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Planet Paradise

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To survive after crash landing on an alien planet, a vacationer must battle against a hostile environment, killer lizards, corporate bureaucracy, and the pessimism of her sole companion, the drug-addled captain of the ship.


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To survive after crash landing on an alien planet, a vacationer must battle against a hostile environment, killer lizards, corporate bureaucracy, and the pessimism of her sole companion, the drug-addled captain of the ship.

30 review for Planet Paradise

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    The story of a space age vacation gone wrong, their spaceship crashing on a huge lizard-infested planet (the lizards being huge, not the planet). Our main character has to be the hero and assert herself. All of it is told with lovely comic-y art (the structuring of frames on the page is especially playful) , and using dialogue only sparsely. In the end, the story doesn't add up to much, but who cares when the journey is this pleasant? (Received an ARC through Edelweiss) The story of a space age vacation gone wrong, their spaceship crashing on a huge lizard-infested planet (the lizards being huge, not the planet). Our main character has to be the hero and assert herself. All of it is told with lovely comic-y art (the structuring of frames on the page is especially playful) , and using dialogue only sparsely. In the end, the story doesn't add up to much, but who cares when the journey is this pleasant? (Received an ARC through Edelweiss)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    A woman discovers she has unknown strengths when forced to do so after a rocket accident. Then she has to prove it to her husband. (I like that the name Rydra-17 is a shout-out to Rydra in Babel-17.) A woman discovers she has unknown strengths when forced to do so after a rocket accident. Then she has to prove it to her husband. (I like that the name Rydra-17 is a shout-out to Rydra in Babel-17.)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kate Atherton

    The only reason I rated this four stars instead of five was because I wanted MORE of it! What an original story about a woman, stranded in a survival scenario in space finding her own courage and excitement for adventure. The book has basically a two story structure ; the first, our protagonist being stranded on an unknown planet with giant ferocious pink lizards, saving her captain and escaping and the second ; having reached her destination now, a resort on a vacation planet, longing for adven The only reason I rated this four stars instead of five was because I wanted MORE of it! What an original story about a woman, stranded in a survival scenario in space finding her own courage and excitement for adventure. The book has basically a two story structure ; the first, our protagonist being stranded on an unknown planet with giant ferocious pink lizards, saving her captain and escaping and the second ; having reached her destination now, a resort on a vacation planet, longing for adventure and showing her husband she's super capable and badass. Well drawn, paced and an exciting and fun quick read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    As someone who grew up watching the likes of Star Wars, I’m no stranger to a simple adventure romp through the galaxy where you can fire cool blasters against giant monsters, as long as it can be backed it up with some depth, whether from characters that we care about or an overarching message. Unfortunately, while Planet Paradise from Image Comics looks good, it doesn’t seem to have much to say. Please click here for my full review. As someone who grew up watching the likes of Star Wars, I’m no stranger to a simple adventure romp through the galaxy where you can fire cool blasters against giant monsters, as long as it can be backed it up with some depth, whether from characters that we care about or an overarching message. Unfortunately, while Planet Paradise from Image Comics looks good, it doesn’t seem to have much to say. Please click here for my full review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    This was very entertaining story with a heroine who discovers herself at a time of crises. It is a simply tale with depth. I wasnt a real fan of the artwork but I still enjoyed it. Copy provided via Edelweiss.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Simon Chadwick

