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Sex, drugs, and murder in 1980s Los Angeles, and the best new twist on paperback pulp heroes since The Punisher or Jack Reacher. ED BRUBAKER and SEAN PHILLIPS, the modern masters of crime noir, bring us the last thing anyone expected from them—a good guy. A bold new series of original graphic novels, with three books releasing over the next year, each a full-length story t Sex, drugs, and murder in 1980s Los Angeles, and the best new twist on paperback pulp heroes since The Punisher or Jack Reacher. ED BRUBAKER and SEAN PHILLIPS, the modern masters of crime noir, bring us the last thing anyone expected from them—a good guy. A bold new series of original graphic novels, with three books releasing over the next year, each a full-length story that stands on its own. Meet Ethan Reckless: Your trouble is his business, for the right price. But when a fugitive from his radical student days reaches out for help, Ethan must face the only thing he fears…his own past.“Oh man this book pushed EVERY crime fiction button for me. Working class setting covering up for a deeper societal rot, a battered, damaged (literally) protagonist against the beast, and all of it squirming and lunging through an over-lit early 80s L.A. Noir bleached to bleakness. Bliss." —Patton Oswalt “Imagine Redford at his peak, ambling through sun-drenched, eighties L.A. in a serpentine plot that is equal parts Long Goodbye and Point Break. No one does crime fic like BRUBAKER and PHILLIPS and their collaboration has never felt more new. Explosive. Vital. And yes...reckless. I love this book.” —Damon Lindelof (Lost, HBO’s Watchmen) "RECKLESS is an absolute rush: on the same level as golden age Travis McGee novels and the hardest-hitting Richard Stark stories. This one comes at you as fast as Steve McQueen in a souped-up Mustang and as hard as Charles Bronson with a baseball bat. You gotta have it." —Joe Hill (Locke & Key, N0S4A2) Look for Book Two in the RECKLESS series in April 2021!


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Sex, drugs, and murder in 1980s Los Angeles, and the best new twist on paperback pulp heroes since The Punisher or Jack Reacher. ED BRUBAKER and SEAN PHILLIPS, the modern masters of crime noir, bring us the last thing anyone expected from them—a good guy. A bold new series of original graphic novels, with three books releasing over the next year, each a full-length story t Sex, drugs, and murder in 1980s Los Angeles, and the best new twist on paperback pulp heroes since The Punisher or Jack Reacher. ED BRUBAKER and SEAN PHILLIPS, the modern masters of crime noir, bring us the last thing anyone expected from them—a good guy. A bold new series of original graphic novels, with three books releasing over the next year, each a full-length story that stands on its own. Meet Ethan Reckless: Your trouble is his business, for the right price. But when a fugitive from his radical student days reaches out for help, Ethan must face the only thing he fears…his own past.“Oh man this book pushed EVERY crime fiction button for me. Working class setting covering up for a deeper societal rot, a battered, damaged (literally) protagonist against the beast, and all of it squirming and lunging through an over-lit early 80s L.A. Noir bleached to bleakness. Bliss." —Patton Oswalt “Imagine Redford at his peak, ambling through sun-drenched, eighties L.A. in a serpentine plot that is equal parts Long Goodbye and Point Break. No one does crime fic like BRUBAKER and PHILLIPS and their collaboration has never felt more new. Explosive. Vital. And yes...reckless. I love this book.” —Damon Lindelof (Lost, HBO’s Watchmen) "RECKLESS is an absolute rush: on the same level as golden age Travis McGee novels and the hardest-hitting Richard Stark stories. This one comes at you as fast as Steve McQueen in a souped-up Mustang and as hard as Charles Bronson with a baseball bat. You gotta have it." —Joe Hill (Locke & Key, N0S4A2) Look for Book Two in the RECKLESS series in April 2021!

