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Sapiens: a Graphic History, Volume 1 - The Birth of Humankind

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A hardcover edition of the first volume of the graphic adaptation of Yuval Noah Harari's smash #1 New York Times and international bestseller recommended by President Barack Obama and Bill Gates, with gorgeous full-color illustrations and concise, easy to comprehend text for readers of all ages. One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabi A hardcover edition of the first volume of the graphic adaptation of Yuval Noah Harari's smash #1 New York Times and international bestseller recommended by President Barack Obama and Bill Gates, with gorgeous full-color illustrations and concise, easy to comprehend text for readers of all ages. One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? In this first volume of the full-color illustrated adaptation of his groundbreaking book, renowned historian Yuval Harari tells the story of humankind’s creation and evolution, exploring the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens challenges us to reconsider accepted beliefs, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and view specific events within the context of larger ideas.  Featuring 256 pages of full-color illustrations and easy-to-understand text covering the first part of the full-length original edition, this adaptation of the mind-expanding book furthers the ongoing conversation as it introduces Harari’s ideas to a wide new readership.


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A hardcover edition of the first volume of the graphic adaptation of Yuval Noah Harari's smash #1 New York Times and international bestseller recommended by President Barack Obama and Bill Gates, with gorgeous full-color illustrations and concise, easy to comprehend text for readers of all ages. One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabi A hardcover edition of the first volume of the graphic adaptation of Yuval Noah Harari's smash #1 New York Times and international bestseller recommended by President Barack Obama and Bill Gates, with gorgeous full-color illustrations and concise, easy to comprehend text for readers of all ages. One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? In this first volume of the full-color illustrated adaptation of his groundbreaking book, renowned historian Yuval Harari tells the story of humankind’s creation and evolution, exploring the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens challenges us to reconsider accepted beliefs, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and view specific events within the context of larger ideas.  Featuring 256 pages of full-color illustrations and easy-to-understand text covering the first part of the full-length original edition, this adaptation of the mind-expanding book furthers the ongoing conversation as it introduces Harari’s ideas to a wide new readership.

30 review for Sapiens: a Graphic History, Volume 1 - The Birth of Humankind

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    I think many of us are familiar with the best selling nonfiction title, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by the same author, and this is its graphic novel counterpart. I have not read the former and really enjoyed my time with the latter. The illustrations are detailed, beautifully colored, informative, and add to the experience. Anthropology was one of my majors in undergrad, and I loved revisiting those topics and also the newer research that’s been discovered/uncovered since I last stud I think many of us are familiar with the best selling nonfiction title, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by the same author, and this is its graphic novel counterpart. I have not read the former and really enjoyed my time with the latter. The illustrations are detailed, beautifully colored, informative, and add to the experience. Anthropology was one of my majors in undergrad, and I loved revisiting those topics and also the newer research that’s been discovered/uncovered since I last studied. I think the graphic novel is a great crossover for both adults and younger readers in learning about a most fascinating topic. I received a gifted copy. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    One of my favourite books of all time, in graphic novel form, works incredibly well. This is only the first volume, its quite a sizeable book even at 250 pages but is a quick and enjoyable read. Often humorous, it is a great look into the history of humankind (as its predecessor was). Just with, of course, a lot more lively and vibrant illustrations. This is possibly the most entertaining way to learn about history, even for somebody who may have not been interested enough to pick up the original One of my favourite books of all time, in graphic novel form, works incredibly well. This is only the first volume, its quite a sizeable book even at 250 pages but is a quick and enjoyable read. Often humorous, it is a great look into the history of humankind (as its predecessor was). Just with, of course, a lot more lively and vibrant illustrations. This is possibly the most entertaining way to learn about history, even for somebody who may have not been interested enough to pick up the original book or was intimidated by its length. This would make an ideal starting point for the younger generation to learn about the history of humanity too. The first part depicts Yuval himself educating his young niece Zoe by taking her to meet biologist Professor Saraswati. There are a whole host of characters who take us through various parts of the beginning of human history, such as Prehistoric Bill. Very excited for Volume 2! And I hope “Homo Deus” - Harari’s second book about the future of humanity - is also put into the graphic novel format in the near future.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rama

