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Two-time Peabody Award-winning writer and producer Ira Rosen reveals the intimate, untold stories of his decades at America’s most iconic news show. It’s a 60 Minutes story on 60 Minutes itself. When producer Ira Rosen walked into the 60 Minutes offices in June 1980, he knew he was about to enter television history. His career catapulted him to the heights of TV journalis Two-time Peabody Award-winning writer and producer Ira Rosen reveals the intimate, untold stories of his decades at America’s most iconic news show. It’s a 60 Minutes story on 60 Minutes itself. When producer Ira Rosen walked into the 60 Minutes offices in June 1980, he knew he was about to enter television history. His career catapulted him to the heights of TV journalism, breaking some of the most important stories in TV news. But behind the scenes was a war room of clashing producers, anchors, and the most formidable 60 Minutes figure: legendary correspondent Mike Wallace. Based on decades of access and experience, Ira Rosen takes readers behind closed doors to offer an incisive look at the show that invented TV investigative journalism. With surprising humor, charm, and an eye for colorful detail, Rosen delivers an authoritative account of the unforgettable personalities that battled for prestige, credit, and the desire to scoop everyone else in the game. As Mike Wallace’s top producer, Rosen reveals the interview secrets that made Wallace’s work legendary, and the flaring temper that made him infamous. Later, as senior producer of ABC News Primetime Live and 20/20, Rosen exposes the competitive environment among famous colleagues like Diane Sawyer and Barbara Walters, and the power plays between correspondents Chris Wallace, Anderson Cooper, and Chris Cuomo. A master class in how TV news is made, Rosen shows readers how 60 Minutes puts together a story when sources are explosive, unreliable, and even dangerous. From unearthing shocking revelations from inside the Trump White House, to an outrageous proposition from Ghislaine Maxwell, to interviewing gangsters Joe Bonanno and John Gotti Jr., Ira Rosen was behind the scenes of 60 Minutes' most sensational stories. Highly entertaining, dishy, and unforgettable, Ticking Clock is a never-before-told account of the most successful news show in American history.


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Two-time Peabody Award-winning writer and producer Ira Rosen reveals the intimate, untold stories of his decades at America’s most iconic news show. It’s a 60 Minutes story on 60 Minutes itself. When producer Ira Rosen walked into the 60 Minutes offices in June 1980, he knew he was about to enter television history. His career catapulted him to the heights of TV journalis Two-time Peabody Award-winning writer and producer Ira Rosen reveals the intimate, untold stories of his decades at America’s most iconic news show. It’s a 60 Minutes story on 60 Minutes itself. When producer Ira Rosen walked into the 60 Minutes offices in June 1980, he knew he was about to enter television history. His career catapulted him to the heights of TV journalism, breaking some of the most important stories in TV news. But behind the scenes was a war room of clashing producers, anchors, and the most formidable 60 Minutes figure: legendary correspondent Mike Wallace. Based on decades of access and experience, Ira Rosen takes readers behind closed doors to offer an incisive look at the show that invented TV investigative journalism. With surprising humor, charm, and an eye for colorful detail, Rosen delivers an authoritative account of the unforgettable personalities that battled for prestige, credit, and the desire to scoop everyone else in the game. As Mike Wallace’s top producer, Rosen reveals the interview secrets that made Wallace’s work legendary, and the flaring temper that made him infamous. Later, as senior producer of ABC News Primetime Live and 20/20, Rosen exposes the competitive environment among famous colleagues like Diane Sawyer and Barbara Walters, and the power plays between correspondents Chris Wallace, Anderson Cooper, and Chris Cuomo. A master class in how TV news is made, Rosen shows readers how 60 Minutes puts together a story when sources are explosive, unreliable, and even dangerous. From unearthing shocking revelations from inside the Trump White House, to an outrageous proposition from Ghislaine Maxwell, to interviewing gangsters Joe Bonanno and John Gotti Jr., Ira Rosen was behind the scenes of 60 Minutes' most sensational stories. Highly entertaining, dishy, and unforgettable, Ticking Clock is a never-before-told account of the most successful news show in American history.

