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My mother told me that men would speak about the Golden Age as a time of peace and happiness for all… However, the women of our age would tell a very different story… Cronus, God of Gods, whose inheritance is the world. Among his possessions: women, imprisoned and fated to serve. The strong-minded Althea Lambros controls her own fate and lives to honor her dying mother’s pl My mother told me that men would speak about the Golden Age as a time of peace and happiness for all… However, the women of our age would tell a very different story… Cronus, God of Gods, whose inheritance is the world. Among his possessions: women, imprisoned and fated to serve. The strong-minded Althea Lambros controls her own fate and lives to honor her dying mother’s plea to protect her two sisters at all costs. Althea’s journey toward crushing the tyranny has begun. It is a destiny foretold by the Fates. And she is following their visions. On the southern isle of Crete, hidden among mortal women who have fled the Titans, is the Boy God, son of Cronus and believed dead. He shares Althea’s destiny to vanquish the Almighty—fate willing. Because Cronus has caught wind of the plot. He’s amassing his own forces against Althea’s righteous rebellion and all those who will no longer surrender or run. There will be war. If she’s to survive to write their history, the indomitable Althea must soar higher than any god.


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My mother told me that men would speak about the Golden Age as a time of peace and happiness for all… However, the women of our age would tell a very different story… Cronus, God of Gods, whose inheritance is the world. Among his possessions: women, imprisoned and fated to serve. The strong-minded Althea Lambros controls her own fate and lives to honor her dying mother’s pl My mother told me that men would speak about the Golden Age as a time of peace and happiness for all… However, the women of our age would tell a very different story… Cronus, God of Gods, whose inheritance is the world. Among his possessions: women, imprisoned and fated to serve. The strong-minded Althea Lambros controls her own fate and lives to honor her dying mother’s plea to protect her two sisters at all costs. Althea’s journey toward crushing the tyranny has begun. It is a destiny foretold by the Fates. And she is following their visions. On the southern isle of Crete, hidden among mortal women who have fled the Titans, is the Boy God, son of Cronus and believed dead. He shares Althea’s destiny to vanquish the Almighty—fate willing. Because Cronus has caught wind of the plot. He’s amassing his own forces against Althea’s righteous rebellion and all those who will no longer surrender or run. There will be war. If she’s to survive to write their history, the indomitable Althea must soar higher than any god.

30 review for Wings of Fury

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chene

    This is a young adult PNR masquerading as mythology fantasy, with heaps of clichés and random bits of half-baked feminism thrown in to look trendy. The Plot (no spoilers): The story can be summed up with a few most overused tropes: - An orphan seeking revenge: Althea's mother was taken away by the Titan god Cronus and died in childbirth, leaving behind Althea and her two sisters. - A forced marriage / runaway bride: Cronus's general, the villain who took Althea's mother, marked Althea with bonding m This is a young adult PNR masquerading as mythology fantasy, with heaps of clichés and random bits of half-baked feminism thrown in to look trendy. The Plot (no spoilers): The story can be summed up with a few most overused tropes: - An orphan seeking revenge: Althea's mother was taken away by the Titan god Cronus and died in childbirth, leaving behind Althea and her two sisters. - A forced marriage / runaway bride: Cronus's general, the villain who took Althea's mother, marked Althea with bonding magic so that she would remain his until he came back to claim her when she grew up. - A prophecy / the chosen one: Althea grew up and decided it was time to run away for a new life. She visited an oracle and was told that she was the special snowflake destined to find Cronus's son Zeus, who would kill Cronus only with her help. - A reluctant ally / enemy to lover: Althea enlists the help of a soldier, Theo, who was part of the group that took away her mother, to sail to Crete and find Zeus. - A love triangle: can you guess this one? Yawn. I don't think we need more of this in 2021. One might say that the mythology retelling sets this book apart from the rest. But the truth is, the mythology is what feels the most out of place here. I'm no expert on the war of Titans and I'm not expecting this story to be textbook accurate, but the author twisted too many facts in order to fit the gods into her characters: Zeus is a wimp king; Hera has wings; Theo and Althea's true identities are contrived and feel forced. Certain location names also don't appear correct for their times, such as Thessaly which should probably be Aeolia. Again, I'm not expecting this to be a mythology textbook, but if so much needs to be changed and the worldbuilding can't be done with enough accuracy or detail, then why use mythology at all? As the first installment in a series, this book does leave some questions unanswered, and the oracle's prophecy about Althea is only half fulfilled at the end, but most subplots wrap up nicely so it could be read as a standalone. The Characters: Althea is your typical YA heroine: headstrong, eager to prove herself, acts without considering consequences but somehow always has luck on her side so she never fails. She lounges at the general capturing her mother when she was a child, even though she can't even protect herself, but somehow no one harms her; she judges and chastises Zeus for hiding from Cronus, trying to persuade him to challenge Cronus by saying her mother was killed and so Zeus is obliged to help her bring justice, but somehow Zeus agrees; she duels with one of the guards on Crete and humiliates them by throwing the guard across the camp, even though her goal on the island is to seek the people's help and support, but somehow her prowess gains everyone's respect. The list goes on. I understand that this type of personality appeals to a large audience and that in an ideal world, she's showing off how badass she is and how proud she is for being herself. But as the author keeps reminding us (by telling, not showing), this is a world full of oppression and hardship, which makes it unconvincing that Althea could survive through all her audacious endeavors. This brings me to the random feminism talks throughout the book. I appreciate the author's attempt at addressing the frequent occurrences of abduction and rape in Greek mythology, but in addition to the same issue of telling instead of showing, I also can't agree that such occurrences warrant the notion that EVERY man is evil, or even worse, EVERYTHING that they do should be condemned, which appears to be what the women in this world believe. For example, here's how Althea responds to a man's compliment (not a malicious or sarcastic compliment, just a simple and natural compliment):"Men compliment women because they want something from them, or to flatter themselves. Oh, look how kind I am! Oh, see how generous I am with my praise! I don't want your praise. What you think of me doesn't matter"I don't quite understand why compliments need to be made into such a big deal. I take compliments from men and women, and I give them to men and women. I don't think there's ever any prejudice or self-importance implied, and even if there is, I don't think it's the gender of the speaker that makes the difference. There are many more scenes like this that just feel too far-stretched to me. Maybe these sentiments explain why all the male characters are so dull. Theo and Zeus are boring, easily replaceable, and unmemorable. It says a lot about the characters in this book that my favorite comes to Althea's sister Bronte. She's just about the opposite of Althea: smart, quick in decisions, reasonable in judgment but still always ready to strike. I wish she could've been the heroine instead, and if there's one thing that I could recommend this book for, it's the healthy sister dynamics. The Writing: I have a feeling that this book was trying to sound lush and lyrical like Circe. But just like with the feminism side of things, it tried too hard in the wrong direction, and instead ended up with cringy purple prose. Like this:My blade grazed his right forearm. He sucked in a cavernous breath, drinking in the whole night sky. And similarly, this (I'll hide the character's name for those who might care):We leaned in, and our lips met. (view spoiler)[Theo (hide spoiler)] sucked in a breath so deep that I thought he might inhale the world, ... Obviously the second one is a kissing scene, though I'm not quite sure how to picture it. Is the guy trying to literally take her breath away? The dialogues are clunky as well, especially the banters. I won't quote more ranting material here but a lot of them even sound modern enough to fit right in a PNR. So to wrap up: I didn't like this book. But I probably have only myself to blame for picking it up before it's published, with no samples or comments to warn me of what I'm getting myself into, so I hope this review can help save someone else's time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shirin Tondkar