    An incomplete and inaccurate graphic history of life Teaching kids to impart knowledge relies on project-based learning (PBL), graphic illustrations, video materials and other tools. After reading this book with the star-studded “positive” comments from Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Natalie Portman, we learn that a good marketing strategy works for sales, but not for knowledge to be gained. It is an exciting journey through ancient times to discover the images, paintings, habitats, and pottery, l An incomplete and inaccurate graphic history of life Teaching kids to impart knowledge relies on project-based learning (PBL), graphic illustrations, video materials and other tools. After reading this book with the star-studded “positive” comments from Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Natalie Portman, we learn that a good marketing strategy works for sales, but not for knowledge to be gained. It is an exciting journey through ancient times to discover the images, paintings, habitats, and pottery, left by our ancestors. But historical evidence for our ancestry also comes from paleo-biological studies of fossils. Interweaving recent discoveries, maps, and illustrations. Evolution tells the story of our origins. This book is narrated with an inquisitive child, an educator, a cop, and author Harari about our origins. There are several instances of inaccuracy and unscientific facts in this book, the examples are: Only homo sapiens can change their social system, and behavior in all animals is determined by their genetic system; homo sapiens had a cognitive revolution that made them different from other animals; and humans are still adapted to hunter-gather lifestyle. The last few pages are devoted to boring narratives of Diprotodons, the largest marsupials whose extinction was brought about by humans. This book which brings life in 245 pages of illustrations miss out on critical historical facts. For example, there were five mass extinctions of life on the planet including the last event called the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event that occurred 66 million years ago. This wiped-out dinosaurs, and it was critical in creating geophysical conditions for the rapid evolution of mammals. The book barely mentions the relationship between humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans. There is genetic evidence for interbreeding with at least four archaic hominin species that included Neanderthals and Denisovans. The continental drift in the late Triassic Period (which lasted from approximately 251 million to 199.6 million years ago), the supercontinent of Pangea fragmented, and the continents began to move away from one another to the current structure creating new opportunities for species evolution. The book has several cases of cultural insensitivities. The story is supposed to be narrated by a character referred to as Professor Saraswati, apparently referring to Hindu Goddess Saraswati of knowledge and learning who is depicted as a fat Indian lady with a large tilak on the forehead. The book also refers to birth of Christianity and Islam but do not refer to Hinduism, the oldest faith in the world. The earliest hymns of the sacred scriptures of Rig-Veda were written in 1700 B.C.E. They not only connect mankind to worshiping God, but also represent some of the finest poetry ever written in an ancient language.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Wow! There are some mind-blowing concepts masterfully laid out in this history of the rise of mankind as a species, from the critical roles of gossip and cooperation in our success to the delusional lies that form the bedrock of our social constructs to our ability to initiate ecological disasters long before the industrial age and global warming. I can't wait for Volume Two; I want to read the original book from which this is adapted. Wow! There are some mind-blowing concepts masterfully laid out in this history of the rise of mankind as a species, from the critical roles of gossip and cooperation in our success to the delusional lies that form the bedrock of our social constructs to our ability to initiate ecological disasters long before the industrial age and global warming. I can't wait for Volume Two; I want to read the original book from which this is adapted.

  5. 5 out of 5

    laurel [the suspected bibliophile]

    A brief history of the history of human kind, specifically the rise of homo sapiens and the fall of the five other species of humans in the era of the cave man. I've been meaning to read the source material for quite some time, as I want to know more about the history of humankind, so this was a nice primer. I was engrossed and learned a bunch, and I'll definitely be tuning into the second volume...and the book. While it was highly intriguing and very informative, I'm not sure who the audience was A brief history of the history of human kind, specifically the rise of homo sapiens and the fall of the five other species of humans in the era of the cave man. I've been meaning to read the source material for quite some time, as I want to know more about the history of humankind, so this was a nice primer. I was engrossed and learned a bunch, and I'll definitely be tuning into the second volume...and the book. While it was highly intriguing and very informative, I'm not sure who the audience was intended to be. Children, due to the presence of Yuval's niece Zoe? If so, the font was too small, too much and the drawings not the best. Additionally, some of the concepts were a bit too much for a child. Adults? Then some of the framing devices were a little...juvenile. I definitely was not a fan of the artwork, although that might be polished up by the time this thing actually hits the shelves. However, I did learn a lot, and I learned that while researchers know an awful lot, there is an awful lot they don't know as well. But what they do know is that homo sapiens have always impacted the areas they enter on a biological, ecological and geographic level. Where humans tread, other species die. I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review

