counter create hit Shh - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Shh

Availability: Ready to download

Silence can be deadly... What’s the best way to frighten a Deaf person? Turn off the light. It sounds like the beginning of a joke, but it isn’t funny at all. Annie Black, who is profoundly deaf, finds herself at the heart of a set of brutal murders. Teaming up with the lead Detective, the pair attempt to understand the psychology driving the killer. Having a voice, and being a Silence can be deadly... What’s the best way to frighten a Deaf person? Turn off the light. It sounds like the beginning of a joke, but it isn’t funny at all. Annie Black, who is profoundly deaf, finds herself at the heart of a set of brutal murders. Teaming up with the lead Detective, the pair attempt to understand the psychology driving the killer. Having a voice, and being able to read not only lips, but body language, Annie realises that the killer is targeting people she knows. And Annie has lots of friends. Friends now at risk. Desperate to save those around her Annie and the police find themselves in a race against time to save people in the deaf community. And as the murders escalate, the killer’s obsession grows. Will the police untangle the killer’s motivation before it’s too late for Annie? Shh is a chilling and twisty psychological thriller from debut author Jocelyn Dexter. It will appeal to fans of authors like Claire McGowan, Cara Hunter and Lisa Jewell.


Compare
Ads Banner

Silence can be deadly... What’s the best way to frighten a Deaf person? Turn off the light. It sounds like the beginning of a joke, but it isn’t funny at all. Annie Black, who is profoundly deaf, finds herself at the heart of a set of brutal murders. Teaming up with the lead Detective, the pair attempt to understand the psychology driving the killer. Having a voice, and being a Silence can be deadly... What’s the best way to frighten a Deaf person? Turn off the light. It sounds like the beginning of a joke, but it isn’t funny at all. Annie Black, who is profoundly deaf, finds herself at the heart of a set of brutal murders. Teaming up with the lead Detective, the pair attempt to understand the psychology driving the killer. Having a voice, and being able to read not only lips, but body language, Annie realises that the killer is targeting people she knows. And Annie has lots of friends. Friends now at risk. Desperate to save those around her Annie and the police find themselves in a race against time to save people in the deaf community. And as the murders escalate, the killer’s obsession grows. Will the police untangle the killer’s motivation before it’s too late for Annie? Shh is a chilling and twisty psychological thriller from debut author Jocelyn Dexter. It will appeal to fans of authors like Claire McGowan, Cara Hunter and Lisa Jewell.

30 review for Shh

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was pretty grim reading. The crimes were so awful and painful to read about that it really impacted my star rating. However, the delayed revelations meant that I was completely consumed by curiosity about the perpetrator, keen to see how the novel would conclude. I found the story itself a little awkward and really struggled to connect with any of the characters. I’ve recently read a book about the deaf community, 'The Silent House', so I wonder if I was trying to draw comparisons. I think b This was pretty grim reading. The crimes were so awful and painful to read about that it really impacted my star rating. However, the delayed revelations meant that I was completely consumed by curiosity about the perpetrator, keen to see how the novel would conclude. I found the story itself a little awkward and really struggled to connect with any of the characters. I’ve recently read a book about the deaf community, 'The Silent House', so I wonder if I was trying to draw comparisons. I think because the protagonist, Annie, is not completely deaf, I forgot she has this disability. She lip-reads and speaks, choosing sign language when she feels she has to. As such, when interacting with other characters, I forgot this main element of the plot; when it was obvious again, I found I had disconnected with the characters, and so the cycle would start again. The crimes committed in this story are very grim and disturbing. They are not for the faint-hearted. I thought I could read most things but here I was literally wincing in my seat. I squirmed with discomfort and this definitely lessened my overall enjoyment of the book. I found I held my book further away from myself – as if physically creating a distance would lessen the impact! Nope, of course it didn’t – it just gave me eye strain. Anyway, in terms of murder mysteries and crime fiction, if you are easily offended or do not like gory reads, then this would not appeal to you. The writer cleverly withholds information about the perpetrator. The criminal isn’t named until the very final few chapters, despite the narrative switching from the murder investigations to the perpetrator’s secret story. It gave readers an insight into the criminal’s mind but without any obvious clues – well, none that I spotted anyway. I found this intensified the story more and added to my enjoyment. This compensated for the grim details and the lack of connection I had with the characters. A well-written story but not to be taken lightly. There is a suggestion that this may be the start of a series. If this is the case, then I hope Annie holds a more formal position with the police force. Once again, a member of the public becomes drawn into an investigation and is a point of contact for discussing crime theories. This is becoming a frequent trait in books I am reading and to be honest, I find it a bit frustrating. I hope Annie becomes an official interpreter, should she return in a later book. It was the pace and intensity of the closing chapters that really captured my interest and allowed me a four star rating. I think I am going to have to seek something more lighthearted after this read and fear that some of the details will haunt me for a while. Don’t even get me started on the skewers… With thanks to Bloodhound books for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pheadra

