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A sumptuously illustrated adaptation casts the powerful imagery of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel in a vivid new format. From the green light across the bay to the billboard with spectacled eyes, F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 American masterpiece roars to life in Katharine Woodman-Maynard's exquisite graphic novel--among the first adaptations of the book in this g A sumptuously illustrated adaptation casts the powerful imagery of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel in a vivid new format. From the green light across the bay to the billboard with spectacled eyes, F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 American masterpiece roars to life in Katharine Woodman-Maynard's exquisite graphic novel--among the first adaptations of the book in this genre. Painted in lush watercolors, the inventive interpretation emphasizes both the extravagance and mystery of the characters, as well as the fluidity of Nick Carraway's unreliable narration. Excerpts from the original text wend through the illustrations, and imagery and metaphors are taken to literal, and often whimsical, extremes, such as when a beautiful partygoer blooms into an orchid and Daisy Buchanan pushes Gatsby across the sky on a cloud. This faithful yet modern adaptation will appeal to fans with deep knowledge of the classic, while the graphic novel format makes it an ideal teaching tool to engage students. With its timeless critique of class, power, and obsession, The Great Gatsby Graphic Novel captures the energy of an era and the enduring resonance of one of the world's most beloved books.


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A sumptuously illustrated adaptation casts the powerful imagery of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel in a vivid new format. From the green light across the bay to the billboard with spectacled eyes, F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 American masterpiece roars to life in Katharine Woodman-Maynard's exquisite graphic novel--among the first adaptations of the book in this g A sumptuously illustrated adaptation casts the powerful imagery of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great American novel in a vivid new format. From the green light across the bay to the billboard with spectacled eyes, F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 American masterpiece roars to life in Katharine Woodman-Maynard's exquisite graphic novel--among the first adaptations of the book in this genre. Painted in lush watercolors, the inventive interpretation emphasizes both the extravagance and mystery of the characters, as well as the fluidity of Nick Carraway's unreliable narration. Excerpts from the original text wend through the illustrations, and imagery and metaphors are taken to literal, and often whimsical, extremes, such as when a beautiful partygoer blooms into an orchid and Daisy Buchanan pushes Gatsby across the sky on a cloud. This faithful yet modern adaptation will appeal to fans with deep knowledge of the classic, while the graphic novel format makes it an ideal teaching tool to engage students. With its timeless critique of class, power, and obsession, The Great Gatsby Graphic Novel captures the energy of an era and the enduring resonance of one of the world's most beloved books.

30 review for The Great Gatsby: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    This is a beautiful graphic-novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby that does justice to its source material and is a worthy companion. K. Woodman-Maynard's illustrations are exquisite, with a dreamy quality that evokes the elegance of the era and of Fitzgerald's rich setting. I especially liked how she reinforced the personalities of Daisy and Tom with the shape of their speech balloons. Daisy's are cloud-like, with wisps that wind and curl; in a part where she's drunk, the balloons are a little m This is a beautiful graphic-novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby that does justice to its source material and is a worthy companion. K. Woodman-Maynard's illustrations are exquisite, with a dreamy quality that evokes the elegance of the era and of Fitzgerald's rich setting. I especially liked how she reinforced the personalities of Daisy and Tom with the shape of their speech balloons. Daisy's are cloud-like, with wisps that wind and curl; in a part where she's drunk, the balloons are a little messier. By contrast, the speech bubbles of her domineering husband, Tom, are box-shaped, with sharp points. Dialogue is neatly printed and clear; there's never any mistaking who's talking. Woodman-Maynard printed the actual text in creative ways, such as along a driveway or vertically along drapes. Readers should take time to read the author's note at the end. Here, Woodman-Maynard talks of her impressive research, which ranged from studying cars to the fashion of the era. With this said, she didn't aim for exact verisimilitude; her illustrations pull from other eras and her own imagination. There's a careful continuity throughout, however, and had she not explained such creative liberties, I wouldn't have known. She also makes clear that this isn’t a literal interpretation of the novel. She speaks glowingly of The Great Gatsby, encouraging any readers who haven’t read the source material to do so. As much as the graphic-novel format works for this story, it did limit her and she was unable to highlight all of The Great Gatsby’s themes. As she says,My goal was to capture the mood of The Great Gatsby, and so there are a few areas where I took more artistic license than others. For example, I reordered certain scenes so that they better suit the pacing of the graphic novel . . . Maynard-Woodman also purposely omitted Nick’s anti-Semitic view of Meyer Wolfshiem:Nick’s depiction of Meyer Wolfshiem is especially difficult. Although both Wolfshiem and Gatsby engage in illegal activity and are essentially gangsters, Gatsby is described as a mythic and beautiful character while the depiction of Wolfshiem is an anti-Semitic caricature of a Jewish mobster.Maynard-Woodman resolved this challenge by illustrating Wolfshiem in such a way that his intimidating and mysterious personality remains intact; that he is Jewish isn’t emphasized. Some readers may object to the changes Woodman-Maynard made, but she achieved what I believe she set out to do: create a loving homage to a favorite novel. I could continue to praise this graphic novel, but I'll stop with some personal high praise: I’m not a fan of the source material, yet I, someone who very rarely rereads anything--and never anything I disliked--was intrigued enough by Woodman-Maynard’s creation that I’d take a second look at The Great Gatsby. NOTE: I received this as an advance reader copy from LibraryThing in September 2020. As always with ARCs, this didn't affect my rating and review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I do not like the original novel. I did not like The Great Gatsby: The Graphic Novel, the other adaptation I read a few months ago. So of course I read this newest adaptation when it came into my library, because I hate myself that much. This one is a bit laughable with the artist adapting Fitzgerald's metaphors into actual illustrations: look at Daisy and Jordan float, look at the orchid that is also an actress. The green light looks like the Emerald City of Oz sitting on the horizon. Also, she I do not like the original novel. I did not like The Great Gatsby: The Graphic Novel, the other adaptation I read a few months ago. So of course I read this newest adaptation when it came into my library, because I hate myself that much. This one is a bit laughable with the artist adapting Fitzgerald's metaphors into actual illustrations: look at Daisy and Jordan float, look at the orchid that is also an actress. The green light looks like the Emerald City of Oz sitting on the horizon. Also, she decided to excise the antisemitic depiction of Meyer Wolfsheim (whom she calls Meyer "Wolfshiem," which I cannot tell is part of removing his Jewish roots or a simple typo), while leaving in all of Tom Buchanan's white supremacist diatribes -- because it's okay to offend Black people but not Jewish people? Huh? Anyway, the original novel is now in the public domain so I suppose I'll be hate reading a few more of these before too long.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gerardine Betancourt