30 review for Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes at 60 Minutes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Glae R. Egoville

    More of an insider's book I am of 2 minds about Ira Rosen's Ticking Clock. Initially I felt that he was describing the schtetl from hell which were his early days at the maniacally competitive CBS. I excused his acceptance of their obnoxious personalities as a factor of his ambition and youth. Mike Wallace alone was too repulsive to imagine let alone work for. Implying that his job was enjoyable was not believable. But as he matured and presumably gained self confidence ( or a tough hide) it was More of an insider's book I am of 2 minds about Ira Rosen's Ticking Clock. Initially I felt that he was describing the schtetl from hell which were his early days at the maniacally competitive CBS. I excused his acceptance of their obnoxious personalities as a factor of his ambition and youth. Mike Wallace alone was too repulsive to imagine let alone work for. Implying that his job was enjoyable was not believable. But as he matured and presumably gained self confidence ( or a tough hide) it was easier to read his book. The characters his 60 Minutes shows featured were fascinating. His chapters on Steve Bannon and John Gotti, Jr are interesting and displayed more depth than others. It became obvious that 60 Minutes had(has) a shelf life and it has reached it's sell by date. Politics today is neither authentic nor altruistic, merely self serving of whatever generation has the upper hand. The media has to allow them to preach or they won't appear in any venue that doesn't praise them. Ira left at the right time. He has written a pretty honest account of his tenure.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Interesting look behind the scenes of the one TV show, that after more than 50 years, I NEVER miss. Sadly, the author explains the number of prima donnas that presented the stories that were usually unearthed by producers, such as himself. After awhile, Rosen is enticed to ABC to help start investigated journalism unit for several of their news magazines. More prima donnas. Back to 60 Minutes but with different on-air personalities. The first who could never acknowledge the job of the producer. T Interesting look behind the scenes of the one TV show, that after more than 50 years, I NEVER miss. Sadly, the author explains the number of prima donnas that presented the stories that were usually unearthed by producers, such as himself. After awhile, Rosen is enticed to ABC to help start investigated journalism unit for several of their news magazines. More prima donnas. Back to 60 Minutes but with different on-air personalities. The first who could never acknowledge the job of the producer. The last two were the people that Rosen always hoped he would work with. A lot of dirt, but even more explanation of the exact job of a producer. Fascinating.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dale Duncan

    Ira Rosen’s memoir of 30 years as a Sixty Minutes producer makes for fascinating reading about what it took to get controversial subjects before the American people. His raw and unvarnished accounts of the people on both sides of the camera are detailed and un-sparing when it comes to the foibles of those who make the news and those who present it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Suzi

    Timely story of television history. John Gotti, Jr toasts Rosen at retirement party. Behind the scenes details and infighting revealed. Do I sound like I wanted to be a journalist? Page turner!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Roth

