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Already Toast: Caregiving and Burnout in America

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The story of one woman's struggle to care for her seriously ill husband--and a revealing look at the role unpaid family caregivers play in a society that fails to provide them with structural support. Already Toast shows how all-consuming caregiving can be, how difficult it is to find support, and how the social and literary narratives that have long locked women into provi The story of one woman's struggle to care for her seriously ill husband--and a revealing look at the role unpaid family caregivers play in a society that fails to provide them with structural support. Already Toast shows how all-consuming caregiving can be, how difficult it is to find support, and how the social and literary narratives that have long locked women into providing emotional labor also keep them in unpaid caregiving roles. When Kate Washington and her husband, Brad, learned that he had cancer, they were a young couple: professionals with ascending careers, parents to two small children. Brad's diagnosis stripped those identities away: he became a patient and she his caregiver. Brad's cancer quickly turned aggressive, necessitating a stem-cell transplant that triggered a massive infection, robbing him of his eyesight and nearly of his life. Kate acted as his full-time aide to keep him alive, coordinating his treatments, making doctors' appointments, calling insurance companies, filling dozens of prescriptions, cleaning commodes, administering IV drugs. She became so burned out that, when she took an online quiz on caregiver self-care, her result cheerily declared: "You're already toast!" Through it all, she felt profoundly alone, but, as she later learned, she was in fact one of millions: an invisible army of family caregivers working every day in America, their unpaid labor keeping our troubled healthcare system afloat. Because our culture both romanticizes and erases the realities of care work, few caregivers have shared their stories publicly. As the baby-boom generation ages, the number of family caregivers will continue to grow. Readable, relatable, timely, and often raw, Already Toast--with its clear call for paying and supporting family caregivers--is a crucial intervention in that conversation, bringing together personal experience with deep research to give voice to those tasked with the overlooked, vital work of caring for the seriously ill.


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The story of one woman's struggle to care for her seriously ill husband--and a revealing look at the role unpaid family caregivers play in a society that fails to provide them with structural support. Already Toast shows how all-consuming caregiving can be, how difficult it is to find support, and how the social and literary narratives that have long locked women into provi The story of one woman's struggle to care for her seriously ill husband--and a revealing look at the role unpaid family caregivers play in a society that fails to provide them with structural support. Already Toast shows how all-consuming caregiving can be, how difficult it is to find support, and how the social and literary narratives that have long locked women into providing emotional labor also keep them in unpaid caregiving roles. When Kate Washington and her husband, Brad, learned that he had cancer, they were a young couple: professionals with ascending careers, parents to two small children. Brad's diagnosis stripped those identities away: he became a patient and she his caregiver. Brad's cancer quickly turned aggressive, necessitating a stem-cell transplant that triggered a massive infection, robbing him of his eyesight and nearly of his life. Kate acted as his full-time aide to keep him alive, coordinating his treatments, making doctors' appointments, calling insurance companies, filling dozens of prescriptions, cleaning commodes, administering IV drugs. She became so burned out that, when she took an online quiz on caregiver self-care, her result cheerily declared: "You're already toast!" Through it all, she felt profoundly alone, but, as she later learned, she was in fact one of millions: an invisible army of family caregivers working every day in America, their unpaid labor keeping our troubled healthcare system afloat. Because our culture both romanticizes and erases the realities of care work, few caregivers have shared their stories publicly. As the baby-boom generation ages, the number of family caregivers will continue to grow. Readable, relatable, timely, and often raw, Already Toast--with its clear call for paying and supporting family caregivers--is a crucial intervention in that conversation, bringing together personal experience with deep research to give voice to those tasked with the overlooked, vital work of caring for the seriously ill.

30 review for Already Toast: Caregiving and Burnout in America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Spector

    Disclosure: the author is a friend and I'm a longtime fan of her as a writer and a person. Caring for a critically ill spouse and caring for newborn babies/small children are two of the bleakest, darkest periods of my life; periods I got through with an enormous improvised network of support. They were isolated, stressful times which are illustrated so deftly here. Kate weaves together her personal narrative of caregiving with the literary and cultural history of caregiving to show how fragile th Disclosure: the author is a friend and I'm a longtime fan of her as a writer and a person. Caring for a critically ill spouse and caring for newborn babies/small children are two of the bleakest, darkest periods of my life; periods I got through with an enormous improvised network of support. They were isolated, stressful times which are illustrated so deftly here. Kate weaves together her personal narrative of caregiving with the literary and cultural history of caregiving to show how fragile the underpinnings of care in this country are- unsupported, invisible, and pushed to the limit. She highlights the crisis of care with laser sharp insight, clarity, and humor. This is a must read for anyone who has ever needed to care for another or needed care- i.e., all of us.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ❤Marie Gentilcore