  6. 4 out of 5

    Diz

    This is a beautifully produced graphic novel that tells part of the story of the rise of humankind. It is based on the author's book on the same topic. I particularly liked the art style used here, which gave the content a sense of fun and wonder. There was one thing that felt a bit off, though. On the back cover of the book there are some blurbs from noted anthropologists Natalie Portman, Chris Evans, and Bill Gates, and from academic journals such as Sunday Express and Financial Times (I'm bein This is a beautifully produced graphic novel that tells part of the story of the rise of humankind. It is based on the author's book on the same topic. I particularly liked the art style used here, which gave the content a sense of fun and wonder. There was one thing that felt a bit off, though. On the back cover of the book there are some blurbs from noted anthropologists Natalie Portman, Chris Evans, and Bill Gates, and from academic journals such as Sunday Express and Financial Times (I'm being sarcastic here). I would have felt more confident about the accuracy of the material in this book if these blurbs were from actual experts in the fields being covered.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Helen | readwithneleh

    I just finished this last night and it just reaffirmed my love for graphic novels. l’ve had the original book, the source material for this graphic novel, on my TBR for a few years now and haven’t gotten around to reading it and it’s not surprising why. While I love non-fiction, the subject matter is complex so I was intimated and apprehensive about picking it up. But, here it is now available in the most approachable way —illustrated and with fun characters to help guide the reader through the I just finished this last night and it just reaffirmed my love for graphic novels. l’ve had the original book, the source material for this graphic novel, on my TBR for a few years now and haven’t gotten around to reading it and it’s not surprising why. While I love non-fiction, the subject matter is complex so I was intimated and apprehensive about picking it up. But, here it is now available in the most approachable way —illustrated and with fun characters to help guide the reader through the information. As expected, some parts were dense and I had difficulty reading through it all. Even in graphic novel format, it was a lot to take in, especially when the small font was living in big blocks of copy. However, I did find this book really fascinating and informative. I found myself reciting facts out loud to my husband multiple times. The illustrations and page layouts were also interesting and educational. And while the editing of content could’ve been a bit better, overall, I thought this was an impressive and fun introduction to the birth of humankind. I would recommend this for both young adults and adults alike. In the beginning it felt targeted towards children, but as I read on it was clear it was made for a wider audience. I can also see this book not being for everyone, specifically those with a strong faith. For background, I was raised in a Christian home and still consider myself one, but one that is more progressive and spiritual. I did not find this book offensive at all, but just wanted to call it out. I’d still recommend this to those of all faith because it talks about human cognitive abilities and how religion came to existence.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tuti

    beautifully illustrated and coloured graphic novel about the development of homo sapiens and its conquering of the planet. interesting facts about how homo sapiens groups lived and how they migrated from africa all over the world, which was always associated with mass death of large mammals - continuing up to the present time. attractive and interesting enough to be read at any age.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Su

    Since my sis read this book, I have been wanting to read. But I am threatened by a great degree after giving a thought about how big the book is. Now, this is just perfect. Give me anything in graphic novel, I will read!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    A really cool nonfiction graphic novel adapted from Harari's bestselling Sapiens. This was a really interesting and accessible read, but it did feel a little like it didn't know who its audience was. On the one hand, the illustrations and framing of the book were incredibly kid-friendly (superheroes, magic shows, explaining concepts to his young niece, etc.), but the concepts he was working through were pretty complex! I definitely was under the impression that this book would be more appropriat A really cool nonfiction graphic novel adapted from Harari's bestselling Sapiens. This was a really interesting and accessible read, but it did feel a little like it didn't know who its audience was. On the one hand, the illustrations and framing of the book were incredibly kid-friendly (superheroes, magic shows, explaining concepts to his young niece, etc.), but the concepts he was working through were pretty complex! I definitely was under the impression that this book would be more appropriate for young readers, but I think most of it may fly right over their heads.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I loved everything about this great graphic novel. I think it will appeal to many age groups and interest levels. As someone with a deep love of anthropology, I found it fun and fascinating, but I don’t think you need an academic background to appreciate it. I received an advanced copy in exchange for my review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    RoshReviews

