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Adventureman, Vol. 1: The End and Everything After

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WHERE HIS STORY ENDED... HER STORY BEGINS! Everyone knows the story of how ADVENTUREMAN, the greatest pulp hero of ended in a heartbreaking CLIFFHANGER with our hero facing execution an the eve of the MACABRAPOCALYPSE... now learn the startling truth about how, eighty years after his seeming demise, single mother Claire and her Adventurefan son Tommy seem to spark his RESU WHERE HIS STORY ENDED... HER STORY BEGINS! Everyone knows the story of how ADVENTUREMAN, the greatest pulp hero of ended in a heartbreaking CLIFFHANGER with our hero facing execution an the eve of the MACABRAPOCALYPSE... now learn the startling truth about how, eighty years after his seeming demise, single mother Claire and her Adventurefan son Tommy seem to spark his RESURRECTION! Can these inheritors of the Adventureman legacy rise up to face down the evil that bested the original?


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WHERE HIS STORY ENDED... HER STORY BEGINS! Everyone knows the story of how ADVENTUREMAN, the greatest pulp hero of ended in a heartbreaking CLIFFHANGER with our hero facing execution an the eve of the MACABRAPOCALYPSE... now learn the startling truth about how, eighty years after his seeming demise, single mother Claire and her Adventurefan son Tommy seem to spark his RESU WHERE HIS STORY ENDED... HER STORY BEGINS! Everyone knows the story of how ADVENTUREMAN, the greatest pulp hero of ended in a heartbreaking CLIFFHANGER with our hero facing execution an the eve of the MACABRAPOCALYPSE... now learn the startling truth about how, eighty years after his seeming demise, single mother Claire and her Adventurefan son Tommy seem to spark his RESURRECTION! Can these inheritors of the Adventureman legacy rise up to face down the evil that bested the original?

30 review for Adventureman, Vol. 1: The End and Everything After

  1. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    This wasn't my favourite Fraction, but I still enjoyed it for what it is — a simple pulp-y family friendly adventure story. It kind of lacked that special something that I usually find in Fraction's other books. Maybe it's just the fact that it was in production for years — some of this book was written even before the first issue of Hawkeye, so its production pretty much lasted through Matt's two whole career-defining runs and the end result could never live up to that level of hype behind it. This wasn't my favourite Fraction, but I still enjoyed it for what it is — a simple pulp-y family friendly adventure story. It kind of lacked that special something that I usually find in Fraction's other books. Maybe it's just the fact that it was in production for years — some of this book was written even before the first issue of Hawkeye, so its production pretty much lasted through Matt's two whole career-defining runs and the end result could never live up to that level of hype behind it. Or maybe it just needs a bit more time to breathe — it's only four issues that are absolutely stuffed with action, worldbuilding and character work with no downtime at all. Either way, I can definitely see Adventureman improving in future volumes, but for now I found it thoroughly okay.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I feel like there really wasn't enough story here for a full arc. Fraction's storytelling is obtuse at times, leaving me somewhat lost. I do love the pulpy feel and the Dodsons' art is gorgeous. However, there's is a lot thrown at us in these 4 issues and none of it is really clear other than the broad strokes of there was a Doc Savage type team 80 years ago that everyone forgot and somehow Clair and her son are starting to remember them through a book they found. I feel like there really wasn't enough story here for a full arc. Fraction's storytelling is obtuse at times, leaving me somewhat lost. I do love the pulpy feel and the Dodsons' art is gorgeous. However, there's is a lot thrown at us in these 4 issues and none of it is really clear other than the broad strokes of there was a Doc Savage type team 80 years ago that everyone forgot and somehow Clair and her son are starting to remember them through a book they found.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    An extended riff on pulp fiction (the genre, not the film), that I had kind of a hard time to follow. Part of that lies in the art, which although quite beautiful, became a bit confusing. There's a story in the world of the pulp books, and there's a story in "our" world, with subsequent overlapping, and the art mainly delineates between the worlds by having different colour palets, but then those palets also overlap. The set of pulp heroes seem interesting, but badly defined. How the pulp world i An extended riff on pulp fiction (the genre, not the film), that I had kind of a hard time to follow. Part of that lies in the art, which although quite beautiful, became a bit confusing. There's a story in the world of the pulp books, and there's a story in "our" world, with subsequent overlapping, and the art mainly delineates between the worlds by having different colour palets, but then those palets also overlap. The set of pulp heroes seem interesting, but badly defined. How the pulp world invades the real world starts out a bit slow, and then flips to moving quickly, which is where I started to get confused. The book feels like a lot of set-up for the real story yet to come. (Received an ARC through Edelweiss)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shadowdenizen