    I really enjoyed this book about Kate Washington’s experience caring for her husband when he contracted a rare cancer. She had to care for him as well as her two young children. I appreciated her sharing her personal story as well as providing information about care giving and how it is undervalued and doesn’t get enough support. I related to this as my husband was primary, unpaid family care giver for his mom for the last several years of her life. I hope there will be changes made so that care I really enjoyed this book about Kate Washington’s experience caring for her husband when he contracted a rare cancer. She had to care for him as well as her two young children. I appreciated her sharing her personal story as well as providing information about care giving and how it is undervalued and doesn’t get enough support. I related to this as my husband was primary, unpaid family care giver for his mom for the last several years of her life. I hope there will be changes made so that care givers can get more support for this difficult job that is made harder by work constraints. Unpaid FMLA was helpful the first year but for the second year he did not qualify because he didn’t have enough hours since he had taken off so much time during the year before. It was stressful trying to balance financial, employment, and family needs. I listened to the audio but I won an autographed hard cover book. I'm excited for this Saturday's book club where we will discuss this book and author Kate Washington, who is from Sacramento, will attend.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    Amazing story. I have no elders or significant other to ever have to care for, so I can't begin to imagine the situation. I do, however, know of four friends who are in this situation with 90 year old mothers and fathers. I pity them as no one can really help them at this time of covid. So isolated in their homes as full time caretakers. I can't even begin to imagine the hell. Most lived alone with the parent for some years and are now trapped. Few outside supports other than visiting nurses and Amazing story. I have no elders or significant other to ever have to care for, so I can't begin to imagine the situation. I do, however, know of four friends who are in this situation with 90 year old mothers and fathers. I pity them as no one can really help them at this time of covid. So isolated in their homes as full time caretakers. I can't even begin to imagine the hell. Most lived alone with the parent for some years and are now trapped. Few outside supports other than visiting nurses and doctors. I feel for Kate Washington. Her book sums up the horror she went through and what I imagine my friends are going through. And, though not from my own experience, I feel for the folks with elders (and others) in nursing homes and hospitals during these times..and likely all times. There is never a good time, it seems, for old age, or illness. And certainly nothing easy or simple in dealing with it. I'm not sure a caregiver would read this book, but am very sure everyone else should. There has got to be a better way of providing for the aged and ill as well as their caregivers. As a senior citizen, I keep reminding the younger adults who think their children are obliged to care for them just because they raised them- when you are very old and suffer from whatever maladies old age brings, just remember you are still going to be an adult and not get baby sized. Same story with the middle aged ill. One adult having to do it all is asking for some kind of a miracle worker. It's inhumane. Also a reminder, the vast majority of people aren't going to have the resources to juggle the lot as Kate Washington noted in her book. Great book! Real insight into what caregivers go through. I received a Kindle arc from Edelweiss in exchange for a fair review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    When Kate Washington's husband contracts a rare lymphoma, she finds herself thrust into the world of caregiving. Already pressed between being a mom to young children and a freelance writer, the additional burden of caring for her husband's illness is overwhelming: there are medical procedures she's expected to perform without any professional training; there's family to keep updated; there are appointments to drive to and phone calls to make and paperwork to fill out and help to hire. She recog When Kate Washington's husband contracts a rare lymphoma, she finds herself thrust into the world of caregiving. Already pressed between being a mom to young children and a freelance writer, the additional burden of caring for her husband's illness is overwhelming: there are medical procedures she's expected to perform without any professional training; there's family to keep updated; there are appointments to drive to and phone calls to make and paperwork to fill out and help to hire. She recognizes the extreme privilege she comes from -- they have insurance, a nest-egg, and help from extended family -- but the load our society expects caregivers to take on as unpaid labor can be crushing even in the best of circumstances. In desperation one evening, she takes one of those goofy online quizzes to rate her level of caregiver burnout. After the questions are answered, the website returns the cheeky result: "already toast." She is not on her way to burnout; she's already there! The internet quiz not-so-helpfully offers solutions like arranging for an overnight away or getting a massage. But she had done those things, and it still wasn't enough. This book weaves memoir into well researched nonfiction, examining the ways that caregiving burdens families, especially women. She examines the dichotomy of professional caregiving, which is an underpaid profession -- especially for women of color -- while also being completely unaffordable for most families who need care. There is discussion on what caregivers sacrifice: their own professional and financial goals, their relationships with the person needing care, their own psychological well-being due to the trauma and duration of the experience. As a bonus for book-lovers, the author's background in English literature means she includes examples of caregiving from books, too: Bertha Mason (from Jane Eyre), Jo (from Little Women), Leslie Moore (from Anne's House of Dreams). I always love a book about books. I appreciated the author's vulnerability in writing so candidly about something so personal. There is a lot of social pressure for women to angelically support their husbands in whatever challenges arise, whether it's professionally or physically. She plainly recounts episodes in which she reacts with anger or frustration, and I wonder if readers -- both strangers and friends -- might judge her for it. But in telling the whole story of caregiving -- including those times which might paint her as petty or bitter -- she diminishes the shame surrounding those human reactions, and reminds us that pedestalizing caregivers does not actually help them. This book spotlights a growing issue in America, concluding with some solutions for individual caregivers as well as what systemic change could happen through legislation. I really enjoyed listening to this book, as it challenged some of the beliefs I had about the issue. Definitely a worthwhile read for me. CLEAN READERS: some swear words, including maybe a half-dozen f-bombs and the s-word for human excrement. I felt like they came mostly in the first half of the book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    S.G. Wright