    I saw author Ira Rosen interviewed on tv recently and knew immediately I wanted to read his book Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes of 60 Minutes, as I watched that show for many years, and the subject matter is a virtual time capsule of my lifetime. I checked library digital offerings and immediately borrowed the Macmillan audiobook on Hoopla, unusual for a recent book (2/16/21) that it would have been available without a hold list. I’ve noticed Rosen has not done a lot of interviews that have be I saw author Ira Rosen interviewed on tv recently and knew immediately I wanted to read his book Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes of 60 Minutes, as I watched that show for many years, and the subject matter is a virtual time capsule of my lifetime. I checked library digital offerings and immediately borrowed the Macmillan audiobook on Hoopla, unusual for a recent book (2/16/21) that it would have been available without a hold list. I’ve noticed Rosen has not done a lot of interviews that have been recorded online, a good way to get word out for this book that should be required reading for every boomer; it does not disappoint. Some say the truth is stranger than fiction, and this book represents that in spades, if for no other reason than truth has become the empty chair in almost all forms of 21st century discourse. Some have criticized the book based on politics, but liars and scoundrels are bipartisan as well as vocationally omnipresent, and I didn’t find anything particularly off putting that would have precluded me from reading the book, if for no other reason than it represents Rosen’s opinions, not necessarily universal truths. If you’re a Mike Wallace fan, you probably won’t appreciate what is possibly the first unblinking, unvarnished depiction of the man. It certainly gave me a better understanding of what son Chris had to contend with growing up. The public hungers for honesty and authenticity in media as in politics, and lines have long since blurred between interviewer and subject; this book reminds me of the Hollywood proverb “once you learn to fake sincerity, you’ve got it made.” It seems as in Hollywood, so goes the nation. Shows like 60 Minutes were must see tv for decades, and the behind the scene ego driven prima donna tyrants of earlier years have been replaced by new generations, while channel choices have increased exponentially. The conceptual value of a show like 60 Minutes still holds true, perhaps more so in today’s chaotic stew of global personalities, but with so much competition across numerous platforms, their clock may soon be silenced. I haven’t tuned into 60 minutes for decades, the caustic arrogance of it’s talent diminished my appetite for its brand of journalism long ago, but I’ll still check out a segment online if it trends. Those like myself who could be happy watching news round the clock seek their sources according to how well any given show or platform meets their expectation of fairness, authenticity, timeliness, and honesty in coverage. We yearn for the journalistic integrity of Lois Lanes and Clark Kents in real life, while the industry overlooks the irony these fictions are almost impossible to detect in the profession. Faking sincerity will get you on the cover of Time, and get your show carried as long as ad revenues support it, but not a moment longer. The 60 Minutes clock stopped ticking for me a long time ago, but I’m glad Ira Rosen took the time to publish his account of the scenes we didn’t see.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ty

    I'm not quite sure what my expectations were going in, but they were really not met. While this was purported to be a behind-the-scenes, tell-all type book, it glossed over a lot. The author went to great lengths to portray Mike Wallace as a jerk with little concern for anything outside his image and job but in the end tries to walk that back and redeem Wallace's portrayal. Imagine after the passing of someone you view as a friend and mentor you trash them openly (whether truth or fiction) but t I'm not quite sure what my expectations were going in, but they were really not met. While this was purported to be a behind-the-scenes, tell-all type book, it glossed over a lot. The author went to great lengths to portray Mike Wallace as a jerk with little concern for anything outside his image and job but in the end tries to walk that back and redeem Wallace's portrayal. Imagine after the passing of someone you view as a friend and mentor you trash them openly (whether truth or fiction) but then realize the error of your ways and try to take back everything bad you said. The author's relationship with Wallace was clearly complicated, much like that a father-son, love-hate relationship. I found it interesting that the author did openly criticize anyone and everyone associated with Trump, but other than a brief foray into Nancy Pelosi's insider trading, there was very little dished on the party with which the author openly admits to being in allegiance. While bashing Trump and his allies took up a significant part of what was supposed to be a "behind the scenes" at 60 Minutes, it painted a picture very much in league with the established media narrative. While not a Trump apologist by any means, I found some of his tales to be a little tabloidesque and steeped in schadenfreude. Having said that, the author also tellingly says, "You will be punished if you buck the established narrative of the mainstream media." That line calls into question much of what he writes about political personalities. His self-portrayal was something of a crusader mixed with a reporter with tunnel vision: everyone he met of any import was an interview target whom he dogged until they relented or became less interesting. I find it particularly laughable that a television producer considers himself a reporter. As a former media relations and strategic communications professional, most of my contacts in television news openly admitted to me that they were not journalists, but entertainers. My own confirmation bias was satisfied to learn that many of the "correspondents" and on-air personalities were focused way more on self-image, competition for stories that would land them more awards and adulation, and their own pumped-up entitlement. While not universal in my own experience in the media world, there were plenty of ladder climbers with the same personality traits. As a former corporate spokesperson, strategic communications professional, and reporter, I found the book little more than bashing coworkers and political enemies. Since I listened to the Audible version, I must also add that the narrator of most of the book (other than intro and closing by the author) brought very little to the story, over-enunciating and delivering in a monotone.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Schuyler Wallace