    Torn about this one. Matt Fraction really speaks to me as a writer; I enjoy how his loves and attitude clearly infects everything he writes ("Sex Criminals" is a great example of how world-views impact art), and I'm always down for at least TRYING anything he writes. That said, not everything he writes is a home-run for me. I loved his Hawkeye & Iron Fist runs (they're up there with James Robinsons' "Starman" and Hickmans' "Fantastic Four" run), his "Fantastic Four" run was solid but unexceptional Torn about this one. Matt Fraction really speaks to me as a writer; I enjoy how his loves and attitude clearly infects everything he writes ("Sex Criminals" is a great example of how world-views impact art), and I'm always down for at least TRYING anything he writes. That said, not everything he writes is a home-run for me. I loved his Hawkeye & Iron Fist runs (they're up there with James Robinsons' "Starman" and Hickmans' "Fantastic Four" run), his "Fantastic Four" run was solid but unexceptional, but "Sex Criminals" started strong but quickly slid into mundanity. So I'm torn on this. While I love the Pulp genre, and thought this would be an interesting romp, this totally subverted my expectations (which isn't necessarily a bad thing). This is a DENSE book, unlike most pulp fiction, and that is both a boon and a drawback in this case. Fortunately, the art by the Dodsons is gorgeous (as always) and serves well to illuminate the action and flow of the story quite nicely. I'd recommend this for fans of Fraction, and for those interested in a story that warps the genre of pulp fiction.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Matt Fraction, who has done exceptional work in superhero comics, has decided to go all-in with the pulp in his latest Image title, now that Sex Criminals is officially over. In Adventureman, the eponymous pulp hero, along with his fellow heroes of Adventure, Inc., fights off a supervillain invasion. Eighty years after his apparent demise, single mother Claire and her Adventurefan son Tommy seem to be the only two people alive who recall the hero’s history, which now exists as adventure novels. Matt Fraction, who has done exceptional work in superhero comics, has decided to go all-in with the pulp in his latest Image title, now that Sex Criminals is officially over. In Adventureman, the eponymous pulp hero, along with his fellow heroes of Adventure, Inc., fights off a supervillain invasion. Eighty years after his apparent demise, single mother Claire and her Adventurefan son Tommy seem to be the only two people alive who recall the hero’s history, which now exists as adventure novels. However, this memory will spark the return of both the heroes and villains from decades ago. Please click here for my full review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A lot of the Matt Fraction I've enjoyed most has been his most pulp work, such as Immortal Iron Fist and Defenders, so this was off to a good start. Yes, the eponymous hero is fairly blatant in his borrowings from Doc Savage and the Avenger, and zeppelins are no longer the exciting (retro-)novelty they once were, but I'm still a sucker for larger-than-life (yet non-spandex) figures facing off against an Art Deco cityscape. Granted, the opening scenes aren't the easiest to follow, which surprised A lot of the Matt Fraction I've enjoyed most has been his most pulp work, such as Immortal Iron Fist and Defenders, so this was off to a good start. Yes, the eponymous hero is fairly blatant in his borrowings from Doc Savage and the Avenger, and zeppelins are no longer the exciting (retro-)novelty they once were, but I'm still a sucker for larger-than-life (yet non-spandex) figures facing off against an Art Deco cityscape. Granted, the opening scenes aren't the easiest to follow, which surprised me; Fraction can sometimes be guilty of chucking cool-sounding ideas at the page without worrying enough about how it'll all cohere, but the Dodsons' art has saved worse than him before. This may be deliberate, though, as it's soon revealed that this is a story within a story, an old pulp being read by a kid and his bookseller mum, who are soon revealed as the series' real protagonists. One detail I enjoyed is that this isn't the old 'taking refuge from an unhappy home life in dreams of another world' bit; both nuclear and extended family are occasionally exasperating in a fond sort of way, but fundamentally lovely; his school doesn't