    Published Date 01 Mar 2021 My review on 19 Apr 2021 Many thanks to 47North and NetGalley for giving me the chance to read Wings of Fury by Emily R. King in exchange for an honest review. The first book of Wings of Fury by Emily R. King is a different, surprising, and strange version of a romantic mythology story of Cronus's reign. A retelling mythology story of the time that Gods have less power and women are warriors and fight for their freedom. What should I call the Lambros sisters? Revolutiona Published Date 01 Mar 2021 My review on 19 Apr 2021 Many thanks to 47North and NetGalley for giving me the chance to read Wings of Fury by Emily R. King in exchange for an honest review. The first book of Wings of Fury by Emily R. King is a different, surprising, and strange version of a romantic mythology story of Cronus's reign. A retelling mythology story of the time that Gods have less power and women are warriors and fight for their freedom. What should I call the Lambros sisters? Revolutionary maybe?! "As long as men still think we're their possessions to buy and sell and trade, we will never be safe." Cleora, Bronte, and Althea are the three daughters of Stavra and Tassos. After their parents died, try to escape and made a better new life for themself, on the island of Crete, where the God Boy was hidden. Althea's destiny is to guide and protect her older sisters. The oracles direct Althea to her fate for finding Zeus and defeat the God of God's, Cronus (who has swallowed his children), which is responsible for Stavra's death. I love this book. There are lots of adventures, twists, and well-drawn characters. An unexpected story, fast-paced, and hard to put it down. I'm looking forward to the second book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shoshanna Ford

    I'm a big fan of YA Mythic Fiction. That is how I would classify this book. It was not *perfect* but I did enjoy it. The story was quite good. A Greek Mythology retelling from a time before most of the retellings start. Starting a series before Cronus had been defeated is a different and fun take. If you are very serious about the myths being accurately portrayed, maybe this one is not for you. If you are instead all in for as many new twists as possible, you'll enjoy it.  There will be some overl I'm a big fan of YA Mythic Fiction. That is how I would classify this book. It was not *perfect* but I did enjoy it. The story was quite good. A Greek Mythology retelling from a time before most of the retellings start. Starting a series before Cronus had been defeated is a different and fun take. If you are very serious about the myths being accurately portrayed, maybe this one is not for you. If you are instead all in for as many new twists as possible, you'll enjoy it.  There will be some overly dramatic love tangles in this series. There just has to be. You cannot have Greek Mythology without the drama. I don't consider that a negative. There were some twists that I did not see coming, which in retrospect, I should have. They weren't shocking, I just wasn't expecting it. I think that made it better. It is not every day something in a YA book catches me off guard anymore. On to the negatives. I think Emily King has some room to grow as an author. The dialogue gets a little clunky in places. The rest of the writing is not quite strong enough to support the more lyrical passages she seemed to desperately try to fit in. I understand the urge to attempt the sometimes hyperbolic, often poetic style of the classics or more serious mythological fiction. Those sentences or passages just felt out of place in this more YA book. I think these, what I would call, rough edges will smooth themselves out as Ms. King writes more. On the whole, I enjoyed this book. A lot. I will absolutely read the rest of the series, and I've already sent a copy to my Best Friend so she can read it too. If you're looking for a good quarantine escape, he's a good one for you. https://ssshwearereading.wordpress.com/

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kitcatscratch

    When I was in third grade, I was obsessed with Greek and Roman mythology (sorry Norse mythology but you guys are too much of a Debbie Downer). This book started off strong as we enter a world where the gods are real (as in it really does take a God in a chariot to bring the sun across the heavens,etc). Not only that but it takes place after Chronos has ascended the throne and before Zeus over throws him. I found this such a wonderful idea as when studying mythology we typically only get a brief When I was in third grade, I was obsessed with Greek and Roman mythology (sorry Norse mythology but you guys are too much of a Debbie Downer). This book started off strong as we enter a world where the gods are real (as in it really does take a God in a chariot to bring the sun across the heavens,etc). Not only that but it takes place after Chronos has ascended the throne and before Zeus over throws him. I found this such a wonderful idea as when studying mythology we typically only get a brief line or two that Chronos was overthrown and then it's all Zeus. So it's a fie!d ripe for creative license. We follow a young girl trying to fulfill a prophecy to help the as of yet unknown Boy God help overthrow the tyrant Chronos. She's strong and independent and quite the feminist. They introduce a secondary character, a soldier who serves Chronos, who joins her in her quest. So far so good. Then after the halfway point the story starts to fall apart. The characters relationships start to ring false, plot hole and worse character focus and motivations start to fall apart. Plus, you have to be really careful when depicting an immortal free for all to ensure it doesn't descend into farce. For instance, you wanna grab temp!e columns and swing them like baseball bats? Ok. I'll buy it but only if you root as much as possible into realism. Otherwise, it becomes cringe. Having said that, I'd be willing to try another one of her works. I probably won't continue with this one. In fact reading this only made me want to re-read Camille Oster's "Truth and Sparta." However "Wings of Fury" is YA and "Truth and Sparta" is DEFINITELY not. Though it has no gods and does have a strong female character it also has non-con and true violence...consider yourself forewarned). Update: I decided to bump this from a 2 to a 3 because as I think about it, I think it was for a younger audience than I originally thought. I was originally thinking high teens. But I think it would be more appropriate for a much younger crowd (10 to 12). So given that, I decided to be less critical as I considered the fact that I would have enjoyed it much more as I went through my mythology phase in 3rd grade.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy Braun