    #BookReview 𝗦𝗮𝗽𝗶𝗲𝗻𝘀: 𝗔 𝗚𝗿𝗮𝗽𝗵𝗶𝗰 𝗛𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗼𝗿𝘆: 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗕𝗶𝗿𝘁𝗵 𝗼𝗳 𝗛𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗸𝗶𝗻𝗱 𝗩𝗼𝗹. 𝗜 𝗔𝘂𝘁𝗵𝗼𝗿: 𝗬𝘂𝘃𝗮𝗹 𝗡𝗼𝗮𝗵 𝗛𝗮𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗶 I had read and reviewed the original Sapiens long back. But a recent query in a Facebook group on whether this graphic version was suitable for a 12 year old got me thinking if I could share this book with my teenager, so I pushed this up right to the top of my TBR. If you want my opinion on the content of the original, please look for that review. This review is only about the graphic version, whether i #BookReview 𝗦𝗮𝗽𝗶𝗲𝗻𝘀: 𝗔 𝗚𝗿𝗮𝗽𝗵𝗶𝗰 𝗛𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗼𝗿𝘆: 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗕𝗶𝗿𝘁𝗵 𝗼𝗳 𝗛𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗸𝗶𝗻𝗱 𝗩𝗼𝗹. 𝗜 𝗔𝘂𝘁𝗵𝗼𝗿: 𝗬𝘂𝘃𝗮𝗹 𝗡𝗼𝗮𝗵 𝗛𝗮𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗶 I had read and reviewed the original Sapiens long back. But a recent query in a Facebook group on whether this graphic version was suitable for a 12 year old got me thinking if I could share this book with my teenager, so I pushed this up right to the top of my TBR. If you want my opinion on the content of the original, please look for that review. This review is only about the graphic version, whether it does justice to the original, and its suitability for younger readers. It is not an easy job to take a nonfiction tome such as Sapiens and adapt it to a graphic version. So I must appreciate the efforts of the author, the storyboard artists, illustrators and editors who would have worked on this graphic version. They have done a fabulous job. 𝗗𝗼𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝘁 𝗱𝗼 𝗷𝘂𝘀𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗼𝗿𝗶𝗴𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗹? Sapiens, if you remember, had four sections: The Cognitive Revolution, The Agricultural Revolution, The Unification of Humankind, and The Scientific Revolution. This first graphic volume covers the first section of the cognitive revolution. To make the topic transit successfully from text to graphic, many interesting characters have been added to the narration. This serves the purpose aptly as the storyline doesn't become monotonous or too intense for younger readers. The book does its best to be inclusive with characters from various backgrounds, including a saree-clad Professor Saraswati who is next only to Harari himself in terms of character scope. Even keeping aside any personal national pride, I loved the portrayal of her character. She rocked the cool grandma approach, and younger Indians will definitely bond with her character. 𝗜𝘀 𝗶𝘁 𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆 "𝗵𝗲𝗮𝘃𝘆"? Well yes, the book is heavy for a graphic novel, but considering what Sapiens was, this is perfect for those who want an insight into it without struggling through the intense content. Especially for those who aren't too crazy about nonfiction, this graphic novel will be a great way to know Harari's theories. At the same time, seeing his theories visually makes them all the more concrete in your head, and you might tend to forget that all his theories are heavily reliant on his assumptions. Adult readers might be able to filter out the chaff from the wheat; youngsters might take his version as an accurate representation of the past. So the content is still relevant, but to be taken with a pinch of salt, just like in the original book. 𝗗𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗶𝗹𝗹𝘂𝘀𝘁𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗿𝗲𝗽𝗿𝗲𝘀𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗼𝗿𝗶𝗴𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝗯𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝗮𝗰𝗰𝘂𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗹𝘆? The illustrations are A-grade, no doubts about that. I never thought an intense book such as Sapiens could be represented so interactively. But mainly because of the rich variety of characters, the illustrations add a pizzazz to the book. Overall, I think I enjoyed this book even more than Sapiens primarily because of the illustrations and characters. To visualise the original content in this graphic version was a thrilling experience, and to do so along with Professor Saraswati was simply enthralling! 𝘗𝘢𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘢𝘭 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘦: 1. One of the characters talks of people sleeping around, adultery, and gossip about crushes in front of Harari's young niece in a couple of the story panels. 2. There is nudity in the illustrations. Nothing vulgar. Just that in a couple of panels, the pubic area of human males and females is depicted. There are some panels with breasts shown. These two points aren't to drive you away from sharing the book with your children, but just so that you can make an informed decision of when you want to share it with them. 𝗦𝗵𝗼𝘂𝗹𝗱 𝗜 𝘀𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗯𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗺𝘆 𝗰𝗵𝗶𝗹𝗱𝗿𝗲𝗻? Whether to share it with your children or not is an individual choice, and there's no right or wrong age for this. After all, these decisions can't be standardised and depend on the age, reading level, comprehension level, and exposure of the kids to such topics. But I hope this post has made things a bit easier for you in taking that decision. ************************************* Join me on the Facebook group, Readers Forever! , for more reviews, book-related discussions and fun.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aqsa