    This book started out with much promise and some very good descriptions as well as information about what it's like to be deaf. Unfortunately, it then descended from a potential 5-star read, rather quickly downhill with its overkill of gory scenes, despicable characters, red herrings and police who are a law unto themselves, don't follow protocol and involve civilians in their investigation without ever checking anyone's background. It's a pity as the premise for a thrilling read was set early. This book started out with much promise and some very good descriptions as well as information about what it's like to be deaf. Unfortunately, it then descended from a potential 5-star read, rather quickly downhill with its overkill of gory scenes, despicable characters, red herrings and police who are a law unto themselves, don't follow protocol and involve civilians in their investigation without ever checking anyone's background. It's a pity as the premise for a thrilling read was set early. 3 Stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Shh is a psychological thriller by author Jocelyn Dexter. A fifteen- year- old deaf boy was left brutally murdered, impaled on a fence, as a crucifix display. Fast forward 1 year later, thirty- seven- year old Annie Black, also deaf, worried about her friend, Sarah and her fifteen-year-old son, Toby who was missing. Toby had last been seen on his way to the deaf Club. Then Annie is attacked outside her home. When questioned by the Detective Crabb, it appears that her attack might be related to the Shh is a psychological thriller by author Jocelyn Dexter. A fifteen- year- old deaf boy was left brutally murdered, impaled on a fence, as a crucifix display. Fast forward 1 year later, thirty- seven- year old Annie Black, also deaf, worried about her friend, Sarah and her fifteen-year-old son, Toby who was missing. Toby had last been seen on his way to the deaf Club. Then Annie is attacked outside her home. When questioned by the Detective Crabb, it appears that her attack might be related to the disappearance of Toby, also deaf. And when Toby’s body is found drowned and Annie’s boyfriend is found murdered in his home, it appears there are links to the brutal killings. Are deaf people being targets of brutal killings? Annie Black, finds herself in the middle of a set of brutal murders. Teaming up with the lead Detective Crabb, the pair attempt to understand the psychology driving the killer. But Annie has another set of skills that can help with the case…she is able to read lips as well as body language. Annie realizes that the killer is targeting people she knows. And Annie has lots of friends, now at risk. Are the victims that are being chosen, people close to Annie? With the clock ticking, it is now a race against time to save people in the deaf community. A well written gripping thriller that gives the reader a better understanding of the deaf community, through adequate research and relatable characters. A very good read! Many thanks to the author and Bloodhounds Books for my digital copy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marjolein

    Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com Shh was one of the Pigeonhole reads, and it started of really good. It had interesting descriptions of the deaf community. However, things became stranger when the main character, who is deaf but lip reads and can talk, is taken along for the investigation as if she is a police officer. And the killings are rather gory, but she is told all the details and dragged along from crime scenes to interviews with no one really questioning her p Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com Shh was one of the Pigeonhole reads, and it started of really good. It had interesting descriptions of the deaf community. However, things became stranger when the main character, who is deaf but lip reads and can talk, is taken along for the investigation as if she is a police officer. And the killings are rather gory, but she is told all the details and dragged along from crime scenes to interviews with no one really questioning her presence. As such, it became very unbelievable rather quick, with some very stupid decisions as well. So, it was a bit of a mixed bag. Interesting premise, but as a detective story not very strong. ~Read through Pigeonhole~

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mags Schofield

    I was looking forward to this book after reading the taster, and apart from being very gory, it didn't disappoint initially. The premise of exploring the deaf community, it's biases and discriminations, was good. We met Annie, who is a straight talker, and learn that the murders seem to be centred around her. For some reason the policeman in charge decides that Annie should become his sidekick. This may have worked if Annie was a likeable character, but unfortunately she isn't. Police procedure is I was looking forward to this book after reading the taster, and apart from being very gory, it didn't disappoint initially. The premise of exploring the deaf community, it's biases and discriminations, was good. We met Annie, who is a straight talker, and learn that the murders seem to be centred around her. For some reason the policeman in charge decides that Annie should become his sidekick. This may have worked if Annie was a likeable character, but unfortunately she isn't. Police procedure is non existent and everyone is allowed to walk across crime scenes. Important information is freely discussed and Annie, who we know is the next target, behaves in a totally ridiculous manner and the whole thing descends into farce. There were clues and red herrings aplenty, but the final twist was no great surprise, and by the end the behaviour of some of the characters was so implausible that I didn't really care who the killer was. Disappointing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Veronika Jordan

    This started with such promise and while I did really enjoy it I had reservations. Firstly I don’t believe Annie would have been allowed to accompany the detective Crabb to crime scenes, let alone discuss them in front of her flat-mate Scarlet, or have her own white-board at home. Secondly I am not sure how Crabb worked out the killer’s ‘Game’ with so little evidence – there were clues but they weren’t obvious – but failed to follow up basic leads or even ask people about certain things which I This started with such promise and while I did really enjoy it I had reservations. Firstly I don’t believe Annie would have been allowed to accompany the detective Crabb to crime scenes, let alone discuss them in front of her flat-mate Scarlet, or have her own white-board at home. Secondly I am not sure how Crabb worked out the killer’s ‘Game’ with so little evidence – there were clues but they weren’t obvious – but failed to follow up basic leads or even ask people about certain things which I can’t mention due to spoilers. Personally I didn’t work out the big twist so I never guessed who was the killer. In fact the twist and lots of other things along the way gave me an uncomfortable feeling about the deaf or Deaf community. I suppose some of them have their prejudices like in any other community, but I still didn’t like that part of it. Then there is the graphic violence and gore, I don’t think it was necessary. The story really didn’t need it. Being a serial killer is scary enough without adding to it. And towards the end it started to descend into the realms of fantasy and over the top madness, which again verges on just silly. Anyway, it was still an exciting and riveting read, but not quite 5 stars. Many thanks to the Pigeonhole, my fellow Pigeons and Jocelyn for making this such an enjoyable read. I’ll look out for the next book by this author. Maybe a Crabb/Annie partnership (professional that is).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amina Kara

