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From the creators of the hit podcast Shameless: relatable ruminations on the mess, the madness and the magic of not-quite-adulthood. There’s this weird gap in life that’s fuelled by cheap tacos and even cheaper tequila – also known as our twenties. It’s a specific limbo of being suspended between being a teenager and a Proper Adult, and though it’s wildly confusing, often l From the creators of the hit podcast Shameless: relatable ruminations on the mess, the madness and the magic of not-quite-adulthood. There’s this weird gap in life that’s fuelled by cheap tacos and even cheaper tequila – also known as our twenties. It’s a specific limbo of being suspended between being a teenager and a Proper Adult, and though it’s wildly confusing, often lonely, sometimes embarrassing and frequently daunting, there’s also a whole lot of magic to be found in the chaos. It’s a time when we’re finding our own voices, cementing our relationships and starting to fulfil our big ambitions (or simply just working out what they are). Michelle Andrews and Zara McDonald, creators of the award-winning pop culture podcast Shameless, are two of the many twentysomething women trying to make sense of it all. They definitely don’t have all the answers but they know that mapping out our place in the world is a little bit easier when we do it together. Brimming with wit and unflinching honesty, here are their stories and personal puzzles about life as twentysomethings: from heartbreak and mental health challenges to overcoming career setbacks and letting go of fear. (Not forgetting the deeper meaning behind the state of their fridges and why it’s so damn good to ghost out of a friend’s party.) Join Zara and Michelle as they navigate their journeys between the women they are now and who they want to be. You just might find tiny pieces of yourself in the space between the first page and the last.


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From the creators of the hit podcast Shameless: relatable ruminations on the mess, the madness and the magic of not-quite-adulthood. There’s this weird gap in life that’s fuelled by cheap tacos and even cheaper tequila – also known as our twenties. It’s a specific limbo of being suspended between being a teenager and a Proper Adult, and though it’s wildly confusing, often l From the creators of the hit podcast Shameless: relatable ruminations on the mess, the madness and the magic of not-quite-adulthood. There’s this weird gap in life that’s fuelled by cheap tacos and even cheaper tequila – also known as our twenties. It’s a specific limbo of being suspended between being a teenager and a Proper Adult, and though it’s wildly confusing, often lonely, sometimes embarrassing and frequently daunting, there’s also a whole lot of magic to be found in the chaos. It’s a time when we’re finding our own voices, cementing our relationships and starting to fulfil our big ambitions (or simply just working out what they are). Michelle Andrews and Zara McDonald, creators of the award-winning pop culture podcast Shameless, are two of the many twentysomething women trying to make sense of it all. They definitely don’t have all the answers but they know that mapping out our place in the world is a little bit easier when we do it together. Brimming with wit and unflinching honesty, here are their stories and personal puzzles about life as twentysomethings: from heartbreak and mental health challenges to overcoming career setbacks and letting go of fear. (Not forgetting the deeper meaning behind the state of their fridges and why it’s so damn good to ghost out of a friend’s party.) Join Zara and Michelle as they navigate their journeys between the women they are now and who they want to be. You just might find tiny pieces of yourself in the space between the first page and the last.

30 review for The Space Between

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Hannan

    A bland, disappointing read with not much relatable content at all. Targeted at directionless, insecure young girls who have a millennial complex that ‘adulting is hard’, this book offers no depth, insight or humour as to what your twenties is like. It glamourises being unkempt whilst simultaneously frowning upon people who have their shit together - god forbid you make appointments on your own, remember your green bags and clean out your fridge. This book is a prime example of how having a few A bland, disappointing read with not much relatable content at all. Targeted at directionless, insecure young girls who have a millennial complex that ‘adulting is hard’, this book offers no depth, insight or humour as to what your twenties is like. It glamourises being unkempt whilst simultaneously frowning upon people who have their shit together - god forbid you make appointments on your own, remember your green bags and clean out your fridge. This book is a prime example of how having a few thousand social media followers seems to make people think they are qualified to give expert life advice to people who are realistically just their peers. Having a section on career is almost laughable, with both authors only really having one previous job as a point of reference for every example. Whilst they have done well to be where they are at a young age, their industry experience is negligible and they fail to address that young women go into degrees that are not just arts/communication. Shocking, I know. Finished off with a chapter on how to be a feminist when you have no backbone and need tips on how to ghost your friend’s birthday. Pass.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten Collins