    4.5 stars rounded up. Yes, this is an eye-opening and unflinching account of a successful writer whose husband was diagnosed with a serious case of T-cell lymphoma in 2015 ... and who was thrown unexpectedly into two years of intense caregiving for him. Not only does she cover the details & toll of her husband's illness on her marriage and her family's lives, she also spotlights the issue of unpaid family caregivers who are sacrificing so much of their lives for others ... and yet receive no com 4.5 stars rounded up. Yes, this is an eye-opening and unflinching account of a successful writer whose husband was diagnosed with a serious case of T-cell lymphoma in 2015 ... and who was thrown unexpectedly into two years of intense caregiving for him. Not only does she cover the details & toll of her husband's illness on her marriage and her family's lives, she also spotlights the issue of unpaid family caregivers who are sacrificing so much of their lives for others ... and yet receive no compensation or acknowledgement for doing so. She discusses various proposals to support family caregivers. Thanks to Kate Washington for this comprehensive look at such an important issue ... and her scary personal story dealing with his husband's cancer. All the best to her.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Houlihan

    Make a plan, and realize that plan is impossible. Do it now. Even books and privilege won't get a family through a crisis or chronic strain. There's a lesson for me. Make a plan, and realize that plan is impossible. Do it now. Even books and privilege won't get a family through a crisis or chronic strain. There's a lesson for me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kim Zarins

    Yup, I'm going to read this book! Yup, I'm going to read this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Interesting blend of memoir and scholarship about an extremely important topic.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jill Reads

