have a book club featuring this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This is a heartwarming story of girls and their families experiencing homelessness and in spite of challenging circumstances coming together as a community to form a Girl Scout troop. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the girls and their troop. My biggest complaint against the book is the author’s tone. She is assuming a reader who reads at a 4th grade level and needs issues of social justice explained as if s/he has never read The New York Times or The Washington Post. It’s condescending. Real This is a heartwarming story of girls and their families experiencing homelessness and in spite of challenging circumstances coming together as a community to form a Girl Scout troop. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the girls and their troop. My biggest complaint against the book is the author’s tone. She is assuming a reader who reads at a 4th grade level and needs issues of social justice explained as if s/he has never read The New York Times or The Washington Post. It’s condescending. Really condescending. I have absolutely no problem with literature for younger readers; I often read YA literature for pleasure. I wish the author and/or publisher had been honest with readers and marketed this book as YA (or younger).

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jon Glazer

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It focuses on the plight of one homeless family and its experience with Girl Scouts, but the author also provides insights into the social services bureaucracy and the Girl Scouts organization. Obviously the homeless women (and man) are the heroes of this book, but it was also good to read about the many outsiders who are trying to help them. Even the local politician, Jimmy Van Bramer, plays a positive role. Nikita Stewart displays the great good sense to let this I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It focuses on the plight of one homeless family and its experience with Girl Scouts, but the author also provides insights into the social services bureaucracy and the Girl Scouts organization. Obviously the homeless women (and man) are the heroes of this book, but it was also good to read about the many outsiders who are trying to help them. Even the local politician, Jimmy Van Bramer, plays a positive role. Nikita Stewart displays the great good sense to let this story speak for itself, without embellishment. The result is a powerful book that will remain with me for quite some time.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tea

    Disclaimer: I used to work with Nikita Stewart many years ago. That said, I enjoyed this story of triumph amidst ongoing strife immensely on its own merits. Stewart deftly introduces readers to the real people behind an innovative Girl Scouts troop created to serve the needs of girls living in New York City’s shelter system. Through Stewart, readers get a peek behind the curtain to see the hard work and stress and emotional struggle that those who only saw Troop 6000’s glamorous media presence cou Disclaimer: I used to work with Nikita Stewart many years ago. That said, I enjoyed this story of triumph amidst ongoing strife immensely on its own merits. Stewart deftly introduces readers to the real people behind an innovative Girl Scouts troop created to serve the needs of girls living in New York City’s shelter system. Through Stewart, readers get a peek behind the curtain to see the hard work and stress and emotional struggle that those who only saw Troop 6000’s glamorous media presence couldn’t know about. She showed that these girls, and the women and men who support them, continue to face adversity – even as they continue to work to make the world a better place.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

    I was so excited to read a book about the Girl Scouts. Being a former Girl Scout myself from a Junior to Senior scout. I was proud reading this book on how a troop and later more troops got started in homeless shelters for young girls. I do feel though the book is more about Giselle Burgess and her side of things, since she was the one to start the troop. Maybe the book should of been named differently to show Giselle's name in the title, just my opinion. Thanks NetGalley for the advance copy.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

    Giselle is a mother of 5 that was living in a homeless shelter when she realized that the children there needed to be a part of something. Since she had worked with the Girl Scouts previously, she started a Girl Scout Troop in the shelter. The author of this book followed the journey of this unique troop and all of the challenges and triumphs along the way. I found this book to be such an inspiration, as these girls could have gotten lost in the system without the bond of being in Girl Scouts. T Giselle is a mother of 5 that was living in a homeless shelter when she realized that the children there needed to be a part of something. Since she had worked with the Girl Scouts previously, she started a Girl Scout Troop in the shelter. The author of this book followed the journey of this unique troop and all of the challenges and triumphs along the way. I found this book to be such an inspiration, as these girls could have gotten lost in the system without the bond of being in Girl Scouts. This troop may have literally saved some lives. I highly recommend this book!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Heather Lother

    I'm so conflicted about this book. On the one hand, it's a great story about women & girls being empowered and finding their voice. It offers insight into the working homeless and our nation's affordable housing crisis. On the other hand, never once does the book question a nonprofit with offices on Wall Street in NYC paying a full-time employee so little that she couldn't afford a place to live in NYC. Nor does it ever recognize that the Girl Scouts profited off Giselle's homelessness and asked I'm so conflicted about this book. On the one hand, it's a great story about women & girls being empowered and finding their voice. It offers insight into the working homeless and our nation's affordable housing crisis. On the other hand, never once does the book question a nonprofit with offices on Wall Street in NYC paying a full-time employee so little that she couldn't afford a place to live in NYC. Nor does it ever recognize that the Girl Scouts profited off Giselle's homelessness and asked her to use her lived experience to further the org without compensating her commensurately.

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