    I love Shameless podcast and love Mich and Zara, have been listening & following them for over 2 years now. However this book really just wasn’t for me. I am 26 and I think this book would have been better aimed at late teenagers/early 20s- I think if I read this book at 17 I would have learned a lot and taken it into my 20s with me. I also couldn’t relate to a lot of the book that focused on career, I think it was very much aimed at women in the same industry (journalism/entrepreneurship). I ap I love Shameless podcast and love Mich and Zara, have been listening & following them for over 2 years now. However this book really just wasn’t for me. I am 26 and I think this book would have been better aimed at late teenagers/early 20s- I think if I read this book at 17 I would have learned a lot and taken it into my 20s with me. I also couldn’t relate to a lot of the book that focused on career, I think it was very much aimed at women in the same industry (journalism/entrepreneurship). I appreciate the intent of the book however really think it would suit a younger audience rather than those in mid-late 20s.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carly Findlay

    Disclaimer - I was asked to endorse this book prior to publication, and I received a free copy from the publisher afterward. The Space Between is a fantastic resource for young people - a book I needed in my 20s. They’re smart, funny, relatable and reliable, and are always committed to using their platform to support and amplify diverse women. I loved reading this. So many of the chapters are really brave (especially the ones about working at a women’s publication, anxiety and chronic pain), and Disclaimer - I was asked to endorse this book prior to publication, and I received a free copy from the publisher afterward. The Space Between is a fantastic resource for young people - a book I needed in my 20s. They’re smart, funny, relatable and reliable, and are always committed to using their platform to support and amplify diverse women. I loved reading this. So many of the chapters are really brave (especially the ones about working at a women’s publication, anxiety and chronic pain), and I think that many readers will relate and feel empowered to speak up about about similar experiences. I think their podcast conversation style translated well into book form. Michelle and Zara’s work ethic, honesty and success is admirable, and I am proud to know them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elena Aleksova

    Much like their podcast the authors failed to unpack anything in this book. The book is a reflection of their thoughts and in no way a roadmap/guidance for your 20s. This is a typical “influencer book” that is poorly written and difficult to get through (I skipped through so many chapters) with the authors attempting to stay relevant in the current climate. Did not relate to this book in any way and I did not enjoy it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eve West

    Felt that this book really offered no depth and it was fairly bland. Although some sections funny, I felt bored and unproductive reading it. I felt there was no really knew insight into anything, but just a few shared experiences. I felt that the podcast is goodg, however for the most part was somewhat not relatable and self indulgent. So I was disappointed. I felt like it should have been for a younger age group. I did not have high expectations prior to reading this book and nor were they met. Felt that this book really offered no depth and it was fairly bland. Although some sections funny, I felt bored and unproductive reading it. I felt there was no really knew insight into anything, but just a few shared experiences. I felt that the podcast is goodg, however for the most part was somewhat not relatable and self indulgent. So I was disappointed. I felt like it should have been for a younger age group. I did not have high expectations prior to reading this book and nor were they met. If you rated this anything above a 3 star - have you ever read a good book in your life? I felt it was a platform to continue to grow their already high social media platform. I felt that the chapter about overworking in your 20’s / jobs was really not felt by anyone else other than people in the media world. I actually felt as though it was a bit of a dig at all of those whom have careers in other areas (medicine) and how much we have studied (8 years + of uni) working overtime post uni and how much sacrifice is actually necessary. I felt as though this is the reality for a lot of doctors and to have someone say “don’t work overtime” isn’t really a choice for us. Overall, the girls are well educated and knowledgeable and this comes across in their podcast. However couldn’t help but feel that it was very hollow. The popularity to purchase this book came at no surprise to me, similar to the book “the subtle art of not giving a f*ck”, I can’t really seem to understand why people enjoyed it so much. On a positive note, I felt that it had a good use of language and the choice of words in the literature were very well established and thought out.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Petrice (yiotasbooks)

