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Corinne Blunt knows what people think of her—she’s an icy, unapproachable executive. It’s the price she’s had to pay to get to the top. But there’s knowing you have a reputation in the office, and there’s hearing your new intern laugh when someone calls you “Blunt the C*nt” in the elevator on his first day. She’d hoped to finally find an ally in Wesley Chambers, but she’s n Corinne Blunt knows what people think of her—she’s an icy, unapproachable executive. It’s the price she’s had to pay to get to the top. But there’s knowing you have a reputation in the office, and there’s hearing your new intern laugh when someone calls you “Blunt the C*nt” in the elevator on his first day. She’d hoped to finally find an ally in Wesley Chambers, but she’s not about to let him off the hook for joining the office boys’ club. Taking refuge in the professional boundaries between them, she relegates Wes to assistant work—which would do the trick, if he weren’t so eager to prove he’s a decent human being. Wes is sincerely apologetic, insisting it was a misunderstanding, and to her surprise, Corinne believes him. Being forced to work together was one thing, but long hours at the office with what turns out to be a kind, thoughtful man soon has their business relationship turning personal, and things get complicated—fast. Could this be something more serious than either of them dared to hope for? Or is their relationship just playing into the harmful power dynamics Corinne’s had to endure her entire career?


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Corinne Blunt knows what people think of her—she’s an icy, unapproachable executive. It’s the price she’s had to pay to get to the top. But there’s knowing you have a reputation in the office, and there’s hearing your new intern laugh when someone calls you “Blunt the C*nt” in the elevator on his first day. She’d hoped to finally find an ally in Wesley Chambers, but she’s n Corinne Blunt knows what people think of her—she’s an icy, unapproachable executive. It’s the price she’s had to pay to get to the top. But there’s knowing you have a reputation in the office, and there’s hearing your new intern laugh when someone calls you “Blunt the C*nt” in the elevator on his first day. She’d hoped to finally find an ally in Wesley Chambers, but she’s not about to let him off the hook for joining the office boys’ club. Taking refuge in the professional boundaries between them, she relegates Wes to assistant work—which would do the trick, if he weren’t so eager to prove he’s a decent human being. Wes is sincerely apologetic, insisting it was a misunderstanding, and to her surprise, Corinne believes him. Being forced to work together was one thing, but long hours at the office with what turns out to be a kind, thoughtful man soon has their business relationship turning personal, and things get complicated—fast. Could this be something more serious than either of them dared to hope for? Or is their relationship just playing into the harmful power dynamics Corinne’s had to endure her entire career?

30 review for Hot Copy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Wowwww! I’m dipping my fingers into water bucket! They’re burning! The extremely high chemistry between Corinne and Wesley put the pages in fire! It’s freaking hot, intense, steamy, pant melting, mind blowing! You keep hyperventilating as you flip the pages faster, turning on AC to cool down ! Office romance, boss heroine and intern hero’s forbidden attraction are my favorite delicious topics and I’m telling you my friends, I haven’t seen so hot, well matched couple who can set your bedrooms on Wowwww! I’m dipping my fingers into water bucket! They’re burning! The extremely high chemistry between Corinne and Wesley put the pages in fire! It’s freaking hot, intense, steamy, pant melting, mind blowing! You keep hyperventilating as you flip the pages faster, turning on AC to cool down ! Office romance, boss heroine and intern hero’s forbidden attraction are my favorite delicious topics and I’m telling you my friends, I haven’t seen so hot, well matched couple who can set your bedrooms on fire! They’re amazing! Especially Wesley: loyal, kind hearted, healer, honest, sweet boy: taking care of his sick mother and after his death, he’s struggling to adopt in his old life, socializing with old friends, rejecting to sell family house he lives with his twin sister. Two years ago he already found a job at the company his father’s close friend Richard work as CEO. Now at age 25, he’s fidgety, trying to adjust in his intern position but when some of the other interns make humiliating comment about his new boss by calling her Blunt the C*nt at the elevator, he lets out a nervous laugh just like he did at the inappropriate conditions he finds himself into before but guess who is already at the elevator ? Yes, her new boss Corinne Blunt is back to them, looking at her phone and eavesdropping their conversation! Sorry Wesley you made terrible first impression and ice queen, ruthless, perfectionist boss of yours are adamant to see you bleed! On the other hand, Richard who acts fatherly around Wesley starts giving the worst Weinstein vibes around Corinne. Classy, workaholic, reserved Corinne isn’t like a ruthless b*tch as people think about: She cares too much! Her reputation already ruined because of her previous intern’s sneaky attitudes who tried to use her to climb corporate ladders. She needs to cover her ears to ignore the unfair comments people make about her and focus on her job. But when her mother suffers from big C and her intern is too kind, caring, she gets more confused about her feelings. When she cries in front of him after hearing her mother’s illness and suffering from one of the most painful migraine attacks, he helped her to get through one of the most challenging presentations she’s made. Well, Corinne cannot hold herself any longer and after their first kiss, things between them growing intenser and getting more complicated! I’m stopping right now! I already gave too much away! This book is hot as well, but also emotional, heartfelt. It’s thought provoking and its powerful approach to #metoomovenent was well crafted and impressively motivational! Both of the MCs are so likable. They find themselves one of the most complicated situation: the forbidden affair at work place where the stakes are way too much high! Thankfully the conclusion of the story was relieving. Overall: I loved this book so much! Instead of romance and steamy scenes, I enjoyed the family relationships, approach to the grief and struggles to move on when you lost your loved ones and its fair and realistic perspective to mansplaining at the work place was bold objective. I’m only cutting half star because at the last third: I found some of heroine’s actions a little annoying. I loved Wesley so much! He was the younger one of the relationship but he was the wiser one from the beginning. I still round up 4.5 to 5 provocative, feminism vibes with forbidden but extremely hot like hell stars! I’m looking forward to read more works of Ms. Barrett! This was one of the best office romances I’ve read for so long! Special thanks to Netgalley and HARLEQUIN-Carina Press for sharing this digital reviewer copy with me in exchange my honest opinions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    *The Angry Reader*

    So I actually called Sam about this one. Her insight is invaluable, and I needed to sort through why this book made me so incredibly uncomfortable. For starters, the workplace situation creates a power imbalance that’s tough to overcome. That’s not to say I haven’t enjoyed a workplace romance - just to say you’re starting behind the eight ball when one of the characters has this kind of power over another. “But the woman’s in charge here. That makes it okay!” No. No it doesn’t. “But they talk ab So I actually called Sam about this one. Her insight is invaluable, and I needed to sort through why this book made me so incredibly uncomfortable. For starters, the workplace situation creates a power imbalance that’s tough to overcome. That’s not to say I haven’t enjoyed a workplace romance - just to say you’re starting behind the eight ball when one of the characters has this kind of power over another. “But the woman’s in charge here. That makes it okay!” No. No it doesn’t. “But they talk about it. They get it out in the open and communicate.” Still not okay. I’m not sure that efforts to be sensitive to an issue of this nature actually make it any better. Consent is great. But there’s never the feeling that it is freely given. Wesley’s status as subordinate is constantly thrown in his face - including during sex. It just feels wrong. And then there’s this entire issue with unrelated workplace sexual harassment but we’re still supposed to cheer for the hero and heroine who are doing their own inappropriate work sex thing? This circles back to my recent thoughts about the tension in a book. I read that Bybee that had no tension. None. Zero. Not necessarily terrible now that I’m prepared for the next one. And then we arrive at this book - where the tension is a sort of career-suicide that has me worrying about the characters. Like people who steal because they need to get caught. How can sex that threatens to destroy everything be okay? And if your job means so little that you’re willing to throw it away like this why not quit and see if the boning is still oh-so-steamy when it isn’t naughty. I was uncomfortable throughout the book. Confused as to what I should be feeling. And overwhelmed by the sex. So. Much. Sex. Which actually added to my confusion - Bc again - what am I feeling? What was the author trying to do? Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the opportunity to offer my unbiased opinion.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dísir

