counter create hit Six by Seuss Limited Edition - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Six by Seuss Limited Edition

Availability: Ready to download

Includes: And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street, The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, Horton Hatches the Egg, Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and The Lorax


Compare

Includes: And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street, The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, Horton Hatches the Egg, Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and The Lorax

30 review for Six by Seuss Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mariah Roze

    Read this book and all the stories with my students! They really enjoyed it. Also, there were so many Dr. Seuss stories in this book that I have never heard of. "Dr. Seuss's magic elixir may--or may not--prolong life, but it is a fact that it makes you feel a whole lot better! Here in one glorious volume are six of the good doctor's best prescriptions. Not a word or a picture has been omitted or changed. Ranging from his very first book, And to Thing That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, to his proph Read this book and all the stories with my students! They really enjoyed it. Also, there were so many Dr. Seuss stories in this book that I have never heard of. "Dr. Seuss's magic elixir may--or may not--prolong life, but it is a fact that it makes you feel a whole lot better! Here in one glorious volume are six of the good doctor's best prescriptions. Not a word or a picture has been omitted or changed. Ranging from his very first book, And to Thing That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, to his prophetic The Lorax, Six by Seuss is the perfect collection to share with the entire family and to pass from generation to generation."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda Klager

    What a great book to read - whether you are a child or an adult! I loved the rhymes and illustrations. And there is great morals to be learned in each story. I think everyone would benefit from reading Dr. Seuss books.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Austin Carroll Keeley

    A terrific collection to read with my daughter. I look forward to revisiting it again soon!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    I don't think picking classics for these works is far off. These are some of Seuss's best loved stories, including "The 500 Hats," "The Lorax," "Yertle the Turtle," "Hortan Hatches the Egg," "And to Think that I saw it on Mulberrry Street," and "How the Grinch Stole Christmas." I don't think picking classics for these works is far off. These are some of Seuss's best loved stories, including "The 500 Hats," "The Lorax," "Yertle the Turtle," "Hortan Hatches the Egg," "And to Think that I saw it on Mulberrry Street," and "How the Grinch Stole Christmas."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chanel

    Tonight I stayed one night in the Seuss room at the Sylvia Beach Hotel - a hotel where each room is dedicated to and decorated after a different author. Figured while I was here, to stay in the zone, I would read every Seuss book on the shelf. 🤷🏽‍♀️ Only marking the anthologies, but the beginning readers are here too!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    What can I say, it's Dr. Seuss at his best and 6 times the fun. What can I say, it's Dr. Seuss at his best and 6 times the fun.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mrswash

    An old deserted town was once flourishing with life. The Once-ler tells a young boy of the Truffula Trees that was inhabited the Street of the Lifted Lorax. He was fine with his knitted Thneed, but then the Lorax appeared. A thriving business appeared but eventual collapse followed. The environment was destroyed. This is one of Dr. Seuss’s stories that I do love. It shows us how greed can destroy, and how the environment should be taken care of. The Lorax trees are beautiful. The illustrator sho An old deserted town was once flourishing with life. The Once-ler tells a young boy of the Truffula Trees that was inhabited the Street of the Lifted Lorax. He was fine with his knitted Thneed, but then the Lorax appeared. A thriving business appeared but eventual collapse followed. The environment was destroyed. This is one of Dr. Seuss’s stories that I do love. It shows us how greed can destroy, and how the environment should be taken care of. The Lorax trees are beautiful. The illustrator shows life with bright colors then despair with dark, dull colors.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    I picked this up early in my teaching career. There were a couple Dr. Seuss books here I had not read before. Dr. Seuss was a prolific writer. ;) What classics! I enjoy this anthology as it is compact for six books. Of course, once I met my wife, we doubled all these books as she has the entire collection. One can never have too many Dr. Seuss books, however.

  9. 4 out of 5

    R.K. Cowles

    4 1/4 stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    C. Patrick G. Erker

    Admittedly, it's cheating a bit to include this book in my read books. It is, after all, a collections of kids' books. But Dr. Suess is a magician with words, and at this point, I suspect that I appreciate his magic more than my five-month-old son, who I read this whole book to in the course of a few short days after buying a copy of it at Forest Books in Japantown, San Francisco. From the incredible imagination of the boy in "To think I saw it on Mulberry Street," to the foreboding tale of "The Admittedly, it's cheating a bit to include this book in my read books. It is, after all, a collections of kids' books. But Dr. Suess is a magician with words, and at this point, I suspect that I appreciate his magic more than my five-month-old son, who I read this whole book to in the course of a few short days after buying a copy of it at Forest Books in Japantown, San Francisco. From the incredible imagination of the boy in "To think I saw it on Mulberry Street," to the foreboding tale of "The Lorax," from the goodness of Bartholomew Cubbins in the eponymous "500 Hats" and the rottenness and redemption found in "Yertle the Turtle," from the devotion in "Horton Hatches the Egg" to the change of heart in the famous "Grinch" story, they're all keepers. I love love love Suess' stories. It'll take a real genius to top Suess in my book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Keke