    I love this surreal interpretation of The Great Gatsby. It is an easy way to introduce us to this wonderful novel. It is not an exact representation of the novel but K. Woodman Maynard knew how to perfectly capture each of the characters in a beautiful way. 4.5 stars ⭐⭐⭐⭐💫 Thanks to netgalley and Candlewick Press for this Arc copy in exchange for a honest review

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Fryman

    I MUCH prefer the original, but can see how some might enjoy this graphic novel version, especially those that find the original text too daunting. **Note: I received an advanced copy for review from the publisher via Netgalley.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Every time I teach juniors, I always make sure to sign up for "The Great Gatsby," but it's not always the most accessible text for all students. The kids who can read it usually enjoy it greatly; those that struggle to read it, hate it greatly. Our department provides graphic novels as options for those kids to get the classics in a more digestible way. Graphic novel adaptations of the classics can be hit or miss, as most teachers can attest. But Woodman-Maynard's adaptation of "Gatsby" has a lo Every time I teach juniors, I always make sure to sign up for "The Great Gatsby," but it's not always the most accessible text for all students. The kids who can read it usually enjoy it greatly; those that struggle to read it, hate it greatly. Our department provides graphic novels as options for those kids to get the classics in a more digestible way. Graphic novel adaptations of the classics can be hit or miss, as most teachers can attest. But Woodman-Maynard's adaptation of "Gatsby" has a lot to offer the classroom teacher. The author sticks to the original text for the most part, obviously cutting some parts of the novel out. What has been added doesn't stray too far from the story. There were a few minor rearrangements of events, but nothing that took away from the author's (probable) original intent too much. The only issue I had was the omission of the description of T.J. Eckleburg, which is crucial for some of the main themes. The artistic portrayal of the billboard wouldn't make the themes and connections apparent to lower-level readers either. The author does mention that there were some themes that weren't as evident in the adaptation for the sake of the format, but this arguably could have added one more page (or even a small little panel or two when it first pops up). I will say that other than this, I couldn't find anything else that was cut that would have made it more difficult to teach this the way I teach the original novel. I was expecting some of the less "famous" quotes to be missing, but I was happily surprised. I enjoyed the watercolor artwork of this text, even though I wasn't completely mad about the character illustrations. The splash pages were especially noteworthy, and I think even if I don't adopt the whole novel for classroom instruction, I'll certainly buy it to use some of the full page illustrations for some scenes. There's also a few scenes that portray the self-confessed struggle Woodman-Maynard had in depicting the events of the original from the perspective of the unreliable narrator, Nick. I think those would be great discussion starters when teaching the original as well.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Madara