    The role reversal that ‘Hot Copy’ presents—a hard, confident and goal-driven boss and an intern, the former of whom misconstrued a meeting and set them both on a path of dislike and spite—is story I couldn’t wait to get my hands on.  ‘Hot Copy’ delves into sexual politics in the office and I definitely cringed at the very real issue of sexual harassment here and the delicate navigating it takes around this thorny issue especially when a woman worms her way around it in order to stay ‘professional The role reversal that ‘Hot Copy’ presents—a hard, confident and goal-driven boss and an intern, the former of whom misconstrued a meeting and set them both on a path of dislike and spite—is story I couldn’t wait to get my hands on.  ‘Hot Copy’ delves into sexual politics in the office and I definitely cringed at the very real issue of sexual harassment here and the delicate navigating it takes around this thorny issue especially when a woman worms her way around it in order to stay ‘professional’. On the one hand, I felt for Corinne, overly-sensitive and spiteful because of her own gender trying to climb the corporate ladder while taking all sorts of harassment along with it.  But if the story explored this question and put it all in form of Corinne and her struggles, inequality seemed to define her and Wesley’s relationship from the start: from boss to intern, from older career-woman to younger greenhorn-subordinate. I simply saw Wesley differing to Corinne at every point, taking her rejections and her whiplash mood-swings and pushing away like punches to the gut without really stepping up on his own to challenger her.  On every front, Wesley stayed the passive one, shifting the blame of everything going wrong onto himself, while refusing to recognise that Corinne needed to own her own part in her fickle ways. That she seemed ashamed of their relationship—admittedly a secret one in the office—while taking only the pieces of Wesley she wanted was too selfish and too one-sided for me to call this a pairing I wanted to get behind.  Above all, where was the communication between them, or worse yet, the reciprocity? There were pages and pages of Wesley cajoling, his rationalising monologues about wanting to be with her, taking the first step of action to do the things to make Corinne comfortable, but her reciprocity was sorely lacking throughout. For once, I wanted her to step up and out of her own comfort zone the way Wesley had done for her, but time and again, it was her tucking tail, keeping quiet and then pushing away when it mattered the most when all the sacrifices were made on his side.  Even towards the end, Corinne seemed more concerned with her job and career status than wanting to be with Wesley—after all that he’d done for her selflessly!—, displaying a mean-spirited, small-heartedness that I just couldn’t get over. She took and took and took, gave too little while Wesley did too much of the opposite. I never saw her taking the big leap forward but instead relegated him to a side matter; instead it was up to serendipity and chance that that they were together by the end of the book. What could have been a way more satisfying conclusion turned out to be a frustrating, hair-pulling one, where the romance wasn’t one made of a couple fighting for each other, but rather, one where Corinne wanted a foot out at all times.  *ARC by the publisher via Netgalley

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rozberry🍓

    2.25-.5 stars Okay, I’m calling it - DNF 53%. I tried 🤷‍♀️. Another deceptive cute cover rears its head again. Anyhoo, (nothing about it was really my cuppa, so tbh I just don’t care about this enough to go into further detail 🤷‍♀️) I’m gonna keep it kind of short & skip to basic points of why it didn’t work out for me... - It was a dud 🥱. The writing just lacked punch/energy/connection (whatever you wish to call it). Sometimes transitions in their relationship felt abrupt. - The workplace dynamics 2.25-.5 stars Okay, I’m calling it - DNF 53%. I tried 🤷‍♀️. Another deceptive cute cover rears its head again. Anyhoo, (nothing about it was really my cuppa, so tbh I just don’t care about this enough to go into further detail 🤷‍♀️) I’m gonna keep it kind of short & skip to basic points of why it didn’t work out for me... - It was a dud 🥱. The writing just lacked punch/energy/connection (whatever you wish to call it). Sometimes transitions in their relationship felt abrupt. - The workplace dynamics felt rather icky/uncomfortable, with the heroine’s boss particularly(which was intentional), but it kinda carried over with her being the hero’s boss (albeit I’m assuming unintentionally). - Generally, there was kind of a sad undertone in their personal lives. - I love a good cinnamon roll, but tbh the hero read a little too boyish for me. As far as connecting with the characters, basically, both were just a miss for me. I’m kinda bummed. I was hoping for an engaging, fun role reversal office romance, but I didn’t get that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rosie Danan

    An intoxicating blend of wholesome sweetness and tear-off-your-clothes steam…Ruby Barrett’s writing leaves me breathless.

  6. 4 out of 5

    nick (the infinite limits of love)

    I love a good office romance and Ruby Barrett's teasers from this book had me hyped to read Hot Copy. It ended up being a really great debut and possibly one of the most realistic office romances I've read. I found it to be emotional, tense, and achingly romantic. Hot Copy tells the story of Wes and Corrine, two characters dealing with a lot of grief in their own ways. I've said this before but I have a soft spot for characters who have an icy exterior, particularly when they are the protagonists I love a good office romance and Ruby Barrett's teasers from this book had me hyped to read Hot Copy. It ended up being a really great debut and possibly one of the most realistic office romances I've read. I found it to be emotional, tense, and achingly romantic. Hot Copy tells the story of Wes and Corrine, two characters dealing with a lot of grief in their own ways. I've said this before but I have a soft spot for characters who have an icy exterior, particularly when they are the protagonists. Corrine here certainly has a hard shell and is, at times, a tough nut to crack. She has this reputation at her office of being unapproachable and has even been given a crude and really gross nickname behind her back just because she is assertive. So obviously, I found Corrine to be endearing. One of my favorite parts about Hot Copy was watching her open up about her feelings and her vulnerabilities. And she grows a lot! She maintains her values and doesn't abide by anybody else's nonsense, but she learns to open up about herself to the right person. That right person happens to be her new intern, Wesley. Oh, how I adored this soft, cinnamon roll boy. Wes has this gentle energy to him that instantly made him likable. He is still reeling from the passing of his mother and is still dealing with that grief. You kind of just want to give the man a hug and tell him that everything will be alright. The way he treats Corrine with nothing but respect despite knowing her reputation makes him ridiculously attractive. While I think most readers will have no issue with Corrine and Wes as characters, I do think that their romance might not be for everyone given the power dynamic of a boss and her intern. I personally thought that the author challenges that power dynamic in the text well, but I can see that others' opinions might differ. The romance worked for me because both Corrine and Wes acknowledge that what they are doing is questionable and won't be viewed kindly by others. Yet they can't entirely resist the connection that they obviously share with each other. It definitely starts off sexual in nature but evolves into something much deeper. It's really a story of two people finding peace and comfort with each other in the midst of grappling with their grief. It's a sweet, very steamy, and sometimes angsty romance that clicked with me. I believed in them as a couple and though they had a lot to overcome, I knew they would eventually get there. If you like your romance books with a bit of a sad tone to them (don't worry there's a HEA), you'll like Hot Copy a lot. It reminded me a lot of the 2012s-2015s contemporary romance novels with its style and I've been really missing that so Hot Copy ended up hitting all the right notes for me. Ruby Barrett is a fantastic writer and I can't wait to see what she comes up with next. CWs: death of a parent, cancer diagnosis, workplace sexual harassment Relationship disclosure: Ruby Barrett and I are mutuals on social media.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Meryl Wilsner

    Ruby Barrett writes the best male characters I’ve ever read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carly

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A sexy, engaging, unexpectedly emotional romance! There are a lot of pieces to this story and it speaks to Barrett’s skills as an author that she can wield them all so deftly. Hot Copy is a book that’s ultimately about relationships - romantic, familial, workplace - and also how showing real vulnerability isn’t a weakness. Corinne is a seemingly tough-as-nails MC whose icy exterior is guarding softer insides, and Wes proved to be the calm, patient foil that slowly weathered down her defenses. I A sexy, engaging, unexpectedly emotional romance! There are a lot of pieces to this story and it speaks to Barrett’s skills as an author that she can wield them all so deftly. Hot Copy is a book that’s ultimately about relationships - romantic, familial, workplace - and also how showing real vulnerability isn’t a weakness. Corinne is a seemingly tough-as-nails MC whose icy exterior is guarding softer insides, and Wes proved to be the calm, patient foil that slowly weathered down her defenses. I appreciated that their romance wasn’t just about some illicit office affair and that the conflict partly came from how women are so often punished for perceived professional missteps. The stakes felt real and genuine, and I’m always weak for a book when the love interest just comes over and takes care of chores around the house because they know their person needs that right now. content warnings: sexual harassment in the office (against heroine), parental death (hero’s mom died of cancer prior to book), cancer (heroine’s mother receives diagnosis and is later in remission) I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    RateTheRomance