    I am obsessed with any retelling or story based on Greek mythology and have loved Emily R. King's previous works, so this was a no-brainer! The story is an empowering one where women take charge and fight for themselves against ruthless enemies, creatures, and gods. The story moves at a brisk, almost too quick, pace that begins with action and allows for plenty of thrilling moments. Althea is a headstrong character who is not afraid to challenge herself and stand up for her sisters when she needs I am obsessed with any retelling or story based on Greek mythology and have loved Emily R. King's previous works, so this was a no-brainer! The story is an empowering one where women take charge and fight for themselves against ruthless enemies, creatures, and gods. The story moves at a brisk, almost too quick, pace that begins with action and allows for plenty of thrilling moments. Althea is a headstrong character who is not afraid to challenge herself and stand up for her sisters when she needs to. Bronte is a great foil for her and I enjoyed their interactions. Theo is a kind, misguided man, and even though Zeus lived to annoy those who taught him, I did find him charming at times. The story plays fast and loose with classical myths, offering an exciting and fresh take while staying true to some of the old gods and traditions. It's also packed with ferocious monsters, wild betrayals, and plenty of drama. Things seem to happen a little too quickly at some points for my taste and I think that Althea jumped to too many conclusions about Theo at other points, but I still found it to be an empowering book. This is a great story for anyone who enjoys seeing women take charge against men, who enjoy new takes on old myths, and are looking for an energetic weekend read!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sam Glasbrenner (Sassyowlreads)

    4.5 stars! I love, love, LOVE this book! The Mythology is divine, the characters are intriguing, the plot kept me on my toes, and the writing was delightful. This story is a myth retold from a woman's point of view and therefore perfect for fans of Circe and The Silence of the Girls. This is the first book I've read by Emily R. King but it definitely isn't going to be my last! I'm so excited there's going to be a sequel! Thanks so much to Netgalley and the publisher for the e-arc! 4.5 stars! I love, love, LOVE this book! The Mythology is divine, the characters are intriguing, the plot kept me on my toes, and the writing was delightful. This story is a myth retold from a woman's point of view and therefore perfect for fans of Circe and The Silence of the Girls. This is the first book I've read by Emily R. King but it definitely isn't going to be my last! I'm so excited there's going to be a sequel! Thanks so much to Netgalley and the publisher for the e-arc!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aly

    This is a fast paced Greek mythology story that I was happy to dive into. I enjoyed the entire book, from the strong female warriors to the various gods and goddesses, it was easy to sink into this and hard to stop myself from bingeing the entire thing at once. Althea is her sister's protector and not about to let a man control her. In this world where women have little rights and men can claim anyone they want, Althea stands out. I felt bad that she and the other women had to put up with being This is a fast paced Greek mythology story that I was happy to dive into. I enjoyed the entire book, from the strong female warriors to the various gods and goddesses, it was easy to sink into this and hard to stop myself from bingeing the entire thing at once. Althea is her sister's protector and not about to let a man control her. In this world where women have little rights and men can claim anyone they want, Althea stands out. I felt bad that she and the other women had to put up with being treated so poorly and I loved every time one of them stood up to their oppressors. The message of femininity is strong and I couldn't get enough. I liked the spin on mythology, particularly Zeus and how he came to power. The abilities the gods and titans have are very interesting and I may do some brushing up on myths because I don't remember all the gods and what they represent. I loved reading this with my buddies and now I'm hyped for book two!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cathy | A Case Full of Books

    This was such a great fantasy based on Greek mythology! I really enjoyed the characters, the world, and the plot. Althea is told by the oracles that she must find and raise up the hidden child of Cronus, Zeus. In doing so, she hopes that he will create a better world for women than they currently have. Knowing how Zeus turns out in Greek mythology hasn't stopped me from being incredibly hopeful for how he turns out. It's almost like a villain origin story, because I know Zeus was a terrible person This was such a great fantasy based on Greek mythology! I really enjoyed the characters, the world, and the plot. Althea is told by the oracles that she must find and raise up the hidden child of Cronus, Zeus. In doing so, she hopes that he will create a better world for women than they currently have. Knowing how Zeus turns out in Greek mythology hasn't stopped me from being incredibly hopeful for how he turns out. It's almost like a villain origin story, because I know Zeus was a terrible person who did whatever he wanted with whoever he wanted. Gripping me from the first sentence, this book which seeks to tell the story from a women's perspective kept me enthralled until the very end. Book two, please?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Inkspill

    Another Amazon First reads which was picked at random. The opening is breath-taking, I am drawn into this word instantly, with its sights sound and smells – it’s wonderful, and wonderfully distracting but then it becomes a plot-pointer. Here, from thereafter, every scene’s drama and tension mirror many a Hollywood blockbuster I’ve seen, and it doesn’t stop there, as the banter between the female and male lead are also replays of these movies. However, it’s impressive that Emily R King delivers t Another Amazon First reads which was picked at random. The opening is breath-taking, I am drawn into this word instantly, with its sights sound and smells – it’s wonderful, and wonderfully distracting but then it becomes a plot-pointer. Here, from thereafter, every scene’s drama and tension mirror many a Hollywood blockbuster I’ve seen, and it doesn’t stop there, as the banter between the female and male lead are also replays of these movies. However, it’s impressive that Emily R King delivers these with such ease, and maybe it would have had the same impact if it had these movies’ special effects and cinematography. The story is set in old times, where Cronus is god of the gods and is not aware that one of his sons is alive. This is a retell with a modern spin to tell a tale of what Althea goes through to keep her family together, a promise she made to her mother. This wasn’t a flawless read, and there was a contradiction in the central message of female independence, as there were many scenes where she was eclipsed by Theo. Theo is her love interest and the other lead whom she’s constantly at odds with in a fun, cute way. These banters are a break from the action scenes, but in a few she seemed to be in his shadow, like the scene where Althea’s sister is held at knifepoint by a bad guy, Decimus, to lure Althea out but instead is reassured by Theo that her sister will be fine, and they need to slip away. I found this an ironic scene that didn’t make sense as Althea resigns not to confront Decimus but instead Theo is outraged and fights with his when Decimus insults his mother. This is one example where the story loses sight of its central message because it’s busier being an action-pack Hollywood flick.