seem that bad either, nor her job. Although as with so many things nowadays, there are moments when it feels a lot darker from context, as with this exchange from Friday night dinner: "I just can't believe nothing interesting happened to you all week." "Well, nothing did." "Nothing interesting?" "No." "Nothing weird?" "No." "Did anything happen you were looking forward to..?" "Yeah, souffle day." Subtract the souffle and that's most weeks now. Except that Claire is lying, having already had her first hint that the world is stranger than she thought, and that maybe those Adventureman pulps aren't as fictional as all that. Soon she's combing through the wreckage of a world that shouldn't exist, and if there's one thing for which I'm more of a sucker than an Art Deco skyscraper, it's an Art Deco skyscraper decades past its prime, the haunted halls and fallen treasures within. And yes, so far I'm not seeing much that's original in the big picture, but it's packed with little treats like that, from the categories in Claire's bookshop (the supernatural is 'between "Pet Sports" and "Train Crimes"'), to the erased lettering which can sometimes just about be read to represent Claire's perspective when her hearing aids are off or out. There are lines which feel a lot like early Grant Morrison – "That sound. Like babies made of glass, shattering." "The Judas Press stirs from its slumber! The Obliteration Bible is written!" Granted, the 2020s make me a little sceptical of the idea of measuring human misery on a clock, at least not unless you also bring in some form of Zeno's paradox right before midnight to enable infinite further gradations of awfulness even when things initially appeared to be at the limit of possible shitness – but that aside, it's an arresting image for how the villainous Baron Bizarre might be summoned into the real world. Does it have strong echoes of Planetary, except with a simpler metafictional level? Yes. But Planetary was a long time ago now, terrifying as that is to consider, and even before recent developments put everyone off Warren Ellis, it was generally agreed to have completely fluffed its second half. So a fresh attempt on that terrain seems fair enough and, if I don't quite get why some people are so excited about this series, it's definitely fun. (Edelweiss ARC)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Adventureman, Vol. 1: The End and Everything After' by Matt Fraction with art by Terry Dodson is a graphic novel about a fictional team of heroes that may or may not be all that fictional. Claire and her son are fans of Adventureman. They read and collect the adventures. Claire starts to find weird things happening to her and around her. Her lifelong hearing loss is suddenly healed, and now there is a building in the city that was never there before but looks very familiar. When it was all said a 'Adventureman, Vol. 1: The End and Everything After' by Matt Fraction with art by Terry Dodson is a graphic novel about a fictional team of heroes that may or may not be all that fictional. Claire and her son are fans of Adventureman. They read and collect the adventures. Claire starts to find weird things happening to her and around her. Her lifelong hearing loss is suddenly healed, and now there is a building in the city that was never there before but looks very familiar. When it was all said and done, I liked it, but it took over half for me to warm to it. Once I did, I enjoyed the ride. The art was a lot of fun and I really liked the perspectives and angles to it. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    A reasonable comic, where a cute, spunky bookseller is mother to a kid addicted to Adventureman books, that have a fantasy superhero world somewhere between LXG and The Rocketeer. A world that is somehow bleeding through into ours – or is it perhaps the other way round? A bit of a mess, all told, both narratively and artistically, this might have some potential, but I didn't find much to recommend. A reasonable comic, where a cute, spunky bookseller is mother to a kid addicted to Adventureman books, that have a fantasy superhero world somewhere between LXG and The Rocketeer. A world that is somehow bleeding through into ours – or is it perhaps the other way round? A bit of a mess, all told, both narratively and artistically, this might have some potential, but I didn't find much to recommend.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mario Alba