    I hoped to enjoy this book, but I didn't. There are quite a few problematic parts in this story. Sexual harassment in the workplace goes both ways. The power dynamic of the female lead being very sexually inappropriate with her male intern while at work was a real problem for me. Equality in the workplace is about EVERYONE being safe and respected. Both male and female. Flipping the script here with a woman in power doesn't make it acceptable and certainty makes it hard to read in a romantic con I hoped to enjoy this book, but I didn't. There are quite a few problematic parts in this story. Sexual harassment in the workplace goes both ways. The power dynamic of the female lead being very sexually inappropriate with her male intern while at work was a real problem for me. Equality in the workplace is about EVERYONE being safe and respected. Both male and female. Flipping the script here with a woman in power doesn't make it acceptable and certainty makes it hard to read in a romantic context.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sonali

    DNF. This was a huge miss for me. It is not interesting or romantic for a victim of workplace harassment to perpetuate those power dynamics with her own intern. Corrine is not a character I can root for and Wes needs to run the hell away from her. I kept waiting for Corinne to learn or grow but at 76% I was done. Not recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    LOVED IT. Sweet, sexy, funny, and so emotionally satisfying. I adored these characters. I can’t wait to read what she writes next.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Em

    Despite knowing this novel featured a role reversal of sorts - she's the boss; he's the intern - I still found the set-up surprising and strangely fascinating. It takes just a bit to get yourself in the headspace of a man somewhat at the mercy of his stone cold, female boss; I think the author does a terrific job setting up the power dynamics via his and her PoV's. It's nicely done. The story kicks off on day one of Wesley Chambers internship with Corinne Blunt at a marketing firm. He's feeling f Despite knowing this novel featured a role reversal of sorts - she's the boss; he's the intern - I still found the set-up surprising and strangely fascinating. It takes just a bit to get yourself in the headspace of a man somewhat at the mercy of his stone cold, female boss; I think the author does a terrific job setting up the power dynamics via his and her PoV's. It's nicely done. The story kicks off on day one of Wesley Chambers internship with Corinne Blunt at a marketing firm. He's feeling fortunate that Richard, a close friend of his somewhat estranged father (whom he dislikes (he abandoned Wesley's mother when she got sick)) was willing to offer him the plum internship at his firm despite the fact he's been out of school for two years. Wesley spent the last two years nursing his ailing mother before her death from ovarian cancer. He’s devastated by the loss of his mother and still hasn't fully recovered from it. [Reader, this is also a bit of a change from your usual stoic male who won't/can't admit he's hurting/sad/miserable. Wesley doesn't hide his feelings]. Speaking of hiding your feelings...Corinne has spent the past few years working her way up the corporate ladder. Her time has been similarly arduous - working harder and longer than most of the men in her office, ignoring the casual misogyny of her fellow employees and the senior staff, and the not so subtle sexual harassment of her former mentor/boss. These two are both emotionally vulnerable/putting on brave facades/hopeful as they approach their first work day together, but things don't quite go as expected. When Wesley steps into the elevator on the way to his first day interning for Corinne Blunt, he’s looking forward to working for a woman who’s forging a new path in digital marketing. She has a reputation for excellence and he’s thrilled to have the opportunity to work for her. But his peaceful ride is interrupted by another intern who introduces himself and then immediately begins oversharing about the office staff and Corinne in particular. By the time they arrive on their floor, Wesley is eager to escape him and he nearly does - but not before the intern reveals the office nickname for Corinne - “Blunt the Cunt.” Wesley isn’t sure how to react and only manages to choke out a pained laugh (his default reaction to things that make him uncomfortable), instead of the set down the intern deserves. Things go from bad to worse when he arrives at the office and discovers the woman who exited the elevator car shortly before him is his new mentor/boss Corinne. And she definitely heard the nickname and his reaction. She’s unfriendly - hostile even - and immediately sets out to put him in his place as her assistant/errand runner. Corinne heard great things about Wesley and was hoping for a productive working relationship with her new intern. But after he laughed at the offensive nickname another intern shared with him, she concludes he isn’t worth her time or attention. Instead of mentoring him, she gives him shit work and errands to run. Ahem. Obviously Wesley and Corinne get off to a rough start. But here’s where this story starts to fall apart. Corinne is supposed to be the consummate professional, ice cold, and aloof. She isn’t. She’s petty and rude and even when Wesley attempts to do the grown up thing and apologize, she ignores him. Then she starts lusting after him. And even though she treats him like total dogshit, he starts lusting after her, too. Meanwhile, the office is a cesspool of misogyny, toxic masculinity, and Corinne’s mentor (Richard!) is a lecherous slimeball who constantly makes Corinne uncomfortable with touches and comments that are completely inappropriate. She doesn’t report him - or Mark (the offensive and inappropriate intern), because she wants to do her job and prove she deserves to rise within the organization based on her business acumen. Good for you Corinne...but that’s total bullshit and belies what we’re supposed to believe about your character - badass in the boardroom with a take no prisoners style of getting shit done, and that’s before Corinne decides to embark on an ill advised, secret affair with Wesley. Friends, I love a good enemy to lovers story. This isn’t it. From the very beginning, Corinne is in the power position in this relationship, and she doesn’t hesitate to abuse that position right away. She pulls Wesley in and then pushes him away, and when he’s hurt by her behavior she uses sex as a weapon and tool for forgiveness. He’s constantly second-guessing how and why he’s at fault or trying to have sexy-times with her in the office after she’s asked him not to, and these two never seem to work as a couple except when they’re having sex. Sex with very little intimacy and lots of orgasms. They hook up, they part on bad terms, they kiss in the office (FFS), they make up, they break up, he tries to be there for her when her personal life falls apart, she tells him to go away, he comes back, she pushes him away...ad nauseum. The author takes an intriguing premise and then overly commits to the characters we meet in the initial elevator ride. Brittle, tough Corinne is unwilling to show any weakness, but it blinds her to the kindness and goodness Wesley constantly offers her, and permits her to rebuff him at the smallest sign of vulnerability on her part. She lacks self-awareness and is selfish and even when her personal life is imploding, she pushes away the one person willing to help. Wesley is the opposite. He gives and gives to Corinne and never seems to need or want the same. Meanwhile, he's so wholly focused on her and her needs, he's a dick to his twin sister, former best friend...and well, he simply ignores his own life in favor of supporting Corinne through hers. He's like that girlfriend you had in high school that gets a boyfriend, drops you like a hot potato, and then wants everything to go back to normal if/when the relationship ends. He just seemed kind of pathetic more than anything else. Sorry. He did. The premise is compelling; the execution is a total disappointment.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Miriam Stern

    Mothereffer... I don't normally start a review with a semi-swear word, but whao. Whao. There's so much wrong with this book that I don't even know where to start. This is, by no means, an attack on the author (I know it's bloody hard to write a book), yet damn. Where do I even start? Just wrong: Listen, I know the excerpt clearly states that it's a hot romance between an intern and his boss, but I didn't expect it to be quite like this. I, perhaps, imagined there was some sort of loophole around Mothereffer... I don't normally start a review with a semi-swear word, but whao. Whao. There's so much wrong with this book that I don't even know where to start. This is, by no means, an attack on the author (I know it's bloody hard to write a book), yet damn. Where do I even start? Just wrong: Listen, I know the excerpt clearly states that it's a hot romance between an intern and his boss, but I didn't expect it to be quite like this. I, perhaps, imagined there was some sort of loophole around the 'intern' being her age and the hierarchy being somewhat 'same level'. I don't know. I didn't really think he'd be 24 to her 30s and legit, the guy that works under her. There's something that's just so bad about that. There's a point where she states "This is unprofessional". Gurl. Because it is! I don't care if they're both adults and they're consenting to it, it's just not the kind of thing you do. I'm in my 30s, I have a junior lawyer (24) who works with me and I'm supposed to set the example here. It's just awkward. Also, if this were a much older guy with a girl, we'd all be irked up too. It's bad any way you see it. Also, ahem, let's get something straight. Her boss was sexually harassing her and she goes straight into the hands of her intern, begging to be fucked right after? What? Am I reading this right? Is she trying to prove a point on the difference between when you don't want it and want it? It's still in the office! Keep. It. In. Your. Pants. What could have been slightly more passable? (and still awkward) That they have their encounter, he disappears and they meet years later in an actual level-playing field. You don't wait to report harassment: As a boss lady myself, I've been there, done that. Listen, no matter what your job means to you, if you're a 'boss lady' as Corrine is described, you don't take the shit. She spends the book being harassed only to do what she should have done in the first place. What changed, Corrine? Why now, Corrine? Ugh. So frustrating. Where's the romantic development, boo? They fuck. They fall in love. Why? I still don't get why they do so. It just happens with no other justification than because yes. #ClaroQueYes (this is a Dominican thing, don't mind me). Listen, I felt so awkward at one point that I fast forwarded through the sex scenes. You hear that? I'm here to read a steamy novel and I fast forward what the good bits are supposed to be. Why? Because they didn't make sense. I get it that sexual attraction is a thing, but man oh man, so is human logic. I'm sad. And disappointed. I came into this book expecting so much out of it and it killed me. Avoid and skip. That's my advice.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Winstead

