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The Potsdam Conference (officially known as the "Berlin Conference"), was held from 17 July to 2 August 1945 at Cecilienhof Palace, the home of Crown Prince Wilhelm, in Brandenburg, and saw the leaders of the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union and the United States, gathered together to decide how to demilitarize, denazify, decentralize, and administer Germany, which had agr The Potsdam Conference (officially known as the "Berlin Conference"), was held from 17 July to 2 August 1945 at Cecilienhof Palace, the home of Crown Prince Wilhelm, in Brandenburg, and saw the leaders of the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union and the United States, gathered together to decide how to demilitarize, denazify, decentralize, and administer Germany, which had agreed to unconditional surrender on 8 May (VE Day). They determined that the remaining German populations in Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary - both the ethnic (Sudeten) and the more recent arrivals (as part of the long-term plan for the domination of Eastern Europe) - should to be transferred to Germany, but despite an undertaking that these would be effected in an orderly and humane manner, the expulsions were carried out in a ruthless and often brutal manner. Land was seized with farms and houses expropriated; the occupants placed into camps prior to mass expulsion from the country. Many of these were labor camps already occupied by Jews who had survived the concentration camps, where they were equally unwelcome. Further cleansing was carried out in Romania and Yugoslavia, and by 1950, an estimated 11.5 million German people had been removed from Eastern Europe with up to three million dead. The number of ethnic Germans killed during the 'cleansing' period is suggested at 500,000, but in 1958, Statistisches Bundesamt (the Federal Statistical Office of Germany) published a report which gave the figure of 1.6 million relating to expulsion-related population losses in Poland alone. Further investigation may in due course provide a more accurate figure to avoid the accusation of sensationalism.


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The Potsdam Conference (officially known as the "Berlin Conference"), was held from 17 July to 2 August 1945 at Cecilienhof Palace, the home of Crown Prince Wilhelm, in Brandenburg, and saw the leaders of the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union and the United States, gathered together to decide how to demilitarize, denazify, decentralize, and administer Germany, which had agr The Potsdam Conference (officially known as the "Berlin Conference"), was held from 17 July to 2 August 1945 at Cecilienhof Palace, the home of Crown Prince Wilhelm, in Brandenburg, and saw the leaders of the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union and the United States, gathered together to decide how to demilitarize, denazify, decentralize, and administer Germany, which had agreed to unconditional surrender on 8 May (VE Day). They determined that the remaining German populations in Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary - both the ethnic (Sudeten) and the more recent arrivals (as part of the long-term plan for the domination of Eastern Europe) - should to be transferred to Germany, but despite an undertaking that these would be effected in an orderly and humane manner, the expulsions were carried out in a ruthless and often brutal manner. Land was seized with farms and houses expropriated; the occupants placed into camps prior to mass expulsion from the country. Many of these were labor camps already occupied by Jews who had survived the concentration camps, where they were equally unwelcome. Further cleansing was carried out in Romania and Yugoslavia, and by 1950, an estimated 11.5 million German people had been removed from Eastern Europe with up to three million dead. The number of ethnic Germans killed during the 'cleansing' period is suggested at 500,000, but in 1958, Statistisches Bundesamt (the Federal Statistical Office of Germany) published a report which gave the figure of 1.6 million relating to expulsion-related population losses in Poland alone. Further investigation may in due course provide a more accurate figure to avoid the accusation of sensationalism.

4 review for The Forgotten German Genocide: Revenge Cleansing in Eastern Europe, 1945-50

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zeb Kantrowitz

    Even before the end of WW2, in countries of Eastern Europe (especially Poland, Hungary and Czecho-slavkia) those who had been under the boot of Nazi Germany, took revenge on the Volks-Deutsch. (The Volks Deutsch were groups of German speaking people who had settled in Eastern European countries in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.) The Soviets exiled the Volga and Crimean Germans wholesale to Siberia and Khazakstan. The minority German groups who lauded it over the locals people found the Even before the end of WW2, in countries of Eastern Europe (especially Poland, Hungary and Czecho-slavkia) those who had been under the boot of Nazi Germany, took revenge on the Volks-Deutsch. (The Volks Deutsch were groups of German speaking people who had settled in Eastern European countries in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.) The Soviets exiled the Volga and Crimean Germans wholesale to Siberia and Khazakstan. The minority German groups who lauded it over the locals people found themselves being subjected to a pogram like had happened to the Jews during the war. Especially hard hit were groups like the Sudeten Germans who helped destroy the Czech state and the Germans who were the elites in the Baltic states. All of the Germans in the former parts of the German Empire that were taken away at the end of WW1 and WW2 were put on trains and sent back to the remainder of Germany. Just as the Germans who literally put unwanted citizens forcibly put onto trains, now found themselves suffering the same indignities. In area where the Soviet Army defeated the Nazi troops woman and girls were subjected to rape, robbery and murder and then expulsion. Brown does a good job of describing what happened on a country by country order. The main complaint that I had about this book, was the redundancy of much of the information. You read about much of what happened in the introduction and the in the by-country discussion, but where there were people on the borders, they were listed both times. In some places it seemed that he was apologizing for what had happened. But most of this revenge was like what happened in Yugoslavia when that country broke-up. People have long memories when it comes to ethnic cleansing and oppression by a minority to a majority population.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    Sad. Nothing good in WW2. Human's totally lost their humanity. Shame on everyone. Sorry, man's inhumanity to man has been ongoing for forever and continues today. I am familiar with this particular segment of history that has been coming to light in recent years. I have elderly family and friends who experienced the war, before and after the U.S. got involved. I have heard so many different POV on the war, from all sides, it remains an interesting subject for us first generations as we try to ma Sad. Nothing good in WW2. Human's totally lost their humanity. Shame on everyone. Sorry, man's inhumanity to man has been ongoing for forever and continues today. I am familiar with this particular segment of history that has been coming to light in recent years. I have elderly family and friends who experienced the war, before and after the U.S. got involved. I have heard so many different POV on the war, from all sides, it remains an interesting subject for us first generations as we try to make some sort of sense of all those stories. It's good that these books are being written, not only for us, but for our children. Thank you Mr. Brown for providing another, oft overlooked, aftermath of a war. (I think it would be useful if other persecuted peoples wrote their stories, as well.) Most people think the war ended in '45 and the world rebuilt and everyone and everything went back to normal. It didn't. Some of us grew up hearing about the "forgotten" the German Genocide, we know people who lived it first hand. The confiscating of property mass deportations, deaths, nightmarish. very informative book. I received a Kindle arc from Netgalley in exchange fopr a fair review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Strike

  4. 5 out of 5

    Leo

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