    Okay, this is perfection. This is a collection of all Dr Seuss's classics! This has his first book and half of the ones in this book have gone on to become movies. Like Horton the elephant, the Lorax, and even the Grinch! Perfect starter book for those who have kids learning to read, the pictures can help connecting words to objects. Especially those wacky words. Even past childhood I find myself reading a story or two. Overall, if you are going to start a Seuss collection start here. Okay, this is perfection. This is a collection of all Dr Seuss's classics! This has his first book and half of the ones in this book have gone on to become movies. Like Horton the elephant, the Lorax, and even the Grinch! Perfect starter book for those who have kids learning to read, the pictures can help connecting words to objects. Especially those wacky words. Even past childhood I find myself reading a story or two. Overall, if you are going to start a Seuss collection start here.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Guess what: the first book Dr. Seuss wrote and illustrated was actually really bad, which make me feel a little better about my own artistic failures. (It also makes me wonder, once again, how all the amazing poets actually manage to reach the point of writing good poetry. I would die long before then from the sheer agony of reading my first 249 terrible poems.) His poetry definitely improved over the years, and so did his illustrating style. It's awesome having a one-volume chronicle of his gro Guess what: the first book Dr. Seuss wrote and illustrated was actually really bad, which make me feel a little better about my own artistic failures. (It also makes me wonder, once again, how all the amazing poets actually manage to reach the point of writing good poetry. I would die long before then from the sheer agony of reading my first 249 terrible poems.) His poetry definitely improved over the years, and so did his illustrating style. It's awesome having a one-volume chronicle of his growth as an artist.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    We checked this book out from the library because we wanted to read Horton Hatches an Egg and this was the only available copy. It came with Yertle the Turtle, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and The Lorax. But also included two stories I wasn't as familiar with - And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street and The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins. I love the Dr. Seuss classics. The stories included in this volume are a bit longer and better for elementary aged children. I found that my preschooler h We checked this book out from the library because we wanted to read Horton Hatches an Egg and this was the only available copy. It came with Yertle the Turtle, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and The Lorax. But also included two stories I wasn't as familiar with - And to Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street and The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins. I love the Dr. Seuss classics. The stories included in this volume are a bit longer and better for elementary aged children. I found that my preschooler had trouble staying with us during many of the stories.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel Voll

    This collection has been a bedtime staple for my son and I in the last couple weeks. Seuss' meter and rhymes are light and attractive to the ear, and each story has a message. My six-year old son always stops me around the climax of the story and says "Dad, that's the lesson! - A person's a person, no matter how small" or "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not." Thanks for the lessons, Suess. And for the memories I'm building with my son. This collection has been a bedtime staple for my son and I in the last couple weeks. Seuss' meter and rhymes are light and attractive to the ear, and each story has a message. My six-year old son always stops me around the climax of the story and says "Dad, that's the lesson! - A person's a person, no matter how small" or "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not." Thanks for the lessons, Suess. And for the memories I'm building with my son.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alisa

    This is a really good collection of Dr. Seuss books, who I haven’t been entirely sold on after reading the horror that is The Cat in the Hat Comes Back. But maybe I’ve forgiven him. MAYBE. I especially like The Lorax—was my first time reading it. Probably my favorite Seuss. Was also pretty great to see how his style developed from his earlier work and I appreciated reading The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, which was closer to a fairy tale. Freddy loved all of them.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nina Fader

    In 2002 I completed a city-wide challenge to read all of the Dr. Seuss books. We went to county and regional libraries all over Indiana to get all of them read. The mayor gave me and I think two others for completing the challenge.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Pinkerton

    I read these to my children at night. There are no greater stories than those from Seuss. Except for the one about the hats...that one I can do without...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A terrific package deal of wonderful stories.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lorlee

    Always fun to read Dr. Suess I Saw it on Mulberry Street, The Loraz, 500 Hats, Grinch, Horton Hatches Before sending it on to the next generation.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jo Oehrlein

    Reviewed the stories on their individual pages.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elisa Hoopes

    this book is really funny!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jaimie

