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Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life

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Based on more than 40 years of clinical research, this illuminating book unravels the mysteries of nutrition and shows how a low-carbohydrate/high protein diet can help prevent cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity, as well as increase strength, endurance, and muscle mass.


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Based on more than 40 years of clinical research, this illuminating book unravels the mysteries of nutrition and shows how a low-carbohydrate/high protein diet can help prevent cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity, as well as increase strength, endurance, and muscle mass.

30 review for Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Maybe 4 stars is a little generous, but this book did help round out some understanding that I needed. I first read "Breaking the Vicious Cycle: Intestinal Health Through Diet." "Life Without Bread" was also recommended by a friend. It has some interesting information on the many health benefits of a low carb diet. It also has a guide in the appendix which will help you determine your total carbohydrate intake. I do not follow health fads, so it took a bit of convincing for me to change my mindse Maybe 4 stars is a little generous, but this book did help round out some understanding that I needed. I first read "Breaking the Vicious Cycle: Intestinal Health Through Diet." "Life Without Bread" was also recommended by a friend. It has some interesting information on the many health benefits of a low carb diet. It also has a guide in the appendix which will help you determine your total carbohydrate intake. I do not follow health fads, so it took a bit of convincing for me to change my mindset on what I felt was a potentially dangerous diet that many people used to lose weight. I am following a similar diet to help with ulcerative colitis, and it definitely does help. I don't have a grain allergy, and I don't have celiac disease. I also have never noticed any negative physical symptoms after eating bread. But after following a limited carb diet for over a month I feel much better (I actually started feeling better almost immediately). The authors recommend 6 bread units per day (or 72 grams total utilizable carbs). This is pretty limited carbs, but technically would allow bread and other starches, fruits, vegetables, and sugars, as long as it is within the allowed amount. The diet I follow is slightly different in that it doesn't allow any grains, sugar, starch, or liquid milk. It does allow other carbs, such as vegetables and fruit, honey, etc. My diet doesn't specifically limit the grams, but suggests a healthy, balanced variety of foods. I have appreciated reading "Life Without Bread" because it introduced the idea of how important it is to limit the amount of carbs. I think both aspects are really important to be successful in healing intestinal disease, if that's your goal. One complaint I have of the book is the emphasis on evolution, and the authors' attempt to tie that in with how well we digest grains, etc. I don't believe we descended from apes, therefore the authors lost some credibility with me. I did appreciate the authors' review of many studies, and their explanation of how these have sometimes been used to mislead the public regarding health advice, such as doctors recommending a low-fat diet for someone who suffers from heart disease. I learned that the heart functions almost exclusively through the nutrient of fat, and the importance of animal fat in our diet. I've always been sceptical of foods with "fake" fat and "fake" sugar. I've also never bought into the "dangers" of eggs, butter, and other foods that are natural. So I enjoyed feeling validated in some things that I have always believed. I admire those who are willing to go against conventional beliefs despite the harm that often comes to their professional reputation among those in the mainstream. There is a lot of good health and nutritional knowledge to be gained if you go to the right sources, and do some thinking for yourself. The best advice is not always the most convenient to follow. And just because we see news headlines making health claims, it does not mean that they are true. No big surprise there.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christie

    I read this as part of my quest to become educated on how to live a low-carb diet. I really liked the author's scientific explanations and citation of studies that back up a low-carb lifestyle. I wasn't comfrotable with the conclusions on evolution and why it supports a low-carb diet. I also remain only partially convinced that consuming unlimitted animal fats is actually good for the body. Thirty-some years of low-fat indoctrination is difficult to give up all at once. I read this as part of my quest to become educated on how to live a low-carb diet. I really liked the author's scientific explanations and citation of studies that back up a low-carb lifestyle. I wasn't comfrotable with the conclusions on evolution and why it supports a low-carb diet. I also remain only partially convinced that consuming unlimitted animal fats is actually good for the body. Thirty-some years of low-fat indoctrination is difficult to give up all at once.