    What's better than Sapiens- the novel??? SAPIENS - THE GRAPHIC NOVEL! Absolutely funny, absolutely mind-expanding, absolutely brilliant! Putting images on Good Reads reviews is a hard process, otherwise would've shared snapshots of its illustrations. Also, even though their pictures definitely speak a thousand words, I think it is better to read the Sapiens novel before beginning this one, so that you realise the arguments and context more deeply. What's better than Sapiens- the novel??? SAPIENS - THE GRAPHIC NOVEL! Absolutely funny, absolutely mind-expanding, absolutely brilliant! Putting images on Good Reads reviews is a hard process, otherwise would've shared snapshots of its illustrations. Also, even though their pictures definitely speak a thousand words, I think it is better to read the Sapiens novel before beginning this one, so that you realise the arguments and context more deeply.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adele

    Sapiens has some interesting information. Unfortunately I was already at least somewhat familiar with most of it. That might have been okay, but the book is so repetitive. Here is just one example. On page 173 the Yuval character says, "So when scholars claim they know what ancient foragers believed, it often tells us more about the scholars' own preconceptions than about stone-age religion!" Then on the very next page Father Klüg says about interpreting cave paintings, "It's like an inkblot tes Sapiens has some interesting information. Unfortunately I was already at least somewhat familiar with most of it. That might have been okay, but the book is so repetitive. Here is just one example. On page 173 the Yuval character says, "So when scholars claim they know what ancient foragers believed, it often tells us more about the scholars' own preconceptions than about stone-age religion!" Then on the very next page Father Klüg says about interpreting cave paintings, "It's like an inkblot test -- it tells us more about modern researchers' mindsets than the original painters' religious beliefs!" And I am not even counting the previews and summary recaps, of which there are a ton. The book is still thought-provoking, but some of the thoughts I had didn't improve my opinion. I found the use of the Egyptian pyramids as an example of "cooperation" off-putting. Technically I suppose it is, but ... I also got tired of reading references to the Cognitive Revolution when I didn't feel we had been provided with a satisfying explanation of what exactly it was, so I googled it. I feel the book presents this theory as generally, if not universally, accepted, but I found that other models have been offered, and according to Wikipedia, some of the proponents of some other theories have suggested the Cognitive Revolution theory reflects Eurocentric bias (Behavior Modernity Wikipedia article) Anyway, not really my cup of tea.

  15. 5 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    I was hyped for this graphic history, but sadly found it massively disappointing. The way the story is laid out, with the author as a character who appears on 90% of the pages, was cheesy and weird. It was like reading a boring, overzealous textbook. There’s some good information, but this medium fell flat. Such a bummer. I wish I’d read the original book instead.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex Zagorac

    I tried reading Sapiens a few years ago and ended up DNF-ing it simply because it was a library hold and I was reading it so slowly. It's one of those books you have to digest and read one chapter at a time. I felt so stressed about reading it in the lending period that I gave up. So now, there's a graphic novel - I thought great! This volume went over the part that I had already read in the book and it was a great refresher but all I could think the whole time was "wow I wish I could just read t I tried reading Sapiens a few years ago and ended up DNF-ing it simply because it was a library hold and I was reading it so slowly. It's one of those books you have to digest and read one chapter at a time. I felt so stressed about reading it in the lending period that I gave up. So now, there's a graphic novel - I thought great! This volume went over the part that I had already read in the book and it was a great refresher but all I could think the whole time was "wow I wish I could just read the book and read it all now" so I went and bought the 2 pack of Sapiens and Homo Deus. Time to read at my own pace! This is a great taste of what Sapiens has to offer, and it was very cool to put a lot of pictures to the words and ideas I had read about... but the book is definitely where it's at.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte McKinney

