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A Native American cartoonist shares his journey from childhood, through struggles with alcoholism, to a spiritual awakening at Standing Rock. In this powerful graphic novel memoir by comics creator Jim Terry, the author shares the personal journey of discovering his spiritual home as a Native American. From a childhood in suburbia, disconnected from his identity as an Indig A Native American cartoonist shares his journey from childhood, through struggles with alcoholism, to a spiritual awakening at Standing Rock. In this powerful graphic novel memoir by comics creator Jim Terry, the author shares the personal journey of discovering his spiritual home as a Native American. From a childhood in suburbia, disconnected from his identity as an Indigenous person, through an urban adulthood marked by a struggle with alcoholism and the death of his parents, to his life-altering experience at Standing Rock, we are privileged to travel this path with the author as he begins to find a new sense of self as a Native and as an American­­.


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A Native American cartoonist shares his journey from childhood, through struggles with alcoholism, to a spiritual awakening at Standing Rock. In this powerful graphic novel memoir by comics creator Jim Terry, the author shares the personal journey of discovering his spiritual home as a Native American. From a childhood in suburbia, disconnected from his identity as an Indig A Native American cartoonist shares his journey from childhood, through struggles with alcoholism, to a spiritual awakening at Standing Rock. In this powerful graphic novel memoir by comics creator Jim Terry, the author shares the personal journey of discovering his spiritual home as a Native American. From a childhood in suburbia, disconnected from his identity as an Indigenous person, through an urban adulthood marked by a struggle with alcoholism and the death of his parents, to his life-altering experience at Standing Rock, we are privileged to travel this path with the author as he begins to find a new sense of self as a Native and as an American­­.

30 review for Come Home, Indio

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Come Home, Indio is a graphic novel written and illustrated by Jim Terry. Terry's graphic autobiography is a roller-coaster ride of doubt and discovery, addiction and recovery. Jim Terry is a Chicago comic book and commercial artist and writer. As a child, Terry grew up between households and cultures: his Irish American father's in the Chicago suburbs and his Native (Ho-Chunk) mother's in the Wisconsin Dells and gets told off by his father constantly about his indigenous culture. However, Terry n Come Home, Indio is a graphic novel written and illustrated by Jim Terry. Terry's graphic autobiography is a roller-coaster ride of doubt and discovery, addiction and recovery. Jim Terry is a Chicago comic book and commercial artist and writer. As a child, Terry grew up between households and cultures: his Irish American father's in the Chicago suburbs and his Native (Ho-Chunk) mother's in the Wisconsin Dells and gets told off by his father constantly about his indigenous culture. However, Terry never fully lets go of his youthful vulnerability. Terry begins his chronicle of his lifelong search for belonging with stories of being raised by parents whose good intentions are undermined by alcoholism and anger, and continues through his euphoric discovery of drinking as a teen and subsequent grim, drawn-out battle with his own addiction, before ending with his activism and spiritual awakening on the campgrounds at the Dakota Access Pipeline. Terry notes his attachment to Will Eisner and friendship with artist James O'Barr and their influence is evident in his expressive line drawings and distinctive shading. While he poignantly recalls his teenage girlfriend, he deliberately silhouettes adult romantic relationships, including a broken marriage. In a stylistic shift, the sections around his travels to the pipeline, in which he processes the inherited trauma of his Native ancestry, are elaborated in full pages of text with atmospheric landscape and portrait drawings. Come Home, Indio is written and constructed extremely well – it is far from perfect, but it is rather close. Covering his entire life from childhood to the present day with dark and evocative art, Terry writes at a very fast clip, skimming over large sections of his adulthood with little explanation. What emerges is a portrait of an artist who was able to fully express himself only after getting sober and addressing his chaotic mental state. Conquering his addiction, Terry gained control of his craft and found ways to honor the sacrifices his ancestors made for him. All in all, Come Home, Indio is an ambitious in scope that breaks ground for contemporary Native portrayals in nonfiction.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Every time I read a graphic novel I am surprised by how much I enjoy them. This is a heartfelt story of a young mans quest to find his place in the world, beautifully drawn; the illustrations adding much nuance. Note to self—- read more graphic novels.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nguyên Nguyễn

    An open, and deeply observed memoir that comes to life through a masterly use of drawing and text.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jack Vinson

    Short version: Graphic novel story of a guy coming to terms with things. Stayed up late to finish it. Longer version: I have read a bunch of stories where the interior dialog of the character just lays them bare, but no one outside can see or hear the story. And this is another example - The author grows up feeling isolated and not fitting in anywhere, but then he also has friends that seems to stick with him through his life. His family life is alternatingly good and terrible. But the terrible t Short version: Graphic novel story of a guy coming to terms with things. Stayed up late to finish it. Longer version: I have read a bunch of stories where the interior dialog of the character just lays them bare, but no one outside can see or hear the story. And this is another example - The author grows up feeling isolated and not fitting in anywhere, but then he also has friends that seems to stick with him through his life. His family life is alternatingly good and terrible. But the terrible tears him down and down. He ends up drinking much of his life away and finally ends up getting sober, where he still has the negative interior. But to some extent he realizes that the negative interior is only one story - there is another story there as well around his family, background, his art.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    Out of all the graphic memoirs I have read, this may be the most difficult to read, because of subject matter. Jim Terry went through some very rough times. BUT I would still recommend this book. Terry is half Native American and lets us know what it's like to grow up as a "half breed" in the U.S. And his art is incredible. He uses gorgeous line work to bring his painful story to life. Out of all the graphic memoirs I have read, this may be the most difficult to read, because of subject matter. Jim Terry went through some very rough times. BUT I would still recommend this book. Terry is half Native American and lets us know what it's like to grow up as a "half breed" in the U.S. And his art is incredible. He uses gorgeous line work to bring his painful story to life.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    A very well done narrative memoir.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy Wochos

    This is the first graphic novel I’ve read in it’s entirety and boy, what a doozy. Authentic, compelling and honest. An excellent memoir

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Carr

    Review forthcoming!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dain

    Wow. Just. Wow. I'm so moved by Jim Terry's story & art and so grateful to him for sharing it with the world. Wow. Just. Wow. I'm so moved by Jim Terry's story & art and so grateful to him for sharing it with the world.

  11. 5 out of 5

    ArchaeoLibraryologist

    Powerful work

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Beautiful, heart-wrenching, honest and relatable; I commend the author for his vulnerability. Hard to put down!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Incredibly visceral and honest. Chronicles Jim Terry's childhood and adulthood, focusing on his relationship with alcohol addiction in himself and his family, loneliness and belonging, and issues with relationships. Personally, I have a complicated relationships with addiction. I found the first part from his childhood extremely relatable. The illustrations are all black and white, and I found them very emotional and full of detail. Incredibly visceral and honest. Chronicles Jim Terry's childhood and adulthood, focusing on his relationship with alcohol addiction in himself and his family, loneliness and belonging, and issues with relationships. Personally, I have a complicated relationships with addiction. I found the first part from his childhood extremely relatable. The illustrations are all black and white, and I found them very emotional and full of detail.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nina D

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  16. 5 out of 5

    Deirdre Routt

  17. 4 out of 5

    julian arenas

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bethia

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tad

  20. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Peggy Russell

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen Hoehne

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karla Strand

  24. 5 out of 5

    Annie Jo

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  26. 5 out of 5

    Diane Bushemi

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nat

  28. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shelly

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

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