    What to say about this one? I had high expectations for this book after reading the synopsis, but sadly it failed to live up to expectations. I love a good crime/murder book, but this one just didn't do it for me. Annie wasn't really likeable as a character and I really couldn't care what happened to her. It started off well enough but then it fast became less plausible, with characters making stupid mistakes and a lack of proper police procedures. Normally a book like this would have scenes tha What to say about this one? I had high expectations for this book after reading the synopsis, but sadly it failed to live up to expectations. I love a good crime/murder book, but this one just didn't do it for me. Annie wasn't really likeable as a character and I really couldn't care what happened to her. It started off well enough but then it fast became less plausible, with characters making stupid mistakes and a lack of proper police procedures. Normally a book like this would have scenes that take place in a police station, with a detective working out of there with a team allocated to them. Also the fact that Crabb (detective) relied so much on Annie made it less plausible. I mean, I get he wanted her input because she knew the deaf community well, but allowing her to come to the crime scenes? I'm sure the police have pretty strict rules on that! Unfortunately this is not a book I will be recommending to others. Thank you to the Pigeonhole app and to Jocelyn for the opportunity to read the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Kerdouci

    I thought the premise for Shh sounded both promising and intriguing and it certainly grabs your interest with an explosive gruesome opening. Try not to let that put you off; I’m not a fan of graphic,gratuitous writing but sometimes a storyline does necessitate this style of writing. The deaf community are at the centre of this psychological thriller and I think the author offers an insight into a world many of us know little or nothing about. Using a much favoured method of narrating events we h I thought the premise for Shh sounded both promising and intriguing and it certainly grabs your interest with an explosive gruesome opening. Try not to let that put you off; I’m not a fan of graphic,gratuitous writing but sometimes a storyline does necessitate this style of writing. The deaf community are at the centre of this psychological thriller and I think the author offers an insight into a world many of us know little or nothing about. Using a much favoured method of narrating events we hear from the perspective of an unknown killer who is targeting people in the local deaf community and the small circle of individuals who are the focus for this monster at large. Annie, who is deaf and some of her closest deaf friends are the ones most at risk for falling victims to this violent and disturbing killing spree and it is up to detective Crabb to find the perpetrator before he/she claims their main prize which appears to be Annie. Exactly why remains a mystery for most of the novel. I definitely think this thriller started well as it is an eye opener into a community of individuals who are divided by their degrees of deafness meaning there’s a great deal of animosity amongst themselves and provides ample characters with possible motives. This killer seems to be playing an elaborate game leaving clues at every scene which Crabb and his team need to decipher yet seem unable to do so without the help of Annie. I can understand why Crabb uses Annie as an entry into a community that is hostile to outsiders,especially hearing ones, if he has any hope of solving the murders but as the thriller progressed I became frustrated at how much sensitive information she was privy to. This means the actions of Crabb and the police as a whole seem implausible. As a character he simply comes across as inept and a bit of a bumbling fool and I didn’t have much faith in him when it came to protecting those most at risk. As for Annie and indeed any of the other characters, I simply couldn’t warm to them and liking characters does often help with your engagement with a storyline. She comes across as quite arrogant with an air of superiority which may or may not be her downfall. Plus they all seemed rather too fond of an alcoholic beverage or two particularly in times of crisis which didn’t strike me as a great way to keep your wits about you! Having said that I was still interested enough to discover the culprit and understand the rules of the game. Some scenes are incredibly gruesome and violent so be warned but it does add to the overall menacing tone of the book. I read this via the Pigeonhole platform so my thanks to them and the publisher for giving me the opportunity to read. Perhaps on this occasion Shh didn’t quite live up to initial expectations but it’s still worth reading even if it’s just to see whether you agree with my humble opinions or not.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alyson Read