  10. 5 out of 5

    CR

    Move over The Hundredth Queen!! I have a new fav from Emily R. King!! OMG!!!! When I started this book I didn't realize this was set before the rise of Zeus etc. I was thinking it was about Sparta. #Facepalm to me!! Well I soon realized that I was so wrong and dived in even harder because I am obsessed with Greek Mythology!! This book was SO GOOD! I loved the weave of the story that King has brought us readers. This book rides the line of high young adult and low new adult. Which I think worked Move over The Hundredth Queen!! I have a new fav from Emily R. King!! OMG!!!! When I started this book I didn't realize this was set before the rise of Zeus etc. I was thinking it was about Sparta. #Facepalm to me!! Well I soon realized that I was so wrong and dived in even harder because I am obsessed with Greek Mythology!! This book was SO GOOD! I loved the weave of the story that King has brought us readers. This book rides the line of high young adult and low new adult. Which I think worked out wonderfully for the story. If you love retellings where girl are in a world that they are not meant to be strong but are strong anyway then this is the book for you! I loved how Althea was so strong with her sisters and the journey she needed to partake in . Even when the world turned itself upside down with a major twist she didn't falter. In the world of mythology this story just makes you really think about the Goddesses that I have come to love and cherish and what they went through. I am excited to get book two of this series and chat once again with the author. Because most of the things I wanted to talk about were all spoilers so I am dying. This is one more book that I need a support group for! #HelpMe!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter Baran

    A Greek Pantheon themed fantasy that puports to tell a feminist take of the overthrow of Chronos the Titan by Zeus (and basically say its Hera that does all the real legwork). Its fun, zippy and tries to normalise to some degree the barbarity of the fantastic society it exists in (Gods are still pulling the sun across the sky after all). Nevertheless it still sits in that wierd zone like Gods Of Egypt where all powerful beings rule over normal humans and yet the interaction seems to require armi A Greek Pantheon themed fantasy that puports to tell a feminist take of the overthrow of Chronos the Titan by Zeus (and basically say its Hera that does all the real legwork). Its fun, zippy and tries to normalise to some degree the barbarity of the fantastic society it exists in (Gods are still pulling the sun across the sky after all). Nevertheless it still sits in that wierd zone like Gods Of Egypt where all powerful beings rule over normal humans and yet the interaction seems to require armies and minions to do all the oppression you should just be doing on a day to day basis. Its last minute reveal is pretty obvious to anyone who knows Greek Gods 101 - but I appreciate Zeus being a vain puppyish young God in hiding here, anticipating many of his later antics. I guess my main problem was that these are mythological characters I needed humanizing, because it really makes they greater actions increasingly monstrous. That said there is one great gag at the end when Chronos throws shade a Hera saying she'll only ever be known as Zeus's wife, and she responds that she will also be remember for her amazing ability to hold grudges.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mansi

    This book was mediocre. Not even like good mediocre but like, question my life decisions mediocre. The main character, Althea, is (in my eyes) one of the most annoyingly stupid characters I’ve ever read about. There’s also this weird love triangle that, mythologically, doesn’t make any sense. Also, I LOVE Greek mythology. It’s one of the things my best friend and I bonded over, but this really made it seem like the author was skimming the surface with the story. Also, I could tell that the autho This book was mediocre. Not even like good mediocre but like, question my life decisions mediocre. The main character, Althea, is (in my eyes) one of the most annoyingly stupid characters I’ve ever read about. There’s also this weird love triangle that, mythologically, doesn’t make any sense. Also, I LOVE Greek mythology. It’s one of the things my best friend and I bonded over, but this really made it seem like the author was skimming the surface with the story. Also, I could tell that the author wanted the book to show feminism but it was coming across as really forced. And after the half way point I don’t even know what was going on. Sadly, this book just wasn’t for me. 🤓

  13. 5 out of 5

    nally nalka

    DNF at 65%. I can't. The way amazon marketed it, I was expecting a Circe type masterpiece but it's just a juviliene YA filled with the common and irritating-to-an-adult YA tropes. Very white feminism-ey too with the character challenging misogyny yet the slavery taking place being casually mentioned with no outrage. Arg. No thank you. Next. DNF at 65%. I can't. The way amazon marketed it, I was expecting a Circe type masterpiece but it's just a juviliene YA filled with the common and irritating-to-an-adult YA tropes. Very white feminism-ey too with the character challenging misogyny yet the slavery taking place being casually mentioned with no outrage. Arg. No thank you. Next.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* Publisher *Genre* Fantasy / Historical *Rating* 3.5-4 *Thoughts* Wings of Fury is the first installment in author Emily R. King's Wing of Fury series. In the beginning, there were three sisters: Cleora, Bronte, and Althea who were raised by their mother Stavra in Thessaly where women are mostly powerless and vulnerable. The God of Gods, aka Cronus, has reigned supreme in this world for 400 years. He takes pleasure in taking whatever woman he desires with no consequences for his actions. Whe *Source* Publisher *Genre* Fantasy / Historical *Rating* 3.5-4 *Thoughts* Wings of Fury is the first installment in author Emily R. King's Wing of Fury series. In the beginning, there were three sisters: Cleora, Bronte, and Althea who were raised by their mother Stavra in Thessaly where women are mostly powerless and vulnerable. The God of Gods, aka Cronus, has reigned supreme in this world for 400 years. He takes pleasure in taking whatever woman he desires with no consequences for his actions. When Althea's impatience gets the best of her, she attacks a General named Decimus who puts a curse on her. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews* https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paige Green

    Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: Wings of Fury Author: Emily R. King Book Series: Wings of Fury Book 1 Rating: 3/5 Recommended For...: Greek mythology, fantasy Genre: Fantasy Publication Date: March 1, 2021 Publisher: 47North Pages: 283 Recommended Age: 16+ (Sexual assault/Rape, Forced marriage, Kidnapping, Slavery, Sexual content, Romance, Language) Explanation of CWs: Rape mentioned but not shown in book. Creepy age gaps, especially between the M Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: Wings of Fury Author: Emily R. King Book Series: Wings of Fury Book 1 Rating: 3/5 Recommended For...: Greek mythology, fantasy Genre: Fantasy Publication Date: March 1, 2021 Publisher: 47North Pages: 283 Recommended Age: 16+ (Sexual assault/Rape, Forced marriage, Kidnapping, Slavery, Sexual content, Romance, Language) Explanation of CWs: Rape mentioned but not shown in book. Creepy age gaps, especially between the MC and a man who wants to have her sexually when she's a minor. Slavery mentioned in book a couple of times. Synopsis: Cronus, God of Gods, whose inheritance is the world. Among his possessions: women, imprisoned and fated to serve. The strong-minded Althea Lambros controls her own fate and lives to honor her dying mother’s plea to protect her two sisters at all costs. Althea’s journey toward crushing the tyranny has begun. It is a destiny foretold by the Fates. And she is following their visions. On the southern isle of Crete, hidden among mortal women who have fled the Titans, is the Boy God, son of Cronus and believed dead. He shares Althea’s destiny to vanquish the Almighty—fate willing. Because Cronus has caught wind of the plot. He’s amassing his own forces against Althea’s righteous rebellion and all those who will no longer surrender or run. There will be war. If she’s to survive to write their history, the indomitable Althea must soar higher than any god. Review: For the most part I thought that this was a pretty well done book. I really like the storyline and I loved how fierce Althea was. I also loved how the author incorporated classic Greek mythology and I thought that the book was very well paced. The author also did well with the world building of the book. However, I do have some issues with the book. The first thing that really jumps out at me is that the book starts when our main character is 11 and an adult male takes interest in her and marks her to be his when she is quote on quote ripened. That's really disgusting and then later on in the book another central character of the story is a 15-year-old boy (who is a God but is referred to as a boy God and is humanly 15) who is being sent maidens to have sex with and is at least shown in one part of the book to be having sexual relations with what I can assume is an older female. Age is really aren't specified, but the impression I got is that these women are adults while he is a minor. That might not be what the author intended, but that is how I interpreted it. So for those two facts alone the book really creeped me out, and the main character does have a relationship with a man who is at least 15 years older than her and while she is 18 throughout the majority of the book it's still really creepy. I also thought that the characters weren't that well developed and the twist at the end of the book wasn't very well explained. It really felt like the book was very rushed towards the end. Verdict: It was good, but I got creeped out.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I WANT BOOK TWO NOW. Althea is now on my list of strong female characters that I adore. I get it that the Author has taken her whatcha call it when they alter what you think you know and make it their own. In Greek Mythology I know Zeus and Hera are together but in this book he's betrothed to Metis and Althea winds up AS Hera and I'm like yeah no she HAS to wind up with Theo Angelos. But yes BOOK TWO needs to tell me all the answers I need. This was an enjoyable read. But she is totally my gal. I WANT BOOK TWO NOW. Althea is now on my list of strong female characters that I adore. I get it that the Author has taken her whatcha call it when they alter what you think you know and make it their own. In Greek Mythology I know Zeus and Hera are together but in this book he's betrothed to Metis and Althea winds up AS Hera and I'm like yeah no she HAS to wind up with Theo Angelos. But yes BOOK TWO needs to tell me all the answers I need. This was an enjoyable read. But she is totally my gal.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hanna (lapetiteboleyn)

    On the one hand, I liked this book a lot. It's an easy read, with strong, interesting female main characters, some well articulated themes and a clear plot. It's wildly, wonderfully feminist and full of fire and fury. On the other hand, it's also just- not well written. There are incredible moments littered between paragraphs of awkward transitions and lumpy descriptions. I enjoyed it a lot. Maybe just not as much as I wanted to. On the one hand, I liked this book a lot. It's an easy read, with strong, interesting female main characters, some well articulated themes and a clear plot. It's wildly, wonderfully feminist and full of fire and fury. On the other hand, it's also just- not well written. There are incredible moments littered between paragraphs of awkward transitions and lumpy descriptions. I enjoyed it a lot. Maybe just not as much as I wanted to.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emeph Alvarado

    Wasn’t sure what I was going to get when I started this one, but I can say it was definitely worth it. Once you start reading hold on tight; the ride is bumpy but so much fun! If you’re a fan of Greek Mythology, you’re definitely gonna love this one.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Selena

    This was free and I still want my money back.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julie Moffett

    Unique and fun! I enjoyed this novel! I found it interesting and intriguing, and loved the story line and setting. Clever and original. Well done!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nikkita

    Gripping page turner Fantastic book - read it in a day as I couldn't put it down. The story follows the fate of three sisters during the age of the Titans. If you like Circe then you'll enjoy this too. I love learning more about the Greek Gods and Goddesses. Already pre ordered the 2nd book. Gripping page turner Fantastic book - read it in a day as I couldn't put it down. The story follows the fate of three sisters during the age of the Titans. If you like Circe then you'll enjoy this too. I love learning more about the Greek Gods and Goddesses. Already pre ordered the 2nd book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I think King is getting better and better as a writer. I enjoyed this novel so much! This is set in ancient Greece, with all of the old Greek Gods, but written with a twist. This is written from the perspective of the women in that world and setting. It is a rather quick and fun read. Actually, the moment I finished it, I really wanted the next one in my hands. Alas, I must wait....