    Once upon a time depictions of the future were all shiny spaceships, jet-packs and copious amounts of leisure time. But, oddly, that’s all a bit boring. Instead, the best sci-fi visions depict the worlds of tomorrow as, well, a little bit crap. Things don’t work properly. People are lazy. Expectations are low. And people are just commodities to be exploited. That should make for some miserable narratives, but, conversely, it makes the stories all the more compelling. Because it’s relatable. In P Once upon a time depictions of the future were all shiny spaceships, jet-packs and copious amounts of leisure time. But, oddly, that’s all a bit boring. Instead, the best sci-fi visions depict the worlds of tomorrow as, well, a little bit crap. Things don’t work properly. People are lazy. Expectations are low. And people are just commodities to be exploited. That should make for some miserable narratives, but, conversely, it makes the stories all the more compelling. Because it’s relatable. In Planet Paradise a group of holidaymakers are put into stasis for a flight to another star system and a luxury planet. Except they fail to get there when the spaceship malfunctions, causing them to crash-land on a far less hospitable world. Eunice, an aforementioned vacationer, survives the impact and is awoken from her slumber. She finds the injured captain of the vessel, but there’s nobody else. Somehow they need to send a distress signal and survive the planet’s perils. The book is not entirely wordless, but they are few and far between. This manages to add to the atmosphere of despair and hopelessness, elevating the story where a constant monologue could have distracted. The illustration style is both vibrant and loose, mashing together a Flash Gordon future with a functional and tired one. The humour’s dark, and served just how I like it. If you enjoy Taika Waititi movies and TV shows then this will be a good fit for you.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Bauer