    The story begins with a description of the horrifying murder and display of a fifteen year old deaf boy a year ago. Then it switches to present day and focuses on Annie Black, a profoundly deaf lady who works as a window dresser and shares a flat with co-worker Scarlet. The deaf fifteen year old son of one of her hearing friends has recently gone missing on his way to Deaf Club and Annie is rushing home hoping to get to the club and find out if there is any news about Toby, the missing boy. She The story begins with a description of the horrifying murder and display of a fifteen year old deaf boy a year ago. Then it switches to present day and focuses on Annie Black, a profoundly deaf lady who works as a window dresser and shares a flat with co-worker Scarlet. The deaf fifteen year old son of one of her hearing friends has recently gone missing on his way to Deaf Club and Annie is rushing home hoping to get to the club and find out if there is any news about Toby, the missing boy. She doesn't make it however, as she is attacked outside her own home by a mystery assailant who puts a bag over her head and nearly kills her. DI Crabb and DS Peters come out to interview her, and even at this early stage Crabb wonders if there is a connection between a dead boy, a missing boy and Annie's attack. All deaf people. It doesn't take long for Toby's body to be found in a pond with a very nasty and distinctive injury and a puzzling signature left by the killer. Crabb enlists Annie's help, since she is able to speak and lip-read as well as sign, and her knowledge and friendship at the Deaf Club will prove useful to him. Some of the members there are quite insular, and there are even divisions between the community, some condemning deaf people that learn to speak or have cochlear implants. With the help of Annie and a hearing interpreter, Crabb sets about trying to discover a motive for the killings and whether deafness links the killer to the victims. It's not long before another body turns up, again known to Annie, and fears rise within the detectives for Annie and the entire deaf community. They are hunting a clever and ruthless killer, and it is a race against time to save more lives. There are lots of passages narrated by the killer describing an abusive childhood and he details his plans for his victims as he lures and kills them. The reader gets a good feel for the true reason for the crimes, making it fairly easy to guess who is responsible, particularly as the body count rises and diminishes the list of suspects! It's an interesting insight into the world of the deaf and has a good plot, but for me the characters felt flat and one dimensional, and needed padding out with more back story and personality. For example, references are made to the scar on Annie's face but there is never an explanation given. Crabb felt a bit of an odd detective as he opened up the whole investigation to Annie who was a possible victim or suspect and should have been nowhere near crime scenes, and that gave the otherwise engrossing story a lack of credibility at times. However it was a promising start and I would be interested to read more stories featuring DI Crabb as there is plenty of scope for him to develop. 4*

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

    Jocelyn Dexter writes an intense, enthralling and grisly début. Shh kicks off with the gruesome discovery of a battered body - that of a fifteen-year-old deaf boy named Adam Jacobs. A year later, Annie Black, part of the Deaf community, is also attacked and finds herself slap in the middle of a sick and murderous game. As people close to her, all of them deaf as well, are being killed, Detective Inspector Crabb enlists her help to find the killer. This was a well-plotted and undoubtedly rather gru Jocelyn Dexter writes an intense, enthralling and grisly début. Shh kicks off with the gruesome discovery of a battered body - that of a fifteen-year-old deaf boy named Adam Jacobs. A year later, Annie Black, part of the Deaf community, is also attacked and finds herself slap in the middle of a sick and murderous game. As people close to her, all of them deaf as well, are being killed, Detective Inspector Crabb enlists her help to find the killer. This was a well-plotted and undoubtedly rather gruesome read. It's shock factor was monumental with graphic descriptions of the murders, as well as child abuse. In this sinister story, the deaf community played a very large part and Jocelyn Dexter had clearly researched her subject well, providing the reader with an insight into what life without hearing must be like. The mystery itself was cunningly and exceptionally cleverly executed as the story snaked along, with abundant subtle and flagrant misdirections. In this story full of menace, the choice of suspects was plentiful and I had absolutely no idea how Shh was going to end. A entertaining, gripping and disturbing début, but certainly not one for the faint-hearted! I for one will be looking out for Jocelyn Dexter's next offering. Thank you to Jocelyn Dexter and Pigeonhole for the opportunity to read this book. This review is my unbiased opinion.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fay Flude