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* NetGalley *Genre* Young Adult / Fantasy / Mythology *Rating* 3.5-4 *Thoughts* I think that those who love Greek mythology will enjoy this story. From Cronus, to Zeus, and the wild ending as to who Althea and her sisters really are. I'll be reading the sequel to find out what happens next since the ending leaves lots, and lots of questions. *Source* NetGalley *Genre* Young Adult / Fantasy / Mythology *Rating* 3.5-4 *Thoughts* I think that those who love Greek mythology will enjoy this story. From Cronus, to Zeus, and the wild ending as to who Althea and her sisters really are. I'll be reading the sequel to find out what happens next since the ending leaves lots, and lots of questions.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bec

    I kindly received a free digital copy of this book via the company/NetGalley. Three stars for this one, I wanted to like it so much...but it just didn't quite hit it for me. I think I would have enjoyed it more if I were a little younger, I'm possibly a bit older than the target audience considering this is a YA read! I'll do my best to keep this review spoiler-free. The concept of this book is super interesting - a young girl who learns it is her destiny to not only protect her older sisters, bu I kindly received a free digital copy of this book via the company/NetGalley. Three stars for this one, I wanted to like it so much...but it just didn't quite hit it for me. I think I would have enjoyed it more if I were a little younger, I'm possibly a bit older than the target audience considering this is a YA read! I'll do my best to keep this review spoiler-free. The concept of this book is super interesting - a young girl who learns it is her destiny to not only protect her older sisters, but also aid Zeus in dethroning the titan, Cronus. I was intrigued to see how it was going to play out. So, what I liked about the book. The characters were interesting - In general, I liked the Heroine, Althea, she had such drive to keep going and not be what she was expected to be as a woman. I also liked Theo and the little plot surprises that came with him. I didn't find myself connecting to any of the other characters that much, I don't think we really got to spend enough quality time with them to really get to know them, but they weren't bad characters. I also liked the Ancient Greece setting and locations, anything in this location is good for me. There was some nice attention to detail with the locations and also with the customs that were likely to be surrounding women - as in how they were often treated as property and unable to own anything themselves. It's always nice to read a book which doesn't sugarcoat the treatment of women in those times. And onto the things I didn't enjoy so much. To be honest, I think I know too much about Greek Mythology to really enjoy this book. Usually it's one of my absolute favourite genres and I can usually accept a few changes to what is generally considered the lore. But this...stretched it a bit too far for me. A lot of changes have been made to suit the plotline and I couldn't quite get into it enough to really enjoy it. I guessed at the plot twist at the end of the book just over half way through, which doesn't say anything negative about the writing - but it's one part of Greek myth that I really couldn't overlook being changed, so I found it harder to enjoy after that because I couldn't understand the character anymore and how it fit with the traditional mythology. I wasn't a big fan of the writing style either. It's not that it was bad per se, but it felt a little clunky and rushed in some places. There were also a few inconsistencies and things that didn't add up without explanation. For example, (view spoiler)[in the final scenes of the battle with Cronus, Bronte is supposedly in her right mind even after having faced Mnemosyne, who we believed had altered her memories. Why would Mnemosyne not change Bronte's memories? Or how did Bronte avoid it? There's mentions of Althea wondering if Bronte tricked Mnemosyne too, but how would she have done it? (hide spoiler)] The final fight was a little underwhelming considering the build up in order to get the characters there. To be totally honest, I think I would have preferred this story without the Mythology. Or with it, but without it being the main characters. The story of a girl in Ancient Greece fighting her fate to be seen just as all women were. For me, gods should be gods, and this seemed all a bit too human. Although the teenage Zeus was quite entertaining, a good little vision into what he will be like when he's grown up and some of the reasons why. I wouldn't say this book had a love triangle, but it seems to be set up for book two. This is actually one of the main reasons I would consider reading the second book. I want to know where this story can possibly go considering the deviations made from the traditional mythology. As with my review of Silence of the Girls, I've seen things calling this book a feminist retelling. I don't agree, it was mainly female-centric but any feminism included felt a little too forced in the writing. So overall, this is a pretty quick and easy read which had some enjoyable moments throughout. It might be enjoyed more by someone with less knowledge of the Greek myths, or perhaps if you don't mind big changes in your retellings. And who knows - perhaps with the second book I'll change my mind entirely on this new storyline retelling! At this moment though, I can't give it more than three stars. But do give it a go if Ancient Greece stories are of interest to you.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rachel P. ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ 「eternal.chapters」