    THIS BOOK WAS SO GREAT AND EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ IT ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE IN YOUR 20’S AND HAVE NO BLOODY IDEA WHAT YOU ARE DOING WITH YOUR LIFE. ⁣ ⁣ The girls have magically put all feelings, questions, moods and scary realities you have to face in your 20’s so perfectly, I honestly cannot put into words how beautiful it was. ⁣ ⁣ Please, please, please do yourself a favour and buy this book, you’re not only helping out these wonderful humans but you’re helping out YOURSELF by reading it. I feel li THIS BOOK WAS SO GREAT AND EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ IT ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE IN YOUR 20’S AND HAVE NO BLOODY IDEA WHAT YOU ARE DOING WITH YOUR LIFE. ⁣ ⁣ The girls have magically put all feelings, questions, moods and scary realities you have to face in your 20’s so perfectly, I honestly cannot put into words how beautiful it was. ⁣ ⁣ Please, please, please do yourself a favour and buy this book, you’re not only helping out these wonderful humans but you’re helping out YOURSELF by reading it. I feel like a new person. I am obsessed. ⁣ ⁣ ⁣ So, this was my first attempt at an audiobook. I REALLY shouldn’t have picked this one as my first audiobook because it felt like I was just listening to an incredibly long Shameless podcast (but girls, if you want to do a 6 hour podcast in the future I would be down for that entirely). But also I am going to go buy the paperback version just so I can make notes and scribble in it and highlight and tab necessary pages because I need this book to be in my life for MANY years to come. ⁣ ⁣ Mich and Zara, thank you. ⁣

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    This was an incredibly relatable read, one where you find yourself nodding along with what Michelle & Zara are saying/writing. Some of the essays are wonderful and eloquent gems. Some of them felt similar to stories I have heard before - granted, I enjoy reading non fiction books written by women about their experiences. Flew through this read super quick - and would recommend to a friend who wants to spend an afternoon reading a book that makes them feel warm and seen.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stef Harms

    I have mixed feelings about this one. Some of the chapters/essays absolutely smashed it out of the park and left me feeling empowered and silently cheering. Other chapters felt somewhat irrelevant and self-indulgent. At times, it was clear to me that the authors have some serious growing up to do. Having said this, I am not from the target demographic. I've happily gifted this to my 20 year-old sister and I would say this book is best suited to those aged under 25. I have mixed feelings about this one. Some of the chapters/essays absolutely smashed it out of the park and left me feeling empowered and silently cheering. Other chapters felt somewhat irrelevant and self-indulgent. At times, it was clear to me that the authors have some serious growing up to do. Having said this, I am not from the target demographic. I've happily gifted this to my 20 year-old sister and I would say this book is best suited to those aged under 25.

  9. 4 out of 5

    alysha

    Okay so, I’m going through a pretty rough time at the moment. Some days ago, I went through something pretty traumatic and the aftermath has not been too great. They say there is light at the end of the tunnel but unfortunately this is one loooonnnggggg tunnel. Mish and Zara made me feel less alone. I genuinely feel like I was in conversation with them while reading this. I felt like they were sitting right next to me, sharing stories, laughing, crying and reminiscing on what were the hard times. Okay so, I’m going through a pretty rough time at the moment. Some days ago, I went through something pretty traumatic and the aftermath has not been too great. They say there is light at the end of the tunnel but unfortunately this is one loooonnnggggg tunnel. Mish and Zara made me feel less alone. I genuinely feel like I was in conversation with them while reading this. I felt like they were sitting right next to me, sharing stories, laughing, crying and reminiscing on what were the hard times. I always get this exact same feeling when listening to their podcast, so it came as no surprise to me that it would feel the exact same while I was reading their book. Their views and some of the topics they talked about, really spoke to me. I learnt so much and I felt less alone doing so. This didn’t feel like a preachy ‘self-help’ book, this just felt like a couple friends telling stories of misfortune, love, ambition and most importantly, tales of coming into learning about where they fit into this catastrophic, weird world. I feel this is definitely what Mish and Zara aimed to do, and they really did succeed perfectly.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pauline [paulineisreading]