    Holy smokes this book is so good! I have been waiting for it to publish since I first saw it in the 2018 Pitch Wars showcase, and oh goodness, it was worth the wait! Hot Copy is one of those warm, cozy books that pulls you in from the very first sentence. I think it's a combination of Barrett's easy, natural writing style and the loveliness of the main characters, Wes and Corrine, that makes reading it feel like sinking into a warm bath. I am not exaggerating when I say I put down the book at one Holy smokes this book is so good! I have been waiting for it to publish since I first saw it in the 2018 Pitch Wars showcase, and oh goodness, it was worth the wait! Hot Copy is one of those warm, cozy books that pulls you in from the very first sentence. I think it's a combination of Barrett's easy, natural writing style and the loveliness of the main characters, Wes and Corrine, that makes reading it feel like sinking into a warm bath. I am not exaggerating when I say I put down the book at one point and thought, wow, I actually *needed* this. I never wanted to finish. Barrett writes about an office romance with a significant power imbalance, which could be tricky, but she handles it so well by confronting issues head-on and making it part of Wes and Corrine's back and forth and what they have to work out to get to their HEA. It was so smart and well done. Everyone who reads this book is going to adore Wes, and rightly so, because he is the most adorable, relatable, charming character, but I want to shout out Corrine, who has to carry a lot of weight on her shoulders and make most of the big decisons. I love her fierce, no-nonsense self (covering a tender heart). The dialogue is witty and incredibly natural, the supporting characters are *adorable* (shout out to Jeremy, my favorite), the sex scenes are literal fire (still sweating), and this was just one of those books you think about all day, waiting to get back to. One of my favorite romance reads ever. Thank you to Netgalley and Carina for the advance copy!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sonny

    **Actually a 2.5-rating** I was hopeful for the start of this book by the summary alone. I am often intrigued by the Office Romance trope when the women is the subordinate, and I sometimes enjoy flipping the switch. That said, the blurb by Helen Hoang on the cover leaves me a bit on the saddened side because I am not even 40% into this book and there is no way this is empowering women... deeply embedded in feminism or not. Corrine is flat-out not just being sexually harassed and sexually compromis **Actually a 2.5-rating** I was hopeful for the start of this book by the summary alone. I am often intrigued by the Office Romance trope when the women is the subordinate, and I sometimes enjoy flipping the switch. That said, the blurb by Helen Hoang on the cover leaves me a bit on the saddened side because I am not even 40% into this book and there is no way this is empowering women... deeply embedded in feminism or not. Corrine is flat-out not just being sexually harassed and sexually compromised by her boss, Richard, but her name and reputation for the type of woman she is... where this wording of "Blunt, the Cunt" comes from means that even other subordinates, like Wesley, are even making jokes and talking gossip about Corrine. We have had several very awkward and highly harrowing moments between Corrine and Richard where we know or have felt immediate "ickiness" in how she feels. And when a job promotion is thrown off a fishing pole to make her do a good job for a client at "presentation time" and then that promotion is yanked from under her... because she will not get under her boss or succumb to his advances, Corrine turns around... and conjures up the latent sexual awakenings she has been having for Wesley. The pattern is such a huge Red Flag...it hurts that it exists and it still manages to happen when it is so obvious what she is doing, not just to herself but to Wesley. I know Wesley has been having much the same for her---finding her beautiful and sexually awakened. And they have had some nice, sweet moments commiserating on their mothers and Cancer diagnosis-es, but... THIS IS NOT FEMINISM. Or sexually empowering for women in the workplace to turn around as their own Boss above them subjects them to scorn and humiliation, Corinne goes and demands Wesley fuck her and then dismisses him as if he means nothing. Or worse that he is always will be... a "mistake". Here is my bigger issue... I have no issue with the age-gap... I have no problem with Wesley's young age [24/25] because it seems to be that he has lived a hard life having had to take care of his Mom in the last legs of her living at home. But where my big issue really comes from is Corrine. And she is the Adult in this relationship at 30-ish. Also she knows what is right and wrong. Not only because of age but past experiences in another job where this was happening to her female boss. What IS and IS NOT good for workplace relationships. Not only is the affair they begin a bad idea... in the face of the sexual harassment she faces on the daily by ALL MEN in her office, and maybe some women who might hate-on her for climbing to the top being a mean Boss Lady...I cannot condone Corrine's actions. Even if it becomes a means to alleviate her emotional state. What a horrid way to abuse a really good guy you could've started dating and finding out you had a bunch of things in common with. Nah, instead we have hit the lowest common denominator like a brick wall. S-e-x, sex and even more sex. On tap. And we are not gonna stop even when we get in bad, bad trouble. It is not that it comes out of nowhere... it is that there is no talking or chatting or small talk to learn about one another. We just end up in bed because of a really great kiss in a baseball field dugout. And now Wesley is a "good guy" not a schmuck asshole like she used to think. I feel bad, too. I like Wesley. I think if he were our only viewpoint or his POV was told in a different format [this First Person Present-tense is always so jarring], this wouldn't feel so in-my-face, loud and proud about the mess being created...I am not sure how to engage with or how to relate to Corrine. I stopped feeling sympathy and empathy for her right when she demanded sex from Wesley. I even wish these two had not had such insta-lust/attraction for no good reason--and that it was begun so petulantly and foolishly--just because they could. I understand that each of them is some extraordinarily gorgeous-looking person for the other... and that..o.h, man, IF THEY WERE NOT WORKPLACE COLLEAGUES then they could fall for one another in a regular-normal manner--whatever THAT means...I guess if they met on a Dating App or were set-up in a Blind Date. Also...uhm... this "waiting to report" sexual harassment in the work place does not sit well with me. Not just because Wesley has allowed days and weeks to pass by having heard a fellow Intern call Corrine a "cunt", but that he was around for that weird and very awkward moment when Corrine's boss wanted a "private" moment with her... just to tell her she did not get her promotion then to subtly make a sexual advancement on her. Wesley had really dropped the ball not just ONCE... but TWICE and then simply adhered to his SEX-IS-ON-THE-BRAIN when he could not get kissing Corrine out of his head or his dick. This is a genuinely bad, bad sign that even a male companion who could be a woman's ally would forego making a hard complaint, shoved into SILENCE... even if the optics look awkward and wonky. Like... why WOULD Their Boss demand "alone time" with Corrine unless he was trying to make a mild subtle sexual move on her? in order for her to sleep her way to the Top or even get a promotion? Wesley became a not-so-nice Hero in this moment... where he chooses to agree to sex with Corrine... and not be a little more adamant of:: WHY DID SHE NOT GET PROMOTED? And why could Richard not tell BOTH of them she did not get the job promotion? What went on behind closed doors once Wesley left that had Corrine so angry? It was as if Corrine brought Wesley to be her ally at the meeting [because SHE KNEW]... and then she allowed him/he even allowed himself... to be kicked out of the office... in order for Richard to drop his sexual proposition onto Corrine... in case she wanted to rethink her promotion at work. Corrine knows better... but she is not even sticking up for herself or handling it very well. She is not handling IT at all... and she keeps dragging Wesley here and there like she needs him... but then she silences him or shuts him up. What is this? Okay at 60% there is moment where Corrine kisses Wesley in the work break room and the Work-Bros who have been bad-mouthing Corrine almost catch them being TOO CLOSE FOR COMFORT. And the men still talk smack about her, almost, once again, calling her a "cunt". For some reason, when Wesley returns to Corrine's office and he feels like reporting this Bro-guy, Mark... Corrine fills the backstory even more with the fact that this dude has been making up fake sex stories about Mark&Corrine, which then makes bad gossip about HER in this workplace--he is also the one calling her a "cunt". She does not want Wesley to go to HR... because she assumes she can handle it. I guess or suppose this is a mode of feminism... but when we ask the men in our lives -- those who work beside us in the same environments-- to BE OUR ALLIES... to speak up when they SEE the wrongdoings going on, and then we SILENCE THEM? When Wesley can actually formulate some anger and feel what is said or done is BAD in that exact moment AND DO SOMETHING-->> report those employees doing bad things... Corrine gives some bullshit excuse that in the past... "reporting sexual harassment" or someone doing you wrong at work to mess with job-growth gets YOU FIRED!?!? And Wesley is quieted down by thinking Corrine has it under control... but DOES SHE, REALLY?? This is a really toxic judgment call for Corrine to make. And she is setting these kind of #MeToo moments back years and years... the way she fathoms she is able to control what is happening. And certainly when she is also using her own Intern for sexual pleasures...and then SILENCING HIM when he wants to speak up... Well, can't say I am not shocked they were found out and both lost their jobs. Eh, not feeling sorry for either of them. And, man... couldn't have been more on the money when Corrine confesses to her mother as her sick Mom lays in the hospital from an adverse reaction to medications... "I used him"... oh, yeah, pretty obvious in so many ways than just one. I wish this had been told differently, and not been so sex-focused [like, WHOA!!] for a good portion. because there is some really heartfelt and tender mentions in here about grief and coping, Cancer and dealing with initial diagnosis... about having your own self identified by being someone's person and not really knowing who YOU are when they are not around anymore... ... and then there is an ending/HEA that should be kind of sweet or bittersweet with Linda, Corrine's Mom... but alas... by the final chapters, I really could care less about these two people. This story could have been told in such a different way where those mentions above would have stood out perfectly and this couple could have felt much more possible/viable for the future. Basically, if the sexual harassment had been reported so much earlier... these two never would have been fired. We could have had this beautiful moment of... Corrine and Wesley moving on 3 months later... so the ending could have been a grand beginning... and then their romance could have taken off. Instead, I think Barrett wants to tell this story in this peculiar way... and that is fine. But so much of this could have been so much better, in truth. Also... don't be deceived by the illustrated cutesy cover... this deals with some hard grief issues... some hard stuff about death and dying. Some really tougher issues about workplace harassment and assaults that seem to be swept under the rug by our female MC... TO BE ONE OF THE BOYS. Oh... and the sex is hardcore steamy... close to being erotica. There is not much in sweetness and fade-to-black. **I received this e-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**