    Rating: 2.5/5 Thank you WunderBooksPR for sending me a copy of the e-book for review! - I was very excited when I read the synopsis for this story because I am an absolute lover of Greek mythology and Greek mythology-inspired books and nothing sings to me more than a story filled with adventures, prophecies, romance and Greek Gods. - Overall, I would say this is an average YA Greek mythology-inspired title with some hit and misses for me. I wanted to love this title so much and it sounded like it h Rating: 2.5/5 Thank you WunderBooksPR for sending me a copy of the e-book for review! - I was very excited when I read the synopsis for this story because I am an absolute lover of Greek mythology and Greek mythology-inspired books and nothing sings to me more than a story filled with adventures, prophecies, romance and Greek Gods. - Overall, I would say this is an average YA Greek mythology-inspired title with some hit and misses for me. I wanted to love this title so much and it sounded like it had the potential to be the next great mythology-inspired title but unfortunately, it did not meet the expectations I had. - As I said, I am a lover of Greek mythology and while I am no expert, I do have basic knowledge about the original myths. I was fully aware that this was Greek mythology INSPIRED story/RETELLING and so I was not expecting a 100% accurate retelling with full details about the myth (if I wanted this I would have reached for a history textbook) and for the most part, I do appreciate and enjoy a retelling with some twists and differences. However, I do find the twists in this story a little too much with some details being way too different from the original that the story kind of lost the essence of the Greek mythology. I personally enjoy a retelling that retains some accuracy (think The Song of Achilles and The Silence of Girls), which is probably why I did not enjoy the unique world development in this story as much, but if you are someone that enjoys a retelling that is mostly different from the original than this might be a great story for you. - The start/beginning half of the story was extremely promising with a good introduction to the characters and storyline. It captivated my attention and I was loving the plot. I had really high hopes for the rest of the book. I would describe this book to be fast-paced, very fast-paced which I love but then the second half started to feel a little rushed and not as well-executed as the start. Some parts were unnecessarily long and others needed more development and clarity. The ending had SO MUCH POTENTIAL but it slipped to my disappointment. - The main female lead is the typical badass, persistent character that embarks on a difficult journey to fulfil their purpose. I do love me a headstrong female lead but I find myself being troubled by some of her actions and her mindset at times. But I do like her conflicts and she was by no means a bad protagonist. - With the main female lead Althea, comes along a love triangle which… … I was not expecting and don’t particularly enjoy, unfortunately. I am just not a fan of love triangles at all. I would have loved the romance so much more if it just stuck to the “enemies to lovers” trope with the funny banters and subtle tension, which was honestly going so well until the love triangle. - While I appreciate Althea's feminist sentiments and dialogue, they do seem a little out of place considering the context of the story. Also, the feminist points of the story didn’t really resonate with me and seemed a little forced in the story. - I do enjoy the writing - it was fairly easy to read and understand. Some of the descriptions are wonderful and beautifully written but there were also moments in the book where it felt like the author was just telling me what was happening instead of describing and showing me the scene. - all in all, I would say that this book had so much great potential and I had high expectations for it but unfortunately it did not meet them. It was still a really entertaining story and I did not struggle to read it per se but it just did not suit what I was looking for in a greek mythology retelling. I would say if you are someone that enjoys a vastly difference retelling with love triangles and a fast-paced and action-packed plot, you should give this book a read for it just might be your thing!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    CONTENT WARNINGS: Gendered violence, misogyny, sexual assault (- not explicitly on the page, but certainly mentioned and there's a lot of it). This book is essentially baked in with a really intensely misogynistic world so if that is not your vibe, this may not be the book for you. Woof, I have a lot of mixed feelings about this book. And I can't really talk about them without going into spoilers so that's all going to go beneath the tag, but I wanted to keep the warnings up top for people who wi CONTENT WARNINGS: Gendered violence, misogyny, sexual assault (- not explicitly on the page, but certainly mentioned and there's a lot of it). This book is essentially baked in with a really intensely misogynistic world so if that is not your vibe, this may not be the book for you. Woof, I have a lot of mixed feelings about this book. And I can't really talk about them without going into spoilers so that's all going to go beneath the tag, but I wanted to keep the warnings up top for people who will need them so. (view spoiler)[Like on the surface, a feminist retelling of the fall of Cronus featuring Hera in the driver's seat rather than giving Zeus all the glory? Love that for her. Love that for me. But this wasn't really what I got, and it was very much not what I expected when I started the book. Honestly it was kind of a lot. I think if the story had just been a standard adventure on it's own, I would have enjoyed it a bit more. But the misogyny of the world building was so overpowering that it really made it difficult to lose myself in the adventure and the struggle, sometime to the point where when those elements of the world came back in, I was taken out of the story. I spent a lot of the page time waiting for some truly terrible characters to die out of spite. There wasn't really a lot of nuance to them. It was very much these characters are Bad Bad Men who do Bad Things and Hate Women, and that really didn't need to be hammered in so many times. Like, best example I can think of: we already know what Cronus did to Stavra. We knew that in the prologue. We didn't need the detail that we got in the final chapters. Some of it was really just excessive. And honestly it's a shame, because I really enjoyed the characters and the story. I'm a sucker for sisters, so Althea, Bronte and Clenora were lovely. I liked the hints of romance we got with Theo and Althea, though that might be dead now and I'm highly uncertain about the idea of selling me on Zeus and Hera as a romance. I loved their journey to Crete, and the mythological elements therein. I actually thought the twist King came up with for how Hera, Demeter and Hestia were "alive" when Cronus had "swallowed" them was really clever and lovely. I feel like there was a lot of here that could have been good, but the world itself was so brutal that I would have struggled with it had it not been so short. I probably will not be picking up the sequel, because as much as I am curious about Hades and Poseidon, I'm not sure I want to return to this world again. YMMV. (hide spoiler)]

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica (justagirlwithabook)

    I’ve got a lot of mixed feelings about this one! General Premise: Althea Lambros lives in a time and place ruled by Titan gods and goddesses, but especially Cronos, the “god of the gods.” In a desire to avenge the death of her mother, protected her sisters, and because the oracles have spoken that this is her destiny, Althea goes on a journey to take down Cronos. What I Enjoyed: - I liked reading a new YA novel focused on the Titans rather than the usual Olympian gods and goddesses. - There was a fu I’ve got a lot of mixed feelings about this one! General Premise: Althea Lambros lives in a time and place ruled by Titan gods and goddesses, but especially Cronos, the “god of the gods.” In a desire to avenge the death of her mother, protected her sisters, and because the oracles have spoken that this is her destiny, Althea goes on a journey to take down Cronos. What I Enjoyed: - I liked reading a new YA novel focused on the Titans rather than the usual Olympian gods and goddesses. - There was a fun reveal at the end in relation to the origin of the main characters that I appreciated. - About halfway through the pace seemed to pick up (but it was slow going until then — it was hard to figure out where we were going). What I Didn’t Love: - At the start, there were a lot of names/characters thrown out but their relationships to other characters weren’t very well described or connected, so it felt like lots of hopping around from one person to the next and struggling to remember their association to the main character and vice versa. It took about 20% in for things to start snapping into place. - There just wasn’t enough time spent initially on describing the world and system. For YA readers not proficient in Titan lore, this would require background knowledge in order to fall in quickly with the story. - There was a lot of discussion about patriarchal society and the main character’s frustrations of not being allowed or able to do things because she’s a woman, which is fine, but she didn’t actually then DO much through most of the story to make that change. She didn’t really seem to become a great female protagonist until the end. There was ultimately of fe most talk and feelings and ideology, but I just found Althea to be not as strong of a female character as I hoped for or expected. Maybe ultimately she just wasn’t super likable for me. - It’s also really hard to listen to someone screaming for equality when our main character wasn’t also just as angered by the slavery system that was also a part of the storyline. There were slaves casually mentioned throughout the whole novel yet it was never addressed as a problem. If it was not written in to be a system that needed to be overthrown, it served zero purpose and didn’t need to be written in; this is a fantasy-esque story based on mythological lore, so the “needing to be historically accurate” argument just won’t work here.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I absolutely loved the concept of the book, and wanted to love everything else about it as well. Unfortunately the writing broke the story down in several places and a stronger editor could have probably knit it back together, if it hadn't wanted so badly to be the next "Wing of Ashes and Songs and Thorns and Motherblood and Cinderskulls and..." (you get the idea). Character-and plot-specific spoilers from here... (view spoiler)[ My main quibbles are examples like these that follow: - All the cliche I absolutely loved the concept of the book, and wanted to love everything else about it as well. Unfortunately the writing broke the story down in several places and a stronger editor could have probably knit it back together, if it hadn't wanted so badly to be the next "Wing of Ashes and Songs and Thorns and Motherblood and Cinderskulls and..." (you get the idea). Character-and plot-specific spoilers from here... (view spoiler)[ My main quibbles are examples like these that follow: - All the cliches, including two main characters fleeing a crumbling building while shouting "(name) is still in there!" - Theo obviously being the love interest, only to read in the Kindle description of the upcoming second book that he will be punted back into the friend zone (which may or may not be obvious depending on the author's liking for revising established mythology). - Lots of info about characters that we never hear about again (no, I don't just assume they'll show up in the next book) - Bronte surviving the brainwashing with no actual explanation, just "(Her) brainwashing didn't work on you either?" - Weren't Bronte and Theo still holding cups they could have poured down Cronus' throat while he was kneeling there, choking and gagging? And maybe Cleorua's cup too? That might have given them an edge! - The ending was a bit too much telling instead of showing...convenient that Althea and Cronus were off-planet while it was happening. - And the one that pissed me off the most...Zeus and Theo not looping Althea in on their twist ending AT ALL?!? To that, you may say..."But they had to do it last second, Decimus just SHOWED UP!" To that I say: they figured it out between the two of them neatly enough so that Theo managed to show up back in his uniform hauling an unconscious Zeus and all something something something about his mother? Then Zeus takes off in an actual GETAWAY BOAT and they just take it on faith that Althea will fit neatly into their lil' plan when it has been clearly foretold that SHE is the chosen one?!? No. If the author wanted to have a twist ending so badly, it should have been written and edited better before publishing. If the author and editor think I'm demanding too much and wanting to unpack the Surprise Ending, I'd say they're doing it wrong. (hide spoiler)] Two stars only because I did genuinely like Althea and the family bonds demonstrated between sisters.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nikki22