    This book opens with a very gruesome depiction of physical violence and brutality. In fact it was so graphic I wasn't sure if it was going to be for me. I am however glad I read on as it became an intriguing and chilling crime thriller set within a local deaf community. The very idea that victims cannot hear their killer and use signing to communicate is a very menacing premise. I don't think this book is for the faint hearted and am surprised I managed to survive as a reader! It is so very dark i This book opens with a very gruesome depiction of physical violence and brutality. In fact it was so graphic I wasn't sure if it was going to be for me. I am however glad I read on as it became an intriguing and chilling crime thriller set within a local deaf community. The very idea that victims cannot hear their killer and use signing to communicate is a very menacing premise. I don't think this book is for the faint hearted and am surprised I managed to survive as a reader! It is so very dark in places and the unknown perpetrator's voice describing despicable childhood torture and abuse is sickening and extremely hard to read. If this had been a true story I wouldn't have been able to read on. In actual fact I would never have selected the book in the first place as I do not like true childhood abuse tales full stop. In this way the book in parts is hardly what one could term entertaining and yet the redeeming feature, that of a very unlikely partnership between Annie and police detective Crabb, thankfully turns the novel into a readable thriller. There are more murders and a macabre set of clues at each death for Annie and Crabb to decipher. Annie is part of the deaf community but held at a distance because she can lip read and talk. Crabb is a strange and odd detective in that there is no way in real life he would have been able to have Annie accompany him to interviews and scenes of crime. If you can look past this, it is a tense race to catch the serial killer and I did NOT guess who the killer was until right near the end. The book therefore does have the elements of shock and surprise with a very good ending. It was this that helped me to award the book 4 stars. What stopped me awarding 5 is the very graphic detail of victims' bodies together with the fact that there were no back stories or real depth of character to Annie and Crabb. For me the pair needed far more personal history revealed to make them individuals you care about and want to get to know.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Shh begins with the gruesome discovery of the battered body of a 15-year-old deaf boy called Adam Jacobs. Just over a year later, the main protagonist of the book, Annie Black, is walking home from work early one Saturday evening when she is attacked yards from her flat. The man puts a plastic bag over her head and she starts to suffocate but he releases her after a few terrifying minutes and she is left unharmed. Annie, 37, is profoundly deaf but can lip read, talk and sign. She is part of a deaf Shh begins with the gruesome discovery of the battered body of a 15-year-old deaf boy called Adam Jacobs. Just over a year later, the main protagonist of the book, Annie Black, is walking home from work early one Saturday evening when she is attacked yards from her flat. The man puts a plastic bag over her head and she starts to suffocate but he releases her after a few terrifying minutes and she is left unharmed. Annie, 37, is profoundly deaf but can lip read, talk and sign. She is part of a deaf group that meets every Thursday. After speaking to Detective Inspector Crabb and Detective Sergeant Peters about her ordeal, the police mention 15-year-old Toby Coleridge, who is deaf and has been missing for 48 hours and is the son of Annie's friend, Sarah. They believe there is a link to the murder of Adam Jacobs and a possible connection with her attack. Sadly, Toby is later found brutally murdered, his body discarded in a small pond on Hampstead Heath, and Annie ends up helping the police with their inquiries and acting as DI Crabb's guide to the deaf community. When another male is discovered murdered, the connection appears to be Annie but everyone is at a loss to work out why, including Annie herself. Interspersed in the book are chapters from the killer's viewpoint and it was shocking to see what made the person tick and how they'd been so damaged by a traumatic childhood, filled with disturbing abuse. Shh is fascinating insight into the world of the deaf and I had no idea there were such divisions and competitiveness between Deaf and deaf people. I also didn't know the definitions of each. Deaf refers to people who were born deaf and tend to communicate in sign language as their first language. They identify with the Deaf community and may have other family members who are deaf. Whereas deaf people are those who have severe hearing problems or are hard of hearing, and are more likely to communicate orally. Their parents may be hearing and they may not have much exposure, if any, to the Deaf community. Overall, this was a well-plotted, if rather gruesome and chilling, read! It's a shocking book with graphic descriptions of murders, as well as childhood abuse. The story was tense and disturbing and I had no idea how it was going to end. An entertaining and gripping read but not one for the faint hearted!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Started well I liked the idea of this story, and was caught up in it at the start. But as I approached the halfway mark it became annoying. The writing style began to bug me. I really didn’t like the use of the word, ‘said’, instead of writing ‘he said’, or ‘she said’. The characters also lost their shine. I skipped over a lot to get to the end. Not my kind of story in the end. A little disappointing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karolyn

    Here is my review of Shh by Jocelyn Dexter, her debut novel, featuring DI Crabb and set in London. A deaf teenage boy, aged 15, is found beaten to death. The killer has never been found, the police could find no reason for the teenager to be targartered. A year later, a young teenage boy, aged 15, called Toby and deaf, is missing. Annie Black is a good friend of his mum and she is worried for them both as it is unlike him to go missing. Whilst on her way home, she is attacked from behind by someo Here is my review of Shh by Jocelyn Dexter, her debut novel, featuring DI Crabb and set in London. A deaf teenage boy, aged 15, is found beaten to death. The killer has never been found, the police could find no reason for the teenager to be targartered. A year later, a young teenage boy, aged 15, called Toby and deaf, is missing. Annie Black is a good friend of his mum and she is worried for them both as it is unlike him to go missing. Whilst on her way home, she is attacked from behind by someone placing a plastic bag over her head, plunging her into darkness and manoeuvring her to the floor. Annie is deaf, so did not hear her attacker approach and could feel a scream dry in her throat as the bag was tightened around her throat. After a few minutes the attacker left her and she managed to stumble home and call the police. What was that all about? DI Crabb and DS Peters responded to the call about the attack. Annie explained to the detectives that she was deaf but could lipread and could speak ok. She could use sign language If she needed to. The detectives asked for her account of what happened that night and then tried to work out why she was attacked. Was there a link to Toby and the boy killed a year ago? She knew Toby but knew nothing of the earlier killing. On Sunday morning, Toby’s body is found floating in a pond on Hampstead Heath. There are signs on his wrists and ankles that he had been tied up before his death. His mouth is sealed shut with tape, once unsealed they found coloured pencil shavings in there. What is the significance? Could there be a link to the deaf community? DI Crabb enlists the help of Annie Black to help solve this case. She knows the people and the community, DI Crabb feels a bit out of his depth and needs all the help he can get. He thinks the cases from a year ago, Toby and Annie may all be linked but needs proof. What is the motive? Will the killer go after Annie? A gripping and interesting read from the outset, it had me hooked from page one. I was so engrossed in this book I read it in a day. Gives an insight to a whole new world which is so different and intriguing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jane Willis