30 review for Reckless

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Ethan Reckless: former undercover FBI operative once posing as a ‘60s radical is now banished from the agency and, in 1981 Los Angeles when we catch up with him, he’s a surfer dude who owns a dilapidated movie house downtown. He’s also a secret gun-for-hire. And then an old flame tracks him down with a mission to kill for a fortune - but who’s playing who and what’s Ethan getting himself into? Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ latest is one helluva barnstormer of a comic! From the cracking opener t Ethan Reckless: former undercover FBI operative once posing as a ‘60s radical is now banished from the agency and, in 1981 Los Angeles when we catch up with him, he’s a surfer dude who owns a dilapidated movie house downtown. He’s also a secret gun-for-hire. And then an old flame tracks him down with a mission to kill for a fortune - but who’s playing who and what’s Ethan getting himself into? Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ latest is one helluva barnstormer of a comic! From the cracking opener to the multi-layered, tense narrative that slowly unfolds, I was gripped all the way through. Like in Criminal with their series regular Tracy Lawless, this book features another tough bastard with an unlikely name: Ethan Reckless. Over the many years he’s been writing these kinds of stories, Brubaker’s perfected the hard-boiled, noirish voice that he uses for Ethan and the words flow easily - it’s an effortlessly compelling read. Meanwhile, the plot twists and turns in unexpected directions, the action scenes are well-spaced apart to keep up the excitement, and you learn bits and pieces of Ethan’s past as you go along, rather than in one heavy info-dump, so there’s never a dull moment - the pacing is masterful. Brubaker’s not doing anything here that we haven’t seen him do before - tailing crooks, tracking down leads, gunfights, bombs, fist-fighting nekkid (ok, maybe that last one’s new!) - but he’s doing it so damn well in this book that I didn’t mind at all. Ethan’s a fascinating character with a storied past, the supporting cast are fine for the roles they’re cast in - Rainy as the femme fatale, Wilder as the villain, Anna as the fixer - and I loved the set pieces (the daring raid on the airfield in particular is amazing) and the conclusion was fantastic. Top it off with Sean Phillips’ usual first-rate artwork and what’s not to love? At least one good thing came out of the pandy this year: Reckless. Because, as Brubaker mentions in his afterword, the pandy put the brakes on his and Sean’s monthlies and allowed him the time to consider what they were doing. He always wanted to do the comics equivalent of paperback pulp novels, similar to Darwyn Cooke’s Richard Stark’s Parker adaptations, and now he had the time to do it. So Reckless is the first of at least three books in a series to come out over the next year. The second Reckless book, Friend of the Devil, is due in April and the third, untitled, probably this time next year. And, if the next two are even half as good as this first one was, I can’t wait! There’s still a few weeks to go before the monumental year that was 2020 slithers away but I don’t expect to come across another comic as good as this so I’m calling it now - Reckless is my pick for comic of the year!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Brubaker and Phillips's ode to the pulp novels of the 60's, even though it's set in 1981. Ethan Reckless is a tough guy, gun for hire. Think Robert Redford in the California sunshine but with Clint Eastwood's disposition. He operates as a surlier, one man A-Team. When you're at your last resort, you call him for help. In the first of at least three adventures to come, an old flame pops up, in trouble of course. This femme fatale sics him on a group of drug runners. Lots of twists and turns I did Brubaker and Phillips's ode to the pulp novels of the 60's, even though it's set in 1981. Ethan Reckless is a tough guy, gun for hire. Think Robert Redford in the California sunshine but with Clint Eastwood's disposition. He operates as a surlier, one man A-Team. When you're at your last resort, you call him for help. In the first of at least three adventures to come, an old flame pops up, in trouble of course. This femme fatale sics him on a group of drug runners. Lots of twists and turns I didn't see coming happen. Brubaker intersperses the action amongst his effortless dialogue. It all adds up to pulpy, noirish, goodness. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    “Put the fucking wrench down, asshole. I’m a pacifist.” “Great. Then so am I.” Reckless is yet another top-of-the-line crime comic by Ed Brubaker and Sean Philips. I saw it just now, got it and read it, setting aside anything else I was doing, as I always do when I see one of their comics come out (why am I weeks late in seeing it??!). One thing that calls attention to itself always in the recent new ones is the coloring by Jacob Phillips, which is different than what Elizabeth Breitweiser had bee “Put the fucking wrench down, asshole. I’m a pacifist.” “Great. Then so am I.” Reckless is yet another top-of-the-line crime comic by Ed Brubaker and Sean Philips. I saw it just now, got it and read it, setting aside anything else I was doing, as I always do when I see one of their comics come out (why am I weeks late in seeing it??!). One thing that calls attention to itself always in the recent new ones is the coloring by Jacob Phillips, which is different than what Elizabeth Breitweiser had been doing, a little quirkier, brighter, but it’s more than fine; everything about this, the writing and the cartooning, is amazing pulp storytelling. And a few times while reading it I laughed out loud with admiration, having been fooled into thinking I knew what was going on. It’s a comics thrill ride into hell. I love the fact that when Ethan Reckless is telling his story we see other things going on, adding texture and layering and another broader story behind the story, things that will always figure in. Pay attention! I mean, not that it matters about paying attention, because you aren’t going to really get what is going on. Not really, as entertained as you will be. But you won't be complaining, trust me. So what does Ethan Reckless do? He’s a kind of fixer, a guy that gets paid to take care of people’s problems, outside of the law, but in the sixties he was being paid by the CIA to be an undercover agent infiltrating anti-war groups. But he fell in love with one of the girls whose brother was part of a Weatherman offshoot group blowing up buildings, and then he was blown up in one, and didn’t see the girl again. Until of course he does. She needs him to recover some bank heist money for him, which gets complicated, as you might have anticipated. This is one of the places I was yelling at Brubaker and Phillips, more like cheering aloud, really, for pulling out the rug on me. I love the subtitles for the various sections: This Thing I heard; I Wouldn’t Really Call it Work; Which Way the Wind Blows; The Underground Woman; Fortunate Son; The Way It’s Done; Down These Mean Streets, The Decline of Western Civilization, and so, all of them references to movies and books Brubaker knows well. Pulp graphic novels, and 2 more coming in the next year within the Reckless World!! I’m ready! Oh, and if you don't like the name Ethan Reckless, then you don't get the pleasure Brubaker derives from pulp stories in all their corny glory. Remember their Criminal series that features Tracy LAWLESS??!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Brubaker and Phillips go the pulp route, which is especially noticeable in the more extravagant plot. The story goes to some ridiculous places, that would stand out in a regular Brubaker book, but here kind of fall in place. If anything, I wish he would go out a bit further with his characters, as they are pretty much in the standard Brubaker mould (meaning: believable and realistic). The most outlandish detail about the main character is that his last name is, well, Reckless. I look forward to s Brubaker and Phillips go the pulp route, which is especially noticeable in the more extravagant plot. The story goes to some ridiculous places, that would stand out in a regular Brubaker book, but here kind of fall in place. If anything, I wish he would go out a bit further with his characters, as they are pretty much in the standard Brubaker mould (meaning: believable and realistic). The most outlandish detail about the main character is that his last name is, well, Reckless. I look forward to see where they will take this series. (Received an ARC through Edelweiss)