    I love The Great Gatsby. I mean - it's been 7 years since I've read the book but I remember really enjoying it. This graphic novel adaptation was a bit off for me. The art is beautiful, I love the watercolor feel but the placement (and font) of the text was a bit off. Some of the quotes just seemed out of place or didn't make sense, I had to reread some of the pages a couple times to understand the context. Overall - it's pretty but I wouldn't keep it on my shelf... Review copy provided by the pub I love The Great Gatsby. I mean - it's been 7 years since I've read the book but I remember really enjoying it. This graphic novel adaptation was a bit off for me. The art is beautiful, I love the watercolor feel but the placement (and font) of the text was a bit off. Some of the quotes just seemed out of place or didn't make sense, I had to reread some of the pages a couple times to understand the context. Overall - it's pretty but I wouldn't keep it on my shelf... Review copy provided by the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)

    Full Review on The Candid Cover 3.5 Stars The Great Gatsby adapted by K. Woodman-Maynard is a great way to make The Great Gatsby more accessible in a graphic novel format. I enjoyed the slight changes the author makes to the source material, and the art style makes elements such as mood and symbolism much easier to understand. However, I also felt as though the story is rushed, and the art also makes the text difficult to read at times. Despite this, I still appreciated what the book accomplishes Full Review on The Candid Cover 3.5 Stars The Great Gatsby adapted by K. Woodman-Maynard is a great way to make The Great Gatsby more accessible in a graphic novel format. I enjoyed the slight changes the author makes to the source material, and the art style makes elements such as mood and symbolism much easier to understand. However, I also felt as though the story is rushed, and the art also makes the text difficult to read at times. Despite this, I still appreciated what the book accomplishes in terms of making The Great Gatsby easier to digest. This book is a graphic novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby that makes the classic story more appealing for a modern audience. I always love to see classics being made more accessible, and the visual form of this book does a great job of this. This is an adaptation, so of course it is not identical to the source material, but I found it mostly faithful, and I liked the changes that the author did make. However, I also found the story a bit rushed, and the events happen so quickly that there is not much time to process them. The original novel is also quite short, which may have influenced this, but this makes the story hard to follow, and I’m not sure I would recommend this one for those who are unfamiliar with the original story. ❀ GORGEOUS ART The art style of this graphic novel is gorgeous, and I loved the use of watercolours. This style feels light, and it makes all the literary elements of the novel much clearer. I particularly enjoyed the way the colours reflect the mood of each scene and how the shapes of the text bubbles match each of the characters’ personalities. I also appreciated the use of quotes from the original that stand out. ❀ MUTED COLOURS That being said, I also think the art style can be considered a weakness. The placement of the quotes, while visually appealing, can be difficult to read because of their intricate shapes. These more eloquent quotes also contrast with the short, simple sentences in the dialogue, which breaks the flow of the story. I am also unsure if the use of watercolours really do Gatsby’s lavish parties justice, as the colours in this book are more muted. ❀ CONFUSING TO READ I appreciate the efforts of the graphic novel, The Great Gatsby by K. Woodman-Maynard, to make the original story more accessible to today’s audience. This adaptation follows the source material closely, and I enjoyed the moments where the author strayed from it. However, I am still unsure how I feel about this book as a whole. I enjoyed the art style’s ability to make literary elements more obvious, but at times, the story can be difficult to read and confusing. I would recommend this one to those who already know and love The Great Gatsby, as an addition to their collection.