  3. 5 out of 5

    L. L.

    There is no ebook edition of this one; unless they have plans to put one out. This one is again more proof that the Atkins diet, a.k.a the low carb high fat diet actually works and it is making a few of the nutrition "doctors" a lot of money by writing books that copy-cat what Atkins knew back in the 70's. You can save the time and money and instead of reading this book just simply cut sugar, breads, pastas, starchy foods/veggies from your diet, keep carb intake below 20grams per day and VIOLA! There is no ebook edition of this one; unless they have plans to put one out. This one is again more proof that the Atkins diet, a.k.a the low carb high fat diet actually works and it is making a few of the nutrition "doctors" a lot of money by writing books that copy-cat what Atkins knew back in the 70's. You can save the time and money and instead of reading this book just simply cut sugar, breads, pastas, starchy foods/veggies from your diet, keep carb intake below 20grams per day and VIOLA! you will lose water weight at first and then your body will go into what is called Ketosis (not ketoacidosis which is quite a different ball game) and your body will learn to convert fat into ketones which it will burn for energy. Simple as that!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Musashi Miyamoto

    Changed my life. It started basically with this Book!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    SO GOOD!!! ......"Once again, we see that the influence of a reduction of carbohydrates plays a key role in a health benefit. Fat is not the culprit here, nor is fat the culprit in most other age-related degenerative diseases. The time has certainly come to return to the diet that mankind evolved to eat, and to set the human race on a steady course to eliminating many of today's 'incurable' diseases." (page 123). "The only way to burn fat is to reduce carbohydrates enough so that the fat-burning SO GOOD!!! ......"Once again, we see that the influence of a reduction of carbohydrates plays a key role in a health benefit. Fat is not the culprit here, nor is fat the culprit in most other age-related degenerative diseases. The time has certainly come to return to the diet that mankind evolved to eat, and to set the human race on a steady course to eliminating many of today's 'incurable' diseases." (page 123). "The only way to burn fat is to reduce carbohydrates enough so that the fat-burning hormone glucagon gets activated." (p 134).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Harrison

    Excellent book. If you believe carbs are good for you (mmm, fruit juice, bread, pizza, cakes, cookies, candy), and fat is the root of all evil, you believe pure, unadulterated lies. The don't call cancer, type-II diabetes, arthritis, etc. etc. the "diseases of civilization" for no reason. While the authors don't go this far (Lierre Keith does), agriculture is the root of pretty much all evil on this planet. And while Keith doesn't go THIS far (Lobaczewski does), psychopathy is the reason it was Excellent book. If you believe carbs are good for you (mmm, fruit juice, bread, pizza, cakes, cookies, candy), and fat is the root of all evil, you believe pure, unadulterated lies. The don't call cancer, type-II diabetes, arthritis, etc. etc. the "diseases of civilization" for no reason. While the authors don't go this far (Lierre Keith does), agriculture is the root of pretty much all evil on this planet. And while Keith doesn't go THIS far (Lobaczewski does), psychopathy is the reason it was able to be such.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Abu Dhabi

    This is a pretty good, common-sense introduction to low carbohydrate nutrition. It's not perfect, though. Contrary to the claims in the book, there actually is some evidence in favor of low-fat diets (though I consider it to be much weaker than the low-carbohydrate position). On the other hand, I think dr Lutz is overly lenient towards carbohydrates and plants in general. But then, a more radical and ultimately healthier stance of no plant foods is too far outside of the Overton window - or at l This is a pretty good, common-sense introduction to low carbohydrate nutrition. It's not perfect, though. Contrary to the claims in the book, there actually is some evidence in favor of low-fat diets (though I consider it to be much weaker than the low-carbohydrate position). On the other hand, I think dr Lutz is overly lenient towards carbohydrates and plants in general. But then, a more radical and ultimately healthier stance of no plant foods is too far outside of the Overton window - or at least was until recently - to be effective in knocking some sense into normies.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Fuller

    Some of this (mostly related to the low-carb thing) is valuable. Other parts (such as the high protein idea) have been proven invalid, counter-productive or suboptimal by newer science. Not a bad read, but I wouldn't make it your only one on the subject! Some of this (mostly related to the low-carb thing) is valuable. Other parts (such as the high protein idea) have been proven invalid, counter-productive or suboptimal by newer science. Not a bad read, but I wouldn't make it your only one on the subject!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    A pretty good book that I decided to read over a year after going keto and being grain, sugar and potato free for over a year. Good information presented well.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Good info, got a little deeper into the scientific jargon than I needed but overall it was important information to be aware of.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    I bought this book to try and supplement my reading about other low-carbohydrate approaches to nutrition. The book was billed to me as taking a scientific approach and a critical look at actual effects in disease conditions. Unfortunately, the writing is not very good. The outline is somewhat rambling. And I found the science to be rather weak. Just using scientific words and explaining principle of biochemistry, physiology, and theories of human evolution are not the same as demonstrating a real I bought this book to try and supplement my reading about other low-carbohydrate approaches to nutrition. The book was billed to me as taking a scientific approach and a critical look at actual effects in disease conditions. Unfortunately, the writing is not very good. The outline is somewhat rambling. And I found the science to be rather weak. Just using scientific words and explaining principle of biochemistry, physiology, and theories of human evolution are not the same as demonstrating a real cause and effect relationship. There is a lot of semiscientific data from Dr Lutz's clinical practice but no clinical trials have been performed. The authors also cite epidemiological data which on one side they say only establishes associations yet on the other they use to show the benefits. All that being said, I think there is an underlying kernel of truth that low carbohydrate nutrition is likely beneficial. The data is not there for low fat diets either. If you want a little insight as to why low carbohydrate diets mY have the beneficial health effects they claim I recommend this book. Otherwise it is probably not worth it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisse

    I thought this book was a bit easier to understand than Breaking the Viscious Cycle by Elaine Gotschall. They fall into the same category of restricting carbs for better health, only I felt that this book was a bit more layperson friendly...not so much science talk and when there was it was well explained. Life Without Bread differes from the SCD, but it has many similarities as well. It's big purpose is to have people cut down to 6 bread units a day (this includes basically all carbs, including I thought this book was a bit easier to understand than Breaking the Viscious Cycle by Elaine Gotschall. They fall into the same category of restricting carbs for better health, only I felt that this book was a bit more layperson friendly...not so much science talk and when there was it was well explained. Life Without Bread differes from the SCD, but it has many similarities as well. It's big purpose is to have people cut down to 6 bread units a day (this includes basically all carbs, including fruit) and eating more meat, cheese and eggs. In some ways I'd prefer it to the SCD b/c I could eat some of the things I once loved but can't eat now on the SCD, but at the same time I think it was good for me not to even get to consider eating breads, etc b/c it'd probably lead me down a bad road. Overall, I'd suggest this book to anyone with a gastro condition, diabetes, blood sugar issues, etc. It's a great read on how diet plays a huge part in what is going wrong in our bodies.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Angie Libert

    I agree with the author that excess carbs can cause various diseases, but not all carbs are the same, and in that opinion I differ. He says a sugar, is a sugar. I do not agree. But what really bothered me about this book was his random assigning of 72 g of carb as a healthy daily intake. He never explains why this number is the chosen number! Other than to say that excessive carbs are bad. So what is the different between say 72 g and 150 g or 400 g or even 20 g of daily carb intake? He never ex I agree with the author that excess carbs can cause various diseases, but not all carbs are the same, and in that opinion I differ. He says a sugar, is a sugar. I do not agree. But what really bothered me about this book was his random assigning of 72 g of carb as a healthy daily intake. He never explains why this number is the chosen number! Other than to say that excessive carbs are bad. So what is the different between say 72 g and 150 g or 400 g or even 20 g of daily carb intake? He never explains this! I find it frustrating when someone makes a statement, but shows nothing to support or back up the statement.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was a good book and very informational. It presented abundant information on the reasons why a low carbohydrate diet is the best one for the human population. It was a bit technical and scientific in parts though, which I personally find boring, so I couldn't rate it higher. I'd definitely recommend reading it though. Fortunately I was already on a low carb diet before I started it having given up sugar and breads so I already knew of the benefits to this type of diet. This was a good book and very informational. It presented abundant information on the reasons why a low carbohydrate diet is the best one for the human population. It was a bit technical and scientific in parts though, which I personally find boring, so I couldn't rate it higher. I'd definitely recommend reading it though. Fortunately I was already on a low carb diet before I started it having given up sugar and breads so I already knew of the benefits to this type of diet.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Very readable. This book explains how current nutritional advice is completely upside down and highly damaging to health. Excess carbohydrate result in high levels of insulin, obesity and dramatically increased risk of arterial disease, strokes, heart attack and cancer. We would all be much healthier if we ate more fat. A must read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pipina

    In spite of its title, this is actually a moderate and sustainable diet. Eat bread, by all means, and rice, and pasta, and fruit. But do it the traditional way. Italians have only about 2 oz of pasta, and then they eat a meat and vegetables course. So must we.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Schober

    Funnily enough this is a low carb plan that allows some bread. This is a very moderate plan by an Austrian doctor.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    Interesting book with good, common sense, advice.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karthi Mohan

    Good book to start breaking out of modern nutritional dogma. And you really should before your gut breaks down from all those GMO grains.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Miroslav

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gregg

  22. 4 out of 5

    Loren

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary Flynn

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lorrie Newmister

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kaye

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michal Pietrasz

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kori Desperado

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peter Julia

  29. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

  30. 5 out of 5

    Isao

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