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As the clock’s pendulum steadily counts down towards the midnight hour, the growing scent of brimstone hangs heavy in the air. The universal symbol of all that is evil, the pentagram, or the inverted pentacle, has been carved in the hardwood floor. Its shape is often described as the goat of lust attacking the Heavens with its horns during the witches’ sabbat. Five obsidia As the clock’s pendulum steadily counts down towards the midnight hour, the growing scent of brimstone hangs heavy in the air. The universal symbol of all that is evil, the pentagram, or the inverted pentacle, has been carved in the hardwood floor. Its shape is often described as the goat of lust attacking the Heavens with its horns during the witches’ sabbat. Five obsidian candles flicker as the incantations begin. Who will be summoned during this unholy evening? Will it be Baphomet? Or Belial? Maybe even Lucifer himself? The roof timbers groan. Stressed plaster drops to the floor. The demon approaches, holding its ancient grimoire filled with evil stories, written in blood…and here they are.


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As the clock’s pendulum steadily counts down towards the midnight hour, the growing scent of brimstone hangs heavy in the air. The universal symbol of all that is evil, the pentagram, or the inverted pentacle, has been carved in the hardwood floor. Its shape is often described as the goat of lust attacking the Heavens with its horns during the witches’ sabbat. Five obsidia As the clock’s pendulum steadily counts down towards the midnight hour, the growing scent of brimstone hangs heavy in the air. The universal symbol of all that is evil, the pentagram, or the inverted pentacle, has been carved in the hardwood floor. Its shape is often described as the goat of lust attacking the Heavens with its horns during the witches’ sabbat. Five obsidian candles flicker as the incantations begin. Who will be summoned during this unholy evening? Will it be Baphomet? Or Belial? Maybe even Lucifer himself? The roof timbers groan. Stressed plaster drops to the floor. The demon approaches, holding its ancient grimoire filled with evil stories, written in blood…and here they are.

30 review for Midnight in the Pentagram

  1. 5 out of 5

    Char

    4.5/5 stars! With this installment,(because it looks like it's going to be a series), Silver Shamrock Publishing has cemented their place near the top of current horror and dark fiction publishers. In this volume, all the stories are joined by a demonic thread and for horror lovers, it doesn't get much better than this! In MIDNIGHT IN THE PENTAGRAM, we are presented with many new authors to discover and some professionals who have been at the top of the business for some time now. Clocking in at o 4.5/5 stars! With this installment,(because it looks like it's going to be a series), Silver Shamrock Publishing has cemented their place near the top of current horror and dark fiction publishers. In this volume, all the stories are joined by a demonic thread and for horror lovers, it doesn't get much better than this! In MIDNIGHT IN THE PENTAGRAM, we are presented with many new authors to discover and some professionals who have been at the top of the business for some time now. Clocking in at over 550 pages I can't go into every story, but I will briefly touch on a few that stood out to me: THE CORN MAIDEN by Brian Moreland. Many times in this volume my heart has gone out to the young female lead, but it started with this story which is also the first in the book. FATHER MACLEOD by Tony Tremblay. I'll just say the priest discovered his real name. THE OTHER by Laurel Hightower. All I'm saying is that this author is one to watch! LEGION CAST FORTH by Robert Ford put me off of bacon for a while. And church. (Just joking, I don't go to church.) WHAT I WOULDN'T GIVE by Chad Lutze. I've been a fan of Chad Lutzke for a few years now and up to this point, nothing that he has written made me laugh my butt off. This story cracked me up. HELLSEED by Tim Curran makes me want to blow off all of my review obligations and make my way back to all the Curran books I have on my Kindle right now. I will get there eventually, this story guaranteed it. BABY TEETH by Azzurra Nox. Who is this person? Because this story was AWESOME. It's hard not to be engaged when the first sentence is "I had to do it." DOG EAT GOD by Kenneth W. Cain. I seem to remember another story about a dog in MIDNIGHT IN THE GRAVEYARD as well. It's working for him! DISCOVERING MR. JONES by Cameron Ulam. This could be my favorite story of the collection. It was off the wall, gross and scary too. Bravo! THE GODS OF OUR FATHERS by Todd Keisling. I felt so much empathy for this female character, I wanted to reach into the words that created her and hug them tight. This could be my favorite story too. I can't really decide. I KNOW HE LOVES ME (HE JUST HAS A FUNNY WAY OF SHOWING IT) by James Newman. Like many other authors in this book, I've been following James Newman's work for awhile now. It never fails to move my heart and this story is no exception. SECOND SIGHT by Allan Leverone. This one left me with such imagery and it comes back to me at the weirdest of times. This one shook me up, folks! A NIGHT ABOVE by John Quick. This author is new to me and this story made me want to immediately go out and buy everything he's written. Don't people get that you can never make a deal with a demon or devil? COMPLEX by Jason Parent helped to get my cult fix. THE BLACK-JAR MAN by Mark Steensland. A fast story that punches you right in the stomach. Oof! EXPRESS by Edward M. Erdelac. I currently have situations in my life that I feel powerless over and because of that, I really identified with the man is this story who had finally had enough. He took that express elevator right to the top so he would BE HEARD by those in charge. There are many other stories within and many of them just as good as the ones I've highlighted above. As such I have to give kudos to the editors that chose to include these tales and chose to present them in the order they did. My only complaint is that this volume is a bit long. However, if I had had to choose which of these stories I would cut, I couldn't do it, so I understand how we got here. I highly recommend this anthology to those horror and dark fiction lovers that prefer their stories to include demons, possessions, evil and other fun devilry! Get your copy here: https://amzn.to/3neTnJL *Thank you to Silver Shamrock for the e-ARC in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    From the depths of hell Midnight in the Pentagram has risen to entertain you with stories steeped in evil and simmered in fear. Demons frolic among humans, sometimes with their own purpose, or perhaps inadvertently summoned by middle school girls who never expected their ritual to wield such results. Demons are not the only beings looking to lead you astray, beware too the people who accept you into their twisted family when you are at your most vulnerable, such as occurs in one of my favorite s From the depths of hell Midnight in the Pentagram has risen to entertain you with stories steeped in evil and simmered in fear. Demons frolic among humans, sometimes with their own purpose, or perhaps inadvertently summoned by middle school girls who never expected their ritual to wield such results. Demons are not the only beings looking to lead you astray, beware too the people who accept you into their twisted family when you are at your most vulnerable, such as occurs in one of my favorite stories in this book The Corn Maidens by Brian Moreland. I think I could best describe this as Midsommar meets Dark Secret of Harvest Home but scarier. Father Macleod by Tony Tremblay was another of my favorites about a priest who attempts to rid his nephew of the demon that has possessed him. Another story of possession of a stranger type was Legion Cast Forth by Robert Ford in which demons are driven from their human hosts and into the swine belonging to Cletus the pig farmer. But Cletus is tired of this low paying deal and wants to strike a new bargain. Speaking of demonic possession Diminishing Returns by P.D. Casek takes a look at what may happen if a demon possessed someone with Alzheimer's disease. Witches' Night by Owl Goingback was another of my favorites. When kids meet up in the cemetery with a spell book one night what could possibly go wrong? The Other by Laurel Hightower was another possession story with a creepy twist. Hellseed by Tim Curran was like a folktale, what happens when you bargain with witches and don't pay up? Babyteeth by Azzura Nox begs the question, what could lead a mother to kill her baby? Was it only post partum depression? My Body by Wesley Southard features bloody good fun and delicious food with a dark side as one restaurant reviewer/critic discovers. Discovering Mr Jones by Cameron Ulam is the story of a junk hauling crew who discover an unexpected and unwelcome surprise in a hoarder's home . The Gods of our Fathers by Todd Keisling Is the story of poor Mary who has lost her mother and does not belong in Christian school. In Second Sight by Allan Leverone a blind woman has a most successful ocular transplant surgery and sees more than she ever wanted to, and perhaps more than she can stand. All of these and more await you in the pentagram, enter if you dare. I received an advance copy for review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Debbi Smith

