counter create hit Deity - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Deity

Availability: Ready to download

Online investigative journalist Scott King investigates the death of a pop megastar, the subject of multiple accusations of sexual abuse and murder before his untimely demise in a fire … another episode of the startlingly original, award-winning Six Stories series. When pop megastar Zach Crystal dies in a fire at his remote mansion, his mysterious demise rips open the bitte Online investigative journalist Scott King investigates the death of a pop megastar, the subject of multiple accusations of sexual abuse and murder before his untimely demise in a fire … another episode of the startlingly original, award-winning Six Stories series. When pop megastar Zach Crystal dies in a fire at his remote mansion, his mysterious demise rips open the bitter divide between those who adored his music and his endless charity work, and those who viewed him as a despicable predator, who manipulated and abused young and vulnerable girls. Online journalist Scott King, whose ‘Six Stories’ podcasts have become an internet sensation, investigates the accusations of sexual abuse and murder that were levelled at Crystal before he died. But as Scott begins to ask questions and rakes over old graves, some startling inconsistencies emerge: Was the fire at Crystal’s remote home really an accident? Whose remains – still unidentified – were found in the ashes? Why was he never officially charged? Dark, chillingly topical and deeply thought-provoking, Deity is both an explosive thriller and a startling look at how heroes can fall from grace and why we turn a blind eye to even the most heinous of crimes…


Compare

Online investigative journalist Scott King investigates the death of a pop megastar, the subject of multiple accusations of sexual abuse and murder before his untimely demise in a fire … another episode of the startlingly original, award-winning Six Stories series. When pop megastar Zach Crystal dies in a fire at his remote mansion, his mysterious demise rips open the bitte Online investigative journalist Scott King investigates the death of a pop megastar, the subject of multiple accusations of sexual abuse and murder before his untimely demise in a fire … another episode of the startlingly original, award-winning Six Stories series. When pop megastar Zach Crystal dies in a fire at his remote mansion, his mysterious demise rips open the bitter divide between those who adored his music and his endless charity work, and those who viewed him as a despicable predator, who manipulated and abused young and vulnerable girls. Online journalist Scott King, whose ‘Six Stories’ podcasts have become an internet sensation, investigates the accusations of sexual abuse and murder that were levelled at Crystal before he died. But as Scott begins to ask questions and rakes over old graves, some startling inconsistencies emerge: Was the fire at Crystal’s remote home really an accident? Whose remains – still unidentified – were found in the ashes? Why was he never officially charged? Dark, chillingly topical and deeply thought-provoking, Deity is both an explosive thriller and a startling look at how heroes can fall from grace and why we turn a blind eye to even the most heinous of crimes…

30 review for Deity

  1. 5 out of 5

    Blair

    I reviewed this (and wrote about my love for Six Stories in general) for Sublime Horror. Read the full piece here: Matt Wesolowski’s Six Stories series gets a superb new addition in Deity The fifth book in Matt Wesolowski's always-excellent Six Stories series, Deity focuses on the life and death of Zach Crystal, a singer who ascends to megastardom while maintaining an enigmatic image and secretive persona, before first disappearing for a year and then – after a brief return to the public eye – be I reviewed this (and wrote about my love for Six Stories in general) for Sublime Horror. Read the full piece here: Matt Wesolowski’s Six Stories series gets a superb new addition in Deity The fifth book in Matt Wesolowski's always-excellent Six Stories series, Deity focuses on the life and death of Zach Crystal, a singer who ascends to megastardom while maintaining an enigmatic image and secretive persona, before first disappearing for a year and then – after a brief return to the public eye – becoming the only victim of a fire at his custom-built home in an otherwise wild area of Scottish woodland. Podcast host Scott King investigates a number of rumours surrounding Crystal, chiefly allegations of inappropriate conduct with young fans. As ever, Wesolowski crafts a gripping and intensely readable mystery laced with elements of horror (here the 'Frithghast', a creature born from a ghost story specific to the locale of Crystal's mansion), but it's also excellent on questions around power, idolatry and celebrity, the role of abuse in shaping an abuser, and 'separating the art from the artist'. A real return to form after Beast, which I enjoyed but found worryingly ambivalent towards the victim at its centre. I received an advance review copy of Deity from Sublime Horror, courtesy of Orenda Books. TinyLetter | Linktree

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again : Matt Wesolowski’s books are just impossible to review when you’re a mere mortal like myself. I lack the vocabulary to adequately express the awesomeness of his work. “Holy shit” seems to be the extent of it. So, this review will most likely be at hot mess but it is what it is. They say you should never meet your heroes or idols. In most instances the reality is hugely disappointing. After all, no matter their achievements or accomplishments they are sti I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again : Matt Wesolowski’s books are just impossible to review when you’re a mere mortal like myself. I lack the vocabulary to adequately express the awesomeness of his work. “Holy shit” seems to be the extent of it. So, this review will most likely be at hot mess but it is what it is. They say you should never meet your heroes or idols. In most instances the reality is hugely disappointing. After all, no matter their achievements or accomplishments they are still as human as the next person. Nowadays with social media, things are even harder to hide. I’m sure I’m not the only one who has unfollowed a favourite actor or singer for whatever reason. Celebrities and fans are in much closer contact these days. Good? Bad? Who knows. But in Deity, there are rumours surrounding singer Zach Crystal and they are a different story altogether. His career was dogged by accusations. Was there a monster lurking underneath that public persona? Or were the rumours indeed just rumours? Now, Zach Crystal has perished in a fire at his secluded mansion in Scotland and his death has divided a nation. Good riddance to bad rubbish? Or a sad farewell to a talented and charitable “legend”? Scott King returns with his podcast. Six episodes, six interviews, six stories about one case. Or in this instance, six ways to look at one man. Son, brother, uncle, friend, entertainer. Misunderstood genius? Perverted predator? Did anyone really know the man behind the legendary entertainer? As I’ve already mentioned, I always find Matt Wesolowski’s books so incredibly hard to review. If you’re familiar with his work, then you know he never writes just a creepy thriller. Spooky and creepy, yes. But the monsters are always horrifyingly real. His stories have immense depth to them and are always far more thought-provoking than you might at first expect. Deity most definitely is and nobody really comes out of this story looking good. The concept of telling these stories via podcasts remains as genius and as fresh as the first Six Stories instalment. (By the way, I’m told that these provide a truly excellent listening experience as well so if audiobooks are your thing, give them a go!) The various points of view made perfect sense and the reader is even given the opportunity to hear from the man himself by way of an exclusive tv interview he conducted a few months before his death. One of the aspects of the story that I found truly fascinating was the fan perspective. I’m sure many of us can relate and I’m sure many of us have seen footage from Beatle-mania, for instance, and I’m also sure many of us look at things like that now and cringe. Thousands of adoring fans lining up, almost being brainwashed by lyrics, convinced the songs are about them, feeling this connection with whomever is singing and ultimately defending this object of their affection until the bitter end. This blind adoration for their idol, their god, their deity. How would a devoted fan feel if their idol suddenly singled them out? How easy is it for someone with bad intentions to take advantage of that? And when someone like that falls from grace, is it still okay to appreciate the catalogue of songs or movies they’ve left behind? Is it ever okay to remain silent? There are an incredible amount of topics in Deity that would make for fabulous discussions. Deity is dark, disturbing, incredibly twisted, so SO immensely clever but also extremely thought-provoking and emotional throughout. And by the end, I was quite frankly just stunned into silence. Utterly speechless. My mind blown, as always happens with a Wesolowski book. So yes, “holy shit”. But also “best one yet”. Buy it now.