    Producer Ira Rosen takes the reader on a salacious tour behind the scenes of CBS “60 minutes” for a tell-all accounting of the behavior of its well-known stable of correspondents. Mike Wallace, Harry Reasoner, Steve Croft, Bill Whitaker, Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, as well as mobsters, political figures, civil rights activists, and other famous people, have their indiscretions and bad habits fully disclosed You may wonder at reading about their peccadillos what prompted their willingness to Producer Ira Rosen takes the reader on a salacious tour behind the scenes of CBS “60 minutes” for a tell-all accounting of the behavior of its well-known stable of correspondents. Mike Wallace, Harry Reasoner, Steve Croft, Bill Whitaker, Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, as well as mobsters, political figures, civil rights activists, and other famous people, have their indiscretions and bad habits fully disclosed You may wonder at reading about their peccadillos what prompted their willingness to give such revealing information, none of which casts a favorable personal light. The answer to that is simple, according to Levin. It was because they were asked. Questions are nearly always answered if asked in the right way and he’s a master at that. Some of the wrongdoing is much in the news today. Bra snapping, unwanted kisses and hugs, indecent proposals, late-night bedroom visits, bottom groping, and other such unseeming behavior seems to be a staple around the studio. Public desire for the details of such conduct is also high. Details about such behavior are everyday occurrences with newspaper accounts, magazine articles, and TV coverage flooding current news with never-ending revelations leading to the damage of many careers in the public eye, although not as many as might be expected. Damaged careers, according to Rosen’s account, don’t get much attention. Even public disclosure doesn’t appear to slow the behavior down, seemingly adding another feather in the headdress of the famous. The more the reports become public, the more the allegations grow. Easy money and fame seem to flow to the accusers, while not much happens to the perpetrator. Public displeasure seems tepid at best. I have to confess, however, to my own interest to such behavior. I enjoy reading reputable accounts of such behavior for some reason I can’t explain, a shortcoming no doubt connected to my nosiness. Rosen’s is certainly credible. Rosen is no hack writer that looks in every corner for something nefarious going on. His research is extensive and well-grounded. The conduct is egregious and should not have widespread acceptance. But there you have it. Rosen found it to be alive and well and decided to tell us about it. Why? He’ll explain that somewhat in his book, although I’m not sure I picked up on it completely. No doubt residuals and royalties in the publication of his book had something to do with it. I would be more likely to read about it in a well-published and edited book than I would in a scandal mag. Something to do with credibility, I suppose. If you are of the same bent, read this book. I can guarantee you will enjoy it. Schuyler T Wallace Author of TIN LIZARD TALES

  8. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    This book covers a lot of ground. The first half of the book could have been called "How much I hated working for the Wallace family". Rosen goes on and on about Mike Wallace and his son Chris. It does validate a lot of the rumors and assumptions I heard and made about some of the people he worked with and for. I think he could have been more critical on the Clintons but you expected it based on the tone of the book being left leaning, albeit covertly vs overtly for the most part. Rosen's career This book covers a lot of ground. The first half of the book could have been called "How much I hated working for the Wallace family". Rosen goes on and on about Mike Wallace and his son Chris. It does validate a lot of the rumors and assumptions I heard and made about some of the people he worked with and for. I think he could have been more critical on the Clintons but you expected it based on the tone of the book being left leaning, albeit covertly vs overtly for the most part. Rosen's career behind the scenes has been incredibly fulfilling for him I would imagine. He was involved in covering many of the huge scandals our nation has seen. Some of them, I remember watching from the other side as a viewer. It is very interesting to see what went into producing a great show that at least I enjoyed. I am never disappointed when I read these books to find that some of these folks are great friends with some people you would never imagine. For instance I read a memoir from Tommy Davidson from In Living Color and one of his close friends was Michael Bolton. In typical liberal attack, no book is complete without a thorough lashing of Trump. Obviously Rosen has an axe to grind with Trump because of Trump purchasing multiple country clubs where Rosen was a member. It is sad because although I agree that Trump can be obnoxious and rude, I think he did a good job as POTUS. Rosen writes that there was no wire tapping against Republicans, this does not make it true. Devon Nunez and other Republicans were in fact wiretapped. Additionally, known false information was provided by FBI and other government agencies to the courts, and Trump and his campaign were 100% spied on. The fact that the courts approved it based on false information is irrelevant. The fact that knowingly false information was provided, and provided by a political rival that was under investigation is chilling and should have landed all parties involved in prison. Of course he mentioned Charlottesville. Anyone worth their salt, would know that this is a bogus allegation and if you have an inch of integrity and read the entire transcript and in context, you would see the same. I think the most comical things he said was the he thought Trump had the beginnings of Alzheimer's. Curiously absent was any comment on Biden and his cognitive decline. His comment about anti-fascism and saying "I wonder if she was thinking about Trump" in Chapter 33, Is comical since it is known that ANTIFA uses Fascism to force their "Anti-Fascism" rhetoric. The book is great. I enjoyed it and recommend it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Budd Margolis