    A super fun, original, and surprising story by Matt Fraction full of unexpected turns of events, with incredibly gorgeous art by Terry and Rachel Dodson. Nowadays I read 99% of my comics digitally, but I'm glad I got the oversized hardcover edition of this one, because it is a thing of beauty. A great experience from beginning to end! A super fun, original, and surprising story by Matt Fraction full of unexpected turns of events, with incredibly gorgeous art by Terry and Rachel Dodson. Nowadays I read 99% of my comics digitally, but I'm glad I got the oversized hardcover edition of this one, because it is a thing of beauty. A great experience from beginning to end!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Spoer

    Super cute. Easy to read. And hot damn Adventureman I really only understand a touch about what's going on. But really, that's the whole point. No one knows what is happening within the story either. Old school adventure meets the present day. (well not really present day. cause this sure isn't taking place in 2020, let me tell you) Super cute. Easy to read. And hot damn Adventureman I really only understand a touch about what's going on. But really, that's the whole point. No one knows what is happening within the story either. Old school adventure meets the present day. (well not really present day. cause this sure isn't taking place in 2020, let me tell you)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    All right the rating is maybe a little high. In one of the floppies' afterwards Fraction talks about wanting to do pulp, but pulp with a more modern take. I'm not going to use the term "new" pulp because outside of the Weird Heroes series I think a lot of "new" pulp = recycled pulp. But Fraction knows something about pulp stylings. With Ed Brubaker on The Immortal Iron Fist they did a damn good job of bringing some pulp style to parts of the story (the legacies, and especially the Orson Randall t All right the rating is maybe a little high. In one of the floppies' afterwards Fraction talks about wanting to do pulp, but pulp with a more modern take. I'm not going to use the term "new" pulp because outside of the Weird Heroes series I think a lot of "new" pulp = recycled pulp. But Fraction knows something about pulp stylings. With Ed Brubaker on The Immortal Iron Fist they did a damn good job of bringing some pulp style to parts of the story (the legacies, and especially the Orson Randall tales as examples). Here working by himself, and with a stated goal, Fraction hits the mark. I was a little surprised, because Fraction's solo work (ex: Casanova) hasn't always been to my taste. Some of the tale is arguably told via flashback, or is it a flashback or another dimension (just tossing it out there), when Claire gifts her son Tommy an Adventureman book he hasn't read. That is how we are introduced to Adventureman and his multi-ethnic team in what appears a Doc Savage type of tale. Then the scene shifts to Claire's extended family and their traditional Friday Sabbath dinner. Her family is, well extended and unique. Things happen, now we can question what is real, what is fiction and who is Adventureman? Kickback and settle in for the ride.