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Although my life is nothing like that depicted in F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel, frequently taught in high school English classes, I have always loved this book. Perhaps I was fortunate to read it on my own and not as part of the ELA curriculum many years ago. Because of my fondness for the original book, I approached this graphic novel adaptation with more than a little trepidation. "Do we really need a graphic version of Gatsby?" I asked myself. "How could anyone do justice to all the th Although my life is nothing like that depicted in F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel, frequently taught in high school English classes, I have always loved this book. Perhaps I was fortunate to read it on my own and not as part of the ELA curriculum many years ago. Because of my fondness for the original book, I approached this graphic novel adaptation with more than a little trepidation. "Do we really need a graphic version of Gatsby?" I asked myself. "How could anyone do justice to all the themes and scenes and descriptions of that book?" Well, as it turns out, es, we did, and yes, this story works in this format since the artist captures the era in which Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan lived quite well, and this book only added to my appreciation for the original work. There is no way that all of the themes explored in the novel could fit into this version, but the artist chose scenes as well as colors wisely, and with the word balloons that contained the book's dialogue, managed to depict the characters perfectly. For instance, Daisy's words are contained in wispy, feathery balloons, and she's every bit as dreamy and frothy and oh, so desirable as she was depicted in the original story. She and Jordan Baker float above a couch in one scene, and the mansions of East Egg and West Egg are surreal, almost like wedding cakes come to life. One of my favorite scenes concerns Gatsby's wonderous library, and another favorite--a double-page spread on p. 225--contains my favorite quote from the book, summing up how individuals like Tom and Daisy Buchanan live their lives, leaving wreckage behind them for others to clean up: "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy. They smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money. Or their vast carelessness. Or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they made..." (p. 225). The illustration, partially covering two pages, shows Tom and Daisy blithely tripping into the future as they climb over that wreckage with not a care in the world. As with the original book, it is hard to know what to make of Nick and his trustworthiness about everything he sees, a point the illustrator mentions in the back matter. I'm still undecided about him since there are so many moments in which he contradicts himself, but I am enthusiastic about this graphic version of the book, which has captured the sights, sounds, and feel of the 1920s with so much hedonism and disregard for anyone else's needs. Gatsby's obsession with Daisy, his own path to success, and his single-minded pursuit of the woman he lost are riddled with so many cracks as well as self-delusion that it still breaks my heart to watch this tragedy with all its twists, turns, lies, and omissions, unfold. High school English teachers would do well to use this adaptation in support of the original book even though much, including several powerful descriptions, have been omitted.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    Like many Americans, I first ready The Great Gatsby in high school. However, unlike most of my classmates it became one of my favorite novels. And now that the novel is in the public domain I am looking forward to some creative retellings. To that end, Graphic Novelist, K. Woodman-Maynard has presented a beautiful and faithful adaptation of the original work. The story was perfectly pared down to suit the medium, all while keeping much of the metaphors and imagery intact. One of the most noticea Like many Americans, I first ready The Great Gatsby in high school. However, unlike most of my classmates it became one of my favorite novels. And now that the novel is in the public domain I am looking forward to some creative retellings. To that end, Graphic Novelist, K. Woodman-Maynard has presented a beautiful and faithful adaptation of the original work. The story was perfectly pared down to suit the medium, all while keeping much of the metaphors and imagery intact. One of the most noticeable changes was taking out the anti-Semitic and racist scenes and descriptions. In the afterward Woodman-Maynard discusses her reasoning behind removing them. These parts of the novel are important for discussion, but are not important to the plot and so there absence doesn't take away from the story. Aside from the story, the most amazing part of this adaptation was the art. The characters look like they stepped out of an advertisement from the 1920s. The color pallet, the lines and the movement of the characters complimented their personalities and role in the story. And the paneling and text placement were well thought out and just added to the feel of the book. This book would be a great addition when reading The Great Gatsby for school, it helps the reader visualize the metaphors in a way that helps understanding without taking the place of the original text. Honestly I loved everything about this adaptation - which is a rare thing for me. Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tanya Ball