    I have heard Yuval a few times on my fave podcast, Armchair Expert. I learned of this book from his latest appearance and wanted to check it out. I could not set this book down. I really enjoyed the format of the graphic novel here. It helped make all this dense information really easy to digest in a fun and engaging way. Highly recommend this book to my fellow Sapiens!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Audra (ouija.reads)

    I loved reading this graphic history and I can't wait for the next volume to come out. Of course, in 250 illustrated pages you can't expect the story to be complete, but I think this book is the perfect jumping off point for people of any age who might be interested in learning more about how we as a species came to me. I especially appreciated the inventive metaphors and fun visual representations that the author/illustrator team used to tell the story of humans. It really made me intrigued to r I loved reading this graphic history and I can't wait for the next volume to come out. Of course, in 250 illustrated pages you can't expect the story to be complete, but I think this book is the perfect jumping off point for people of any age who might be interested in learning more about how we as a species came to me. I especially appreciated the inventive metaphors and fun visual representations that the author/illustrator team used to tell the story of humans. It really made me intrigued to read the actual book, so that will be one of my upcoming nonfiction reads! My thanks to Harper Perennial for my copy of this one to read and review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    Does what it says on the tin. Condenses down parts of the original Sapiens into a graphic novel format. Will presumably be a lot of scope for sequels as Harari’s anthropological quest continues through his three book repertoire.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lyria E.

    Ένα καταπληκτικό graphic novel σχετικά με την γέννηση και την εξέλιξη του ανθρώπινου είδους. Δεν έχω διαβάσει το κανονικό βιβλίο (Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind) οπότε δεν μπορώ να ξέρω τι έχει κοπεί από αυτό, αν και θεωρώ ότι είναι μια σύντομη εκδοχή ενός μέρους του. Ήταν πολύ ενδιαφέρον, και παρά το γεγονός ότι είχε περισσότερα λόγια (μερικές φορές ολόκληρες παραγράφους σε ένα καρέ) απ' ότι συνηθίζεται στα graphic novels (αν και ήταν κάτι αναμενόμενο σε αυτό, όπως και να 'χει πρόκειται γ Ένα καταπληκτικό graphic novel σχετικά με την γέννηση και την εξέλιξη του ανθρώπινου είδους. Δεν έχω διαβάσει το κανονικό βιβλίο (Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind) οπότε δεν μπορώ να ξέρω τι έχει κοπεί από αυτό, αν και θεωρώ ότι είναι μια σύντομη εκδοχή ενός μέρους του. Ήταν πολύ ενδιαφέρον, και παρά το γεγονός ότι είχε περισσότερα λόγια (μερικές φορές ολόκληρες παραγράφους σε ένα καρέ) απ' ότι συνηθίζεται στα graphic novels (αν και ήταν κάτι αναμενόμενο σε αυτό, όπως και να 'χει πρόκειται για βιβλίο εκλαϊκευμένης επιστήμης), δεν με κούρασε καθόλου. Αυτό κατά τη γνώμη μου οφείλεται και στο ότι η όλη αφήγηση της εξέλιξης του ανθρώπου έγινε σε ένα "μυθιστορηματικό" πλαίσιο. Με αυτό εννοώ πως δεν ήταν όλο μια συνεχής διήγηση των επιστημονικών ανακαλύψεων και των πορισμάτων που προέκυψαν από αυτές, αλλά οι συγγραφείς είχαν φροντίσει να εντάξουν αυτή τη διήγηση σε διάφορες περιστάσεις στις οποίες συμμετείχε ο πρωταγωνιστής-κύριος αφηγητής (ο οποίος είναι μάλιστα ο Yuval Noah Harari, ο συγγραφέας του βιβλίου). Όπως και να 'χει, είναι ένα εκπληκτικό βιβλίο να διαβάσετε, ειδικά εάν πιστεύετε ότι θα σας κουράσει το κανονικό Sapiens αλλά ταυτόχρονα σας ενδιαφέρει το περιεχόμενό του. Βρίσκω τον τρόπο που χειρίστηκαν το βιβλίο και το προσάρμοσαν στα δεδομένα των graphic novels πολύ έξυπνο, με αποτέλεσμα να παραμένει πλούσιο σε γνώση και να κρατάει αμείωτο το ενδιαφέρον του αναγνώστη! Περιμένω με ανυπομονησία το επόμενο! Υ.Γ. Η έκδοση από τις εκδόσεις Αλεξάνδρεια είναι πολύ ποιοτική. Συγχαρητήρια και γι' αυτό.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Prabhani | Book Fairy Reads