    3.5 stars | From the creators of the hit Australian podcast ‘Shameless’, came this book where the hosts reflect on their experience as young women in their twenties, so far. I’d like to note first and foremost that i’m not a listener of the podcast - hence i’m not familiar with the authors and the experiences that they talk about in the book. Split into 4 parts (Love, Ambition, Mind and Body & Voices), the book covers a wide range of content. Some of the chapters are much lighter and told in non- 3.5 stars | From the creators of the hit Australian podcast ‘Shameless’, came this book where the hosts reflect on their experience as young women in their twenties, so far. I’d like to note first and foremost that i’m not a listener of the podcast - hence i’m not familiar with the authors and the experiences that they talk about in the book. Split into 4 parts (Love, Ambition, Mind and Body & Voices), the book covers a wide range of content. Some of the chapters are much lighter and told in non-conventional or ‘fun’ forms like checklists, recipes and downsides / upsides list. On the other hand, you also have parts where both authors speak to more weighty topics like major break-ups, parental divorces, mental illnesses and sexual assaults. The part that resonated with me the most is the chapters within ‘Ambition’. As a millennial who has the tendency to link her identity with her career path and forever chasing the notion of ‘success’, i found myself nodding along with a lot of the thoughts that Zara discusses. However, i also think it’s important to realise that both Zara and Michelle speak to a lot of personal experiences. This means that a lot of it is coming from two white, straight, middle-class, and able-bodied cis women. They’ve acknowledged this and have interwoven these thoughts into their reflections. Their experiences are still valid, of course - but in light of the discussions around intersectionality, i felt like this book emphasised the lack of marginalised voices within this space for me. I was craving for more, and i knew i would have to seek out other accounts from BIPOC voices to get a more rounded view on some of these topics. In saying that, i can see how the book and its content would resonate with a lot of young Australian women as so many of these experiences are universal. This was an enjoyable read overall and i can now see the hype! I also listened to most of it on audio, which makes it even more engaging.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    A really easy read that unpacks some of the trials and tribulations of your 20s. While not every chapter resonated with me, McDonald and Andrews don’t pretend their experiences are universal; they’re not trying to create a book of absolutes, rather, a taste of some of the feelings and experiences they themselves have had. Well worth the read, with a reasonable time/effort ratio.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Sewell

    As a huge fan of their podcast, I was so excited for this book, and it didn’t disappoint! It is a collection of short essays and conversations where they (Michelle and Zara) discuss life in their twenties. The book is split into four section; love, ambition, mind and body and voice. Since I’m still a teenager, the first chapter on love was not very relevant, however I loved the rest of the book. I was particularly taken by their analysis on ambition and success. It is definitely a book which I w As a huge fan of their podcast, I was so excited for this book, and it didn’t disappoint! It is a collection of short essays and conversations where they (Michelle and Zara) discuss life in their twenties. The book is split into four section; love, ambition, mind and body and voice. Since I’m still a teenager, the first chapter on love was not very relevant, however I loved the rest of the book. I was particularly taken by their analysis on ambition and success. It is definitely a book which I will read again in the future, and one that I’ll be able to draw different insights from each time.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

    I couldn’t recommend this book more - for those in their twenties, late teens or even anybody above the age of 29! It’s filled with everything I could want and more, with so much wit, humour and relatable content! Now all I want to do is go out and buy it for ALL of my friends!! Well done Zara and Mich for another piece of amazing content, I absolutely adored it!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna W