    Thanks so much to Library Thing, Candlewick Press, and K. Woodman-Maynard for an advanced copy of this graphic novel! I loved it! I was worried that it would lose so much as I have seen happen with other book to GN adaptation. I would definitely recommend reading the original novel before the graphic novel so that you can fully enjoy the gorgeous language and other nuances. However, K. Woodman-Freeman has done a wonderful job in keeping the important as well as subtle points of the story so that Thanks so much to Library Thing, Candlewick Press, and K. Woodman-Maynard for an advanced copy of this graphic novel! I loved it! I was worried that it would lose so much as I have seen happen with other book to GN adaptation. I would definitely recommend reading the original novel before the graphic novel so that you can fully enjoy the gorgeous language and other nuances. However, K. Woodman-Freeman has done a wonderful job in keeping the important as well as subtle points of the story so that anyone can grasp it, first time or no. The art is GORGEOUS!! Woodman-Freeman has especially nailed what I always pictured Daisy to be. I loved seeing her interpretations of first meetings, of Eckleberg, of everything. My copy is in black and white, but Candlewick Press was gracious enough to include a pamphlet containing a few pages of the finished artwork. It is STUNNING!! The colors and style are PERFECT for the time and setting of the novel, and I am very tempted to pick up a copy when it comes out!

  11. 5 out of 5

    ℳacarena

    K. Woodman-Maynard's graphic adaptation of The Great Gatsby captures the essence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece. The art reinforces some of the most notorious aspects of the story, the characters are nicely depicted and the adaptation of the original story is well summarised. It's been 8 years since I read The Great Gatsby, so when I saw this graphic novel adaptation I was quite curious to see how it was, and I'm glad I requested it. Thanks to Candlewick Press and NetGalley for providing me K. Woodman-Maynard's graphic adaptation of The Great Gatsby captures the essence of F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece. The art reinforces some of the most notorious aspects of the story, the characters are nicely depicted and the adaptation of the original story is well summarised. It's been 8 years since I read The Great Gatsby, so when I saw this graphic novel adaptation I was quite curious to see how it was, and I'm glad I requested it. Thanks to Candlewick Press and NetGalley for providing me with this e-arc in exchange for my honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Almeida

    This is my first time writing a review for a graphic novel, so it should be known that my rating is for the presentation and artwork rather than the original source material of The Great Gatsby. The watercolors in this are absolutely beautiful. I've noticed that multiple graphic novels of The Great Gatsby are starting to be published, and I'm hoping that eventually, one will use the vibrant and extravagant artwork and colors that match with the facade Jay Gatsby puts on for everyone. This is not This is my first time writing a review for a graphic novel, so it should be known that my rating is for the presentation and artwork rather than the original source material of The Great Gatsby. The watercolors in this are absolutely beautiful. I've noticed that multiple graphic novels of The Great Gatsby are starting to be published, and I'm hoping that eventually, one will use the vibrant and extravagant artwork and colors that match with the facade Jay Gatsby puts on for everyone. This is not that novel, but I appreciated the colors and style all the same. Important quotes are presented in a unique way that helps them stand out on certain pages. Some of the symbolism and overall themes are presented in a way that could make them more accessible to struggling readers. I think some worthy analysis could be done of the color choices for the artwork in this text and how that matches the mood of certain scenes, as well. Chapter 7 with the scene of Tom finding out that Myrtle is going West was done well; it chooses quotes that I think would help students focus on the significance of that scene without getting caught up in all of the language, which some students often find difficult. I also felt that Chapter 9 with the flashback of Gatsby and Daisy was particularly beautiful, and possibly one of my favorite scenes in this version of the text. I think it's worth saying that this definitely isn't a replacement for the novel in a classroom setting. However, I do feel this would be a great supplemental text to have students compare to the original as well as other graphic novels of Gatsby. Truthfully, the author's note is what is most worth teaching. It is mentioned that Meyer Wolfshiem's depiction was changed to avoid the anti-Semitic caricature he is originally described as in the novel. This would be an easy way to help teachers discuss the problems of Fitzgerald's work. The author also explains their inspiration and reasoning for all of the artistic choices made, which could be valuable in showing young readers the choices that go into creating a novel or any work of art. Overall, if you still teach The Great Gatsby, I recommend checking out this version.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    So I liked it and I disliked it all in the same breath and I'm okay with that. The mood was captured wholeheartedly which is a major positive for the storytelling but one of those elements wasn't as powerful and I don't know if it was it's placement or disconnection to the text itself but the additional narrative that was "written" on walls, doorways, floors to give readers a taste of the original fell flat. But it worked the intention. I don't know if it needed to be more apparent, more integra So I liked it and I disliked it all in the same breath and I'm okay with that. The mood was captured wholeheartedly which is a major positive for the storytelling but one of those elements wasn't as powerful and I don't know if it was it's placement or disconnection to the text itself but the additional narrative that was "written" on walls, doorways, floors to give readers a taste of the original fell flat. But it worked the intention. I don't know if it needed to be more apparent, more integrated with what was happening on the page, or just acknowledged differently. Yet, when it the ARC was finished, readers are right back understanding Fitzgerald's motivations for writing a story about illusions and introducing us to these flawed characters making huge mistakes but not seeming to learn from any of them. It's a sad sort of book and the illustrations do capture that well. I'll totally have a few copies in our HS library for sure, but it's not a super-love, hug it to my chest kind.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica C Writes