    Annie, profoundly deaf, is attacked outside her home. When questioned by the detective, Crabb, it begins to look as if her attack is in some way related to the disappearance of 15 year old Toby, also deaf and known to Annie who is a good friend of his mother. And if deaf people are the targets, there are possibly also links to the brutal killing of a 15 year old boy two years earlier. Because Annie can lip read and has been taught to speak, she agrees to help Crabb with his investigations among Annie, profoundly deaf, is attacked outside her home. When questioned by the detective, Crabb, it begins to look as if her attack is in some way related to the disappearance of 15 year old Toby, also deaf and known to Annie who is a good friend of his mother. And if deaf people are the targets, there are possibly also links to the brutal killing of a 15 year old boy two years earlier. Because Annie can lip read and has been taught to speak, she agrees to help Crabb with his investigations among the deaf community, although all official police business has to have an official interpreter, so Sam, who regularly works with the local deaf club, is drafted in. Over the weekend, the body of Toby is found floating in a pond, and Annie is also worried that she has been unable to contact her “boyfriend” for several days. She goes to visit him to see if he is unwell, and finds him murdered in his home. It seems that the victims that are being chosen are people close to Annie, and yet although her attack has similar hallmarks to the murders, she was left unharmed – what is the connection and why was she spared? In this sinister story full of menace and threat, the deaf community play a very large part and I learned many things that I’d not thought of – for instance a deaf child not understanding how his hearing mother knew to open a door when somebody was waiting outside. As well as being a good read, it has given me a better understanding of what life without hearing must be like. A chilling and very cleverly plotted story with a soaring body count. I did guess the culprit partway through the book but only after suspecting practically everybody else – including some of the characters who went on to become victims

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maria Rivas-mc

    The characters are not perfect. They’re not beautiful nor generally handsome (well, other than one whose beauty is all surface). The majority of them live in a world of perpetual silence and of vulnerability. Annie, the leading lady makes the point, early on, ‘Did you know that deaf boys are two to three times more likely to be the victims of sexual abuse than hearing boys?’ A sad statistic in a story that brings you into the Deaf community, a closed one from the perspective that, if you haven’t The characters are not perfect. They’re not beautiful nor generally handsome (well, other than one whose beauty is all surface). The majority of them live in a world of perpetual silence and of vulnerability. Annie, the leading lady makes the point, early on, ‘Did you know that deaf boys are two to three times more likely to be the victims of sexual abuse than hearing boys?’ A sad statistic in a story that brings you into the Deaf community, a closed one from the perspective that, if you haven’t lived it yourself or through a loved one, then you can’t possibly understand their world. As members of their community keep getting picked off, one by one, the fear is magnified by the sense of vulnerability because the ‘why’ remains unanswered. Jocelyn Dexter’s detective hero, Crabb, is drawn to protect Annie even as she pushes his efforts away: ‘Crabb hated to leave Annie, but he couldn’t mother her now. Or whatever it was that he was doing to her.’ Dexter allows us into the mind of her villain, witnesses to his unravelling: ‘The behaviour and madness of the people involved. I never get used to other people. Humans – they’re a strange and not particularly nice species.’ Even though I figured out his identity midway through, there was a twist that I hadn’t considered. The murders themselves are fairly horrific but, if you are a fan of the detective and psychological mystery genre, you’ll enjoy this one. Thanks are due to the author and the Pigeonhole for the exclusive early access.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    The protagonist of Shh... is Annie Black and from the outset, I felt that she was a character with whom I could connect. She is a strong woman who is very intelligent and not afraid to be herself, despite the problems this causes for her within her community. Although she is deaf, she does not allow her disability to prevent her from doing the things she wants to do. Shh... begins with a very brutal and gruesome killing and from there, it does not let up. The killer's modus operandi may not be fo The protagonist of Shh... is Annie Black and from the outset, I felt that she was a character with whom I could connect. She is a strong woman who is very intelligent and not afraid to be herself, despite the problems this causes for her within her community. Although she is deaf, she does not allow her disability to prevent her from doing the things she wants to do. Shh... begins with a very brutal and gruesome killing and from there, it does not let up. The killer's modus operandi may not be for the more squeamish reader, but although I found the deaths horrific, I was intrigued to find out what made the killer tick and I did enjoy the tension created by each killing. There are chapters in this novel written from the perspective of the killer and this gave me insight into what had triggered the murderous episodes. The killer is a truly chilling and damaged person and this was conveyed really well. Many of the suspects and victims in Shh... are deaf, and as we dig deeper into their lives, we discover much more about the deaf community and their attitudes towards their disability and each other. As the community is so close knit, this helps to build a claustrophobic atmosphere which creates some palpable tension! I was fascinated by the way the community works and Dexter has clearly undertaken a huge amount of research to ensure it is portrayed accurately.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Star