  16. 4 out of 5

    Izabella Vasconcelos

    wow! I was really not counting on this book being so good. call me cover snob, because this one is not that great. it starts a bit slow, but when it picks up it was surprise after surprise up until the end, and the best part? It just felt so real, never gimmicky.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katie Golding

    Ruby Barrett’s HOT COPY is a sizzling debut—sweet, steamy and oh so satisfying, this book stole my heart on every blissful page. Wesley is the soft-hearted, glasses-fogging hero we all need, and Corrinne is a power house heroine who doesn’t shy away from the job she wants, or the man she deserves. Barrett’s prose is clean and masterful throughout, with a workplace romance plot that keeps the reader on the edge of their seat. HOT COPY is hot hot hot!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andree V.M.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thank you so much to the publisher and NetGalley for this ARC copy in exchange for an honest review. It's difficult to put into words how much I loved this beautiful story. A raw and honest view of the shameful reality we live in where the lack of respect and the degradation of women's humanity is so normalized that it's still so difficult to talk about and fight back. Corrine and Wesley's story dives so beautifully into this issue and touches base on all the consequences women (and men who stand Thank you so much to the publisher and NetGalley for this ARC copy in exchange for an honest review. It's difficult to put into words how much I loved this beautiful story. A raw and honest view of the shameful reality we live in where the lack of respect and the degradation of women's humanity is so normalized that it's still so difficult to talk about and fight back. Corrine and Wesley's story dives so beautifully into this issue and touches base on all the consequences women (and men who stand up for what is right) get when they decide that enough is enough. That's why this romance story felt so realistic and relevant for today's society. First, I want to highlight how in love I am with Wesley. This is the guy who is fully aware of his privilege and is willing to keep learning about it and use it for the greater good, to believe women and defend women from the injustices of the corporate world. He was so kind, caring and understanding, even when he was hurt by the walls she had around her heart. His heart of service and true care for her was unbelievably sweet. He was willing to dig into her heart and show her how beautiful it is to be vulnerable with the right person. He was a guy who didn't pretend and gave exactly what Corrine saw in him, even if the first impression was unfortunate. He was a good man at heart, awkward in the cutest way and the way his anxiety triggered was incredibly relatable. His journey to self love and finding his own worth was beautiful and brought tears to my eyes to see him taking such difficult but crucial decisions before being able to move forward with Corrine. Corrine is the epitome of courage and hard work. A woman that has had to do twice the effort to prove to the world what she knows she's worth, even when the world doesn't want to see her, and refuses to give her a chance because of her gender. She had her heart in a vault because it was fragile and tender, waiting for someone like Wesley to cherish it and keep it safe. My heart broke millions of times with all the things she had to endure all at once and even though she made a few mistakes misjudging Wesley at the beginning, I rooted for her and her happy ending from start to finish. Because of the themes of this book, it had so many moments that made me uncomfortable for all the right reasons, I was able to put myself in Corrine's shoes and reassured my feminism in so many ways. One of the most romantic aspects of this story is the ability they both had to empathize with each other and share each other's burden. It was so refreshing to see them talking and sharing about their pain because they knew exactly what the other was feeling. Wesley found that the biggest purpose of his pain was to be a witness to Corrine that in the end, everything was going to be OK and she was going to conquer whatever life threw at her. He believed in her just as she believed in him, his insecurities and his wounds allowed him to be the safe place she needed when she was tired of being so tough. Their relationship was so deep and intense from the very start because they were able to carry each other's burdens and being understanding with one another without pressures or obligations. The relationships they had with their families were tough and realistic as well, the author did an amazing job describing how all their relationships were being affected by the way they saw themselves, and how important it is for a person to understand that we cannot love others the way they deserve if we don't love ourselves first. I don't think I consider this book as a slow burn, but the climax of the sexual tension was exquisitely developed, the emotion and the connection they had from the first encounter was vivid because by the time of release, they were already half in love with each other, even if they hadn't acknowledged it. One of the most romantic part in opinion of all the physical touch they shared, was the amazing and heartwarming way they practiced consent. The respect they both had for each other, the worry they both experienced about crossing boundaries with each other made the steam of this book the sexiest I've ever read in my life. I always thought consent is sexy, but this book made it explosive. Their happy ending brought tears to my eyes, it was a breath of fresh air seeing both of them getting to a point were they were mentally and emotionally healthy and finally be able to give each other what they needed, including the sense of family and belonging. I loved this book so much and I'm honored to have read it before the release!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mila Nicks