    Almost everyone at some point will need to provide care for a sick or dying loved one. And the problem is that so many of us will face burnout in this caregiving role. In the case of Kate Washington, when she googled something about caregiver burnout, she checked enough boxes to determine that she was “already toast.” Fair warning: this books is a difficult read. Because Kate Washington doesn’t sugarcoat what it’s like to nearly watch her husband die. Then have to lose her identity as a mother, a Almost everyone at some point will need to provide care for a sick or dying loved one. And the problem is that so many of us will face burnout in this caregiving role. In the case of Kate Washington, when she googled something about caregiver burnout, she checked enough boxes to determine that she was “already toast.” Fair warning: this books is a difficult read. Because Kate Washington doesn’t sugarcoat what it’s like to nearly watch her husband die. Then have to lose her identity as a mother, a freelance writer, a friend and a wife as she has to pick up every piece of life and try to keep things afloat. With a smile. This is part memoir and part cultural critique. Yes, it’s Kate’s story, but it’s also chock full of stats about caregiving in the U.S. and how our policies and expectations are all wrong. If I had not read this book on my e-reader, I would have earmarked the hell out of the paper copy. I empathize with Kate as a mom, wife and freelancer. And, at times, I felt like she was a bit of a narcissist in her resentment—especially toward her husband. (She even considered leaving her him in the middle of his illness). But I’m not in her shoes. And she didn’t leave. All I know is that I would *easily* break into a million pieces if I had to take care of a very aggressive cancer, my two kids, the bills, the medications, the advocating, the sterilization of the house, the family and friend communication, the housekeeping, the grocery shopping and the cooking. So I feel super judgmental thinking anything negative about Kate. Because, after all, that’s what society does to caregivers… especially women. We put them in boxes and tell them to smile and look pretty, and make everything look perfect. And to just make it work, despite the grief, the loneliness and the thankless labor. Meanwhile, our caregivers are, themselves, dying inside. And we don’t give them the help or the support that they really need. I highly recommend “Already Toast” because we can and must do better. Kate is an excellent writer, who’s paid to write for a living, so she grabs you in and takes you on her emotional journey. Plus, she includes a lot of useful resources. That said, I much prefer the memoir portion vs. the stats and resource guide. She's not just bitching about the problem ... she's offering solutions, advice and help for those in need. So if you’ve already been the caregiver for a child, spouse, parent or grandparent, this book is for you. Or, if you know of someone who’s been thrust into this role, this book is for you (so you can support someone else). And if you are likely the one who will be tapped to take on caregiving in the future, this book is for you. Special thanks to Beacon Press/Random House for an advanced reader copy of this book, via Edelweiss+, in exchange for my honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lee Woodruff

    What is it about evil and mass murder that fascinates humans? Crime shows and podcasts about evil dominate the ratings. This book piqued my curiosity because I’d never heard of this disaster, one with more lives lost than the Columbine and Sandy Hook school shootings. Schechter forensically recreates the family history and gradual unravelling of mass murderer Andrew Kehoe. In 1927, the residents of Bath, Michigan were proud of their new elementary school. Local farmer and school board treasurer, What is it about evil and mass murder that fascinates humans? Crime shows and podcasts about evil dominate the ratings. This book piqued my curiosity because I’d never heard of this disaster, one with more lives lost than the Columbine and Sandy Hook school shootings. Schechter forensically recreates the family history and gradual unravelling of mass murderer Andrew Kehoe. In 1927, the residents of Bath, Michigan were proud of their new elementary school. Local farmer and school board treasurer, Kehoe, seemed like an accommodating neighbor and friend. Yet underneath the surface, as his financial world crumbled, his narcissism, rage and paranoia coalesced into a plot to rig the school with explosives. On May 18th his bombs killed 38 children and six adults, injuring many more. The deadliest school massacre in US history was promptly overshadowed by Lucky Lindbergh’s landing in Paris as the birth of the modern tabloid was at full tilt. For true crime lovers, this author has done his research.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    There need to be more books about caregiving. Period. As a social worker with geriatrics, I work alongside informal caregivers daily, often helping their loved ones return home safely. Even without the anticipated boom of elderly population anticipated in the next few decades, it is tough to find any appropriate resources. Those that do exist often cost a pretty penny, or don't service rural areas like the one in which I work. 99.9% of the time, I see the daughter (or even daughter in law) of th There need to be more books about caregiving. Period. As a social worker with geriatrics, I work alongside informal caregivers daily, often helping their loved ones return home safely. Even without the anticipated boom of elderly population anticipated in the next few decades, it is tough to find any appropriate resources. Those that do exist often cost a pretty penny, or don't service rural areas like the one in which I work. 99.9% of the time, I see the daughter (or even daughter in law) of the family going over to the elderly person's home for 2-12 hours a day. They get 0 reimbursement, and they get burnt out. Heck, even I get burnt out from providing psychosocial care at my job in which I get adequately reimbursed. I really liked that Kate gave an honest insight into caregiving, and also highlighted the issues that are faced in the caregiving industry as a whole. I found the literary comparisons to be my only grievance as I found there to be too many of them. Highly recommend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    This book hit me right in the gut. Having been a caregiver myself, it was an eye opening look into the things that made me say, "THAT WAS ME." Or, "That totally explains what happened." And while I loved her story, and felt a strong connection to it I was more interested in the parts of the book that explain what TO DO about it. So the information around Fureai kippu in Japan, or Federal caregiver leave were enticing, but also I wonder then about the self-employed or those in the gig economy. Yo This book hit me right in the gut. Having been a caregiver myself, it was an eye opening look into the things that made me say, "THAT WAS ME." Or, "That totally explains what happened." And while I loved her story, and felt a strong connection to it I was more interested in the parts of the book that explain what TO DO about it. So the information around Fureai kippu in Japan, or Federal caregiver leave were enticing, but also I wonder then about the self-employed or those in the gig economy. You can't get mandatory paid time off if you work for yourself, or just have multiple jobs. We continually forget about those people (as show during the early packages offered for small biz revealed in the pandemic). I was a small business owner when I was a caregiver. It was incredibly difficult - how do we make ourselves a more empathetic country? This is a great book for a topic many may not understand, but reveals a lot about where we are as a country when it comes to giving each other care.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    I thought the book did an admirable job of weaving the author and her family's personal experiences in with a thoughtful treatise on the abysmal state of caregiving and support for families and individuals with care needs. Although there were moments of hope offered, both individually and culturally, Washington pulls no punches about how hard all of it is and how much work needs to be done to rectify the situation. In fact, it left me a little depressed! As an English major, I enjoyed the through I thought the book did an admirable job of weaving the author and her family's personal experiences in with a thoughtful treatise on the abysmal state of caregiving and support for families and individuals with care needs. Although there were moments of hope offered, both individually and culturally, Washington pulls no punches about how hard all of it is and how much work needs to be done to rectify the situation. In fact, it left me a little depressed! As an English major, I enjoyed the through-lines of works of fiction and fictional caregivers. I also felt personally compelled by the descriptions of things like "mental load" and emotional caregiving, things that I have sometimes found to be nearly too much to bear myself. Despite not having gone through anything like their family's health crisis, I often related strongly to the struggle of having to juggle too much.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cari