    Another book with insight into the dark side of some of the most celebrated onscreen journalists and the producers who deserve more credit than they ever receive. Why are so many top names in TV so insecure, abusive, misogynists as well as assholes? Does it seem that to get ahead, in the past, one had to be utterly ruthless and vile as well as talented and intelligent? Rosen lays out his career as we travel from job to job, story to story, and many insights and lessons as to what it took to creat Another book with insight into the dark side of some of the most celebrated onscreen journalists and the producers who deserve more credit than they ever receive. Why are so many top names in TV so insecure, abusive, misogynists as well as assholes? Does it seem that to get ahead, in the past, one had to be utterly ruthless and vile as well as talented and intelligent? Rosen lays out his career as we travel from job to job, story to story, and many insights and lessons as to what it took to create some amazing revelations that often changed views and the laws of the land. But his vast and long-serving experience at CBS's 60 Minutes, arguably the best TV journalism created, tells the story of how society has changed, and highlights what needed to change, hopefully for the better. The 60 Minutes formula, how to interview, the different areas to cover to be perceived as well rounded and not typecast into any theme, the preparation and psychological process to get the best interviews are explained and worthy for anyone interested in how TV journalism works. The culture is real Mad Men. And the age of TV as a dominant medium, now in decline, is well recorded and depicted. Imagine what quality would have been possible with professional behavior and no egos? 60 Minutes should have had the insight to have had a full psychiatric staff on the floor to cope with the abuses. And management & HR has a responsibility as well. What strikes me is the stark proof that journalism, TV or print, has informed and changed our society mostly for good. That the recent lie of fake news, empowered by digital formats and the internet, is an attack against truth meant to harm society, fracture the common good and divide us in. order to control us. 60 MInutes was as much a part of our culture and history as any force in America. But the abuse that was allowed to permeate that company, and others, is a sad statement of the lack of moral values of the past. For that, this is an especially worthy read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. With this book, I have discovered that I have always been a news junkie and I held 60 Minutes with the highest regard. At first, the book is a little terrifying because if you are familiar with these anchors, correspondents, and journalists and their work, you would think they are professional and respectable most of the time. You then get to really know them through the eyes of a co-worker. My attention was kept because I had to know more about the sources and how these stories were even caught With this book, I have discovered that I have always been a news junkie and I held 60 Minutes with the highest regard. At first, the book is a little terrifying because if you are familiar with these anchors, correspondents, and journalists and their work, you would think they are professional and respectable most of the time. You then get to really know them through the eyes of a co-worker. My attention was kept because I had to know more about the sources and how these stories were even caught. Then if you are familiar at all with the show The Newsroom, I couldn’t get it out of my head. I don’t understand others views like ‘this book is pointless and is about a somewhat disgruntled employee’. I completely disagree. When have you loved your job the whole time? Did you love certain aspects and hate certain people? What can we learn through you and your job experience? I read this as I wanted to know more about 60 Minutes and I can’t dismiss good journalism. You have to admit, Ira played a huge role in these stories being on air and it’s scary to think if Wallace was in a mood then we as the country might miss out on a huge debacle. I no longer have to imagine how it was at the offices at 60 Minutes and I am thankful. It was saddening to hear of those passing and how some deteriorated beforehand, but conflicting when as a woman you think, I am going to be reduced to how good I was in bed? And to know a lot of the men really just used women like a tissue was disappointing and annoying especially when I held them to that highest regard. Good thing I always loved and respected Leslie Stahl.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This was a very well written, fascinating tale of high- and lowlights that comprised the television production career of Ira Rosen. Most of his time was spent at 60 Minutes, although he did a stint at ABC with Prime Time. I admire Rosen's straight talk about the people with whom he worked--he pulls no punches and calls it just the way he sees it. Rosen seems to take his role as a truth teller seriously, and I admire his devotion to that role. Although he does not say outright that the seemingly This was a very well written, fascinating tale of high- and lowlights that comprised the television production career of Ira Rosen. Most of his time was spent at 60 Minutes, although he did a stint at ABC with Prime Time. I admire Rosen's straight talk about the people with whom he worked--he pulls no punches and calls it just the way he sees it. Rosen seems to take his role as a truth teller seriously, and I admire his devotion to that role. Although he does not say outright that the seemingly shoddy ethics of CBS Corporate, the Washington Post and The New Yorker in handling sexual harassment and opioid epidemic issues hastened his desire to retire, it strikes me as more than a coincidence that his decision to do so happened right on the heels of those events. A nit picky but important note to those of us who care about quality: I encountered two egregious editing mistakes that shocked me and diminished my admiration for those who edited and published this book. Perhaps these were only found in the Kindle edition that I read--I certainly hope so. One error was the statement about Trump that "With all the legal scrutiny he and the paper were under, he was worried that the Bezos story would be looked at as a hit piece ordered by publisher David Pecker because of Bezos’s friendship with the president." The other was a printing error, with one incomplete sentence introducing another sentence that said essentially the same thing. I look forward to learning that these errors have been corrected!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tom Holehan