    It's hard for me to properly write a review for this book. First off, it's my first graphic novel, so I do not have much to compare it to. I enjoyed the art style, and I think the color palette perfectly captured the atmosphere and mood of the original text. The metaphorical interpretations of some scenes were certainly fascinating, and it was a joy to watch the book come to life on the page. However, I do not think the flow of the story worked very well. There were a couple of instances where th It's hard for me to properly write a review for this book. First off, it's my first graphic novel, so I do not have much to compare it to. I enjoyed the art style, and I think the color palette perfectly captured the atmosphere and mood of the original text. The metaphorical interpretations of some scenes were certainly fascinating, and it was a joy to watch the book come to life on the page. However, I do not think the flow of the story worked very well. There were a couple of instances where the scene changed so abruptly, that I was getting lost (despite having read the book by Fitzgerald twice & seen the movie at least three times). I think the book needed at least another 10 or so pages to fill in some of those gaps, especially for those who are picking up the graphic novel without having ever read the original work. Overall, I think this first experience with graphic novels was an enjoyable one, and I will definitely be on the lookout for more works by this author!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'The Great Gatsby: A Graphic Novel Adaptation' by F. Scott Fitzgerald with illustrations and adaptation by K. Woodman-Maynard is the second recent adaptation I've read of this famous novel. Nick Carraway is the narrator to this slowly unfolding tragedy. From the enigmatic Jay Gatsby to the troubled marriage of Tom and Daisy Buchanan. Unfolding against a cacophonous background of early automobiles and free-flowing booze. I liked this adaptation a bit better, even though it's a looser adaptation. Th 'The Great Gatsby: A Graphic Novel Adaptation' by F. Scott Fitzgerald with illustrations and adaptation by K. Woodman-Maynard is the second recent adaptation I've read of this famous novel. Nick Carraway is the narrator to this slowly unfolding tragedy. From the enigmatic Jay Gatsby to the troubled marriage of Tom and Daisy Buchanan. Unfolding against a cacophonous background of early automobiles and free-flowing booze. I liked this adaptation a bit better, even though it's a looser adaptation. The story flows rather well. I was less enamored of the art. It had a kind of unfinished quality to it. Hopefully that was just because I was reading a review copy. I did like the artist's choice to incorporate narrative in to the flowing art. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Candlewick Press and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dan Allbery

    K. Woodman's adaptation is STUNNING! The watercolor pictures are masterpieces and her use of color is intentional and mood-altering. Shockingly, I have never read The Great Gatsby before, not sure how I dodged this book in high school. However, leafing through the pages at a local bookstore made me pick it up. Since I lacked the background knowledge, I would say I was having to fill in many details that caused me to leap from scene-to-scene. A common fallout of text-to-graphic adaptation. With t K. Woodman's adaptation is STUNNING! The watercolor pictures are masterpieces and her use of color is intentional and mood-altering. Shockingly, I have never read The Great Gatsby before, not sure how I dodged this book in high school. However, leafing through the pages at a local bookstore made me pick it up. Since I lacked the background knowledge, I would say I was having to fill in many details that caused me to leap from scene-to-scene. A common fallout of text-to-graphic adaptation. With that, those who have read F. Scott Fitzgerald's original novel may not experience the gaps that I did. Woodman actually acknowledges this in her author's note. "If this is your first encounter with The Great Gatsby, I encourage you to read Fitzgerald's masterpiece. Limitations of the graphic form prevented me from highlighting all of the themes that appear in Fitzgerald's work." So it makes for a better companion piece as opposed to a stand-alone. Recommended for GR 8 and up (*if you've previously read the novel).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Madeline (The Bookish Mutant)

    ⭐︎Thank you to Edelweiss and Candlewick Press for giving me this eARC in exchange for an honest review!⭐︎ This was an interesting adaptation of the classic novel! Personally, something about it didn’t quite live up to the glory of the source material, but it certainly came close. The art style was cute, simple and stylized, but not overtly so. The interpretations of the characters and their thoughts were certainly faithful. I especially liked how Daisy and Tom were drawn; Daisy was as dollish as s ⭐︎Thank you to Edelweiss and Candlewick Press for giving me this eARC in exchange for an honest review!⭐︎ This was an interesting adaptation of the classic novel! Personally, something about it didn’t quite live up to the glory of the source material, but it certainly came close. The art style was cute, simple and stylized, but not overtly so. The interpretations of the characters and their thoughts were certainly faithful. I especially liked how Daisy and Tom were drawn; Daisy was as dollish as she appears in the novel, and Tom is especially imposing and stubborn. Daisy even has her own style of speech balloons that curve out at the edges when she spoke, which was a detail I loved. I loved the watercolors that were used to color the graphic novel. The shifting color schemes were especially deft when it came to conveying the different moods of the scenes. However, with that being said, I don’t completely feel like it was the right art style to adapt The Great Gatsby. Although I loved the watercolor and simple style, it failed to depict some of the lavish imagery (ex. with Gatsby’s parties) as well as the novel did. A bit more coloring and definition might have done the trick. All in all, this was an inventive adaptation of The Great Gatsby. Though it wasn’t without its flaws, it was certainly enjoyable to read and explore. 3.5 stars! (I rated the original novel 4 stars.)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Travelling Bookworm