    Washington's impeccably researched memoir is also a call to action. When her husband became extremely ill with cancer and other ailments, she was forced to give up her life as she knew it and reckon with her new role as a caregiver. Washington details the intense stress she faced as she needed to learn how to be on 24/7 to help her husband live, plus deal with all the other moving parts of her everyday life. She weaves in the most relevant scholarship surrounding this conundrum today, as well as Washington's impeccably researched memoir is also a call to action. When her husband became extremely ill with cancer and other ailments, she was forced to give up her life as she knew it and reckon with her new role as a caregiver. Washington details the intense stress she faced as she needed to learn how to be on 24/7 to help her husband live, plus deal with all the other moving parts of her everyday life. She weaves in the most relevant scholarship surrounding this conundrum today, as well as some literary criticism (I was compelled to take another look at Jane Eyre after reading this book!) Washington is brutally honest and clear-eyed about the struggle her family faced, while also being intersectional and mindful of the privilege she has. A must-read that opened my eyes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    (a)lyss(a)

    I received a copy of this book through the Amazon Vine program. This is a fascinating read! Part memoir, part information on caregiving in America this is a great book! Washington shares her experience being the caregiver for her husband after his cancer diagnoses. She talks about how she remained responsible for the kids in addition to caring for her husband and her responsibilities beyond his recovery. Washington also talks about the state of caregiving and how it often falls to women, why burn I received a copy of this book through the Amazon Vine program. This is a fascinating read! Part memoir, part information on caregiving in America this is a great book! Washington shares her experience being the caregiver for her husband after his cancer diagnoses. She talks about how she remained responsible for the kids in addition to caring for her husband and her responsibilities beyond his recovery. Washington also talks about the state of caregiving and how it often falls to women, why burnout is so high, and how there often aren't a lot of legal protections under current American laws. It's a harrowing and interesting read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ann Fisher

    A scorchingly honest look at the bleak reality of all the caregiving that's been offloaded from health care professionals onto untrained and already busy family members--usually women. That said, though the book is frequently angry, it's never depressing. And though I'm sure there are some people who start to yawn at the very thought of reading a whole book about caregiving, I can assure you that it's never dull, ponderous, or preachy. Washington's own story of having to manage the her husband's A scorchingly honest look at the bleak reality of all the caregiving that's been offloaded from health care professionals onto untrained and already busy family members--usually women. That said, though the book is frequently angry, it's never depressing. And though I'm sure there are some people who start to yawn at the very thought of reading a whole book about caregiving, I can assure you that it's never dull, ponderous, or preachy. Washington's own story of having to manage the her husband's nearly fatal illness and frequent crises is complemented by frequent dips into all the caregivers, again women, who show up so often in Victorian literature. Highly recommended.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Shepherd