    I can’t believe that the first book that Theodor Geisel ever tried to get published was rejected so many times before someone saw the genius in his work. I guess it takes a Seussical mind to really appreciate the whimsy and avant-garde of his books as an adult. That being said, it seems to be a no-brainer that children would love Suess’ books, since they are from the get-go charming, hilarious, and ridiculous - which really captures the imagination and true essence of children everywhere. And to I can’t believe that the first book that Theodor Geisel ever tried to get published was rejected so many times before someone saw the genius in his work. I guess it takes a Seussical mind to really appreciate the whimsy and avant-garde of his books as an adult. That being said, it seems to be a no-brainer that children would love Suess’ books, since they are from the get-go charming, hilarious, and ridiculous - which really captures the imagination and true essence of children everywhere. And to Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street is a Suess book that I often over-look, since it doesn’t have the same amusing made-up characters that I find so endearing in stories like How the Grinch Stole Christmas and The Lorax, but I definitely appreciated this first volume of the Seuss-library. All children tell stories, and exaggerated stories at that, so I found it hilarious to read along to see just how ridiculous this little boy would make his story by the time he returned home. Unfortunately his father (the instigator of the careful observations by the little boy) doesn’t get the enlarged version of the story, so the reader is left with the secret of the boy’s imagination. We know what the little boy thinks he saw on Mulberry street, so we in a sense become his confidants and closest friends - even if we don’t get a chance to tell our extrapolated version of the story in turn. I was not veyr impressed by The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins. Suess seems to have lost his eloquence and humour that comes from his careful use of lyricism and brevity that were so apparent in And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street. He's trying to be too much like storytellers of old - who overuse words and don't utilize illustration enough - and this clearly doesn't work. It's pretty obvious why I had never read this book (or even noticed it in a store), since there's no way that lovers of Seuss's distinctive style could like this story. Horton Hatches the Egg is a pretty cute story, even if it is a bit overtly moralistic. The message that it's a good thing to be responsible is very clear, but thankfully Seuss wraps the theme up in the hilarious scenario of an elephant awkwardly perched in a tree in an attempt to hatch an egg. I was pretty surprised (and overjoyed) to see the lazy Maysie bird get her come-uppance when the egg finally hatched and it turned out to be a little winged elephant! Too cute, if completely unrealistic! Not a big fan of Yertle the Turtle and other Stories. The animals are great characters and the rhymes are typically well-done, but their moralist-themes make them not much more exciting than Aesop's Fables. It's not surprising that Seuss published this set of stories, though, since his publishers likely looked at his talent for drawing animals and figured that a set of values-tales would be an easy sell for the children's market. Kids get entertainment through the rhymes and illustrations, and parents get to feel good about teaching their children positive values. How the Grinch Stole Christmas is in much the same vein (in essence it is a story about the true value of Christmas and a condemnation of consumer society), but Seuss takes it one step further by giving this story such a memorable protagonist. The story of the Grinch and his hatred towards Christmas has become as synonymous with the holiday as Charles Dickens' Scrooge, who learns a similar lesson - albeit without the whimsical setting and amusing thymes that Seuss is known for. I often forget the simpler aspects of this story in lieu of the Jim Carey film version which expands a lot on Seuss's original story, but the original never loses it's charm. The Lorax is a moral tale as well, and even though it's environmental message is a bit heavyhanded, I absolutely love this story. Suess' rhymes are absolutely perfect and his bevy of fantastical creatures (from singing fish to the fiesty Lorax) are absolutely wonderful. I can't imagine that anyone reading this story would be unaffected by the devastation that corporate greed and lack of environmental care that occurs in the story, since it's so blatantly obvious that this is exactly what is happenning in the world right now. I sincerely hope that kids who read the Lorax in this generation and the next take it to heart, since Suess is absolutely right when he says that "unless someone like [us] cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is the best treasury that I've seen so far. I read The Lorax of my 1st graders This is the best treasury that I've seen so far. I read The Lorax of my 1st graders

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Nobody does children's books like Seuss! To rate these in order, I'd pick How the Grinch Stole Christmas at the top, then The Lorax, Horton Hatches the Egg, Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, and lastly, the old and non-rhyming 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins. Nobody does children's books like Seuss! To rate these in order, I'd pick How the Grinch Stole Christmas at the top, then The Lorax, Horton Hatches the Egg, Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, and lastly, the old and non-rhyming 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Westen

    Another book full of Dr. Seuss stories for kids to enjoy. Great for free time of the students.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Wirtz