    Thank you for the opportunity to learn about the d/Deaf culture and self-identification within the Deaf Community. I was not aware of the distinctions between the small 'd' and the big 'D'. It was a revelation that members in the Deaf community view deafness as a difference in human experience rather than a disability. Signing is a language on its own merit and this book has promoted the awareness that Deaf people is a culture with its own language and social norms. Of the language alone, there Thank you for the opportunity to learn about the d/Deaf culture and self-identification within the Deaf Community. I was not aware of the distinctions between the small 'd' and the big 'D'. It was a revelation that members in the Deaf community view deafness as a difference in human experience rather than a disability. Signing is a language on its own merit and this book has promoted the awareness that Deaf people is a culture with its own language and social norms. Of the language alone, there are more than 200 sign languages used around the world which in itself is astonishing. The plot of this dark psychological thriller comprises a macabre series of murders. The murder scenes are gruesome,violent and graphic. The story was fast paced, full of suspense - definitely a page turner. Some depictions of torture and animal abuse could be a turn off for some. I can establish a sense of relatedness and association with some of the characters in the book some of the time, others not so much. Some plot twists and developments were not so credible or realistic, which detracted from the story towards the end. While the denouement was not as convincing or satisfying - there is an indication that the story has not yet ended and the sequel to this book may be able to offer a better resolution.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    Right from the beginning of the book it is descriptively graphic; but don’t let that put you off as you will soon find yourself being drawn completely into the book. The killer is taking his victims from the deaf community but why? And for some reason everything seems to be centered around Annie, a profoundly deaf woman. She is a strong, feisty and determined woman, and even after she is herself attacked; doesn’t play the victim. When her friends fifteen-year-old son Toby goes missing, and his b Right from the beginning of the book it is descriptively graphic; but don’t let that put you off as you will soon find yourself being drawn completely into the book. The killer is taking his victims from the deaf community but why? And for some reason everything seems to be centered around Annie, a profoundly deaf woman. She is a strong, feisty and determined woman, and even after she is herself attacked; doesn’t play the victim. When her friends fifteen-year-old son Toby goes missing, and his body is later found dead in the water, she is determined to help detective Crabb. I liked the way that through the chapters you "hear" in the killers own words, what they went through as a child and the despicable and abusive way that they were treated. With thrilling writing you are kept guessing the identity of the killer right up until the end if the book. I will definitely look forward to reading more from this debuting author.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mackenzie-smaller

    This is a solid psychological thriller with an interesting premise. Annie is a deaf woman raised by hearing parents, so can both sign and talk. She is attacked at the start of the book and there is soon no doubt that her attack is connected to the brutal murder of her friend’s deaf son, and possibly an earlier murder. As people close to Annie are kidnapped and killed, it’s a race against time for detective Crabb to find the killer, before the killer comes back to get Annie. Whilst I thought I’d i This is a solid psychological thriller with an interesting premise. Annie is a deaf woman raised by hearing parents, so can both sign and talk. She is attacked at the start of the book and there is soon no doubt that her attack is connected to the brutal murder of her friend’s deaf son, and possibly an earlier murder. As people close to Annie are kidnapped and killed, it’s a race against time for detective Crabb to find the killer, before the killer comes back to get Annie. Whilst I thought I’d identified the killer relatively early on, the book held my interest through the exploration of what it means to be Deaf with a capital D. Maybe a bit of poetic licence taken with regard to the police work and definitely not for the faint of heart because the murders are pretty graphic, I enjoyed this and would read more of Jocelyn Dexter’s work. Read with The Pigeonhole.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Di Paterson

    This book is well written, and the biggest plus is that I did not guess who the killer was. But ... It starts off very well, and the premise is very definitely an interesting and intriguing one; I learnt a lot about the deaf community. The plot developed intriguingly, and I liked the way we were given the killer's perspective, but then it just simply became totally implausible and contrived, and ruined all the good feelings I had built up, despite not liking the main characters overly much. In f This book is well written, and the biggest plus is that I did not guess who the killer was. But ... It starts off very well, and the premise is very definitely an interesting and intriguing one; I learnt a lot about the deaf community. The plot developed intriguingly, and I liked the way we were given the killer's perspective, but then it just simply became totally implausible and contrived, and ruined all the good feelings I had built up, despite not liking the main characters overly much. In fact, I must admit to never really engaging with the characters - I constantly found myself wondering who some characters were as their names came up, and how they fitted into the scheme of things. I also wasn't too enamoured with the ending. My thanks to The Pigeonhole and Jocelyn Dexter for the opportunity to read the book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Danny Matheson

    This was a very interesting and thrilling psychological thriller. It is set in the deaf community and centred round profoundly deaf Annie Black and people she was close to. People she knew well were getting killed and quite brutally and she herself was at risk.  Once I got my head around the terminology used by the deaf describing themselves and their ways of communicating this became a very good book to read. The story flows well and is very descriptive, describing the manner of killing quite gr This was a very interesting and thrilling psychological thriller. It is set in the deaf community and centred round profoundly deaf Annie Black and people she was close to. People she knew well were getting killed and quite brutally and she herself was at risk.  Once I got my head around the terminology used by the deaf describing themselves and their ways of communicating this became a very good book to read. The story flows well and is very descriptive, describing the manner of killing quite graphically. As a good book should be you are left wondering as to who the killer is until very near the end.  I certainly would recommend reading this book and staying with it until the end.  Thank you to Bloodhound Books for the ARC which I've reviewed voluntarily 