  5. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Another crime story written by Brubaker, so you know this shit gonna be good. We have a ex-fbi worker, who lost some of his memory, who now runs a Movie Theater, who also happens to help people with problems when they pay him. When a old friend comes around and asks him for help he can't deny her after their past. But once he gets tangled up in a web of lies he starts to get in over his head. Backstabbing, plenty of deaths, and a pretty fucked up ending we get everything we want from Brubaker. T Another crime story written by Brubaker, so you know this shit gonna be good. We have a ex-fbi worker, who lost some of his memory, who now runs a Movie Theater, who also happens to help people with problems when they pay him. When a old friend comes around and asks him for help he can't deny her after their past. But once he gets tangled up in a web of lies he starts to get in over his head. Backstabbing, plenty of deaths, and a pretty fucked up ending we get everything we want from Brubaker. The character work, as always, is really solid. The artwork, come on what do you expect. I wasn't completely sold on the partner for our main guy Reckless here, but I feel like we'll get more of her in the next volume coming out in 2021. Overall, if like any of Brubaker's work, this is a easy buy/read. A 4 out of 5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    SUPER FAST REVIEW: Good but not Brubaker’s best (though to be fair I did just read Cruel Summer which was a masterpiece!). So as always the art and story are excellent! This one also has some suspense and good action scenes too. There’s also some comic relief that works surprisingly great (mostly thanks to a pretty decent supporting character). There’s also some good dialogue. I wasn’t particularly into the main character TBH (that could change in future books). There’s a global warming bit that ju SUPER FAST REVIEW: Good but not Brubaker’s best (though to be fair I did just read Cruel Summer which was a masterpiece!). So as always the art and story are excellent! This one also has some suspense and good action scenes too. There’s also some comic relief that works surprisingly great (mostly thanks to a pretty decent supporting character). There’s also some good dialogue. I wasn’t particularly into the main character TBH (that could change in future books). There’s a global warming bit that just felt forced and didn’t make any sense (especially weird to see forced political moments here since Brubaker’s work is rarely political). Also, I didn’t like how it seemed to sort of embrace drug use (between this and My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies, I seriously hope one of my favorite writers of all time doesn’t have a drug problem). Overall definitely good stuff. Book two comes out in a few months and should be pretty bad-ass. I liked this for sure but it ain’t on the same level as Criminal, Fatale or The Fade Out. Still worth a read nonetheless. 4/5