    Such a great history book! Harrari explains the history in a way that is very easy to understand. Full of exciting stories makes the reader curious from beginning to the end of this graphic novel. Great illustrations takes the reader to the scenery with the characters. Awaiting for the next volume.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dramapuppy

    This was interesting information presented in an interesting way, but I wish the author had distinguished more between fact and theory. I appreciated the use of characters asking questions and going to conferences as a means to present the information. It made the nonfiction read like a story, which I always enjoy. Within this basic narrative, we're treated to smaller narratives illustrating specific concepts, such as a game show explaining evolution or a courtroom drama on a species-wide scale. This was interesting information presented in an interesting way, but I wish the author had distinguished more between fact and theory. I appreciated the use of characters asking questions and going to conferences as a means to present the information. It made the nonfiction read like a story, which I always enjoy. Within this basic narrative, we're treated to smaller narratives illustrating specific concepts, such as a game show explaining evolution or a courtroom drama on a species-wide scale. These stories were even more fun. They made new information more digestible while keeping me from getting bored during information I already knew. Perhaps it's because of this casual presentation, but I was annoyed by the lack of clarity between what is scientifically proven fact and what is commonly disputed theory. I couldn't really tell the difference without outside research. I don't agree with all the theories the author explores. I still enjoyed learning more about these theories, though, and I wouldn't have minded their inclusion if only they had been presented as theories. Overall, this was a fun book to read, and it sparked some fun discussions afterward. It's not perfect, but I would still recommend it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    anto

    Amazing graphics. If you want your younger ones to know the info that you read as an adult in Sapiens (the original) this book is perfect. Visual storytelling of the best kind, looks like a superhero comic book, very attractive to young adults. The images are really good and they are remembered easily, great way to learn history.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lady Brainsample

    A really nice adaptation of the first portion of the non-graphic version. I enjoyed it much more because it didn't include the stupid nonsense I hated in the last one. Guess I'll have to wait for Volume 2 of the graphic novel to get irritated at those parts all over again, ha ha! A really nice adaptation of the first portion of the non-graphic version. I enjoyed it much more because it didn't include the stupid nonsense I hated in the last one. Guess I'll have to wait for Volume 2 of the graphic novel to get irritated at those parts all over again, ha ha!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bre

    This graphic history of humans is so well done. I loved the way each point was weaved into the next amd learned so much about myself. If you're a visual learner, this graphic novel adaptation is perfect for you. This graphic history of humans is so well done. I loved the way each point was weaved into the next amd learned so much about myself. If you're a visual learner, this graphic novel adaptation is perfect for you.

  26. 4 out of 5

    jenna

    Amazing. They translated the content of the book into a graphic novel so well. This was very engaging and a fun way to learn about evolution. Can’t wait for the second volume!!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    The_story_scribbler

    I absolutely LOVE this book! It is super interesting, though quite complex. It has incredible illustrations and it is amazing!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    4.5 stars.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rose Heartfilia

    I am not a "good" comic reader. I always like that comics in general are short and that I easily can go through them and take a break. 240 pages is therefore quite a read for me. Plus it is a very serious and interesting topic. This comic is done well, I am not even sure if you can call it a comic but this graphic design for this book was good. It made me want to reread Sapiens and finally finish it. Now that I have not much more homework to do (I started a Swedish language course though), I fee I am not a "good" comic reader. I always like that comics in general are short and that I easily can go through them and take a break. 240 pages is therefore quite a read for me. Plus it is a very serious and interesting topic. This comic is done well, I am not even sure if you can call it a comic but this graphic design for this book was good. It made me want to reread Sapiens and finally finish it. Now that I have not much more homework to do (I started a Swedish language course though), I feel like it might be easier to read than while I was trying to write essays and study. I heard so many positive notions of this book and it was a very welcome gift from my internship. I think changing the impressive work of Sapiens into a graphic book makes it easier for people to also read. Those that do not like reading thick books or are easier distracted. I would definitely recommend this book and I hope they continue with the whole series of Harari's work.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Lalor

    Really entertaining and informative! Loved the pictures and comics, made it that much more engaging! The ending was great, I feel like the last 75 pages made the book for me. The earlier chapters were a bit repetitive, but still interesting! Looking forward to reading part 2

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