  12. 5 out of 5

    April Gray

    Ok, so, wow, that was good. I loved this, I don't know if it just hit me at the right time, but I think it's more that this was really good. It was fun, a rollicking good time. So much pulpy goodness! Pulp fiction action-adventure heroes and heroines are fighting the evil bad guys, all seems lost- then the book ends. Not this book, the book in the story that the mom is reading to her son before bed. The mom that runs a book store, that a mysterious woman brings a super rare book to, gives it to Ok, so, wow, that was good. I loved this, I don't know if it just hit me at the right time, but I think it's more that this was really good. It was fun, a rollicking good time. So much pulpy goodness! Pulp fiction action-adventure heroes and heroines are fighting the evil bad guys, all seems lost- then the book ends. Not this book, the book in the story that the mom is reading to her son before bed. The mom that runs a book store, that a mysterious woman brings a super rare book to, gives it to the mom, tells her to read it. It's a compendium of sorts about the main hero of the book she's just finished with her son, Adventureman. Then the weirdness shows up, the world of Adventureman et al. starts bleeding into the mom's world, and hell is literally trying to break loose. This was a wild ride, I could not put it down until I finished, and omg when is the next volume coming out?!? The art is gobsmackingly beautiful, just stunningly gorgeous, and fits the story perfectly. Seriously, though, next volume please?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Read more graphic novel reviews at www.graphiclibrary.org. Former cop Claire and her son Tommy are big fans of the stories of Adventureman and his squad of superhero friends, who protect a city that looks an awful lot like New York meets Gotham. The last Adventureman book left things on quite a cliffhanger that didn’t seem very favorable to the Super squad, so Claire challenges Tommy to come up with his own ending. Claire manages her boisterous family dynamic with the quiet of her late mother’s b Read more graphic novel reviews at www.graphiclibrary.org. Former cop Claire and her son Tommy are big fans of the stories of Adventureman and his squad of superhero friends, who protect a city that looks an awful lot like New York meets Gotham. The last Adventureman book left things on quite a cliffhanger that didn’t seem very favorable to the Super squad, so Claire challenges Tommy to come up with his own ending. Claire manages her boisterous family dynamic with the quiet of her late mother’s bookstore, both playing different games with her hearing aides. One day, a mysterious customer comes in and leaves an older, possibly first edition copy of Adventureman with Claire, and the fiction starts to bleed into her reality. Men made of bugs chase Claire, she finds a mysterious skyscraper she’s never noticed before, and relative strangers, who resemble fictional characters, begin to help Claire. The beginning of this book will completely throw you off. Don’t worry, keep reading. You didn’t miss another volume, there wasn’t something that came before this, and it’ll all make sense soon. The introduction of Claire and her family is one of the most sincere, genuine beginnings of character development I’ve seen in a while. Claire's hearing loss is handled beautifully, with Cowles lettering changing to match her level of hearing - as she turns the volume down, the words become more faint

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Anderson

    Loved it! Great fun reminiscent of Doc Savage and the old pulp adventures.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Imogene

    While there were some amazing concepts, the all adopted family of amazing women from all over the world, the memory erasure storyline, etc, there was just too much. Without enough space to breathe, of a different colour palette for the past and present, it just seemed like a bit to much hard work. So much potential though!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 Total review score: 2.69 Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 Total review score: 2.69

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    I'm aware of Matt Fraction's history not just with adult topics like Sex Criminals but also how his career was forwarded by things he loved. It's how he met his wife Kelly Sue DeConnick. But the things you love can easily vanish when something groundbreaking comes along. Video tapes and physical media getting replaced, or in this case pulp magazines getting replaced with comic books. These stories can invigorate readers from a boring life in spite of people not minding that boring life. I certain I'm aware of Matt Fraction's history not just with adult topics like Sex Criminals but also how his career was forwarded by things he loved. It's how he met his wife Kelly Sue DeConnick. But the things you love can easily vanish when something groundbreaking comes along. Video tapes and physical media getting replaced, or in this case pulp magazines getting replaced with comic books. These stories can invigorate readers from a boring life in spite of people not minding that boring life. I certainly felt that when Claire got that surge of excitement from living those stories she shares with her son. Not to mention those fun times come with a lifetime potential that was long held back in Claire. But at the same time, it's not the safest thing as it's like living in a dream. Unlike nightmares that more easily come back like the Baron (and Baroness) that are cautionary and self-destructive for people to get involved in. The worst part is, people focus way too much on these bad times and not enough on the good. This by no means implies that you can separate the good from the bad. There are some things that you have to critique to fully appreciate, especially when they show their age. But where does Pulp Magazine formats fit in? Get an impression in Adventureman.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    First, this is a gorgeous collection. It is an oversized hard cover and feels a little like reading a storybook. This is a good book too. From Matt Fraction's story to the Dodson's art to the use of color to tell the story it is all dome very well. The story centers around Claire and her son Tommy. They have a book telling the story of Adventureman and his team facing off against their foes and apparently losing. The world they live in is a dull colorless world but as Claire digs into a story sh First, this is a gorgeous collection. It is an oversized hard cover and feels a little like reading a storybook. This is a good book too. From Matt Fraction's story to the Dodson's art to the use of color to tell the story it is all dome very well. The story centers around Claire and her son Tommy. They have a book telling the story of Adventureman and his team facing off against their foes and apparently losing. The world they live in is a dull colorless world but as Claire digs into a story she finds all s not as it may seem. Fraction weaves a fun story with engaging characters. Claire and Tommy are a solid family and they have flaws. Claire has a hearing difficulty. Her extended family is made up of an interesting mix of multi-ethnicwomen and their father. All are successful in their fields of choice. It is a bit of world building here before jumpingintothe greater story. Terry and Rachel Dodson do a great job on the Art, Inks and colors of this book. It was well thought out and is gorgeous to look at and easy to read. I look forward to more stories in this world as it continues to grow. You should check this out if you like classic pulp tales and adventure comics.