  7. 5 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    In 1975, an undercover FBI agent almost died in the blast of an anti-government terrorist bomb. With holes in his memory and trauma-muted emotional response, he was cut loose in disgrace by the federal authorities. Today, unwanted by the Bureau, he survives as a soldier of fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find him, maybe you can hire...Ethan Reckless. Okay, obviously the elevator pitch reminds me a lot of The A-Team , but the tone is pure Brubaker-Phillip In 1975, an undercover FBI agent almost died in the blast of an anti-government terrorist bomb. With holes in his memory and trauma-muted emotional response, he was cut loose in disgrace by the federal authorities. Today, unwanted by the Bureau, he survives as a soldier of fortune. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find him, maybe you can hire...Ethan Reckless. Okay, obviously the elevator pitch reminds me a lot of The A-Team , but the tone is pure Brubaker-Phillips and the quality is far beyond that of the junk TV show. Reckless is seriously good***, and I was thrilled to learn that this is the first of three planned volumes, all of which will be released before the end of 2021. The colors are marvelous. The plot is complex and unpredictable without sacrificing plausibility. The aesthetic design of the villain especially is superb. Homerun. -------------------------- [***It's seriously good with the exception of the protagonist's name. 'Ethan Reckless' is the kind of hero moniker you see in a 30 Rock episode that mocks bad TV detective shows.]

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Vlasaty

    Everything Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips do together is the best thing.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Benji Glaab

    4.5🌟 This is some of the best Brubaker/Phillips to date. There are some clever choices made by Brubaker here where he can stay in the similar circles that most of their stories occur while giving us a unique protagonist. While Ethan Reckless is more like a Kurt Russel/Mel Gibson type rather than a shady criminal. I can't wait for volume 2 this was literally unputdownable and had to read this in one sitting. I think it's also worth noting this was created as a graphic novel instead of being serial 4.5🌟 This is some of the best Brubaker/Phillips to date. There are some clever choices made by Brubaker here where he can stay in the similar circles that most of their stories occur while giving us a unique protagonist. While Ethan Reckless is more like a Kurt Russel/Mel Gibson type rather than a shady criminal. I can't wait for volume 2 this was literally unputdownable and had to read this in one sitting. I think it's also worth noting this was created as a graphic novel instead of being serialized into 5-6 monthly issues. Volume 2 and 3 will also be released in volumes this year!!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Combine the A-Team, half a dozen 70's detective shows, and Max Allan Collins Quarry books and you get Reckless. Combine the A-Team, half a dozen 70's detective shows, and Max Allan Collins Quarry books and you get Reckless.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sean Pollock