    Behind the scenes at one of the landmark television series of all time, producer Ira Rosen doesn't hold back in dishing the dirt about the egos, ambitions and out of control tempers of the big names in front of the cameras on "60 Minutes". Primary target here is Mike Wallace and, though not really surprising, Rosen's depiction of the incredibly insecure but openly hostile reporter is both loving and spewed with bile. To say his relationship borders on love/hate is pretty clear. He admires the ge Behind the scenes at one of the landmark television series of all time, producer Ira Rosen doesn't hold back in dishing the dirt about the egos, ambitions and out of control tempers of the big names in front of the cameras on "60 Minutes". Primary target here is Mike Wallace and, though not really surprising, Rosen's depiction of the incredibly insecure but openly hostile reporter is both loving and spewed with bile. To say his relationship borders on love/hate is pretty clear. He admires the genius of the man and credits his career to Wallace's leadership (if that's the word). This fast-paced memoir is chock full of juicy stories about Diane Sawyer, Barbara Walters, Scott Pelley, John Gotti, Jr. (a friend!), Anderson Cooper, Andrew Cuomo and many more. There are surprises and only a few lulls and you really get the sense of how important and detailed the job of producer is. Rosen could be more open about his personal life, especially since this is a memoir of his 40+ years in the business, but the news he does reveal may be enough.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lance Hillsinger

    Ticking Clock: Behind the scenes at 60 Minutes is a tell-all book. The author, Ira Rosen, was a producer at 60 Minutes for many years. Through his eyes, the reader sees the “big names” (Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, etc.) of 60 Minutes up close and personal. “Up close and personal,” most didn’t look very good. If not true, many of the incidents recounted by the author would be considered libelous. The reader also sees how much can be involved in getting someone to talk on-camera and getting “t Ticking Clock: Behind the scenes at 60 Minutes is a tell-all book. The author, Ira Rosen, was a producer at 60 Minutes for many years. Through his eyes, the reader sees the “big names” (Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, etc.) of 60 Minutes up close and personal. “Up close and personal,” most didn’t look very good. If not true, many of the incidents recounted by the author would be considered libelous. The reader also sees how much can be involved in getting someone to talk on-camera and getting “the story” in general. Further, as a producer, the author was often better acquainted with the individual being profiled by 60 Minutes than the correspondent doing the interview. For his role in investigative journalism, the author has won numerous Emmys and other top-tier awards. In an understated way, his pride in his work and making the world a better place are evident. Still, Ticking Clock is first and foremost a tell-all book. Even though it is a “tell-all” book, Ticking Clock deserves five stars.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Doug Eymer