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I picked this one up because the premise really caught my attention. This book follows Corinne Blunt and Wesley Chambers at a marketing company. Wesley has just been hired on for an internship and Corinne is the only female executive. From the get-go, we see what Corinne has to go through at a workplace that's basically a "boy's club" type of environment. I empathized with her immediately on this. Her reaction to many of the situations felt very relatable and true to life. After a brief misunders I picked this one up because the premise really caught my attention. This book follows Corinne Blunt and Wesley Chambers at a marketing company. Wesley has just been hired on for an internship and Corinne is the only female executive. From the get-go, we see what Corinne has to go through at a workplace that's basically a "boy's club" type of environment. I empathized with her immediately on this. Her reaction to many of the situations felt very relatable and true to life. After a brief misunderstanding between Wesley and Corinne, where she believes Wesley is in on the sexist behavior, the two form a bond and start a workplace affair. I admit I'm still a little unsure how I feel about Corinne and Wesley's relationship. You can't ignore the huge power imbalance. Not only is Corinne older and more mature to Wesley's borderline naive and boyish outlook, she's his boss and he's her intern. Add in the fact that Corinne herself is being sexually harassed by male coworkers and her male boss (former mentor), and it's complicated. I probably would've preferred if this aspect was changed. Maybe to alleviate the issue of Corinne being Wesley's direct boss in a storyline where we're supposed to be horrified by the power her boss Richard has over her. But what really shines about this book are the interactions between Corinne and Wesley. The intimate scenes between Corinne and Wesley were frequent, but fresh and steamy. One thing I really appreciated was how she wrote Wesley during these encounters. Wesley is the type of beta male character who is so often written as inadequate and unsexy, but she made him sexy. She showed how he could sometimes take the lead and that he was more than capable of satisfying Corinne. We usually see the hot alpha male type who is a sex god, so this was a nice change of pace. For as dorky and sweet as Wesley was, he was just as capable as any shirtless, six-pack alpha male, and I really liked that characterization. I'm sure some take issue with Corinne and her behavior. She is an executive, and she makes the conscience decision to engage in inappropriate behavior with her intern. Again, I do kind of wish this aspect was changed. Though I appreciate that Ruby had Corinne acknowledge many times the impropriety of what she and Wesley were doing. That's a huge distinction between Corinne and Richard. While both of them were in positions of power and engaged in inappropriate behavior with a subordinate (Richard with Corinne and Corinne with Wesley), there was consent in Corinne and Wesley's case. It was a mutual affair, with Wesley even kissing Corinne first. In Richard and Corinne's situation, Corinne never gave consent or any indication she was comfortable with his advances. That's the key difference for me. But I am glad Ruby showed the realistic outcome of this type of situation. Corinne and Wesley deserved to lose their job because of what they did, but so did Richard and Mark. Anyway, I loved the descriptions of how Corinne felt about the harassment. They really did feel very realistic. For as no-nonsense and strong as Corinne was, she was only human. She worked at a company where the "boy's club" atmosphere wasn't being overturned anytime soon, and she knew this. There's a lot of nuance that goes into reporting something like sexual harassment, and I love that Ruby showed Corinne's thought process as she finally worked up the courage to do so. I will say, I know the characters confessed their love for each other toward the end, but I didn't get the genuine feeling this was love between Corinne and Wesley. More so lust/mild like. In real life, I don't think their relationship would work out at all. I think it'd end with the workplace affair and that was it, lol. Definitely a book that's worth a read. There's plenty of nuance and gray area with the story and characters, and it left me thinking after the fact. Would recommend.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    3.75 A few months after his mother’s passing, Wesley Chambers begins the internship he was awarded two years prior but couldn’t accept given his priority became caring for his mother as she deteriorated from ovarian cancer. At the time, he was set to begin with Richard, the CEO of Hill City and respected colleague of his loser father. As it turns out, the mentor has changed in two years and Wes has been placed with Corinne Blunt, a high achieving young woman who is often the butt of sexist commen 3.75 A few months after his mother’s passing, Wesley Chambers begins the internship he was awarded two years prior but couldn’t accept given his priority became caring for his mother as she deteriorated from ovarian cancer. At the time, he was set to begin with Richard, the CEO of Hill City and respected colleague of his loser father. As it turns out, the mentor has changed in two years and Wes has been placed with Corinne Blunt, a high achieving young woman who is often the butt of sexist commentary and snide remarks because she dares to be ambitious and work hard - harder than most her male counterparts it appears. After a misunderstanding that occurs in the elevator on his first day, Corinne responds quite punitively to Wes for his first couple of weeks until it is clear that he isn’t the man she thinks he is, and a rogue kiss at the company’s softball practice shifts their relationship entirely. As Wes struggles to pick up his life where he left it 2 years prior, including trusting his friendships, the complications at work hit an all time high when he is forced to keep his feelings for Corinne and their raunchy affair secret. Sadly for Corinne, her mother is similarly diagnosed with cancer and simultaneously she is forced to contend with an ever increasing volatile workplace as it is clear Richard is never going to award her for her work and talents unless she submits to his gross sexual overtures. Written from a dual perspective, we get a deep view into both Wes and Corinne’s internal motivations that underpin both characters and give insight into the experiences that have moulded who they are. Wes was a gentle soul, whose loss of his mother changed the way he viewed and interacted with the world, and it is evident from the onset that his values were shaped by her and via the sibling relationship he had with his twin Amy. Similarly, it is clear Corinne’s world is shaped by the ongoing challenges she faces in the corporate setting. Barrett paints a pretty rough picture that likely isn’t inspiring for young women whose talent and ambition is leading them in a leadership direction, suggesting that if you’re are excellent at what you do, it still somehow needs to be on a man’s terms and if not, a man will no doubt still have control of your success. As a result, Corinne initially comes off as pretty hard-nosed and petty, however, as the novel progresses, there are very real reasons for her behaviours and her clandestine relationship with Wes complicates things for her all the more. Quite successfully, Barrett manages to balance some playful and raunchy scenes with a clear statement on the enduring nature of the patriarchy in the workplace, in that when a woman behaves like a man she is subject to offensive name calling, and when she doesn’t, she is subject to sexual harassment. Either way, she just needs to suck that up and be a team player! Overall, Hot Copy successfully steams up the windows with its spicy love affair and the rage felt due to the inequities that still somehow exist in the 21st century. Undoubtedly you will want Wes and Corinne to navigate the complications together and find a HEA that doesn’t compromise their careers or their personal integrity – because frankly, why should it?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeeves Reads Romance

    Uncomfortable. The power dynamics in this made me very uncomfortable. While this started off with a lot of potential - the writing is solid, the characters are interesting, and the hate to love office dynamic is one that I can't get enough of - it wasn't long before red flags started popping up. And then it just devolved into a LOT of inappropriate steam that made me feel dirty. I felt bad for this hero. He is such a sweet, cinnamon roll of a man, but this heroine... whew, she literally dismisse Uncomfortable. The power dynamics in this made me very uncomfortable. While this started off with a lot of potential - the writing is solid, the characters are interesting, and the hate to love office dynamic is one that I can't get enough of - it wasn't long before red flags started popping up. And then it just devolved into a LOT of inappropriate steam that made me feel dirty. I felt bad for this hero. He is such a sweet, cinnamon roll of a man, but this heroine... whew, she literally dismisses him after sex, makes him feel used again and again, and breaks his heart at every turn. I really don't understand how we're supposed to root for these two. Pair that with the focus on sexual harassment - while the heroine is borderline sexually harassing her intern - and... this just wasn't a fulfilling romance. The story follows Wesley, a 25-year-old just starting out at a new internship. While he was looking forward to working with his new boss, their relationship starts off on the wrong foot when Corrine overhears him (awkwardly) laughing at an inappropriate comment about her. Corrine (30) is a workaholic who deals with small - and not-so-small - acts of sexual harassment against her on a daily basis. She has accepted it as part of her job, but doesn't want to hear it from an employee. So, Corrine does everything she can to make Wesley's job miserable. But once Corrine begins to realize what a good guy Wesley is, their relationship shifts... and it's not long before she's doing some inappropriate things in the workplace herself. I started off enjoying this, and there were several moments throughout that pulled me back in. Wesley is a great guy, and I loved the opposites attract relationship. There was some serious potential for him to soften Corrine's edges, and there are a few scenes that started to go there. But then Corrine would do something that made me uncomfortable again. It's a very sex-focused relationship that accelerates abruptly - and at the worst times. There'd be a scene of Corrine being sexually harassed by her boss, and then suddenly she'd be demanding that Wesley (her employee) make her forget with sex. Which... yeah. Don't know what to say about that. Maybe if Wesley didn't seem so desperate for approval, it wouldn't have been so cringey. But he asks for validation of his (sexual) performance, makes pleas for more than sex, and gets disappointed or dismissed at every turn. It just didn't sit right. So every time I started to get invested in the book again, something else would make me uncomfortable. I appreciate what the author was going for here, but I can't say that it was successful. I received an early copy and am voluntarily leaving a review of this steamy office romance.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stef (Noveltea Corner)