    Brubaker and Philips are aging like a fine wine. I feel like a broken record saying their latest work is some of their best every time, but this really is. As is standard for them by now this book has excellently well thought out and written characters. A roller coaster of a plot, and an utterly gorgeous look thanks to Sean and Jacob Philips. Can't wait for the next one. Brubaker and Philips are aging like a fine wine. I feel like a broken record saying their latest work is some of their best every time, but this really is. As is standard for them by now this book has excellently well thought out and written characters. A roller coaster of a plot, and an utterly gorgeous look thanks to Sean and Jacob Philips. Can't wait for the next one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Geraghty

    A great graphic novel. Ethan Reckless reminded me of characters like Lew Archer or Elliot Gould as Philip Marlowe in The Long Goodbye. The cover reminded me of the paperback novels I read during the 70s and 80s . I am definitely getting Friend of the Devil in April.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    Brubaker and Phillips are masters of pulp fiction graphic novels and I seriously think Reckless is perhaps one of their best. It has all the elements of what makes a good novel plus rather inspired twists and turns. Great art, even better writing, definitely a book worth savoring.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    I've been a long time reader of Brubaker and Phillips, and what I've loved the most is the slow tension-filled build to the moment of chaos: the heist that goes horribly wrong, the plans built on the assumption that gives way, the reveal of the relationship that means everything is going to shit. As a result, I have been less impressed with recent shorter works (like Pulp or My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies) --- they had the atmosphere I was looking for, but not the length of tension. This is b I've been a long time reader of Brubaker and Phillips, and what I've loved the most is the slow tension-filled build to the moment of chaos: the heist that goes horribly wrong, the plans built on the assumption that gives way, the reveal of the relationship that means everything is going to shit. As a result, I have been less impressed with recent shorter works (like Pulp or My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies) --- they had the atmosphere I was looking for, but not the length of tension. This is better than those volumes, but not up to my favorites from the duo. It's longer, and it does a great job of setting up our protagonist Reckless as the man who will "help out" for a cause and cash. (According to back matter, this is the first of three volumes featuring Reckless coming out this year.) There's a fine early 80's setting in LA and an even better back story from the 70's (which is worth not spoiling). There's the violence and detection that I wanted to see, and some (but only some) of the chaos I cherish. One note that troubles me: Brubaker is writing Reckless with a loss of emotional affect due to physical trauma. I'm all good with private detectives and their ilk showing little emotion, but I prefer the idea that they are choking all the pain down (or drinking it away) to the idea that the pain is neurologically absent. It led to a somewhat blank feel to the narration that wasn't to my taste. One last note: someone who helps out for cash headquartered in a movie theatre? Luke Cage much?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Having so much of Criminal centre on a family called Lawless was already pushing it, but now Brubaker and Phillips give us Ethan Reckless. Admittedly his setting and vibe are a lot more eighties, a deliberate homage to paperback action heroes of the era, which in some ways makes it easier to get away with. Much like the Equalizer or the A-Team, or their grislier literary equivalents, Ethan helps people out of the sort of situation the cops can't or won't. Because this is a Brubaker/Phillips book Having so much of Criminal centre on a family called Lawless was already pushing it, but now Brubaker and Phillips give us Ethan Reckless. Admittedly his setting and vibe are a lot more eighties, a deliberate homage to paperback action heroes of the era, which in some ways makes it easier to get away with. Much like the Equalizer or the A-Team, or their grislier literary equivalents, Ethan helps people out of the sort of situation the cops can't or won't. Because this is a Brubaker/Phillips book, that includes being happy to help crooks for pay – but equally, the deserving he helps without asking reward, much to the frustration of his assistant. There's a bit of a meta angle, which I enjoy as I enjoy anything that gets Brubaker a little out of his comfort zone – when Ethan talks about how he feels flatter since his little accident than he did in the seventies, it's hard not to take it as a commentary on eighties glitz replacing seventies grit. And equally, while as usual it all looks very good, the pages that genuinely impressed me were the ones that weren't the usual dark rooms and scuzzy motels, but the sunny beach scenes. The afterword talks about Brubaker's creation of Ethan, "using his point of view to look back at when the world made a little more sense, yet still felt like it was doomed", and explains the book as a product of lockdown. Which reminded me that in April, when the UK was first locked down, the only fresh Image ARC on Edelweiss was a Brubaker/Phillips. And now we've been struggling through this morass long enough for them to come out with a whole new book from scratch, just as the few scraps of liberty we'd been thrown have been snatched away again, and yes, once more this is the only new Image ARC up there. The worst of it is, I fear they'll manage at least one more installment before any semblance of the world that was is restored to us.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    Ed Brubaker is probably my favorite comic book writer. Why? Well he is something that very few writers of the graphic medium ever are and that is consistent. Everything that he has written has been at the very least very easy to read, at his apex he is a fantastic read nearly all the time. If he is paired with his regular artistic partner, Sean Phillips then he has been 100% amazing. With Reckless, he is at his A game best. He has created a classic 1960's-70's crime book detective. He reads a li Ed Brubaker is probably my favorite comic book writer. Why? Well he is something that very few writers of the graphic medium ever are and that is consistent. Everything that he has written has been at the very least very easy to read, at his apex he is a fantastic read nearly all the time. If he is paired with his regular artistic partner, Sean Phillips then he has been 100% amazing. With Reckless, he is at his A game best. He has created a classic 1960's-70's crime book detective. He reads a little like Travis Mcgee or Lew Archer with a twist of Parker or Quarry added in for some nice gray tone. Ethan Reckless is a man looking to be a redeeming person who questions choices that he has made in the past. He still does things his way which sometimes blurs the lines of right and legal. He still loves the ladies. The story is solid. This feels like a return to that era the late 70's or early 80's. Brubaker writes full characters. Phillips conveys the story as well as ever. Jacob Phillips does a fine job coloring the book. I look forward to the further adventures of Ethan Reckless and hope that Brubaker continues to publish complete stories as he has here in one volume.