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bobbi Wagner

    I enjoyed this book. This is my first book by this author and I can't wait to read more from her. This is a well developed story that is full of action and is engaging. The characters brought the story to life for me and kept me turning pages. I had no problem connecting to them. Annie is deaf but can read lips and body language. She finds herself in the middle of a investigation of murders in her community. It becomes a race against time for life, will Annie and the police be able to find the k I enjoyed this book. This is my first book by this author and I can't wait to read more from her. This is a well developed story that is full of action and is engaging. The characters brought the story to life for me and kept me turning pages. I had no problem connecting to them. Annie is deaf but can read lips and body language. She finds herself in the middle of a investigation of murders in her community. It becomes a race against time for life, will Annie and the police be able to find the killer before it is too late? This is a great book that kept me reading to the end. I highly recommend this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mel Mars

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What an intense read! Annie Black, part of the Deaf community, is brutally attacked and ends up in a middle of a quest for revenge. Soon, several people close to her, all of them deaf as well, are being killed. Why are they all being targeted, and what is Annie's role in this sick game? Like I said, a very intense read, with graphic details (one particular death gave me a hard time, and luckily my brain would not let me try to imagine the scene), but all in all, I loved the story and definitely reco What an intense read! Annie Black, part of the Deaf community, is brutally attacked and ends up in a middle of a quest for revenge. Soon, several people close to her, all of them deaf as well, are being killed. Why are they all being targeted, and what is Annie's role in this sick game? Like I said, a very intense read, with graphic details (one particular death gave me a hard time, and luckily my brain would not let me try to imagine the scene), but all in all, I loved the story and definitely recommend this book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This starts with a rather gruesome murder, and as the murders unfold the goriness rating really increases! I would describe this as a psychological thriller, set in the deaf community, which appears to be being targeted specifically. As the story unfolds it becomes apparent that Annie Black has a link to the victims, and the main storyline follows the police investigation. I felt it got a little drawn out in the middle, but had a satisfying ending. I would have given it 5 stars, but it was a bit too This starts with a rather gruesome murder, and as the murders unfold the goriness rating really increases! I would describe this as a psychological thriller, set in the deaf community, which appears to be being targeted specifically. As the story unfolds it becomes apparent that Annie Black has a link to the victims, and the main storyline follows the police investigation. I felt it got a little drawn out in the middle, but had a satisfying ending. I would have given it 5 stars, but it was a bit too gory for my personal taste.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sue Jenkins

    This started well but went downhill due to the inadequacIes of the policing policies! The storyline was an interesting premise and although I did guess the identity of the killer and the big twist quite early on, it held my attention. It gave a good insight into the deaf community but it is a pity that the behaviour of Crabbe, the detective in charge of the case, was very questionable. The descriptions of the killings and the bodies are not for the faint hearted! Thanks Pigeonhole and Jocelyn fo This started well but went downhill due to the inadequacIes of the policing policies! The storyline was an interesting premise and although I did guess the identity of the killer and the big twist quite early on, it held my attention. It gave a good insight into the deaf community but it is a pity that the behaviour of Crabbe, the detective in charge of the case, was very questionable. The descriptions of the killings and the bodies are not for the faint hearted! Thanks Pigeonhole and Jocelyn for giving me the chance to read this.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lianna

    Interesting to read about the Deaf community. The author offers a great insight into what life is like for them, and the prejudices both from hearing people and other Deaf. As well as getting into your head with the psychological parts, to learn about the struggles of a Deaf person is enlightening! The author takes us on many twists and turns throughout the book; not all of the characters are likeable but as the reader I was still on their side. I was left guessing until the very end as to who th Interesting to read about the Deaf community. The author offers a great insight into what life is like for them, and the prejudices both from hearing people and other Deaf. As well as getting into your head with the psychological parts, to learn about the struggles of a Deaf person is enlightening! The author takes us on many twists and turns throughout the book; not all of the characters are likeable but as the reader I was still on their side. I was left guessing until the very end as to who the killer was.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I have tremendously enjoyed this story! It takes the reader inside a community of deaf people which I have found very interesting and sometimes surprising as to their own hierarchy. The plot kept me guessing till the end. The main characters are not typical as to what one might expect from other crime books. I had no problem with that as I was so engrossed in the plot!! Thank you Jocelyn and Pigeonhole for letting me read this book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    This book started really well though I found the description of the murders to be extremely gory and rather nauseating. I didn't guess who the murderer was even though in hindsight there were several clues pointing to him. I also found detective Crabb's insistence on involving Annie in the investigation implausible and unprofessional. There was a surprise ending which I'm assuming means there could be a sequel.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christina Mama-Kyriacou

    Unfortunately, despite a great start, I didn't enjoy this book much. However, it did keep me guessing till the end (although, as I read it through the Pigeonhole, a lot of other clever readers guessed who the killer was early on). The portrayal of the police was quite silly in my opinion. It's a shame because it had the promise of a very good and creepy story but unrealistic police behaviour and too much gore ruined it for me.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.