    I had this book and read it many times as a kid and even later on, it got so worn. It is a seemingly random assortment of 6 Dr. Seuss books (although I noticed there were in fact 8 stories, only later to learn that was because Yertle the Turtle included two additional stories.) The stories included, appear in publication order. They are, "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street", this was Seuss'es first book. About a kid who sees an increasingly bizarre parade on his way to school or so he I had this book and read it many times as a kid and even later on, it got so worn. It is a seemingly random assortment of 6 Dr. Seuss books (although I noticed there were in fact 8 stories, only later to learn that was because Yertle the Turtle included two additional stories.) The stories included, appear in publication order. They are, "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street", this was Seuss'es first book. About a kid who sees an increasingly bizarre parade on his way to school or so he claims. Next is "The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins", a fantasy style story written in prose, about a boy with a magic hat that catches the attention of the King. Next is "Horton Hatches the Egg" about Horton the Elephant, and a bird leaving her egg with him, the resulting baby being an interesting result. Then there is "Yertle the Turtle" about a Turtle that is so prideful he basically makes the other turtles his slaves just so he can see the rest of the world, and when he finally accomplishes his task he realizes it wasn't worth it. Included with this is "Gertrude McFuzz" about a vain bird, and "The Big Brag" about different animals claiming they have ridiculous abilities with their senses. It also includes "How the Grinch Stole Christmas! a story most should be familiar with. The final story is the colorful environmental tale, "The Lorax".

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I can't help it...I love Dr. Seuss books...something I was raised on from a wee age, and however many times I read them, they are still excellent works of art! This book had six classics: And to Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street - how a boy thinks up a tall tale all the way home, only to be honest, and truthful, even if not as amazing, in the end...The 500 Hundred Hats of Bartholemew Cubbins - while I prefer the Ooblek to this story, still interesting inability to conform to a king's comman I can't help it...I love Dr. Seuss books...something I was raised on from a wee age, and however many times I read them, they are still excellent works of art! This book had six classics: And to Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street - how a boy thinks up a tall tale all the way home, only to be honest, and truthful, even if not as amazing, in the end...The 500 Hundred Hats of Bartholemew Cubbins - while I prefer the Ooblek to this story, still interesting inability to conform to a king's command, as the hat has a mind of its own...Horton Hatches the Egg - again, I prefer Horton Hears a Who, but still, showing how Horton reaps what he sows by being faithful while the eggs mother goes off to have fun in the sun is classic Seuss...Yertle the Turtle - a few stories in hear, but the namesake harkens to Nazi Germany and the need to take over the world...The Holiday Classic - How the Grinch Stole Christmas - where a 'bah - humbug' creature discovers the meaning of Christmas while ransacking Who-ville...and finally one of my very favorites - The Lorax - even though you could say its full of environmentalist propaganda, its a good reminder that we need to care for the planet in which we live. A nice present from my deceased mother-in-law to me after she passed...one that I will cherish.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    It was great to revisit these classics, with a few exceptions. "Bartholomew Cubbins" was way too long and did not have enough of a payoff. I read it to a 3-year-old when putting him down for a nap. The bad: saying 'Bartholomew Cubbins' repeatedly was very difficult. The good: the kid fell asleep instantly, because this story is dull and the pictures don't provide enough interest. "Mulberry Street" was quaint. "Yertle the Turtle" was great: Seussian drawings and rhymes, and a good social message. It was great to revisit these classics, with a few exceptions. "Bartholomew Cubbins" was way too long and did not have enough of a payoff. I read it to a 3-year-old when putting him down for a nap. The bad: saying 'Bartholomew Cubbins' repeatedly was very difficult. The good: the kid fell asleep instantly, because this story is dull and the pictures don't provide enough interest. "Mulberry Street" was quaint. "Yertle the Turtle" was great: Seussian drawings and rhymes, and a good social message. "Horton Hatches the Egg" has a more pertinent message than ever with our surrogate mothers, gaybies, blended families and prolific adoption. I was surprised at how short "The Grinch" was, making the TV version a nice adaptation/expansion, especially the dog. "The Lorax" was also excellent, and when reading it aloud I found myself practically singing it in the style of the TV special I saw so many times as a kid.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Just as the title suggests (or at least I hope it suggests it) this collection contains Six of Theadore Guisel's best full length picture books. My family's premier storybook collection and a must have for any household, I would regret the erosion time has had on my family's copy if both this collection and its separate counterparts were not available in store to this day. The chronological order suites it not only due to its introduction and general nature of capturing its authors life, but als Just as the title suggests (or at least I hope it suggests it) this collection contains Six of Theadore Guisel's best full length picture books. My family's premier storybook collection and a must have for any household, I would regret the erosion time has had on my family's copy if both this collection and its separate counterparts were not available in store to this day. The chronological order suites it not only due to its introduction and general nature of capturing its authors life, but also do to the narrative sequencing the book has beginning with the optimistic and imaginative Mulberry St. And ending in the quietly bittersweet story of the Lorax. I highly recommend getting this collection specificity, but if you must live with the individual books in your collection instead, then you are just as in luck.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lexi Acca

    Bedtime stories with Marron

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.