    The Great Gatsby has been a favorite of mine ever since I first cracked its cover open in high school. The melancholy tale of vainly clinging on to the past under the decadent opulence of the post-WWI modernism mesmerized me at the first read, and continues to do so with each reread and countless adaptations the story has merited since. Woodman-Maynard's adaptation takes this story known for its powerful imagery and fascinating characters, and makes it even more magnetic with beautiful water colo The Great Gatsby has been a favorite of mine ever since I first cracked its cover open in high school. The melancholy tale of vainly clinging on to the past under the decadent opulence of the post-WWI modernism mesmerized me at the first read, and continues to do so with each reread and countless adaptations the story has merited since. Woodman-Maynard's adaptation takes this story known for its powerful imagery and fascinating characters, and makes it even more magnetic with beautiful water color illustrations. At the end of the day, it is an adaptation, so don't expect an identical retelling of the novel, but the graphic novel has definitely succeeded in capturing the spirit of the story beautifully.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Huge thanks to Candlewick Press and Edelweiss for an ARC of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest review. I, like every other high school, read the original Great Gatsby in my high school English class. It's since then turned into one of my favorite classics. I saw this graphic novel and had to get my hands on it. I loved the art in this one. It's whimsical and playful which fits perfect with the original symbolism in the story. The author captured the main parts of the story beautifully Huge thanks to Candlewick Press and Edelweiss for an ARC of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest review. I, like every other high school, read the original Great Gatsby in my high school English class. It's since then turned into one of my favorite classics. I saw this graphic novel and had to get my hands on it. I loved the art in this one. It's whimsical and playful which fits perfect with the original symbolism in the story. The author captured the main parts of the story beautifully while still sticking to the themes and plot of this story. My only gripe with this one is the fact that some of the text blended in with the background too much. Also, the text was written sideways which I felt made it hard to read in certain spots. Overall, I gave this three stars. This was a fun adaptation and a good read for those that love the Great Gatsby story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Frankie Lovely

    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review The Great Gatsby: a Graphic Novel Adaptation 4 stars What I like The Great Gatsby is one of my all time favorite books, so to be back in this story was quite a bit nostalgic for me. I feel like a graphic novel is something that is especially difficult to review. Especially one that is a retelling and therefore can hardly go wrong with the storyline and plot. I will say that this graphic novel did not butcher the story in any form o I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review The Great Gatsby: a Graphic Novel Adaptation 4 stars What I like The Great Gatsby is one of my all time favorite books, so to be back in this story was quite a bit nostalgic for me. I feel like a graphic novel is something that is especially difficult to review. Especially one that is a retelling and therefore can hardly go wrong with the storyline and plot. I will say that this graphic novel did not butcher the story in any form or fashion, so I give it points for that. I liked the watercolor imagery in this graphic novel although sometimes I found the words a bit difficult to find. Other than that, this graphic novel was enjoyable and whimsical and a great addition to any Gatsby collection.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    I remember having to read Gatsby in high school and then I ended up teaching the novel later on when I became a teacher myself. It is a staple in the high school classroom. I would have done a lot better as a student if I'd had this graphic novel version. It takes the most important parts of the story and illustrates them beautifully. It even includes some of the most important quotes. A very well-done adaptation of this classic novel. I remember having to read Gatsby in high school and then I ended up teaching the novel later on when I became a teacher myself. It is a staple in the high school classroom. I would have done a lot better as a student if I'd had this graphic novel version. It takes the most important parts of the story and illustrates them beautifully. It even includes some of the most important quotes. A very well-done adaptation of this classic novel.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vighnesh Muraly

    I didn’t really care for this book. I finished it in one sitting and it honestly did not do anything for me. I found it hard to follow and I think it’s because I haven’t The Great Gastby so I would suggest reading that first before picking this up. I wasn’t a huge fan of the art style either. It wasn’t for me and I honestly found the change in color a bit confusing too. Overall, this book just fell short of what I expected.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    What I Liked - The art was beautiful. I loved the light and airy art style and the watercolour that brought the story to life. - In general, classics intimidate me. There is a reason why The Great Gatsby (original version) sat on my shelf untouched for many years! However I appreciate that this graphic novel adaptation told the story in a way that wasn’t as intimidating, which is motivation for me to read the original novel. - I liked that the graphic novel kept some of the lines from the original What I Liked - The art was beautiful. I loved the light and airy art style and the watercolour that brought the story to life. - In general, classics intimidate me. There is a reason why The Great Gatsby (original version) sat on my shelf untouched for many years! However I appreciate that this graphic novel adaptation told the story in a way that wasn’t as intimidating, which is motivation for me to read the original novel. - I liked that the graphic novel kept some of the lines from the original book, and merged them seamlessly with the narration in the story. To be absolutely honest, sometimes these quotes went over my head but it was great to sit and reflect on some of these famous lines in literature. What I Didn’t Like - Since I never read the original The Great Gatsby book, it was difficult to piece together what was exactly happening in the story for the first 20 pages or so. - Although I didn’t dislike the characters, I felt distant from them. I didn’t know if this was a limitation of the graphic novel format. The Bottom Line I enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of The Great Gatsby, and I loved that this adaptation gave me a glimpse of a literary classic that I would be otherwise too intimidated to read. After reading this graphic novel, I feel more motivated to read the original to see how it would compare!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Evans