    My mother told me that men would speak about the Golden Age as a time of peace and happiness for all. Passed-down stories would boast of an era of general ease when the lives of men were blissful, full of abundance, and blessed with spontaneous growth, each man unconstrained in heart and soul. However, the women of our age would tell a very different story. Wings of Fury is a compelling retelling of the overthrowing of the Titan Cronus in Greek Mythology. This engaging plot explores relationshi My mother told me that men would speak about the Golden Age as a time of peace and happiness for all. Passed-down stories would boast of an era of general ease when the lives of men were blissful, full of abundance, and blessed with spontaneous growth, each man unconstrained in heart and soul. However, the women of our age would tell a very different story. Wings of Fury is a compelling retelling of the overthrowing of the Titan Cronus in Greek Mythology. This engaging plot explores relationships, bonds between family, and the treatment of women in a fantastical world which, to back it all up, has beautiful writing that captures your imagination right from the start. While, in the few initial chapters the feminism displayed in the book does seem half-baked, the more I read the more I appreciated the consistency of the anger towards the mistreatment of women (which is extremely rare to find - looking at you Vox). The plot follows Althea, a strong minded and resolute young woman trying to escape from the misogynistic clutches of her homeland while trying to keep herself and her sisters safe and navigate her family's history at the same time. On top of that she has follow her destiny to find the young Boy-God and guide him with a firm and steady hand so that he can complete his own destiny. The plot is hugely captivating and I must admit that I was hugely relieved to discover that the love triangle (did I mention there is a love triangle?) did not take control of the whole storyline the way so many YA books find happening to their plots. There are a few negatives. The showy writing can feel a bit over the top at time and I found myself scrunching up my eyebrows in confusion wondering why the writing felt like a Madeline Miller rip-off. Also the love triangle in question does become more and more weird as more information is revealed during the book. However, all this won't stop me from eagerly awaiting the sequel and instantly buying it when it comes out.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Van (Short & Sweet Reviews)

    Disclosure: I received a copy for review in exchange for a honest review. Greek mythology is back y’all. I remember Greek mythos was all the rage in YA and Middle Grade back around 2010. And I honestly haven’t encounter many Greek mythology inspired novels since then, that is until now with King’s Wings of Fury. Wings of Fury is a coming of age and self-discovery story of Althea Lambros. As with most heroine in a story, Althea is destined for greatness and on her journey to greatness she is proph Disclosure: I received a copy for review in exchange for a honest review. Greek mythology is back y’all. I remember Greek mythos was all the rage in YA and Middle Grade back around 2010. And I honestly haven’t encounter many Greek mythology inspired novels since then, that is until now with King’s Wings of Fury. Wings of Fury is a coming of age and self-discovery story of Althea Lambros. As with most heroine in a story, Althea is destined for greatness and on her journey to greatness she is prophesied to bring down the tyrannical Titan Cronus with the help of The Boy God. Many Greek inspired novels are centered on the Gods and Goddess. I love that Wings of Fury took a different route and focused on the Titan…and womanhood. This past year it was all about girl power and femininity taking center stage and Wings of Fury is no exception. Althea is a very independent and headstrong character. While she is the middle child of three sisters, she is a true lioness when it came to protecting her family and those she cared about. I love that we were right besides Althea as she set out to discover herself, not only her true identity but what she’s capable of. Even a tribe of so-called warrior women was not match for Althea, she didn’t back down to any man, woman or god. I liked her fieriness. However, the supporting cast wasn’t as interesting as our lead. While Theo and Zeus played an important role and I enjoyed their banter, they easily faded into the background. And Althea’s sisters were sadly the least memorable of the cast. I never connected with them and hope the sequel will heavily focused just on the trio: Althea, Theo and Zeus. Overall Wings of Fury was a solid start to a brand new series. I enjoyed it and am looking forward to seeing more titans and gods and what King has in store for Althea. If you like female, feminist driven novels with a dose of Greek mythology then Wings of Fury is for you. It’s a fairy short novel that offered a few hours of escapism. Which was exactly what I needed.

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