counter create hit The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States

Availability: Ready to download

"The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States" marked the beginning of the study of our postindustrial information society. Austrian-born economist Fritz Machlup had focused his research on the patent system, but he came to realize that patents were simply one part of a much bigger "knowledge economy." He then expanded the scope of his work to evaluate "The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States" marked the beginning of the study of our postindustrial information society. Austrian-born economist Fritz Machlup had focused his research on the patent system, but he came to realize that patents were simply one part of a much bigger "knowledge economy." He then expanded the scope of his work to evaluate everything from stationery and typewriters to advertising to presidential addresses--anything that involved the activity of telling anyone anything. "The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States" then revealed the new and startling shape of the U.S. economy. Machlup's cool appraisal of the data showed that the knowledge industry accounted for nearly 29 percent of the U.S. gross national product, and that 43 percent of the civilian labor force consisted of knowledge transmitters or full-time knowledge receivers. Indeed, the proportion of the labor force involved in the knowledge economy increased from 11 to 32 percent between 1900 and 1959--a monumental shift. Beyond documenting this revolution, Machlup founded the wholly new field of information economics. The transformation to a knowledge economy has resonated throughout the rest of the century, especially with the rise of the Internet. As two recent observers noted, "Information goods--from movies and music to software code and stock quotes--have supplanted industrial goods as the key drivers of world markets." Continued study of this change and its effects is testament to Fritz Machlup's pioneering work.


Compare

"The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States" marked the beginning of the study of our postindustrial information society. Austrian-born economist Fritz Machlup had focused his research on the patent system, but he came to realize that patents were simply one part of a much bigger "knowledge economy." He then expanded the scope of his work to evaluate "The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States" marked the beginning of the study of our postindustrial information society. Austrian-born economist Fritz Machlup had focused his research on the patent system, but he came to realize that patents were simply one part of a much bigger "knowledge economy." He then expanded the scope of his work to evaluate everything from stationery and typewriters to advertising to presidential addresses--anything that involved the activity of telling anyone anything. "The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States" then revealed the new and startling shape of the U.S. economy. Machlup's cool appraisal of the data showed that the knowledge industry accounted for nearly 29 percent of the U.S. gross national product, and that 43 percent of the civilian labor force consisted of knowledge transmitters or full-time knowledge receivers. Indeed, the proportion of the labor force involved in the knowledge economy increased from 11 to 32 percent between 1900 and 1959--a monumental shift. Beyond documenting this revolution, Machlup founded the wholly new field of information economics. The transformation to a knowledge economy has resonated throughout the rest of the century, especially with the rise of the Internet. As two recent observers noted, "Information goods--from movies and music to software code and stock quotes--have supplanted industrial goods as the key drivers of world markets." Continued study of this change and its effects is testament to Fritz Machlup's pioneering work.

33 review for The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mladen

  3. 4 out of 5

    Katie King

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josh Rowe

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Forman

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tom Bice

  7. 5 out of 5

    Levan Ramishvili

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ben Peters

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

  10. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jade

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alla

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gonnamakeit

  16. 4 out of 5

    Randy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Reza Taher

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sergei

  20. 4 out of 5

    Steven Chang

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tien-Hsin

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

  24. 4 out of 5

    Negra Martin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  26. 5 out of 5

    Victor

  27. 4 out of 5

    Haines Eason

  28. 5 out of 5

    Esme Condon

  29. 4 out of 5

    Valarie Kay

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Mitton

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Luedtke

  32. 5 out of 5

    Richard Strum

  33. 5 out of 5

    Oisín

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.