    Enjoyable enough. These two women are successful in what they do and have inspired me but I almost feel like they tried to be too relatable and championed this lazy/lost millennial lifestyle (even though I doubt that’s how they got where they are??)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Renee Elliott

    Most of those essays were so amazingly written, heartfelt, relatable and just purely brave. I found myself taking pictures of certain passages just to re read again later.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kate Forrester

    Bit sick of hearing how hard their life is to be honest

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jessamy

    I am in awe of Michelle and Zara. This book is the necessary big hug everyone in their twenties so desperately needs, to feel a little less alone. I love love love this book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Molly Sharpe

    What an incredibly joyful experience. I’ve just devoured this book in less than twenty four hours and I feel cleverer, braver and happier for it (I’m absolutely not being hyperbolic 😉). I had pretty high expectations going in and oh my were they met and then some, this book is so well written. It is a warm and heartful view on the Millennial experience. I felt the structure was successful with nods to the Shameless Podcast that felt spot on. The topics covered were nuanced and right on the money What an incredibly joyful experience. I’ve just devoured this book in less than twenty four hours and I feel cleverer, braver and happier for it (I’m absolutely not being hyperbolic 😉). I had pretty high expectations going in and oh my were they met and then some, this book is so well written. It is a warm and heartful view on the Millennial experience. I felt the structure was successful with nods to the Shameless Podcast that felt spot on. The topics covered were nuanced and right on the money for me personally, touching on events that I’ve grappled with during my 20’s. This is an incredibly witty, wise and personal series of essays that will fill you with a sigh of relief that you’re not alone in feeling like you don’t have all the answers. I laughed, I cried, ACTUALLY, I was weepy throughout the whole thing because how amazing is reading a book and feeling UNDERSTOOD. Pick this one up for a fierce dose of empowerment and reliability ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dana Kavanagh

    I’ve never read a book I’ve related to more. All the things I’ve said to my friends as we’ve gone through our twenties and more so all the things we haven’t said, but have definitely experienced quietly and alone. I wish I read this years ago, especially about finding your voice and sticking by it ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brodie May

    Like most 20 something year old Australians, I listen to the Shameless podcast weekly. I look forward to the friendly and familiar voices of Michelle and Zara in my ears, while I catch up on all things pop culture. Michelle and Zara have such a special way of making sure every voice is heard throughout their podcast episodes, and in conversation episodes. The ability to do this is rare, especially in the Australian media. This amazing talent of theirs was transferable to their debut book 'The Spa Like most 20 something year old Australians, I listen to the Shameless podcast weekly. I look forward to the friendly and familiar voices of Michelle and Zara in my ears, while I catch up on all things pop culture. Michelle and Zara have such a special way of making sure every voice is heard throughout their podcast episodes, and in conversation episodes. The ability to do this is rare, especially in the Australian media. This amazing talent of theirs was transferable to their debut book 'The Space Between'. The Space Between is written about living through the confusion of your twenties. They explain it as the weird gap in your life where you are not quite sure what is going on while you are 'weirdly suspended between being a teenager and a Proper Adult'. I was so excited about the release of this book, I pre-ordered a copy and then on release day had extreme FOMO of the people who already had the book, that I did an online order to my local bookshop who I knew would deliver it on the same day (Thank you local book shop, I love you always). The book is written in four parts - Love, Ambition, Mind and Body, and Voice. Michelle and Zara write about heartbreak, friendship, being in love, careers, being lonely, not enjoying university, not making your bed, mental health, sex, shame, feminism and trauma. There is not a moment in this book where I thought, "this does not apply to me", or "I never experienced that in my early twenties". Unlike their podcast which focuses on the latest in pop culture and the news cycle, the girls share a lot of their personal selves in this book. They are incredibly generous in their story telling, which makes the content so relatable. The entirety of this book is witty and charming. I loved the use of playful lists, including '29 things we wish we could have told ourselves on the final day of university' and 'Am I still immature as fuck, or am I a boring adult now? A checklist'. In the chapters that speak of mental health and anxiety, I felt I was not alone and I know that this would have been a collective feeling across the board. There are some incredibly deep and complex essays that speak of the shame felt when you are unable to have sex, and an essay that discusses a personal experience of sexual assault. These chapters were so personal and I felt so grateful that Michelle and Zara were able to trust their community in sharing this part of themselves. The way in which the girls write about these tough subjects were so articulate and shared with such fragility and empathy to people who may also share these experiences. There were certainly standouts for me. My favourite part of the book was Part 4: Voice. 'A letter to my future daughter' had me in tears as I was reminded about how our parents can be such a big influence on how we hold and accept ourselves. I loved being reminded of the dangers of Instagram and influencer culture, while being reminded that as long as I am growing and learning every day, who I am is enough. The whole book was flared with feminism, but the essays on influence, mind and body, and voice were what really made myself think about my own feminist practices and how I could do better. This quote really stood out to me: "... social media flattens conversations. It removes nuance and detail, and encourages us to talk in absolutes. On Instagram, feminism has been diluted to mean 'women supporting women', when in reality, feminism doesn't mean blindly supporting women, particularly the ones inflicting harm on young girls" This book came at the perfect time. It may not seem that releasing a book during a global pandemic was 'good timing', but reading The Space Between whilst stuck in Stage 4 lockdown made me feel comfort in such a confusing time. It reminded me that it is absolutely okay to not know what the hell you want to do. Thank you Michelle and Zara for writing a book that I will return to time and time again.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ella