  3. 4 out of 5

    The Tattooed Book Geek (Drew).

    Deity is a look at the evil within, the monster that can be hidden behind the mask of celebrity, fame and fortune and how those in a position of power exploit their fans to sate their depraved appetites. Deity is yet another addictive, clever and twisted delight by the diabolical talent that is Matt Wesolowski and the fifth book in his always stellar Six Stories series. Like the previous four books, it features a self-contained story and can easily be read as a standalone. Six Stories is a true- Deity is a look at the evil within, the monster that can be hidden behind the mask of celebrity, fame and fortune and how those in a position of power exploit their fans to sate their depraved appetites. Deity is yet another addictive, clever and twisted delight by the diabolical talent that is Matt Wesolowski and the fifth book in his always stellar Six Stories series. Like the previous four books, it features a self-contained story and can easily be read as a standalone. Six Stories is a true-crime podcast hosted by the online journalist Scott King where six individual stories are told over six episodes with each new episode introducing a new guest who has links to the case that King is investigating. With each guest, King questions them, probing and reopening old wounds, but he allows them the chance to tell their own story and their piece of the puzzle. King has no agenda, he is an intermediary, a go-between and Six Stories the conduit that allows the guests the opportunity for their voice and their words to be heard. Where the story goes, King follows travelling down the roads that open up. King allows listeners to his podcast (us readers) the chance to make up our own minds, laying out the information while remaining neutral. He has no personal stake in the investigation and he doesn’t pass judgement until he has all the facts at his disposal and until he has heard all six stories from his guests. In Deity, Scott King is looking into the life and death of Zach Crystal and the allegations of abuse that plagued his career both in life and in his death as more and more women are coming forward with historical abuse claims against the deceased superstar. Zach Crystal was a megastar who had a stratospheric rise to fame. A rags to riches story, coming from a poor family and a deeply religious upbringing on a council estate in the Midlands, through to his teenage years in ‘The Crystal Twins’ with his twin sister Naomi before he left to going solo and his ascent to becoming a world-famous musician. Crystal was a recluse and an enigma who, before his death lived in Crystal Forest, a five-hundred-acre estate in the Scottish Highlands comprising a remote mansion, recording studio and two-storey treehouse (a sanctum, a sanctuary away from the world where he could be himself) deep in the wilderness, surrounded by state-of-the-art security and miles away from anyone. Without going into detail, the six guests on the six episodes of Six Stories in Deity and the souls that are tangled in the story, that are entwined with Zach Crystal and the web surrounding him are the host of Monster-Busters, a YouTube channel that exposes online predators and who believes that Crystal is guilty of the accusations levelled against him. A super fan of Zach Crystal and ardent supporter of his innocence who has her own podcast ‘The Crystal-Cast’. A groundskeeper in Colliecrith National Park, the park where Zach Crystal’s estate (Crystal Forest) was located who was originally employed to help build the estate and who was then, after the estate’s completion hired as a security guard. A mother of a Zach Crystal fan who, along with her daughter spent time at Crystal Forest. A musician who was famous in the early noughties, who have had their own share of controversy surrounding them (they are a returning guest to Six Stories, their inclusion in Deity makes perfect sense from a storytelling perspective as both they and Crystal are/were involved in the music industry and their appearance is also a wonderful nod and throwback to a previous Six Stories book and serves to show how much Scott King has grown as a host as back on their first appearance, King wasn’t asking the right questions, but maybe he is now) and whose path has crossed with Zach Crystal on both a personal and a professional level. And finally, a family member, kin and Zach Crystal’s own blood. Interspersed between each of the episodes of Six Stories there are snippets of a transcript from the last interview that the Zach Crystal did a few months prior to his death. Each new episode and interview goes further beneath the surface and there’s nothing shallow or superficial about the story told in Deity as Wesolowski plumbs the depths of Zach Crystal. Wesolowski keeps the waters murky and tenebrous, obscuring the picture and making you question if Crystal is someone whose legacy has been tainted by people with a vendetta against him. People who are out for nothing more than to make money and a name for themselves at the expense of a dead man as the dead can’t speak and they can’t defend themselves or their actions. If he is simply different and misunderstood, an eccentric musician who wanted nothing more than to help damaged teenagers from disadvantaged upbringings by giving something back to those who have nothing in life but scars from a troubled childhood. Or, if he truly is guilty of the heinous and horrific accusations against him and that he used his fame, fortune and name to coerce, manipulate and seduce his fans into doing things that they shouldn’t as they worshipped at the altar of their musical idol. As you fall deeper down the rabbit hole you find yourself turning the pages with ominous dread, a sense of foreboding for where the story will lead. After all, it’s Six Stories, it’s Wesolowski and you know that there will be no sunshine, kittens and lollipops waiting for you as you reach the end of the story. However, it’s only with the last guest and the last part of their interview that the water truly becomes clear, chillingly so and any lingering shred of doubt that you might have had over whether or not Zach Crystal is guilty of the accusations against him finally vanishes. You are nearing the end, the page count is fast dwindling, there are only a few pages left, you think that all the cards have been dealt and that you know where they have fallen, but no, Wesolowski has one last trick up his sleeve as he pulls out THAT shocker of a revelation and jaw-dropping denouement, stunning, absolutely stunning. The plotting in Deity is devilish by design, tension-filled and keeps you gripped throughout. The writing is the same high standard that we have all come to expect from Wesolowski and that he consistently delivers in his Six Stories series. The sense of setting that Wesolowski manages to convey is, once again terrific with the forest where Crystal Forest is located feeling menacing and highly atmospheric. Even five books into the series the interview transcript format still feels fresh and unique. There are distinctive characters in Deity, all with their own voice who come to life and feel like real people, while they may not be likeable, they are human. In the Six Stories series, Wesolowski incorporates a supernatural element into his work that casts a lengthening shadow over the story blending together the natural with the supernatural in an unholy union. In Deity, the supernatural aspect comes from the Frithgast, a creature with a rotting body, a skeletal face and glowing red eyes. Sighting of the Frithgast is a portent that something bad will happen and an ill omen for what is to come. The local legend has its own folklore and myth surrounding it and comes with its own chilling ghost story. Deity once again finds Wesolowski dancing with the darkness as he takes the reader on another powerful, unsettling and thought-provoking journey into the disturbing and darkened heart of human nature.