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips are perhaps the best creative team currently working in comics. Their long-term creative partnership continues to bear fruit, and each project brings something new to the table without ever sacrificing quality. Reckless, their new OGN, is no exception. It's a period piece, set in LA of the early 80s, with currents running form the counter-culture of the late 60s and early 70s still in play. Ethan Reckless is a character you'd recognize from any action movie of that Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips are perhaps the best creative team currently working in comics. Their long-term creative partnership continues to bear fruit, and each project brings something new to the table without ever sacrificing quality. Reckless, their new OGN, is no exception. It's a period piece, set in LA of the early 80s, with currents running form the counter-culture of the late 60s and early 70s still in play. Ethan Reckless is a character you'd recognize from any action movie of that era, but has a depth and nuance of character most action heroes lack, but the book provides the kind of breakneck action those films delivered as well. Yet, there is still quiet moments for character development and revelation, all in a package that showcases Brubaker's noir and pulp sensibilities as well. Brubaker and Phillips never disappoint, and this one will place high up on my list of favorites from the pair.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    The hero's name is Ethan Reckless? Other than this, this is a really nice slice of 70s paranoia, coupled with a hardboiled detective yarn. Reckless is a detective along the lines of Travis McGee: not licensed, but doing jobs for a portion of the amount to be recovered. He lives in the ruins of an old movie theater, still equipped to run the occasional film or midnight matinee. And an old flame from the radical 60s drops in to ask him for a favor. This is just about perfect, although the denoueme The hero's name is Ethan Reckless? Other than this, this is a really nice slice of 70s paranoia, coupled with a hardboiled detective yarn. Reckless is a detective along the lines of Travis McGee: not licensed, but doing jobs for a portion of the amount to be recovered. He lives in the ruins of an old movie theater, still equipped to run the occasional film or midnight matinee. And an old flame from the radical 60s drops in to ask him for a favor. This is just about perfect, although the denouement doesn't really add up--I'm not sure Reckless really solves this particular case, to be honest. Still, you pretty much can't go wrong with a Brubaker/Phillips production and I'm glad to see that there are plans for another Reckless adventure.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    The Brubaker/Phillips team does it again, with a taut thriller that feels like noir but transposed into the 80's. A man who makes his living as a fixer gets pulled into trouble when an old flame appears, tangling him in his past as well as a dangerous present. It is occasionally brutal, convoluted without ever being confusing, and full of memorable characters and memorable art (matched with great color work). I hope it's successful enough to inspire further volumes; Ethan Reckless has all the ma The Brubaker/Phillips team does it again, with a taut thriller that feels like noir but transposed into the 80's. A man who makes his living as a fixer gets pulled into trouble when an old flame appears, tangling him in his past as well as a dangerous present. It is occasionally brutal, convoluted without ever being confusing, and full of memorable characters and memorable art (matched with great color work). I hope it's successful enough to inspire further volumes; Ethan Reckless has all the makings of a Parker or Travis McGee, and the scenario Brubaker has cooked up is rife with possibilities.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Reckless is an original graphic novel by one of the best duos in comics today, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips. Set in Southern California in the 1980s, Ethan Reckless is a pulp hero with a troubled past. Call a 1-800 number with your troubles and Ethan may just solve them if he likes your case and your wallet. I haven't read a lot of Brubaker's indie work but that is going to have to change. This book was pulpy greatness. It has the feel of your 70s/89s gritty movie heroes. There is plenty of act Reckless is an original graphic novel by one of the best duos in comics today, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips. Set in Southern California in the 1980s, Ethan Reckless is a pulp hero with a troubled past. Call a 1-800 number with your troubles and Ethan may just solve them if he likes your case and your wallet. I haven't read a lot of Brubaker's indie work but that is going to have to change. This book was pulpy greatness. It has the feel of your 70s/89s gritty movie heroes. There is plenty of action and violence with a ton of twists and turns. The art is also perfect for the feel of this world. Very excited for the follow up book in April.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    I wasn't gonna read this but they they had a signed copy by brubaker and phillips, both of whom I am a fan of. So...it was a well told story. Very noir-ish. I thought the twist was a little contrived but I wasn't too disappointed because I enjoyed the read. It felt personal. The kind of story we've come to expect and enjoy from brubaker. 4 stars. I wasn't gonna read this but they they had a signed copy by brubaker and phillips, both of whom I am a fan of. So...it was a well told story. Very noir-ish. I thought the twist was a little contrived but I wasn't too disappointed because I enjoyed the read. It felt personal. The kind of story we've come to expect and enjoy from brubaker. 4 stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Sztehlo