  19. 4 out of 5

    HowardtheDuck95

    I was suspicious of this book. I’d heard it was a bit dense and askew from folks I know...so I was a little hesitant to read it, despite knowing it’s by people I really like and contains things that are my kind of stuff (pulp superheroics, Art Deco, and metatext!) Yeah...this is extremely MY $#!+. I love it. The art is gorgeous (it goes without saying with Terry and Rachel Dodson) and the presentation of the Hardcover is perfect. I absolutely love the use of color and in particular the temperatur I was suspicious of this book. I’d heard it was a bit dense and askew from folks I know...so I was a little hesitant to read it, despite knowing it’s by people I really like and contains things that are my kind of stuff (pulp superheroics, Art Deco, and metatext!) Yeah...this is extremely MY $#!+. I love it. The art is gorgeous (it goes without saying with Terry and Rachel Dodson) and the presentation of the Hardcover is perfect. I absolutely love the use of color and in particular the temperature changes that give different scenes a distinct sense of reality and place. It’s a story about a mother and son who like a certain pulp hero, Adventureman, who is surely just a fictional character, right? Well, if you believe that, I have some real estate to sell on Krypton. When Adventureman’s story and theirs began to intersect, it goes from good to great, and moves at a solid pace. The sense of humor makes it feel almost like She-Hulk meets the Rocketeer. But also very much in the vein of The Sentry. The forgotten heroes on purpose. Fraction mentioning the film Up in the afterward makes so much sense. This book is definitely kin to that film in some ways. I truly can’t wait to see where this goes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Matt Fraction's writing plus Terry & Rachel Dodson's art is a match made in comic geek heaven! The story opens with pulp hero Adventureman and his colleagues in Adventure, Inc. preparing for their greatest battle against Baron Bizarre (and his own team of villains). The story seems to end with Adventureman about to die at the hands of Baron Bizarre, but surely this is just another cliffhanger ending. Alas, that was the last story ... until today when single mom Claire and her son Tommy are readi Matt Fraction's writing plus Terry & Rachel Dodson's art is a match made in comic geek heaven! The story opens with pulp hero Adventureman and his colleagues in Adventure, Inc. preparing for their greatest battle against Baron Bizarre (and his own team of villains). The story seems to end with Adventureman about to die at the hands of Baron Bizarre, but surely this is just another cliffhanger ending. Alas, that was the last story ... until today when single mom Claire and her son Tommy are reading the adventures and some strange things start happening to Claire, such as seeing an Art Deco skyscraper that no one else can see, suddenly growing over a foot taller, and finally, going missing. While Claire's father and sisters don't seem too concerned, Tommy thinks of a plan to find his missing mother, but it will mean following her - to the greatest unknown! Fans of The Shadow, The Rocketeer by Dave Stevens, Tom Strong by Alan Moore (never mind his recent comments about comics), or any pulp fiction adventures from the first half of the 20th century will surely enjoy Fraction's & the Dodsons' latest!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    It's a Doc Savage pastiche, except that the Doc Savage analogues are far in the past and our current protagonist (Claire McConnell) is in our time and starting to notice something... off. (Could it be connected to those analogues? How could it not be?) I found it fun, but not something I might want to read more of. Which is somewhat a shame, since the volume ends after the first four issues of the comic, and there's no real conclusion at that point. I do like Fraction's and Dodson's attention to It's a Doc Savage pastiche, except that the Doc Savage analogues are far in the past and our current protagonist (Claire McConnell) is in our time and starting to notice something... off. (Could it be connected to those analogues? How could it not be?) I found it fun, but not something I might want to read more of. Which is somewhat a shame, since the volume ends after the first four issues of the comic, and there's no real conclusion at that point. I do like Fraction's and Dodson's attention to detail --- there's a ton of complexity here (storywide and graphically), so much so that I found a reread of the first issue helpful. But that complexity meant I found it difficult to connect to the main story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tony Delgado (Comics)