  4. 4 out of 5

    The Book Review Café

    Deity is the 5th book on the #SixStories series and like the other books in the series it features modern day themes, combined with the darkest myths. Like each book in this much loved series, Deity makes for a disturbing, haunting, bone chilling read. Zach Crystal’s story is one that we have all sadly heard or read at some point.  A pop mega star adored by the public, known for their charity work, but behind the public persona he’s plagued by controversy, speculation and allegations of abuse of Deity is the 5th book on the #SixStories series and like the other books in the series it features modern day themes, combined with the darkest myths. Like each book in this much loved series, Deity makes for a disturbing, haunting, bone chilling read. Zach Crystal’s story is one that we have all sadly heard or read at some point.  A pop mega star adored by the public, known for their charity work, but behind the public persona he’s plagued by controversy, speculation and allegations of abuse of young, vulnerable girls. The megastar is dead, and yet there are a plethora of questions left unanswered, and that’s the very reason investigating journalist Paul King creates a Six Stories based on Crystal’s life. Each podcast is told from the perspective of six witnesses, whose lives are intertwined with Crystal’s.  Matt Wesolowski takes the reader on a unsettling journey that grows darker at every flip of the page.  There’s a tangled web of stories, accusations and claims to explore in the convoluted story of Zack Crystal, Paul King like any good interviewer slowly but deftly scratches away, digging deeper into the rabbit warren that is Crystal’s life. As we learn more about the pop star’s life, the book takes on an ominous, chilling tone. Was Zach an eccentric, “Peter pan”, shy, misunderstood individual, whose aim in life was to help underprivileged children? Or was he a typical predator, manipulative, devious, someone who committed the most hideous crimes, using his superstar status to his own advantage? It’s only as you reach the final podcast that the truth is revealed.  Matt Wesolowski always creates the perfect location and atmosphere for his books, in Deity it’s Crystal’s remote home set against the backdrop of the wilderness of the Scottish Highlands. It’s a forest where an ancient evil spirit roams, it’s a forest that’s shrouded in folklore and malevolence. If there’s one thing I that makes this series a ‘must read’, it’s the author’s astonishing ability to write a book that doesn’t fit one particular genre, it has elements of many genres, horror, crime thriller with a modern day twist, which blend together to make an all-consuming read. Each book Matt Wesolowski writes is imaginative, unique, captivating, and devilishly plotted. Six Stories is a series that takes you by surprise, as each book is so different to the last. Once again, the author has written the epitome of a page-turner. Highly recommended to those looking for a unique and memorising read that’s not without its fair share of chills and thrills.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    Today is my birthday and there's a release date for the new Six Stories book AND I LOVE LIFE SO MUCH RIGHT NOW Today is my birthday and there's a release date for the new Six Stories book AND I LOVE LIFE SO MUCH RIGHT NOW

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea | thrillerbookbabe

    I skipped from the first Six Stories book to Deity, which is the 5th book in the Six Stories series. I absolutely have to go back and read the other three because these books are truly one of a kind. Thank you so much to Orenda Books and Matt Wesolowski for this thrilling book. They are written in the format of a podcast that tells six stories and gets six points of view on one polarizing case. This book was about superstar Zach Crystal, who was found dead in his home. After his death it comes t I skipped from the first Six Stories book to Deity, which is the 5th book in the Six Stories series. I absolutely have to go back and read the other three because these books are truly one of a kind. Thank you so much to Orenda Books and Matt Wesolowski for this thrilling book. They are written in the format of a podcast that tells six stories and gets six points of view on one polarizing case. This book was about superstar Zach Crystal, who was found dead in his home. After his death it comes to light he may have been a predator? Maybe a pure-hearted lover of charity? Maybe a delusional mad-man who believed in a dark beast that was an omen of death? So many stories come out and Scott King and his podcast are trying to get to the bottom of it. Thoughts: I love the way this book contrasts old folklore with relevant and poignant themes of today. The juxtaposition of Scottish lore against current rock music is interesting and unique. I love the way that each story explains things more and more, and shows things in a different light. The author creates the perfect atmosphere for a creepy story and building plot. I love the way his books always have so many relevant issues, in this book being the #metoo movement. I loved the different perspectives in this story and how you can truly imagine it happening in real life. Each story was so different and unique, and it all twisted together to create a great story. I never can guess where his books are going and this one was no exception. I was completely captivated by this book- 5 stars!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Louise Beech

    This has become my annual joy. Another book from Matt in the Six Stories series. What will I do if they ever end? I guess ... read them all again. Be excited about what he does next. Deity is another twisted, clever, unusual, thought-provoking and yet still somehow always emotional read, with all the usual dark fairytales and folklore present. There are woods again, an evil forest, where a great deity lives - worldwide superstar Zach Crystal. Except now he's dead. But is he quite the revered ido This has become my annual joy. Another book from Matt in the Six Stories series. What will I do if they ever end? I guess ... read them all again. Be excited about what he does next. Deity is another twisted, clever, unusual, thought-provoking and yet still somehow always emotional read, with all the usual dark fairytales and folklore present. There are woods again, an evil forest, where a great deity lives - worldwide superstar Zach Crystal. Except now he's dead. But is he quite the revered idol everyone thought? I loved this, needless to say. I'm now bereft. So, as Scott King says, this has been Six Stories, and until next time....