    Don't be fooled, there are both spaces and words in this book. Don't be fooled, there are both spaces and words in this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Stanton

    I love the Shameless podcast: it makes Mondays worthwhile. But as another review mentioned, I think this book would be better marketed to teens who are about to enter their 20s rather than marketed at people in their 20s. Yes, there was some content that was relatable and made me feel seen, hence the 3 stars. But there were other sections that I tuned out of, sections that missed the mark. I also felt it was pushing too hard to incorporate “The Space Between” into each segment. I wouldn’t bother I love the Shameless podcast: it makes Mondays worthwhile. But as another review mentioned, I think this book would be better marketed to teens who are about to enter their 20s rather than marketed at people in their 20s. Yes, there was some content that was relatable and made me feel seen, hence the 3 stars. But there were other sections that I tuned out of, sections that missed the mark. I also felt it was pushing too hard to incorporate “The Space Between” into each segment. I wouldn’t bother with a reread but it does have some quotable and memorable content that will stick with me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Holly May

    It’s well-written, but I struggled to get through this book. A lot of reviews had said how great it was, how people thumbed through it in a day, etc. but unfortunately that wasn’t the case for me. It was kind of relatable, but not really that relevant to my current life? Hard feeling to describe. Perhaps it was the hype surrounding the book that made it a bit disappointing. As other reviews have said, it’s probably better suited to girls in their late teens or early twenties.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Liv