    I'll admit, I have conflicting thoughts on Hot Copy, which I'd initially requested because I do enjoy a good workplace romance. I'm not sure if the content warnings were included initially in the synopsis when I first requested it or not (and if they were I completely missed them), but I think they're hugely important to anyone considering picking up this book, mostly because if you're thinking you're going to get a light-hearted workplace romance, you're going to be completely blind-sided. Hot C I'll admit, I have conflicting thoughts on Hot Copy, which I'd initially requested because I do enjoy a good workplace romance. I'm not sure if the content warnings were included initially in the synopsis when I first requested it or not (and if they were I completely missed them), but I think they're hugely important to anyone considering picking up this book, mostly because if you're thinking you're going to get a light-hearted workplace romance, you're going to be completely blind-sided. Hot Copy is the workplace romance between Corinne and her new intern, Wesley. And their meet cute is horrendous and honestly had me wondering if I was going to enjoy the book. Which I did, but perhaps not for the romance. Corinne is a prickly heroine who has been dealing with workplace sexual harassment for almost her entire career. Forced to be tough as nails, and branded as worse by her male colleagues, she's fighting to just do her job well and be acknowledged for something other than her gender. When she first crosses paths with Wes, he's brand new to the company and gets caught up unintentionally in a conversation with another intern, chauvinistic Mark, and being out of his depth, he's blindsided by the comments Mark makes and Corinne mistakes his uncomfortableness for compliance. She then spends the first part of the book making his life a misery. Wes is a total cinnamon-roll of a hero, who's dealing with a ton of grief after putting his life on hold for two years to be the full-time carer for his mother in her terminal battle with cancer. The internship is his chance to get his life back on track and then he comes up with the formidable Corinne. Now, I enjoyed both characters. Wes a little more, but only because I have a soft-spot for cinnamon roll heroes, but I respected the very tight-spot that Corinne was in. What I struggled with a lot was their dynamic. There is a significant power imbalance between the two of them - she's his boss and they can't be open about their relationship, and the back and forth really bothered me. Which is a bit of a problem in a romance, because part of me never really believed they could make it work. I did like that it tackled the huge issue of workplace harassment and showed that the path isn't always easy for women to stand up and hold the people responsible to account. Corinne was trying to do her job in the boy's club, while dealing with her own personal issues and trying to keep a secret boyfriend. Had we spent more time on either the relationship or the workplace issues, I think I would have found it less jarring each time we switched theme. It's not a bad book - in fact, I think it's doing some important work, but it was only just okay in the end for me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Misha

    I REALLY like and admire that the author asked for honest reviews at the end of the book. It felt like a very sincere and non-pushy request. I wish I was leaving this book a 5 star review, but it didn’t quite hit the mark for me. I think this would have been good if it was marketed as a high school romance because our hero and heroine truly and sincerely behaved like teenagers. I think two grown adults hiding a secret work relationship would have the common sense not to make out in the communal I REALLY like and admire that the author asked for honest reviews at the end of the book. It felt like a very sincere and non-pushy request. I wish I was leaving this book a 5 star review, but it didn’t quite hit the mark for me. I think this would have been good if it was marketed as a high school romance because our hero and heroine truly and sincerely behaved like teenagers. I think two grown adults hiding a secret work relationship would have the common sense not to make out in the communal lunchroom. Or need more than a few weeks to randomly decide they’re completely in love. Or know how to have a very simple, baseline conversation to communicate needs. There was never any actual conflict- it was all contrived, like when you’re young and incorrectly think being distraught over someone is romantic. The avoidable melodrama was unnecessary and annoying. White people want to be oppressed so badly. It just felt very immature and hard to get behind. At first, Corinne and Wesley had zero chemistry. The pacing made no sense and their dynamic was uncomfortable and unsexy. The character work didn’t quite hit the mark- Wesley wasn’t quietly strong and steady, he was naive and a people pleaser. Corinne wasn’t a boss ass bitch, she was just inconsiderate and reactive. These are all fine traits to give your characters, I’m not saying they have to be perfect, but there was no acknowledgement of their mistakes or opportunity for growth and redemption- it felt like the reader was aware of the toxic relationship dynamics, but the author and characters weren’t. As I kept reading, there were definitely some hot and romantic moments between our couple. I liked the small details the author included- the mundane but sweet moments that couples share- small touches, unwinding on the couch, etc., I thought those moments were really cute. There just wasn’t enough overall substance to make me care about the characters or plot. The story felt prematurely published- like it needed to simmer a little longer on the stove and come together. I’m no Sensitive Samuel when it comes to romance novels- I think any trope, no matter how controversial, can be appealing if well executed- but the power imbalance between Corinne and Wesley felt awkward and inappropriate. And no, it’s not because we’re all internal misogynists who would love the book if the power imbalance was reversed and Wesley was the superior- if anything, I think people are more lenient because our hero was the subordinate. This was just clumsily written (in my dumbass personal opinion). But as it’s her debut novel, hopefully the author just needs to get her sea legs and the next book will be great.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessica (the naptime writer)

    Thanks to Harlequin books & Netgalley for the complimentary ARC. All opinions provided my own. ​3.5 ⭐️ Ruby Barrett’s Hot Copy is spicy w/ several H O T scenes & feels modern & innovative in some big ways; it didn’t make me swoon as much as I hoped but it leaves me wanting more from the author. On his first day as a marketing intern Wesley Chambers hears a coworker refer to his female boss as a c**t & awkwardly laughs in response before telling the guy he shouldn’t “say that word.” His boss, a powe Thanks to Harlequin books & Netgalley for the complimentary ARC. All opinions provided my own. ​3.5 ⭐️ Ruby Barrett’s Hot Copy is spicy w/ several H O T scenes & feels modern & innovative in some big ways; it didn’t make me swoon as much as I hoped but it leaves me wanting more from the author. On his first day as a marketing intern Wesley Chambers hears a coworker refer to his female boss as a c**t & awkwardly laughs in response before telling the guy he shouldn’t “say that word.” His boss, a powerhouse named Corinne Blunt, overhears his laugh & this, coupled w/ previous negative experiences w/ men in the workplace, makes her give Wes annoying, time-sucking tasks to complete instead of the digital marketing jobs he hoped for. But after Wes helps Corinne face challenges when he doesn’t *have* to, she realizes she might have misunderstood what happened. This is both bad & good b/c Wesley is described as a hot nerd & now she can see what a big heart he has...but she’s also his boss. Hot Copy tries to tackle some big topics & it succeeds in some ways but falls a bit short in others. The exploration of grief is touching, as is the fact that it’s a way for them to connect. Beta hero Wesley is stunningly portrayed; I love his uncertainty, sensitivity, & desire to nurture. I’m less enthusiastic about the portrayal of Corinne. On one hand I love her complexity—she’s smart, hardworking, & keenly aware of the power imbalance between herself & Wesley in the workplace & how that affects their personal relationship. On the other, I grew frustrated w/ her prickliness bc it’s so pervasive. Corinne’s frequently rude to even her close friend & I was frustrated by how she responds to the crisis moment w/ Wes. She consistently comes across as inflexible & I would have loved to have seen her taking more emotional initiative w/ Wes throughout the book. I’m all here for an adorkable beta hero w/ a novelty sock collection & a kicking ass, taking names heroine who’s soft w/ people she trusts. But I did want more emotional nuance in regards to the latter in Hot Copy. ​CW: ​sexual harassment; cancer & death of a parent (in past)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Debut romance Hot Copy by Ruby Barrett delves into some heavy issues like the loss of a parent, grief, and sexual harassment. The author also delivers some scorchingly hot steam! Wes deferred his internship at a marketing firm to care for his dying mother for two years. He's already nervous so when a fellow intern makes an off-color remark about Wesley's new boss, he nervously laughs to hide his utter disbelief. That's not what his new boss, Corinne, hears though. She thinks that he's another sex Debut romance Hot Copy by Ruby Barrett delves into some heavy issues like the loss of a parent, grief, and sexual harassment. The author also delivers some scorchingly hot steam! Wes deferred his internship at a marketing firm to care for his dying mother for two years. He's already nervous so when a fellow intern makes an off-color remark about Wesley's new boss, he nervously laughs to hide his utter disbelief. That's not what his new boss, Corinne, hears though. She thinks that he's another sexist man, ready to dismiss her authority and spread rumors like her previous intern. We've got a meet-cute gone wrong right off. Wesley's nervous awkwardness gets worse and Corinne's determination to not repeat the mistakes of the past amp up the tension between the two. Wesley's not just a cinnamon roll of a love interest; he's a cashmere scarf. He's determined to make the internship work and convince Corinne that he has good ideas. But he also wants to give her support in other ways, like backing her up about reporting the other intern's inappropriate remarks or caring for her when she has a migraine. Because of what's happened in the past, Corinne is hesitant to depend on anyone other than herself. And she worries that reporting anything to HR won't end well for her. The story's told in alternating POV between Wes and Corinne allowing us to peek into both of their heads as their relationship develops. If you love forbidden romances, Hot Copy checks the box on the boss/intern trope. You also get an age difference with Corinne as the (slightly) older woman. The story is fast-paced and you can't help but cheer for things to work out for Wesley and Corinne. As well as hoping for repercussions for other characters. The tension between the MCs is undeniable and the intimate scenes are incredibly steamy. The "hot" in the title is no joke! While not always likable, I found Corinne to be relatable. Even in today's workplace, women bear the brunt of gossip and are maligned for traits that are praised in male coworkers. Sexual harassment victims are often told that it happened because of their actions, not the harassers. So her reserved exterior is definitely understandable. Wesley was totally likable and relatable - the consummate caretaker and supporter. I even understood why he shut people out or was afraid to share with friends and even his twin sister about his grief and even his conflicted feelings about being his mom's caretaker. Even cinnamon rolls can feel guilt. Ruby Barrett has created the most adork-able cashmere sweater of a male lead ever. Hot Copy is a contemporary workplace romance with mega-hot steam and a cinnamon roll male MC coupled with some weightier topics. CW: Death of a parent, grief, sexual harassment