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Van Damme

    Deity is the fifth instalment in the Six Stories series, time really does fly when you’re having fun! It can be read as a standalone: once again Six Stories podcast creator and host Scott King is trying to get to the bottom of an entirely new case, and he is literally the only constant throughout the entire series. There is, however, a treat for those who have read Hydra: Deity makes reference to the Arla Macleod case and one of the interviewees from that case pops up in this case as well. But d Deity is the fifth instalment in the Six Stories series, time really does fly when you’re having fun! It can be read as a standalone: once again Six Stories podcast creator and host Scott King is trying to get to the bottom of an entirely new case, and he is literally the only constant throughout the entire series. There is, however, a treat for those who have read Hydra: Deity makes reference to the Arla Macleod case and one of the interviewees from that case pops up in this case as well. But don’t let that scare you off if you haven’t read Hydra: everything you need to know is explained and there are no spoilers either, should you want to catch up with the series afterwards. With all the formalities out of the way, let’s get down to the nitty-gritty! Scott King is back! Six new podcast episodes, six interviews, six stories about one case: Zach Crystal. In 2018, enigmatic superstar Zach Crystal disappeared from his 500-acre property, nicknamed Crystal Forest, in the Scottish Highlands. Crystal, described as the sultan of song-writing, the personification of the dream to grow up and be Someone, the walking rags-to-riches fairy, remained missing for an entire year before popping back up, only to die in a fire at Crystal Forest a few months later. One might describe Zach Crystal as Britain’s answer to Michael Jackson, or that’s who he reminded me of in any case: a brilliant artist, a musical legend on the one hand, a bit of a weirdo entertaining questionable relationships on the other. Even after his death there’s this whole polemic: his fans believe he was a good guy, a charitable man and everything else is just rumours; his haters call him a predator: it’s not normal for a guy his age to invite teenage girls to stay at his private estate, even if he does invite their parents as well, and that’s not even mentioning the girls who were found dead at Crystal Forest and his closest advisor / PA / friend who had a fatal accident there. Once again, Matt Wesolowski has created a story that is somehow utterly believable. As usual I will treat myself to the audiobook as soon as it’s out, which will be February 2021 if it’s to match the paperback publication date, although this year’s Beast took a while longer because Audible did a dramatisation, and I have a feeling they might do the same for Deity, they could do great audio things with one, let me tell you! But I digress. If it seems this real on paper, I already know that listening to the audiobook I will have to remind myself constantly that it is not an actual podcast, not an actual case, not a real person, not factual history. It’s the manner in which Deity is composed that brings about that eerie feeling of reality. Like all Six Stories instalments, Scott King is either addressing his listeners or interviewing someone, and it creates such intimacy, like an actual person is, for instance, telling you about that awful moment when he found two dead girls in the woods, or that awe-inspiring moment when she met the man behind the legend and found him to be kind and sincere. As always, there’s an occult thread woven into the story, muddying the waters. This time it is the legend of the Frithghast, some kind of spectre with horns and hooves, a dark half-rotten deer or stag roaming the forest. I found it such interesting folklore that I went looking for more information, but there isn’t any: the Frithghast sprung from the dark crevices of Matt Wesolowski’s mind. Clearly a master of suggestion, the creepiness and eeriness of his stories lies in insinuation, which somehow makes the narrative a lot scarier than it would have been with full-on monster action scenes galore. I would love to talk more, but I don’t want to spoil things. And what’s more, whatever else I might say, I will still leave things knowing I haven’t done Deity justice so I might as well call it a day! I will just add this: knowing what came before, I went in with the highest expectations, still Deity blew my socks off, the suspense mounting until it becomes positively unbearable, relief only to be had with the very last story. A top-notch thriller with thought-provoking themes and a dark folklore element, Deity held me captive from intriguing start to mind-blowing finish, even when I had to put it down and long after I’d finished it. Highly recommended!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Deity is my first time reading Matt Wesolowski and based on the brilliant plotting and expert narrative it won't be the last. Deity works as a standalone novel but may slightly spoil a previous Six Stories due to a returning character. This is a book that you need to know as little about as possible bar the synopsis. The only thing I can say about Deity is that it is one of the best books I've read this year. Wesolowski is a genius at characterisation and dialogue. This is good old fashioned stor Deity is my first time reading Matt Wesolowski and based on the brilliant plotting and expert narrative it won't be the last. Deity works as a standalone novel but may slightly spoil a previous Six Stories due to a returning character. This is a book that you need to know as little about as possible bar the synopsis. The only thing I can say about Deity is that it is one of the best books I've read this year. Wesolowski is a genius at characterisation and dialogue. This is good old fashioned story telling at it's very finest. The delivery of story via interviews, newspaper clippings and of course the podcast is incredibly well done. Wesolowski absolutely nailed the story, keeping me on my toes whilst I frantically turned the pages as I worked towards the conclusion of Zach Crystals controversial life. As I said, one of the best books I've read this year and in Matt Wesolowski I have a new author that I'll want to read everything they've published. Six Stories is an inspired idea and Deity has delivered a superbly.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Amazing Honestly these books are my favourite series the podcast format just works and Matt has done it again with Deity these book have that true crime feel with just the right amount of horror that gives you this creepy vibe as you get a full story from 6 different perspectives. Deity was such a interesting and heartbreaking story very relevant in today's world can't wait for the next one! Amazing Honestly these books are my favourite series the podcast format just works and Matt has done it again with Deity these book have that true crime feel with just the right amount of horror that gives you this creepy vibe as you get a full story from 6 different perspectives. Deity was such a interesting and heartbreaking story very relevant in today's world can't wait for the next one!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    3.5 🌟 A timely and pertinent read. I enjoyed this latest installment in the Six Stories series but, for me, it lacked a bit of depth and mystery compared to previous books. It felt a bit rushed, if I'm honest. 3.5 🌟 A timely and pertinent read. I enjoyed this latest installment in the Six Stories series but, for me, it lacked a bit of depth and mystery compared to previous books. It felt a bit rushed, if I'm honest.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mairead Hearne (swirlandthread.com)