    Fuck this was gooooood. Brubaker and Phillips are aging like fine wine, their stories getting better and better. After 20 years of writing and drawing crime comics you’d think it would get stale. But it never does. A fantastic new entry in their pantheon of crime comics, with a great new hero to rally around. I can’t wait for the next instalment.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dan Blackley

    This is a new series that Brubaker and Phillips are doing. It's about a man named Reckless who helps people that can't go to the police. I like the premise of the novel and the writing and illustrations are amazing. Brubaker can spin a story better than anyone in comics. This book, however, was a little disappointing. After the book, Pulp, I felt that the story wasn't as interesting as it was in Pulp. Don't get me wrong, it's still a good story and this is the beginning of a series. There is an a This is a new series that Brubaker and Phillips are doing. It's about a man named Reckless who helps people that can't go to the police. I like the premise of the novel and the writing and illustrations are amazing. Brubaker can spin a story better than anyone in comics. This book, however, was a little disappointing. After the book, Pulp, I felt that the story wasn't as interesting as it was in Pulp. Don't get me wrong, it's still a good story and this is the beginning of a series. There is an ad for the next Reckless Book in April in the back. I just hope the stories are more in line with his previous work. Still, he writes the best that Comics have!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Finishing the year on a high with a great Brubaker/Phillips story. These guys really never put a foot wrong. Great crime story, superb artwork as always. Their character work is amazing as always. Cant think of a duo who does that aspect better. Highly recommend this one