    While growing up and in addition to watching the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite, my family gathered around our TV every Sunday night to watch 60 Minutes. Reading Ira Rosen's behind-the-scenes stories was a clear glimpse at the Mad Men's version of TV news journalism. Mike Wallace was an emotionally frail male chauvinist, Morley Safer and Kurt Vonnegut smoked cigarettes while playing tennis with the author, and Ed Bradley was quite the lady's man. The gripping and slightly gossipy text goe While growing up and in addition to watching the CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite, my family gathered around our TV every Sunday night to watch 60 Minutes. Reading Ira Rosen's behind-the-scenes stories was a clear glimpse at the Mad Men's version of TV news journalism. Mike Wallace was an emotionally frail male chauvinist, Morley Safer and Kurt Vonnegut smoked cigarettes while playing tennis with the author, and Ed Bradley was quite the lady's man. The gripping and slightly gossipy text goes on and on. I found it fascinating to learn of the role that a producer plays in bringing a story to the screen. During the pre-Internet era, Mr. Rosen describes jetting from one airport to the next to retrieve copies of the local newspapers so that he might begin to build a story. It would usually take a few days for West Coast newspapers to reach CBS offices, and Ira was constantly attempting to get the jump on a breaking news item that may have not yet reached New York City. This book is a quick and enjoyable read. I highly recommend it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Carlson

    Emmy, DuPont and Peabody Award winning producer Ira Rosen talks everything news and behind the scenes in Tickling Clock: Behind the Scenes at 60 Minutes (pp.324). I grew up watching my late Dad watch the show every Sunday. Back then it was must see television especially because there were only a few stations to watch. I can now fully appreciate why he enjoyed the show because I now make time for it when there's a million other choices. Rosen, who's very likable, probably received a nice paycheck Emmy, DuPont and Peabody Award winning producer Ira Rosen talks everything news and behind the scenes in Tickling Clock: Behind the Scenes at 60 Minutes (pp.324). I grew up watching my late Dad watch the show every Sunday. Back then it was must see television especially because there were only a few stations to watch. I can now fully appreciate why he enjoyed the show because I now make time for it when there's a million other choices. Rosen, who's very likable, probably received a nice paycheck for revealing the dirt on what goes on. As a young man who was living at home with his parents he got the call to come join 60 Minutes but they didn't tell him about the late Mike Wallace. The portrait is anything but flattering. Along with some of the other personalities we know; Katie Couric-who believes she didn't know Lauer was a creep, The Clintons and Diane Sawyer apparently are less than appealing. Bill Whitaker, Anderson Cooper, The Carters and Lesley Stahl are the classiest.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hal