    This book is by no means a replacement for the original (as the author describes in their note), but the watercolor images do really add to the fantastical appearance of Gatsby’s parties and the horrific, poetic ending of the story. This is a good read for someone who wants to be reminded of major plot points and even some of the symbolism in the book came back to me from this adaptation.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Beatrice

    This is a beautiful adaptation! So, English teacher friends, if you teach Gatsby, you definitely will want a copy of this. The key word is adaptation. It is important to read the author's note at the end to understand the research that went into the visuals. There's a lot to discuss and break down. I loved that she was attempting to truly illustrate the metaphors within the novel. It was beautiful and dreamy and an exciting new way to experience a book I've read many times. This is a beautiful adaptation! So, English teacher friends, if you teach Gatsby, you definitely will want a copy of this. The key word is adaptation. It is important to read the author's note at the end to understand the research that went into the visuals. There's a lot to discuss and break down. I loved that she was attempting to truly illustrate the metaphors within the novel. It was beautiful and dreamy and an exciting new way to experience a book I've read many times.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Craig David

    Obviously the book itself was great and I enjoyed the graphics a lot but I felt the color felt a little too upbeat for this book. I would've liked something with more neutrals. Obviously the book itself was great and I enjoyed the graphics a lot but I felt the color felt a little too upbeat for this book. I would've liked something with more neutrals.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pauline

    3.75 stars I really liked this adaption of the story of Jay Gatsby. Now I want to rewatch the movie haha. I was not fan of the art style, it was not my style. Thank you to NetGalley for this e-arc.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tabatha Shipley

    Thank you to the publisher for my ARC. What I Did Like: -The illustrations. They’re WONDERFUL. They have text hidden all over them, they bring the story to life in amazing ways, and the author chose to put metaphors into literal images. It’s remarkably well done and would foster incredible conversations. -The entire concept. I’m not a particular fan of The Great Gatsby so I had my reservations. But I honestly think this brings the story to life in a perfect way. I wouldn’t recommend reading this Thank you to the publisher for my ARC. What I Did Like: -The illustrations. They’re WONDERFUL. They have text hidden all over them, they bring the story to life in amazing ways, and the author chose to put metaphors into literal images. It’s remarkably well done and would foster incredible conversations. -The entire concept. I’m not a particular fan of The Great Gatsby so I had my reservations. But I honestly think this brings the story to life in a perfect way. I wouldn’t recommend reading this exclusively, but I think it could help people appreciate the original in new ways. Who Should Read This One: -Reluctant readers of Gatsby or people who maye didn’t love the book the first time around. This may give you new insight or appreciation for the classic. -Young readers trying to wade through Fitzergerald’s work for the first time. This format uses much of the same language but in a way that you may prefer. My Rating: 4 Stars. I think this set out to bring the novel to life in a graphic way and it does exactly that. I honestly think graphic novel readers will adore this adaptation. For full review (including what I didn’t like): https://youtu.be/IakhIHxSWto

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thindbooks

    *This graphic novel was given to me by the publisher to give an honest review* I enjoyed this little graphic novel which is a reimaged of The Great Gatsby as you can see by the title. This will be a short review as I only gotten the first part of the book. I enjoyed the artist’s watercolor drawing because it brought the whole book alive. The writer did an amazing job bringing the whole story since it is a reimagined of The Great Gatsby. I enjoyed the characters so far also the setting. I haven’t *This graphic novel was given to me by the publisher to give an honest review* I enjoyed this little graphic novel which is a reimaged of The Great Gatsby as you can see by the title. This will be a short review as I only gotten the first part of the book. I enjoyed the artist’s watercolor drawing because it brought the whole book alive. The writer did an amazing job bringing the whole story since it is a reimagined of The Great Gatsby. I enjoyed the characters so far also the setting. I haven’t read the original Great Gatsby but I know the main points and I think so far the book nailed it with those. I think this would be a great book to use for middle school children or even elementary kids. Since a lot of kids do love pictures in their book, I think this would help bring out the story more clearer for them. I enjoyed this graphic novel and recommend it to The Great Gatsby fans.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    The water color illustrations are sumptuously beautiful and the color choices expertly anchor the reader in the location and mood of each setting. The adaptation choices are smart and keep the soul of the novel in tact. A wonderful addition to the Gatsby expressions. Netgalley provided me with an arc in exchange for an honest review.

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