  26. 4 out of 5

    Twice Upon A Book

    Thank you to NetGalley and Harlequin for the ARC in exchange for an honest review CW: workplace sexual harassment, cancer, parental death, grief I would recommend if you're looking for (SPOILERS) -m/f enemies to lovers -workplace romance -close proximity -forbidden romance -older heroine/younger hero -sick/comfort -migraine rep -so much love for Boston -a very sturdy desk Ever since I heard Ruby Barrett describe her hero as a soft cashmere boy I knew I needed him in my life. This book was such a rollercoas Thank you to NetGalley and Harlequin for the ARC in exchange for an honest review CW: workplace sexual harassment, cancer, parental death, grief I would recommend if you're looking for (SPOILERS) -m/f enemies to lovers -workplace romance -close proximity -forbidden romance -older heroine/younger hero -sick/comfort -migraine rep -so much love for Boston -a very sturdy desk Ever since I heard Ruby Barrett describe her hero as a soft cashmere boy I knew I needed him in my life. This book was such a rollercoaster of emotion. Returning to his life after taking care of his dying mother Wes does not have the best meet-cute with Corinne, the supervisor for his internship. They instantly clash pulling you into the story. This book was a great example of how romance can cover difficult topics. Double standards and what women face in the workforce every day, the delicate decision of do I complain, what am I risking if I speak up? With the added complication of a sick family member, I was along for the ride. These topics were handled well without being bogged down by them. By the constant was the story of Wes and Corinne, a forbidden romance, the book didn't shy away from dealing with the issues of a supervisor dating an employee. Consent was always at the forefront and the steam was sooo good. Even when I got frustrated with the characters their decisions were so grounded and understandable. It was so nice to see the softer hero giving the heroine the emotional space she needed and just being there for each other. Corinne was so relatable and assertive and sweet to Wes in her own way. This book did not take the easy way out in bringing the characters together, making the HEA that much sweeter. I hope so much that there are more books in this series and can't wait to read more from Ruby. Rating: 5 Steam: 4

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marianne | Petite.BumbleBeeBooks

    Review ⭐️⭐️💫 Hot Copy by Ruby Barrett 🐝 Office romances are not my favourite, the power imbalance between the main characters makes me uncomfortable, and this one is between an intern and a high level department manager. I am very glad that we get conversation about consent, and there's a real effort by both of them to make sure the other is comfortable. However, Wesley's status as Corinne's subaltern is often thrown in his face - during sex. One time after having sex in her office she even used t Review ⭐️⭐️💫 Hot Copy by Ruby Barrett 🐝 Office romances are not my favourite, the power imbalance between the main characters makes me uncomfortable, and this one is between an intern and a high level department manager. I am very glad that we get conversation about consent, and there's a real effort by both of them to make sure the other is comfortable. However, Wesley's status as Corinne's subaltern is often thrown in his face - during sex. One time after having sex in her office she even used the words "You're dismissed", and this was not said as a joke. I did love that both of them lost their jobs, its realistic, and frankly what they both deserved. While their office affair was going on, there was also a sexual harassment plot about her boss making unwanted advances, and I did really like that aspect of the book, how honest and raw it felt to have a women feel and live these issues. Nonetheless, when matched with an office affair, it made me feel uneasy. I believed in the lust they had for one another, but love? I believe Wesley was infatuated with his boss, the taboo and secretive aspect playing big role in it. But, I didn't believe the love, especially Corinne's. The writing style was strong and has a lot of potential, but this was just not my cup of tea. 🐝 Steam Level | Lots of descriptive sex scenes, power play. 🐝 I want to thank NetGalley and Harlequin for gifting me an E-ARC of this book. As always all thoughts and opinions are honest and my own. 🐝

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    I did not enjoy this book. There were things to like about it (grief and coping with the illness/loss of a parent, sympathetic characters) but I just couldn’t get past the squick factor. This has been marketed as a hot feminist office romance, and it was certainly hot. Lots of sex I would have appreciated in another book. But it was not feminist. I don’t know who needs to hear this, but reversing genders in a traditional workplace power dynamic does not make it feminist. The woman being the boss I did not enjoy this book. There were things to like about it (grief and coping with the illness/loss of a parent, sympathetic characters) but I just couldn’t get past the squick factor. This has been marketed as a hot feminist office romance, and it was certainly hot. Lots of sex I would have appreciated in another book. But it was not feminist. I don’t know who needs to hear this, but reversing genders in a traditional workplace power dynamic does not make it feminist. The woman being the boss does not make it feminist. The woman dealing with sexual harassment from her boss, and then literally responding to the acute trauma of that by immediately having sex with her intern at the office does not make it feminist. My book club and I have been talking about romance tropes we do and don’t like, and I’ve always been on the fence about bosses. I think there is a way to do it that can neutralize the power imbalance and make it a relationship of equals, but we never come anywhere near that here. Every time Wesley wants more from their relationship, or wants to talk about things that happened, Corrine distracts him with sex. They do have a discussion about consent, but it’s too little too late, and did nothing to relax me about their relationship. If you want a hot office romance, go read the Hating Game, and give this one a miss.

  29. 5 out of 5

    ✰ BJ's Book Blog ✰Janeane ✰

    Copy received via Netgalley for an honest review Oh, how I wanted to love Corinne and Wesley's story, but in the end I only just liked it. I am a fan of a strong, independant woman forging her way in her career, and taking down the mysoginists on the way, but there was something about Corinne that just irked me. It was not the imbalance, though that is an issue whether it is the man or woman in the position of power. It was not her keeping things a dirty little secret. I just can't put my finger on Copy received via Netgalley for an honest review Oh, how I wanted to love Corinne and Wesley's story, but in the end I only just liked it. I am a fan of a strong, independant woman forging her way in her career, and taking down the mysoginists on the way, but there was something about Corinne that just irked me. It was not the imbalance, though that is an issue whether it is the man or woman in the position of power. It was not her keeping things a dirty little secret. I just can't put my finger on what is was. I was a bit confused by the inappropriate things that they did in the office, but then there was the complaining about inappropriate things in the office. Don't get me wrong, I abhor sexual harrassment in the workplace, or in any place, but don't go do things you did which are just as inappropriate - OK, rant over. These might just be things that bothered me though, and others might not have that problem. Hot Copy did have its cute and heartwarming moments, but overall the other stuff just took away from my being completely involved in the story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kini

    I really, really enjoyed this book. Corinne is a sad girl pretending to be a tough girl. She is a VP of marketing and is assigned a new intern, Wes. He is reentering the workforce after taking some time off due to caring for his dying mother. They have a bad meet-cute and Corinne is mad and attempts to make Wes's work life hellish. It works for a bit and then they realize they like each other. This is a grief story. They are both sad for lots of different reasons. And I loved it. Wes is a complet I really, really enjoyed this book. Corinne is a sad girl pretending to be a tough girl. She is a VP of marketing and is assigned a new intern, Wes. He is reentering the workforce after taking some time off due to caring for his dying mother. They have a bad meet-cute and Corinne is mad and attempts to make Wes's work life hellish. It works for a bit and then they realize they like each other. This is a grief story. They are both sad for lots of different reasons. And I loved it. Wes is a complete softy who can get it in. Aka there is face-sitting in this book- you're welcome. Wes is also working on repairing a broken friendship. Wes let his best friendship fade out while he was carrying for his dying mom. As he is slowly coming out of the fog of new grief, he decides maybe he can repair that relationship. I loved it. Show me all the work that goes in to maintaining platonic and romantic relationship. This book is high heat with several explicit sex scenes, I forgot how sexy carina allows their books to be. CW: (view spoiler)[work place harassment, cancer, grief (hide spoiler)]

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