    Monday’s aren’t always the best day of the week, but they always start the same way; a coffee in hand & a new episode of Shameless making my Monday drive to work a little bit sweeter. The Space Between is a new book by Zara McDonald & Michelle Andrews, hosts of the award winning pop culture podcast Shameless, & is a collection of personal essays about life as a 20 something year old, & the joys & challenges that come with this flux period of our lives. It’s not a self help book or a how to guide Monday’s aren’t always the best day of the week, but they always start the same way; a coffee in hand & a new episode of Shameless making my Monday drive to work a little bit sweeter. The Space Between is a new book by Zara McDonald & Michelle Andrews, hosts of the award winning pop culture podcast Shameless, & is a collection of personal essays about life as a 20 something year old, & the joys & challenges that come with this flux period of our lives. It’s not a self help book or a how to guide, but its a non fiction read where you will little bits of your own thoughts & experiences in the pages, & maybe a feel little less lost. I’m not normally an audio book fan (curse my wandering mind & inability to concentrate for more than 3 seconds) but this was brilliant; it felt like listening to a very personal, very extended episode of the podcast. I found myself looking for pockets of time where I could sneak in an extra 5 minutes of listening, & could see myself in almost every essay shared. Some parts had me audibly laughing, like the chapter titled Is ‘He a Closet Sexist? A Checklist’ which had many things my colleague has said to me word for word, including he could return a ball to Serena Williams 🙃 (I wish I was joking) but some parts had me crying real tears, like when Zara was talking about heartbreak, but in particular Michelle’s final essay which is so courageous & moving. The way discussions around typically taboo subjects like mental health & sex & consent & trauma are carried out in an honest yet careful way, & I love the way it balanced serious topics with moments of joy, like talking about wanting to leave town because you’re tired & cold & you want your blanket. It’s relevant, nuanced & poignant, & just pretty magical if I’m honest. The ONLY reason it lost .5 of a star for me is because I’m on the tail end of their target market (I’m 28) so some parts feel a little young for me. In saying that, this is a book I wish I had 5 years ago, it’s a book I want my sister to read & it’s a book I highly recommend you gift to nieces, daughters, or any young woman trying to find her way in the world. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 from me!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Del

    When I recently started listening to the intelligent and eloquent conversations on the Shameless podcast, I knew I had to get my hands on their book and I'm so glad I did. I listened to the audiobook and quickly realised there's something in here for everyone. For me, there were about 15 pieces that stood out most. My favourites mainly came from the ‘Love’ and ‘Voice’ sections. This book made me realise I probably could have been braver and taken more risks when it came to love in my early 20s. When I recently started listening to the intelligent and eloquent conversations on the Shameless podcast, I knew I had to get my hands on their book and I'm so glad I did. I listened to the audiobook and quickly realised there's something in here for everyone. For me, there were about 15 pieces that stood out most. My favourites mainly came from the ‘Love’ and ‘Voice’ sections. This book made me realise I probably could have been braver and taken more risks when it came to love in my early 20s. ‘29 Amazing Things About Being Single in Your Twenties’ took me back to the fun possibilities that come with being single, like being able to move to London on a whim and all those “silent flirtations.” ‘A Rough and Tumble on… Settling’ took me back to teary conversations I’ve had with my sister on this topic. Both authors had insightful points. I resonated with what Michelle wrote: that in questioning if you’re settling it can make you confront your situation and give it a chance to “pivot.” The friendship essays were excellent and I wholeheartedly agree that no one friend can play every role for you. The truths of ‘The Downsides and Upsides of Having a Sister’ made my heart glow with love for my own sister and ‘The Space Between What I Thought My First Job Would be and How Toxic it Was’ is an incredibly needed reminder not to stay in toxic work environments, no matter what industry you’re in or how old you are. I loved the sentiments in ‘A Letter to My Future Daughter’ and the idea of “grey areas.” To me, anyone who thinks they know everything must not be very intelligent. I also got so frustrated as I listened to ‘The Kinds of Invisible Labour Young Women Carry’ that it made me pick a fight with my partner after tidying all morning. The final essay was heart-wrenching and so important. Overall The Space Between is deep, thought-provoking, powerful, relatable, well-written and researched. It made me laugh, cry, feel love and anger. I'm certainly not surprised it’s doing so well. The Shameless girls 100% deserve it! Clearly the very thoughtful, entertaining and clever Michelle and Zara have worked and continue to work extremely hard. I hope in less than 10 years they come out with one about being in your 30s.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I’ve become very attached to the Shameless podcast this year so I was very excited to get this on publish day and get straight into it. Unfortunately I’ve entered my 30s... but I obviously still really enjoyed this one. I love the way Michelle and Zara see the world, and how smart and switched on they are, and that came across even more in their book where they’re talking about themselves and their histories as opposed to pop culture and current events. Their essays were thought provoking and rela I’ve become very attached to the Shameless podcast this year so I was very excited to get this on publish day and get straight into it. Unfortunately I’ve entered my 30s... but I obviously still really enjoyed this one. I love the way Michelle and Zara see the world, and how smart and switched on they are, and that came across even more in their book where they’re talking about themselves and their histories as opposed to pop culture and current events. Their essays were thought provoking and relatable, and their listicles were funny and spot on. I think someone who spent more time in the dating world (or any time for that matter) would find a lot of this even more identifiable. My favourite essays were Zara’s on fertility, Michelle’s on losing friends, the spotlight on sister relationships and heaps of the ambition chapter. I think it’s one I’m probably going to need to flick back through and read a few times since reading cover to cover. I have to say that the perfect accompaniment to this book is the @shamelesspodcast In Conversation podcast episodes Michelle and Zara did for each other. These definitely added a whole heap more vulnerability to their already powerful stories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    This is the kinda book that becomes the default gift you buy anyone in their 20’s. I found myself fully immersed in it, so much so that when I looked up from the book my room was dark. I clearly did not notice how many hours had gone by. I felt that this book was truly written for me- am I in the Truman show?! If not, this must mean there are people out there like me. People who see the world the way that I do. People who accept that some life events will stick with you forever, like I have. Peo This is the kinda book that becomes the default gift you buy anyone in their 20’s. I found myself fully immersed in it, so much so that when I looked up from the book my room was dark. I clearly did not notice how many hours had gone by. I felt that this book was truly written for me- am I in the Truman show?! If not, this must mean there are people out there like me. People who see the world the way that I do. People who accept that some life events will stick with you forever, like I have. People who have experienced hurt like me. People who thrive in the joy of true friendship. People who are insightful and reflective, and use these skills to contribute positively to their world. Zara and Michelle are also a pure example of a strong friendship forming later in life, which I have the privilege of experiencing, and this is something I will never ever let go. The space between is narrowing, which means the book has done its job. I cannot recommend it enough.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hibba