    Ira Rosen's rambling reminiscence and revelations of his career behind the scenes producing the renowned investigative news program. Although there is a lot of scintillating insides onto what took place over the years I found it a bit flat. His profiles and relations with some of the note worthies such as Wallace and Kroft were at times interesting and revealing. Both difficult men to work with and Ira should be noted for putting up with their crap over the years. There was a lot of info on some Ira Rosen's rambling reminiscence and revelations of his career behind the scenes producing the renowned investigative news program. Although there is a lot of scintillating insides onto what took place over the years I found it a bit flat. His profiles and relations with some of the note worthies such as Wallace and Kroft were at times interesting and revealing. Both difficult men to work with and Ira should be noted for putting up with their crap over the years. There was a lot of info on some of the famous stories and investigations they did and again interesting at times, slow at other times. The one factor which both made the series famous and manipulative was how they could really shape and edit their pieces to really sway perceptions, and not always fairly. But what is fair after all in journalism anymore. Fake news the new buzzword, often pioneered by this news program.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I waited a day to write a review. I’ve already referred to this book (but mostly this writer / producer) more than I might have expected. There is a lot to take in here. As a professional woman of a certain age, I was very interested in the accounts of terrible behavior in the workplace but I truly had no idea how brazen and perpetual and ubiquitous these behaviors were. This positively eviscerates Mike Wallace, so if you want to stay ignorant of exactly how despicable he was, this is not for yo I waited a day to write a review. I’ve already referred to this book (but mostly this writer / producer) more than I might have expected. There is a lot to take in here. As a professional woman of a certain age, I was very interested in the accounts of terrible behavior in the workplace but I truly had no idea how brazen and perpetual and ubiquitous these behaviors were. This positively eviscerates Mike Wallace, so if you want to stay ignorant of exactly how despicable he was, this is not for you. I loved the book and the insider’s look at the news magazine shows, investigative journalism, and frankly, one hysterical (but horribly misogynistic) story about Ed Bradley.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    I'm not a fan of TV or the news but years ago this was the 1 weekly program that I watched. My husband said it was a waste of 60 Minutes and I knew it was geared for ratings more than to inform. This was a fascinating read. I even took notes in my book lovers journal. It doesn't paint a very pretty picture. I'm not a fan of TV or the news but years ago this was the 1 weekly program that I watched. My husband said it was a waste of 60 Minutes and I knew it was geared for ratings more than to inform. This was a fascinating read. I even took notes in my book lovers journal. It doesn't paint a very pretty picture.

  19. 4 out of 5

    James Baynes

    Absolutely the most boring book I have read in a very long time. In the first twenty or so pages, the author drops names left and right, after bragging about all the awards he’s won. I wish I could get a refund. I’m going to attempt to finish it, but not anytime soon.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I'm a HUGE 60 Minutes fan---have recorded it weekly for years and enjoy most of the stories. This book was a must read for me. Intriguing look behind the scenes told by Rosen in vignettes. I especially enjoyed recalling the stories featured and remembering seeing the profiles over the years. I'm a HUGE 60 Minutes fan---have recorded it weekly for years and enjoy most of the stories. This book was a must read for me. Intriguing look behind the scenes told by Rosen in vignettes. I especially enjoyed recalling the stories featured and remembering seeing the profiles over the years.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Terry Dullum

    Good information and good gossip about 60 Minute correspondents. Mr. Rosen explains which are the good guys and which are the bad guys among the likes of Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, Ed Bradley, Steve Kroft, Leslie Stahl, Katie Couric, Anderson Cooper and others.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    An interesting behind the scenes look at 60 Minutes. Certainly doesn't paint a flattering portrait of many of the show's correspondents. One of the few journalism biographies I've read that doesn't touch on 9/11. An interesting behind the scenes look at 60 Minutes. Certainly doesn't paint a flattering portrait of many of the show's correspondents. One of the few journalism biographies I've read that doesn't touch on 9/11.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thomas J Coelho

    Well written, interesting story. This is not the type of book I usually read. I started this and read in 72 hours. It kept my attention because it was interesting. The author did a great job.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Miller

    I hate read this book. I am just not here for nostalgia pieces about the good old days where white men were free to abuse and harass in the name of a good story. I refuse to believe that talent has to equal asshole. These men all behaved badly because they could and the author helped that happen.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dan Gilliatt

    Great book very fascinating. I hope we can all view the stories with a proper historical context. Maybe some of the people he talks about were not great guys to hangout or work with/for. It does not change my perception of the stories that they told.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    Interesting read on what makes 60 minutes “tick”. Rosen has a huge ego so I took every thing he wrote with a gain of salt as everything that worked was due to him & everything that didn’t was someone else’s failure. Still I am a great admirer of 60 minutes & found this entertaining.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Romina Villaflor-Wilson

    Very impressive take on the ins and outs of investigative journalism, I enjoyed the back stories behind the rise and fall of the most prominent people in the world of tv news (being an avowed news junkie).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jane Galvin

    Riveting Are there any decent peoplee ut ther Are there any decent people in government and journalism? After reading g this book it makes you wonder.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pat Targonski

    Riveting.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I enjoyed this look behind the scenes at 60 Minutes. I used to watch it long ago. Sure are a lot of assholes in top anchor spots!

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