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    3.5 This was interesting and different from what I usually read. I liked the art style and the crime aspect. Wish we found out a little more, but I’m sure we will in the next volume.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erik Carl son

    Delicious and pulpy! I love the long format graphic novel approach.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Hmmm… Ethan Reckless (stupid name, let's face it) is a tough guy, perfectly willing to do bad in order to do good, much as he did in a certain time in his past. That's a past that's going to come back to bite him on the tail when he gets one of those jobs you just know is not going to lead to happiness, a safe conclusion, or even payment, when an old flame comes calling and declares him the only way for her to get her hands on the "boat drinks" fund she's been robbed of. This started excellently Hmmm… Ethan Reckless (stupid name, let's face it) is a tough guy, perfectly willing to do bad in order to do good, much as he did in a certain time in his past. That's a past that's going to come back to bite him on the tail when he gets one of those jobs you just know is not going to lead to happiness, a safe conclusion, or even payment, when an old flame comes calling and declares him the only way for her to get her hands on the "boat drinks" fund she's been robbed of. This started excellently, and tapered off to such a weak ending I had to re-read it and see if I'd missed anything – I hadn't. The bigger dramatic twists and surprises, if any, end up concerning the past, and the timeline our narrator is living in (actually, for little reason, the very early 1980s) ends up exceedingly meh. I'd actually go as far as to say that if this were not from these creators I would doubt my picking up the rest of this planned trilogy. Despite all the puff quotes from star names, this is not them at their best.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jake Slaughter

    Brubaker and Phillips make perfect crime/pulp comics. The coloring in particular stands out in this volume. I reread their Criminal work last year and I'm thrilled they're moving to this new format. Looking forward to the next Reckless later this year. Brubaker and Phillips make perfect crime/pulp comics. The coloring in particular stands out in this volume. I reread their Criminal work last year and I'm thrilled they're moving to this new format. Looking forward to the next Reckless later this year.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    This is a review of a sample Image provided for me. Unsurprisingly this Brubaker & Phillips collaboration is a crime story about a “fixer” of problems getting involved in a case with alarming consequences. My sample ends on a cliffhanger but it incorporates most of the creators’ specialities: a “hero”, femme fatale, criminal elements and murder. It’s intriguing enough to make me want to read the finished product. Good stuff.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Brubaker and Phillips are one of the few teams in comics that have never let me down in the entire history of their collaborations. Reckless is no exception. Brubaker and Phillips give us their take on the non-Private Eye paperback heroes that lined shelves in the 1970s and 1980s. Like all their previous work, they easily master the genre. Ethan Reckless is a man who has a 1-800 number where you tell him your problem. If he likes your story, he'll take your case for a fee. Part Matthew Scudder a Brubaker and Phillips are one of the few teams in comics that have never let me down in the entire history of their collaborations. Reckless is no exception. Brubaker and Phillips give us their take on the non-Private Eye paperback heroes that lined shelves in the 1970s and 1980s. Like all their previous work, they easily master the genre. Ethan Reckless is a man who has a 1-800 number where you tell him your problem. If he likes your story, he'll take your case for a fee. Part Matthew Scudder and part Travis McGee, Ethan is a new kind of character for the Brubaker/Phillips team to tackle, he's secretly a knight errant, just waiting for the right woman to drift back into his life. From page one I read through the whole graphic novel breathlessly. And the best part is that we know we have two more graphic novels coming very soon, as the Reckless world has only begun to reveal itself. (Special Note: I received an digital ARC from Image Comics through Edelweiss)

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