    2nd experience with a Lonergan scifi after Hedra. Whereas the former was like a Kirby-esque scifi gone silent indie-epic, Planet Paradise is perhaps best described as lo-fi scifi. Eunice and her husband Peter are off for a vacation on Rydra-17, aka the "Paradise" planet. Or at least they were, until engine trouble forced a crash-landing that left only Eunice, and the irate (now wounded) captain of the ship conscious. To survive and rescue the other passengers's stasis pods, the two will have to w 2nd experience with a Lonergan scifi after Hedra. Whereas the former was like a Kirby-esque scifi gone silent indie-epic, Planet Paradise is perhaps best described as lo-fi scifi. Eunice and her husband Peter are off for a vacation on Rydra-17, aka the "Paradise" planet. Or at least they were, until engine trouble forced a crash-landing that left only Eunice, and the irate (now wounded) captain of the ship conscious. To survive and rescue the other passengers's stasis pods, the two will have to work together in a dangerous, barren environment. But can they do so when they seem so intent on getting on each others nerves? One word that describes this work is slight. It's not a big story, conjuring up old-school scifi short stories and films like Robinson Crusoe on Mars. Within its slightness though, Lonergan works some fairly cutting interpersonal drama. Particularly between Eunice and the ever-sunny Glenda (The captain) as Eunice finds herself in the unenviable position of having to do all the legwork to get them out of their situation. There's also an undercurrent of pitch-black humour that adds some spice here and there, and had me genuinely fearing for the lives of the protagonists. Even Glenda, for all her ornery selfishness. Where this fell a little flat for me was in its conclusion. Without going into too much detail, the punch-line felt a bit simple after everything before it. Not that I was expecting something with the same sense of grandeur as Hedra, but considering how subtle most of the book is, I could have used something that had me dwelling on a question rather than thinking "Ah, okay, I get it". Which isn't to say the ending isn't fun or nonsensical. In sum: It's a bit on-the-nose. Fortunately, while it may not wholly stick its landing, Lonergan continues to be a pure pleasure in the art department. Unlike Hedra, which could admittedly be hard to follow, Paradise reserves a lot of its Ware-y panel shenanigans for action and space-travel sequences to great effect. With more of a palette than Hedra, it's also quite vibrant at times. One sequence in particular smack in the middle of the book brought to mind Space Odyssey and Alien, without feeling derivative of either. I also dig his character designs, how expressive their facial expressions are. A tad reminiscent of Jeff Lemire's designs, but without that permanent haunted look everyone Lemire draws seems afflicted with. If you dug Hedra and want to see what else this guy can do, I think you'll dig this book. Ditto if you're hungry for unambitious science fiction with a lived-in, worn out universe. If you want a book that's going to last longer than a single sitting, or that offers you something you've never seen before...you may be underwhelmed. I personally am looking forward to whatever scifi, epic or mundane, this guy pens next.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    On a spaceship bound for a vacation resort, one woman finds herself stuck with the cranky drug-addled spaceship captain after they crash land on a random planet. She ends up as the reluctant hero, having to contend with her (in need of medical attention) companion as well as some giant lizard-monsters that want to eat her. That's... kind of it. I enjoyed this book, but it's a very quick read. Lonergan's one-shot Hedra was fantastic, and used some unique panel layouts to tell a story without any d On a spaceship bound for a vacation resort, one woman finds herself stuck with the cranky drug-addled spaceship captain after they crash land on a random planet. She ends up as the reluctant hero, having to contend with her (in need of medical attention) companion as well as some giant lizard-monsters that want to eat her. That's... kind of it. I enjoyed this book, but it's a very quick read. Lonergan's one-shot Hedra was fantastic, and used some unique panel layouts to tell a story without any dialogue. There is dialogue in Planet Paradise, but not a lot. Most of the story is still told through art, but there aren't as many bold panel layouts in this book. There are some, of course, and I particularly liked the way that the ships and space stations were explored. Planet Paradise is a book that will live and die off of its artwork. If you're like me, and Lonergan's art meshes with you, you'll probably enjoy this. The ships looked cool, the various monsters are all memorable, and I enjoyed the creative applications of white space in the panel layouts. The colours are usually vey soft with a lot of pinks, whites, and blues, it makes me wonder if Lonergan takes his inspiration from cotton candy bubble gum ice-cream. But at least it's colourful! The last thing you want is for your sci-fi setting to look dull and boring, and the colouring choices here bring some vibrancy to what is otherwise a planet setting mostly composed of rocks, more rocks, and some ground that is probably just smaller rocks smashed together. I look forward to seeing what project Jesse Lonergan decides to tackle next. Hopefully after Hedra and Planet Paradise this year he can shore up the plot weaknesses while continuing to expand his artistic capabilities.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Played very much for laughs, a lot of the appeal of this book will be reliant on you being OK with the design. The artwork is rather loose, rough and ready, although pretty much readable, but it's the layout that makes this stand out. You often get far more than the usual boxes in the page, and sometimes the reading order for them is not the expected one. Don't get me wrong, this is no Chris Ware (thank god), but it's not the usual 2x3 grid, and the construction of the story makes good use of th Played very much for laughs, a lot of the appeal of this book will be reliant on you being OK with the design. The artwork is rather loose, rough and ready, although pretty much readable, but it's the layout that makes this stand out. You often get far more than the usual boxes in the page, and sometimes the reading order for them is not the expected one. Don't get me wrong, this is no Chris Ware (thank god), but it's not the usual 2x3 grid, and the construction of the story makes good use of the quirks, zooming in, leaving huge angular guttering gaps, filling irregular sections of page with irregular-proportioned panels, and so on. Also important, of course, is the story, and this one concerns a Something Going Wrong on a spaceship taking tourists to a hedonistic planet of paradise. One of the passengers gets awoken from her obligatory cryosleep, rescues the captain and gets her to safety – only for them to find safety highly unlikely, given the native animal lifeforms. Can someone butch enough come and rescue them – or will he be too interested in watching the latest soap opera to be much use? Like I say, played for laughs. It's droll, it is actually a quick, fun, light read, however heavy I got discussing the look, and it succeeds in being flippant enough to make this a hit, however old-hat so much of the contents are. Hand-written FX noises blooping across the page suggest this is a one-man labour of love, and there certainly are people out there who will love this.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    Many of the indie comics that I read that have artists as writers suffer from bare bones storytelling. The characters announce what they are doing even as you can see them doing what they are doing because ... well ... comics are a visual art form. But the artist doesn't know how to trust their readers. The alternative are the indie artists who don't include enough context, and you're reading a basically wordless or word-spare text, but don't know what's going on. Lonegran falls into neither trap. Many of the indie comics that I read that have artists as writers suffer from bare bones storytelling. The characters announce what they are doing even as you can see them doing what they are doing because ... well ... comics are a visual art form. But the artist doesn't know how to trust their readers. The alternative are the indie artists who don't include enough context, and you're reading a basically wordless or word-spare text, but don't know what's going on. Lonegran falls into neither trap. Yes, this is a word-spare book. Yes, there is not a lot to the plot. It's very basic. But it's very easy to follow, and the plot does actually go somewhere. It's the story of a woman whose ship crashes on her way to a paradise planet, and how she survives, and how she's denied the agency for her survival, and then how her survival experience helps her in her post-crash life on the paradies planet. It's not profoundly deep. But it's well told, easy to follow, and while it doesn't deviate too widely from some basic sci-fi tropes, it doesn't cling to them either. If you like basic, short stories in the sci-fi genre, or just enjoy checking out indie comic books, I think you'll enjoy this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Every so often I read something from Image which, despite the fact that they no longer have a corporate identity as such, really doesn't feel like an Image book. Case in point: with its spare, cartoon-y characters, gorgeous landscapes, and extensive use of negative space, this felt much more like something I'd expect from Avery Hill. The story is simple enough - a space holiday gone wrong, leading to one of the passengers and the arsehole of a pilot having to survive and find a way off a dangero Every so often I read something from Image which, despite the fact that they no longer have a corporate identity as such, really doesn't feel like an Image book. Case in point: with its spare, cartoon-y characters, gorgeous landscapes, and extensive use of negative space, this felt much more like something I'd expect from Avery Hill. The story is simple enough - a space holiday gone wrong, leading to one of the passengers and the arsehole of a pilot having to survive and find a way off a dangerous planet. But the charm is in the telling, whether that's the scene where a ship lands and nobody comes out (because the pilot wants to get to the end of the episode they're watching), or the art. Though it's worth mentioning that some of the bits of that I found most effective - the pages with a single small panel lost in white, the space voyages depicted as tiny white lines against the black - might provoke more ambivalent feelings in some who've paid for this already slim volume, rather than getting an Edelweiss freebie as I did.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Meachman