    It was OK. It's a takeoff of pulp heroes, and Fraction populates his works with many characters and story hooks, but I wish this issue was more substantive. It might have been better to collect 6 issues as when I finished, I felt as if we were just beginning leaving me unsatisfied. Dodson's art is pretty slick and I liked the muted colors. That said, there were many moments I was confused as to what was happening, which is, well, bad. It was OK. It's a takeoff of pulp heroes, and Fraction populates his works with many characters and story hooks, but I wish this issue was more substantive. It might have been better to collect 6 issues as when I finished, I felt as if we were just beginning leaving me unsatisfied. Dodson's art is pretty slick and I liked the muted colors. That said, there were many moments I was confused as to what was happening, which is, well, bad.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Asha McKay

    The art work is amazing and the story is fresh and fun. I find it a little hard to follow with the back and forth in time lines, and the vast amount of characters. My only major issue is that the women supers all kind of look the same and sometimes I get confused as to who is who. I will definitely check out the next volume though. I can definitely see the potential and I’m curious as to where this is going.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Adventureman issues #1-4 I love plots that blur the lines between "real-life" and stories inside the narrative. This book plays around with that idea, but because this collection only has the first four issues, we are just scratching the surface of the potential that this series has. I'm definitely intrigued and plan to read on. Final rating = 4.5 stars Collects Adventureman issues #1-4 I love plots that blur the lines between "real-life" and stories inside the narrative. This book plays around with that idea, but because this collection only has the first four issues, we are just scratching the surface of the potential that this series has. I'm definitely intrigued and plan to read on. Final rating = 4.5 stars

  25. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    Read as single issues. Honestly I had super night it’s gonna be a four hopes. But instead it really felt like it player out a long game that can’t be resolved in 4 issues. I want to still love this but I am likely done reading as single issues.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This is such an energetic story. It's fun to read about characters that are just super excited about heroes and their stories. It's got an unrelenting optimism and keeps a fast pace, but can sometimes become a little hard to follow. I plan to continue the series. This is such an energetic story. It's fun to read about characters that are just super excited about heroes and their stories. It's got an unrelenting optimism and keeps a fast pace, but can sometimes become a little hard to follow. I plan to continue the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kaiulani

    Huge world. Great pulpy fun.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    The inclusiveness, the writing, the art, the story, the focus on women...everything about this hits the spot.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael Rhode

    It's good to see Doc Savage again. It's good to see Doc Savage again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    Fantastic book with a great Pulp feel. The story is intriguing and the art is just fantastic.

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