    Deity by Matt Wesolowski will be published with Orenda Books in ebook format December 18th and in Original Paperback format February 18th 2021. Described as ‘dark, chillingly topical and deeply thought-provoking…both an explosive thriller and a startling look at how heroes can fall from grace and why we turn a blind eye to even the most heinous of crimes…’ this is the fifth book in this series that has really grabbed the imagination of many readers. Based around a podcast, each book highlights a Deity by Matt Wesolowski will be published with Orenda Books in ebook format December 18th and in Original Paperback format February 18th 2021. Described as ‘dark, chillingly topical and deeply thought-provoking…both an explosive thriller and a startling look at how heroes can fall from grace and why we turn a blind eye to even the most heinous of crimes…’ this is the fifth book in this series that has really grabbed the imagination of many readers. Based around a podcast, each book highlights an unsolved mystery, a tragedy that, for whatever reason, remained without resolution. Scott King is the genius behind these rather unique recordings and, by now, has gained a reputation for delivering the truth, with an expectation that it will be done with a fair and balanced approach, giving a platform to many on all sides. Scott King refers occasionally to past individuals who he crossed paths with and who do surface again but it does not impact the reading or enjoyment of this book in any way. Matt Wesolowski has created something very original and unique with Six Stories. A simple concept, he has truly managed to make it his own with a unique approach to the telling of the tale. When you pick up a book in the series, you know the basics of what awaits you. Scott King will interview six different people over a number of weeks. He will let them each have a platform. He will not try to inflict his own personal beliefs on the interviewee, remaining relatively neutral at all times yet extracting all the necessary information to bring the story to its always excellently depicted shocking conclusion. It’s all very real. All very expertly threaded together by Wesolowski, reading these books feels like reading transcriptions from true-life episodes of a real-life podcast. Deity centres around the fantastical life and death of megastar Zach Crystal. From a young age Zach Crystal broke onto the live music circuit with his sister Naomi. But as he grew into adulthood he went out on his own taking his music in a whole new direction. His fanbase grew at a stratospheric pace across the globe leading to fanaticism and adulation to the extreme. Zach Crystal became an enigma. Off stage he hid away in a remote forest area in Scotland in a residential compound with very heavy security. He was known for his work with underprivileged teenagers, young girls who came from very difficult homes. Having struggled through his own teen years, he had a great empathy with their challenges and he loved to spend time with them, listening to their stories. He created a magical place, a realm that was hidden away from the outside world with only limited access to certain trusted personnel. But there were those that began to question Zach Crystal’s interest in these troubled young girls. Was it all done in complete innocence, or was something much larger lurking in the shadows? Zach Crystal had tragedy follow him through his life and after the death of a very close associate, he went underground, searching for himself. After a year of rumours he reappeared, giving an exclusive interview on the BBC about an upcoming album and world tour. His fans were ecstatic. His adversaries were angry. But all that was to change when the world woke up one morning to the news that Zach Crystal was dead. A fire at his home was to end the stellar career of this controversial musician but the rumour mill went into overdrive. Was it suicide as a result of the ‘predatory’ rumours? Was it an accident or was something darker at play? Scott King decides that the time has come to attempt to unravel the truth. Who was Zach Crystal underneath the drama and the mask? Was he an innocent dragged into scandal by those who refused to believe his generosity was authentic? Or was there something sinister and malevolent to every act he undertook? Deity takes the reader on this journey of discovery as the truth is slowly revealed amidst the dark layers of this very complex individual. Deity is a very compelling and addictive read. Author Michael Marshall Smith describes the Six Stories series as ‘unfolding like dark origami to reveal the black heart inside’ and I honestly think that this is possibly one of the best descriptions of this very intense reading experience. Although Zach Crystal is very much a fictional character, similar stories, unfortunately, have been reported about in real-life. Deity raises many questions about how we all view the celebrity, that person who oft-times sits on a pedestal very much removed from the reality of the majority of our lives. Society is most definitely questioning more, with social media providing a platform for many to express their opinions. Sometimes these platforms can be very toxic places with very disturbing outcomes but other times a spark is lit and a movement begins, a movement for justice and truth. Deity is a chilling look at society with Matt Wesolowski enthralling his own cult following with another original and offbeat read, one that can make for disturbing reading but one that you just cannot put down. TV rights for Six Stories were sold to a major Hollywood studio so how cool would it be to see this series transferred to our screens. I can feel the hair rising on my skin at the thought. Doors locked, lights on….. The cover of Deity is deserving of it’s own few words. Designed by Mark Swan of kid-ethic design studio, when I referred to its striking artwork, Matt Wesolowski responded with this – “All of us are in thrall to the witchcraft of lord Kidethic"- Matt Wesolowski Deity continues this haunting series. with Matt Wesolowski’s now trademark unique style. Definitely a series worth picking up from the beginning, you will be equally enthralled, disturbed and shaken by the darkness that rests in the mind of this most unconventional of writers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    As ever this review also appears on my blog: https://livemanylives.wordpress.com/ When I pick up a Six Stories novel my pulse starts racing. I know that there will be six episodes, all bringing a new perspective to a mystery, I know that I need to keep an open mind and not take what I am reading at face value, and I know that I will not rest until I have got to the end. Matt Wesolowski has a formula that works and gives you the assurance that he will deliver, but he also has a creative mind that As ever this review also appears on my blog: https://livemanylives.wordpress.com/ When I pick up a Six Stories novel my pulse starts racing. I know that there will be six episodes, all bringing a new perspective to a mystery, I know that I need to keep an open mind and not take what I am reading at face value, and I know that I will not rest until I have got to the end. Matt Wesolowski has a formula that works and gives you the assurance that he will deliver, but he also has a creative mind that keeps his novels fresh, exciting and full of anticipation. It feels like a cliché to say that you cannot put a book down, but that is what Matt’s novels are, a compulsion to read until there is nothing left, to feed and not slow down until fully satisfied. Scott King presents Six Stories, a true crime podcast that seeks to bring new insight to stories that are shrouded in mystery and have a dark, supernatural shadow hanging over them that questions our reality. This is the fifth book in this series and although it can be read, as all the others can, as a standalone story Scott’s own journey runs through them and ties them together into a unified whole. In Deity, he will revisit an interviewee he has met before, but he will come to the conversation changed. Deity focuses on the global music phenomenon that is Zach Crystal, or was until his untimely demise in a fire at his remote Scottish mansion. Crystal has a huge and devoted following, but there are also disturbing accusations about the nature of his relationship with the teenage girls who idolise him and in some cases join him in the magical treehouse that sits alongside his mansion in the grounds of the “Crystal Forest”. Through the course of the six podcast episodes we hear from a YouTube paedophile hunter, an online super fan, a former employee at the Crystal Forest, the mother of one of Crystal’s “special” girls, a fellow musician with a very different public persona and a close family member, as Scott King follows a trail to the truth. Before each new episode we hear Zach Crystal himself through the transcript of an interview he gave with the BBC’s Ruby Rendall shortly before the fire, in which he tells the story of his year-long disappearance and stunning return with a new album and tour, to the rapturous response of his fans. As always with Six Stories, once the storytelling begins it builds such an irresistible momentum that you simply cannot let go. Each new insight raises more questions and you find yourself unable to turn away, you need to get to the truth. As Zach Crystal’s truth reveals itself we are faced with an all too familiar horror, but where did it come from and how was it allowed to build into such a destructive tsunami of pain? Deity is an exploration of fame and the power that it wields in our society. It is a novel but it is also a true story in the sense that we all grow up with our heroes, the people who manage to touch an elemental nerve within us and help us define who we are. As teenagers we are vulnerable as we set out on a personal journey of identity, separating ourselves from the inherited parameters of our childhood guardians. The influences that take hold are powerful in shaping the rest of our lives for both good and ill. Maybe it’s not fair on our heroes, the unwitting deities of our lives, that they have such power over us. Mostly it is a distant unknowing connection, a helpful guide that supports our movement from child to adult, but when it becomes real, when the bond is one to one, the responsibility for that power cannot be ignored. Perhaps it is most dangerous when the wielder of power is also broken and as a result spreads their own pain with devastating results and maybe we all play our part when we help to propagate these mythologies, about artists, celebrities and even ourselves. Six Stories is set around a true crime podcast, it combines the cultures of ancient and dark fairytale with our modern technological society, and with this fifth novel in the series, rather than losing its impact it is elevated to new heights. Deity is for me the best of them all and Matt Wesolowski is an extraordinary writer at the very top of his game. A dark thriller and a powerful commentary that should go straight to the top of your reading list.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Claire Sheldon