    Lonergan gives a good sense of this world in a short time, with artwork and language that really drive home the atmosphere. The story is lighthearted and mixes humor and action well. Where the story suffers is in its pacing and character development. There are multiple stretches of time drawn out for exaggerated payoffs that don't always feel worth the investment. This feels all the more frustrating when considered alongside the lack of character development for anyone but the main character, Eu Lonergan gives a good sense of this world in a short time, with artwork and language that really drive home the atmosphere. The story is lighthearted and mixes humor and action well. Where the story suffers is in its pacing and character development. There are multiple stretches of time drawn out for exaggerated payoffs that don't always feel worth the investment. This feels all the more frustrating when considered alongside the lack of character development for anyone but the main character, Eunice. Among the many other trials she must endure, surviving in a universe of one-dimensional characters shouldn't be one. It's a fun, enjoyable read that certainly has a place on classroom and library shelves, but probably won't see anyone giving it a re-read anytime soon. For a story labeled as Teen, it doesn't fully address the complex expectations of its audience.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jared

    I love Jesse's art. The page composition is always inventive, there's a great sense of time passing, and it all has a slightly rough and sketchy look that still pays attention to detail. The story has lots of humor and adventure, but what stands out for me is the focus on the supporting characters really selling how bored and irritated they are with this space-traveling future they live in. They mirror us now in many ways, and only really serve as obstacles for Eunice. There's this banal incompe I love Jesse's art. The page composition is always inventive, there's a great sense of time passing, and it all has a slightly rough and sketchy look that still pays attention to detail. The story has lots of humor and adventure, but what stands out for me is the focus on the supporting characters really selling how bored and irritated they are with this space-traveling future they live in. They mirror us now in many ways, and only really serve as obstacles for Eunice. There's this banal incompetence and self-serving drive that gets under your skin, even as she brushes them off. It says a great deal about the human condition, even as we expand into the larger universe.