    This has been on my list since its release earlier this year. As a listener of Shameless podcast, I thought it might just feel like an extended podcast episode - but it proved to be more than that. A series of interesting and thought-provoking essays, relevant to various points of your life. Not every essay will hit home, but if you are a fan of Zara and Mish, I would recommend this. Oh and PS - I'm well over my 20's decade, but still didn't find myself that removed. This has been on my list since its release earlier this year. As a listener of Shameless podcast, I thought it might just feel like an extended podcast episode - but it proved to be more than that. A series of interesting and thought-provoking essays, relevant to various points of your life. Not every essay will hit home, but if you are a fan of Zara and Mish, I would recommend this. Oh and PS - I'm well over my 20's decade, but still didn't find myself that removed.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hermine

    I loved the essays in the Serious font the most, and then the second half of the email threads chapters, where by that time they sounded less like contrived emails. There’s something in here for everyone, and I loved that it started with love to reel you in, but it then got to less well-trodden topics such as career ambition, health and audience as the book progressed. Zara writes frankly about her vulnerabilities and uncertainties, in a way that’s a little reminiscent of Jia Tolentino, which I’ I loved the essays in the Serious font the most, and then the second half of the email threads chapters, where by that time they sounded less like contrived emails. There’s something in here for everyone, and I loved that it started with love to reel you in, but it then got to less well-trodden topics such as career ambition, health and audience as the book progressed. Zara writes frankly about her vulnerabilities and uncertainties, in a way that’s a little reminiscent of Jia Tolentino, which I’m coming to appreciate more and more - that we all don’t have the answers, and what’s more of value is that we’re talking and thinking and discussing these things with each other.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I have too many essay favourites to name but everyone should read this book. You will most definitely find something relatable, if not multiple things. PS thanks to ma gal Katrina for gifting this to me. I’m assuming you now want to borrow?

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