    There is so much I want to say about this book, and I don’t even know if I can begin to write down my feelings for this book other than you need to read it! There is so much linkage in the story to, todays happenings in the “celebrity” world and as I read this novel I could help but make comparisons to what we know about Jimmy Saville, Michael Jackson and Ian Watkins (Lost Prophets.) Matt uses the memories we have of our “heroes” and plays on what we * think * we know and leads us down a dark aven There is so much I want to say about this book, and I don’t even know if I can begin to write down my feelings for this book other than you need to read it! There is so much linkage in the story to, todays happenings in the “celebrity” world and as I read this novel I could help but make comparisons to what we know about Jimmy Saville, Michael Jackson and Ian Watkins (Lost Prophets.) Matt uses the memories we have of our “heroes” and plays on what we * think * we know and leads us down a dark avenue of deception, secrecy and the costs of fame and what we * can * have when we’ve got the world at our feet. I am of the generation of “nu metal” and I have felt comforted by the songs of Lost Prophets. “Its not the end of the world” is my song I bring out once a year when we get super busy at work, I can probably sing most tracks on “fake sound of progress” I also made the mistake of reading the trail transcripts when Ian Watkins was sent down. At the beginning I felt that it wasn’t the other three members of the bands fault but…. Michael Jackson was (possibly) comparing himself to god by the end of his career he was coming back! With a tour and new albums before he died (side note: I thought the touring company killed him for insurance purposes because they knew he couldn’t deliver) And as for Jimmy Saville he prayed on those who were in care, and common how many of us wanted to go on “Jim’ll fix it” and a lot of what he was up to didn’t come out till after his death and many of those who were in charge of such vulnerable people looked the other way. Matt seems to have taken all of these examples and possibly many more and created a story around a “pop star” and his rise to fame and then death and all the things that we learn during the course of the book he was doing / said to be doing. Scott King’s voice in the podcasts comes across like we are listening to our mates speaks, Scott comes across as someone who is seeking the truth and won’t let himself by swayed by the stories he hears from either side of the camp and when the final reveal is made like in all the other stories, he makes the right decision and does the right thing never mind the consequences. But our main character has been like this all the way through the books, even when he started to be trolled early on in I think book 2. This is all to the credit of Matt’s writing and his use of characterisation in the stories he tells. When we reach the last story and we learn the truth I sort of felt that those who create the “monster” are the only ones who can bring them down which is very true in many scenarios but with how this book is written and the characterisation use, we know the decision is left ultimately to the Podcast author Scott King. Matt is fast becoming one of my favourite authors and this book is up there with Changelling, though I didn’t cry as much at this one, you will be glad to know. What I also like about Matt is when I start his book I don’t feel like I want to cry because I will never be that good. Which is certainly how I feel when I read some of my other favourite authors… Which I think is to his credit he is good but he doesn’t make me feel like I’ll never be that good! Matt is one of the powerhouse authors at Orenda who continues to deliver a new style of telling a story whose style can’t be copied because it’s original and different and if it was we would immediately know it was no doubt Matt who has inspired the work…

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This book ... It should come with a warning. After the celebrity scandals of the past few years this really does start to read like crime fact and not crime fiction at times. Matt Wesolowski has triumphed once again in what could well be his best Six Stories book yet. And that's a pretty bold statement coming from me because I absolutely bloody adored Hydra and Beast, they really tapped into my darker, horror loving side. But this book ... this book will have you feeling all manner of emotions. This book ... It should come with a warning. After the celebrity scandals of the past few years this really does start to read like crime fact and not crime fiction at times. Matt Wesolowski has triumphed once again in what could well be his best Six Stories book yet. And that's a pretty bold statement coming from me because I absolutely bloody adored Hydra and Beast, they really tapped into my darker, horror loving side. But this book ... this book will have you feeling all manner of emotions. From disgust at the main premise of the story, to a strange kind of affinity for the charm of one of the central characters, and then back to an edge of the seat kind of trepidation and uncertainty because of the elements of the folklore style storytelling that the author weaves into the novel with his usual, inimitable, ease. This is the story (six episodes of them actually) of Zach Crystal, a music Icon who was adored, revered even, by his fans, hated by his critics, and who became embroiled in a scandal before dying in tragic circumstances on the cusp of a major comeback tour. Told through the usual episodic format of the six podcasts, Scott King tries to get to the heart of a star he once idolised himself, to find out who, or what, was the real Zach Crystal. Each podcast is preceded by a soundbite from Crystal's last televised interview, and each story brings a new perspective as to the true nature of this mysterious man. It is not really that hard to see where Matt Wesolowski has drawn his inspiration from for this novel. You don't have to look far back in history to find examples of rich and famous people whose altruistic and legendary reputations have been torn down after being accused of using their status and their money to abuse others. This is much the case for Crystal, a man accused of having perhaps too unhealthy an interest in the welfare of teenagers, largely girls, and whose charity, helping the underprivileged, has been called into question both before, and especially after, his death. When you read some of the early reports, get a feel for some of the chilling events that occur around Crystal, it is easy to understand why. And yet ... Matt Wesolowski has done such a brilliant job of writing Crystal's character, has made him so utterly charming and genuine throughout the television interview that despite having that ounce of doubt in the back of my mind, I really did warm to the character. I, like many of his fictional fans, wanted King to prove the cynics wrong. I found myself so completely invested in Crystal and his story that I couldn't pull myself away from the book at all. I had to know how it ended. I resented sleep, and work, for getting in my way. But there was still that doubt I mentioned earlier. Something a little too ... strange about a grown man who hides away in the middle of a remorse and reportedly haunted forest and spends his nights sleeping in a custom built treehouse. Maybe you recognise the type? No pet monkeys called Bubbles that I recall, but there was definitely something not quite right about Crystal and his remote Scottish hideaway. Now, this is no straight did he/didn't he abuse scandal thriller - it wouldn't quite be a Matt Wesolowski book if there wasn't something just a little more supernatural about the story. Deity is no different to previous books in that it draws upon the kinds of folklore and legend that run rampant across our country, this time surrounding a haunted wood in the Cairngorms, and with a backstory that will send a shiver down the spine. It perhaps doesn't have quite the chill factor of the BEKs from Hydra, but it certainly does make you think. It's the kind of tale that grandparents tell small children to keep them from wandering off into the woods, and when put into the context of one of the grim discoveries revealed through the podcasts, is adds that anticipated dark element to the novel. And speaking of BEKs, there is a recurring character in this book who readers may recall from that very dark podcast ... This book really engaged me as a reader, making me think back over the reactions I have had to the various scandals over the years. The questions you ask yourself about whether it is still okay to listen to a Michael Jackson song say, knowing what you know know about allegations about their private lives, whether fully proven or not. Do you forego songs, movies, memories, that form an important part of your childhood to stand with the accusers, or do you give the accused the benefit of the doubt, knowing that they have no chance left to defend themselves. Whatever your feelings, believe me when I say that this book will leave you with no doubts about guilt or innocence at the end, but certainly plenty of emotions. I know I say it often, but I put off writing this review as I didn't know how to begin. I'm still not. sure I've really captured how brilliant and clever this book is now. Packed with the trademark atmospheric and almost cinematic imagery, characters who will challenge your emotions and have you changing your feelings about Crystals guilt a dozen times or more, and a story that is so topical that feels like it is ripped from the headlines, if you love the Six Stories series, you absolutely need to read it. This guys is a genius writer and it’s stag-geringly brilliant. Definitely recommended.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Swords & Spectres