  14. 5 out of 5

    April Gray

    Okay, this wasn't bad, I enjoyed it. The art is good, the layouts are cool; most of the story is told without text, and the visuals really carry the story well. The story is decent, a ship full of space tourists crashes on a planet after Something Goes Wrong™, leaving one of the cryogenically frozen passengers and the captain the only ones awake, with the pods scattered, some damaged or destroyed. What happens next I won't say, except that I'd've smacked a bitch. The ending, though....it was app Okay, this wasn't bad, I enjoyed it. The art is good, the layouts are cool; most of the story is told without text, and the visuals really carry the story well. The story is decent, a ship full of space tourists crashes on a planet after Something Goes Wrong™, leaving one of the cryogenically frozen passengers and the captain the only ones awake, with the pods scattered, some damaged or destroyed. What happens next I won't say, except that I'd've smacked a bitch. The ending, though....it was appropriate and fitting, but it needed more to it, I wanted more "I Will Survive" kind of drama, it was a bit abrupt. Still, a good story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Good sequential storytelling with the art, however the plot is paper thin and completely forgettable. I would have given this 3 stars if it were not for the $16.99 cover price. I read this and a single issue of Starman tonight and it took me longer to read the single issue of Starman. $16.99 for a book that takes 15 mins to read is not acceptable. The art, whilst more than capable of doing the job, with inventive layouts that show a great understanding of the language of comics, does not hold the Good sequential storytelling with the art, however the plot is paper thin and completely forgettable. I would have given this 3 stars if it were not for the $16.99 cover price. I read this and a single issue of Starman tonight and it took me longer to read the single issue of Starman. $16.99 for a book that takes 15 mins to read is not acceptable. The art, whilst more than capable of doing the job, with inventive layouts that show a great understanding of the language of comics, does not hold the readers attention long enough to compensate for the sparse dialogue.

  16. 4 out of 5

    zapisanekartki

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The comic is brutal. There is really no text only the illustrations. The main character is killing some monsters, that look like animals, to survive. It's a story of a woman who crashed on the wrong planet and had to fight with big lizards to survive, and then she's on a Paradise Planet, and she's killing another animal to survive. I really didn't enjoy this because of the brutality and basically no plot. Copy provided via Edelweiss. The comic is brutal. There is really no text only the illustrations. The main character is killing some monsters, that look like animals, to survive. It's a story of a woman who crashed on the wrong planet and had to fight with big lizards to survive, and then she's on a Paradise Planet, and she's killing another animal to survive. I really didn't enjoy this because of the brutality and basically no plot. Copy provided via Edelweiss.

  17. 4 out of 5

    -RadioactiveBookworm-

    Not really sure what I was getting myself into, Planet Paradise is a really cute graphic novel, for what the story really is. I loved the art, and really disliked everyone but the main character, but I think that's the point. Short and sweet, I really enjoyed this book. Check out my full review here! https://radioactivebookreviews.wordpr... Not really sure what I was getting myself into, Planet Paradise is a really cute graphic novel, for what the story really is. I loved the art, and really disliked everyone but the main character, but I think that's the point. Short and sweet, I really enjoyed this book. Check out my full review here! https://radioactivebookreviews.wordpr...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Very enjoyable comic tale about survival on an unknown planet. What this is really about is the development of the main female character who learns to adapt and become much more adventurous. It’s about how women can be treated in society, even in a far distant future. Nicely conceived with simple artwork. Well done.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leah Shannon

    I definitely could have used a little bit more from this story. It had such an interesting concept, I would have loved to see some more plot and adventures but either way it was entertaining and I liked it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John Funderburg

    The art was clever at times, but the story was overly basic and it rambled a bit. I'm still not entirely sure what the point was. The art was clever at times, but the story was overly basic and it rambled a bit. I'm still not entirely sure what the point was.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Francis Murray

    Fun quick read, Jesse Lonergan has a great grasp on the mediums strengths. The price tag is very steep for the experience, but divorced from that I loved the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This was a fun little space romp. My only complaint is that it's too short. ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This was a fun little space romp. My only complaint is that it's too short. ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nick Zambrano

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ross Duncan

  28. 5 out of 5

    PBNightmare

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zio Adams

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike

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