    I received a copy of this book free from Beacon Press through Goodreads. It is a firsthand account of what a caregiver goes through in America. While we all probably know someone who is a caregiver for a loved one today, we really have no idea what this really means. I had never thought about the day-to-day routine of one who is caring for a spouse with a life threatening illness. The amount of time needed just to wade through all the paperwork is mind boggling. Add to that the physical toll of I received a copy of this book free from Beacon Press through Goodreads. It is a firsthand account of what a caregiver goes through in America. While we all probably know someone who is a caregiver for a loved one today, we really have no idea what this really means. I had never thought about the day-to-day routine of one who is caring for a spouse with a life threatening illness. The amount of time needed just to wade through all the paperwork is mind boggling. Add to that the physical toll of caring for an ailing spouse while trying to keep up with the household, the children, and friends and family. This book gives a no-holds-barred glimpse into one caregiver's life.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Beverly Hallfrisch

    I did not want to put this book down. I appreciate the brutal honesty of the author; and she doesn't sugarcoat the strain on her marriage. She is up front about her privilege and owns it. But her privilege does not negate the struggle of her situation. With privilege her situation still feels unbearable; it makes it more upsetting to think about the vast number of individuals without financial or social support (and the tragic state of u.s. healthcare system). I loved all the references, particul I did not want to put this book down. I appreciate the brutal honesty of the author; and she doesn't sugarcoat the strain on her marriage. She is up front about her privilege and owns it. But her privilege does not negate the struggle of her situation. With privilege her situation still feels unbearable; it makes it more upsetting to think about the vast number of individuals without financial or social support (and the tragic state of u.s. healthcare system). I loved all the references, particularly to other books. I have added a few books to my reading list.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Frances Thomas

    This is a sobering and all too realistic tale of what it is like to care for an ailing spouse. I'm in a similar, although thankfully less serious, situation. The author had a lot more resources than I do. That helped but by no means made her journey an easy one. The statistics about how unappreciated and underpaid caregivers are have been written about many times before, but changes are few and agonizingly slow in coming. As we baby boomers get older, this will become an even more urgent issue. I This is a sobering and all too realistic tale of what it is like to care for an ailing spouse. I'm in a similar, although thankfully less serious, situation. The author had a lot more resources than I do. That helped but by no means made her journey an easy one. The statistics about how unappreciated and underpaid caregivers are have been written about many times before, but changes are few and agonizingly slow in coming. As we baby boomers get older, this will become an even more urgent issue. I wish Washington's conclusions had been more encouraging.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Wb

    Caveat - I know the author. I tore this beautiful memoir that also has concrete policy suggestions about how to better support caregivers, a growing population in our country, particularly with the uncertain outcomes of the COVID pandemic. I loved how Kate shared her story so honestly, while not shying away from diving deep into the current state of affairs for caregivers in the US. A must read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Jennings

    Kate Washington has written a very much needed book... This is not only beautifully written...it's a 'Red Flag' to our system of care-giving... Everyone should read this book...because ultimately someone you know will need the help that's so necessary in this day and age... Recommended reading for one and all! Kate Washington has written a very much needed book... This is not only beautifully written...it's a 'Red Flag' to our system of care-giving... Everyone should read this book...because ultimately someone you know will need the help that's so necessary in this day and age... Recommended reading for one and all!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Kate Washington’s honest description of her caregiving experience and thoughtfully research book serve as a notice to acknowledge care workers and their value in our society. I enjoyed her personal writing style and the number of resources Kate provides for further information on the subjects covered in her book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    My amazing sister gifted me this book at the absolutely right time. Kate Washington’s words and thoughts so closely parallel my own right now as a caregiver. She wrote in words that which I am feeling but could never as eloquently express.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Well written but much more of a personal memoir of caregiving with some statistics added than I was expecting. She also made some detours into caregiving in literature which was interesting and enjoyable but also not quite what I expected from the subtitle which suggested a much broader focus.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Possibly best book about care giving. Intertwined with authors love of literature. Should be a social work requirement.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Rounded up from 4.5. Astonishingly honest.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    A little too close to my heart. Excellent writing....just excellent

  28. 4 out of 5

    Deena Tracy

    Everyone in the field should read this book. My heart. So many so so many....

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Lazzaro

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

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