    Up until finishing Deity, Changeling was my favourite thriller I'd read this year. It was also my favourite in the Six Stories series. Deity has robbed that wonderful book of the top spot for both.  Where Changeling was excellent for the unexpected reveals and long-lasting ramifications it has for the series, Deity was brilliant for not only having potential ramifications going forward with the series, but for being one heck of a complete story. It literally had everything I wanted from a Six Sto Up until finishing Deity, Changeling was my favourite thriller I'd read this year. It was also my favourite in the Six Stories series. Deity has robbed that wonderful book of the top spot for both.  Where Changeling was excellent for the unexpected reveals and long-lasting ramifications it has for the series, Deity was brilliant for not only having potential ramifications going forward with the series, but for being one heck of a complete story. It literally had everything I wanted from a Six Stories episode and I can't think of anything I would have changed were I given carte blanche to do so. With the focus being around the once global pop mega star, Zach Crystal, we are treated to a character that exudes the controversial vibes of Michael Jackson whilst being mired with the possibility of the horrific darkness of Gary Glitter. You certainly get images of both as far as the meteoric rise to stardom and the subsequent cult-like following he has globally. At it's core, Deity is a story about how enough fanatics can make even the most evil and heinous of accusations go away as if they never happened. It's a look into how much trust and love we pour into the very idea of 'celebrity' and how much we'd be willing to let our idols get away with when at the heights of their power. I think the main strength that Wesolowski possesses is his ability to create fictional characters that exist in our real world and make them feel so very real. When people are mentioned from earlier books you feel like they're names you're used to seeing in the headlines, or the musicians are people you expect to see on Youtube whenever you click on for a music fix. In short, Wesolowski does a wonderful job of making the fiction incredibly believable.  Another one of his strengths, one that certainly resonated with Deity, is the ability to make the reader feel uncomfortable at what is happening (given the subject matter it's hard not to feel like having a bit of a cringe every now and then) yet leaving you with that insatiable desire to see what's actually occurring.  This was the best of the bunch for me for a number of reasons, some of which I have already mentioned but, chief amongst them would have to be the fact that, at no point was I completely certain of what was happening/would happen. Looking back, there were clues that I could have pieced together, but they were given in such a blasé, normal way that you don't think to do so. Even had I guessed most of what was happening, I got to the conclusion and felt that, even had I a crystal ball, I'd not have been able to get everything all straightened out as it had been when laid bare at the end.  To cut a long story short, Matt has left me keen to see what happens with Scott next and I only hope there are many more episodes of Six Stories in the pipeline. This was my 100th, and final, book of the year and I'm glad that I saved the best thriller novel until last.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. These episodes of Six Stories are bookish catnip to me. Can't stop once I start. This is the 5th book where Scott King will interview 6 people behind a case that is not quite cold. A fire at a remote mansion has bought about the demise of a mysterious pop megastar. Rather than heighten the memories and legend though, the star is now tainted by women who say they were girls when he abused them years ago. The dedicated fans swarm over any allegations, turning up damning evidence that has any accuser These episodes of Six Stories are bookish catnip to me. Can't stop once I start. This is the 5th book where Scott King will interview 6 people behind a case that is not quite cold. A fire at a remote mansion has bought about the demise of a mysterious pop megastar. Rather than heighten the memories and legend though, the star is now tainted by women who say they were girls when he abused them years ago. The dedicated fans swarm over any allegations, turning up damning evidence that has any accusers running fearing for their lives. I like that Scott goes in as mediator, not on a 'side', to get stories so you can make your own mind up, I like his thoughts on where it's going and what he wants to ask. What starts as a ghost story soon turns to horror as the lore of the wood the star housed himself in comes to light. It was a very well told story. The #metoo movement has done a lot on social media and I could help but notice a few similarities to certain pop stars of the day, however all coincidental. Was nice to hear a voice from a previous episode too. Scott's got credit for listening to someone's version, but he knows he is not necessarily in control of where the flow will take him next. He just about got away in Hydra, wondering if Zach Crystal fans will let this go? I'm always worried he's gone after something too big, but his name is out there now, he's not untouchable, raking through theoretical old graves is what he does best. It's the danger element I can't stop going back for. Very thought provoking and again causing much to discuss if you buddy read or use these episodes at book clubs. I highly recommend you investigate.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mandie

    Deity is the 5th book in the Six Stories series and they just keep getting better and better. This time Scott King is investigating the life and death of popstar Zach Crystal. Crystal had quite the following at the time of his death, but he was also involved in some scandalous accusations that if proved would end his career once and for all. Even Scott himself admitted to being one of his fans when he was younger. Over the course of the six episodes Scott King talks to a fan, a sceptic, a parent Deity is the 5th book in the Six Stories series and they just keep getting better and better. This time Scott King is investigating the life and death of popstar Zach Crystal. Crystal had quite the following at the time of his death, but he was also involved in some scandalous accusations that if proved would end his career once and for all. Even Scott himself admitted to being one of his fans when he was younger. Over the course of the six episodes Scott King talks to a fan, a sceptic, a parent, a former associate, a former worker and finally Crystals sister. Each one gave their account of what life was like, and their opinion of the man and the legend. One thing they did all agree on was there was two sides to him and at the height of his fame, he was very reclusive and was protected from the public by some very forceful people. Did these people help to perpetuate some of the stories that were being bandied about?? You will have to read the book to determine this for yourselves. What I love about the way these books are written is that with each podcast you get another layer to the story. As a reader you are drawn in bit by bit as you play amateur detective trying to work out the truth from the fiction. Whilst each person gives their views and their feelings, it is not until Scott Kings speaks to the person that really knew Zach Crystal the best that you really get to find out what happened, what is fact and what is fiction although deep down you will probably have an idea. It wouldn’t be a six stories book without that supernatural element and this time it came in the form of an old tale passed down from generation to generation about something that lived in the woods and Zach Crystal and his manager certainly used this to their advantage. For me Deity is probably the darkest book of the series as it comes close to so many of the stories that have been in the news over the last few years and for this reason at times I struggled as I just couldn’t help making those comparisons. That being said it is still a fabulous addition to the series and once again Matt Wesolowski has created something that will challenge the reader at every turn of the page. The only thing left to ask is where will he take Scott King next??

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Maybe the best yet for Six Stories! The Six Stories series has become THE series that I now look out for and read any new instalment as soon as I possibly can. There aren't many book series out there now that have that allure for me, but I've been hooked on these books since I discovered them through Orenda's Twitter feed. Told in a series of interviews and social media accounts, this is contemporary storytelling at its most compelling and addictive. I started this story yesterday and couldn't wa Maybe the best yet for Six Stories! The Six Stories series has become THE series that I now look out for and read any new instalment as soon as I possibly can. There aren't many book series out there now that have that allure for me, but I've been hooked on these books since I discovered them through Orenda's Twitter feed. Told in a series of interviews and social media accounts, this is contemporary storytelling at its most compelling and addictive. I started this story yesterday and couldn't wait to get up today and finish it. Never usually a comfortable read, Deity was a disturbing insight into how one man can be transformed into an idol, a living god, and how the ramifications of that echo through to those who know him and his fans. I thoroughly enjoyed this. The best yet from this series!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dale Robertson

    Another superb addition to the Six Stories series. Matt's writing is brilliant and the podcast style of the tale is catchy and interesting. This time Scott King is investigating allegations about a famed popstar and trying to unravel what really happened behind the scenes of his lifestyle, and his death. Some pretty creepy aspects reveal themselves in terms of the myth that "haunts" the woods where Zach Crystal built his mansion, but most of the story is about how a man can reach god like status Another superb addition to the Six Stories series. Matt's writing is brilliant and the podcast style of the tale is catchy and interesting. This time Scott King is investigating allegations about a famed popstar and trying to unravel what really happened behind the scenes of his lifestyle, and his death. Some pretty creepy aspects reveal themselves in terms of the myth that "haunts" the woods where Zach Crystal built his mansion, but most of the story is about how a man can reach god like status and use his power to get whatever he wants, whilst his fans will blindly disregard any bad accusations and bring hell down on anyone that voices them. I mean, I couldn't help thinking of Michael Jackson whilst reading this. It's rings true and is certainly relevant in terms of how the world and society works. Which is super scary.

  21. 4 out of 5

    K.S. Thompson

    Now we know what Matt Wesolowski was up to in 2020. Another amazing addition to the "Six Stories" series. This one centers around the mysterious life and death of a pop star. An individual who was adored by many and sadly questioned by few. A creature said to be lurking in the woods, seeming to herald the arrival of misfortune. Was it real or just a tale to keep people at arm's length and afford a reclusive artist the privacy they craved? This is what happens when a human being rises to the leve Now we know what Matt Wesolowski was up to in 2020. Another amazing addition to the "Six Stories" series. This one centers around the mysterious life and death of a pop star. An individual who was adored by many and sadly questioned by few. A creature said to be lurking in the woods, seeming to herald the arrival of misfortune. Was it real or just a tale to keep people at arm's length and afford a reclusive artist the privacy they craved? This is what happens when a human being rises to the level of Deity, the price we're willing to pay for a glimpse behind the curtain, and the price those around them must pay in order to keep them on top.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sally Boocock

    Matt Wesolowski has a unique way of writing which has a way of pulling you in from page one . Deity is no exception. A thought provoking , original,dark story which is genuinely chilling and an ending I never saw coming. A fabulous clever and intriguing story which I highly recommend. Ig you haven't read any of the six story series I highly recommend you start right now. Matt Wesolowski has a unique way of writing which has a way of pulling you in from page one . Deity is no exception. A thought provoking , original,dark story which is genuinely chilling and an ending I never saw coming. A fabulous clever and intriguing story which I highly recommend. Ig you haven't read any of the six story series I highly recommend you start right now.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Abery

    This was really good. Like...really REALLY good. It's bone-chilling and has a great plot idea. I love Wesolowski's writing and ability to make you shudder as you read. Also, can we take a moment to LOVE that cover?? This was really good. Like...really REALLY good. It's bone-chilling and has a great plot idea. I love Wesolowski's writing and ability to make you shudder as you read. Also, can we take a moment to LOVE that cover??

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Another exceptional book from the Six Stories series. I love these stories so much and each one gets better and better. When are they going to make this a series in Netflix?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Armor

    A fantastic addition to the Six Stories series. This one is a slow, unrelenting burn all the way through. I loved it! And Leonard too!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christine Blake

    Another strong entry in a consistently excellent series. Full review to follow on my blog in due course.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Don Jimmy Reviews

    Full review to come.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Valentina Matveeva

    The best as usual All I say is I can’t believe I have to wait one more year for the next book. Not ok Matt, Not ok

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leo

    Will I ever not rate a Matt Wesolowski book 5 stars? This was fantastic just like the other books in the series, this is definitely one of my favourites and one I will think about for awhile

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

    This series is so compelling and atmospheric and this installment was incredible. So thought-provoking.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.