    Really good book. Not a story I didn't like. Really good book. Not a story I didn't like.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brennan LaFaro

    Publishers take note. This is how you set up the buzz for an anthology. Submission calls opened nearly a year before release, and once the author signings began rolling in, every one was more exciting than the last. From Brian Keene to Tim Meyer to Owl Goingback to Graham Masterton to established Silver Shamrock authors like Steph Ellis, Shannon Felton, and John Quick. That’s just the tip of the iceberg. Weighing in at about 500 pages, Midnight in the Pentagram offers stories focused around demo Publishers take note. This is how you set up the buzz for an anthology. Submission calls opened nearly a year before release, and once the author signings began rolling in, every one was more exciting than the last. From Brian Keene to Tim Meyer to Owl Goingback to Graham Masterton to established Silver Shamrock authors like Steph Ellis, Shannon Felton, and John Quick. That’s just the tip of the iceberg. Weighing in at about 500 pages, Midnight in the Pentagram offers stories focused around demons, possessions, and all sorts of tangential areas; stemming from both Christianity, as well as religions and mythologies far older than that. As we found with Midnight in the Graveyard, Silver Shamrock Midnight anthologies are a nice blend of new voices and established voices. As with most other anthologies, there were some stories that worked brilliantly for me, and some that didn’t resonate. It seems a silly complaint to moan about a loaded table of contents being too big, but there were certain instances during the back half of the book where stories, although well executed, felt like we’d been there before. As a silver lining, the authors who took the themed trope and pulled it off in a unique way really stood out. Let me share a few favorites: The Other - Laurel Hightower: One of the stories I anticipated most in this collection, and it didn’t disappoint. Hightower managed to surround her main character with other people and still write in a sense of isolation, one of the most effective tools in horror. This story is more about losing your sense of self than demons popping out from behind corners. Angel Dust - Shannon Felton: This one worked for me for the same reason that Felton’s The Prisoners of Stewartville did. It felt fresh, original, and unexpected. The use of second person narration gives it a bit of a Chuck Palahniuk vibe, but the story is all Felton. My Body - Wesley Southard: Unapologetically Southard, My Body reminded me of King’s Needful Things, combining it with a monster only this author could have dreamed up. Discovering Mr. Jones - Cameron Ulam: Another story I was anticipating. I keep seeing Cameron Ulam’s name pop since her acceptance to this book. For good reason too. Ulam makes great use of sensory description to paint a picture and bring the audience into the story. A Night Above - John Quick: Great mix of humor, twists, and horror. I picked this book up to be entertained, and this one did the trick. Brujeria - Michael Patrick Hicks: The idea Hicks uses to explore the book’s theme is underutilized, in my opinion. Hicks doesn’t leave much to the reader’s imagination, but manages to create a landscape you can’t look away from. The Furious Pour - Amanda Hard: Hard’s story came late in the book, and the originality shone a spotlight on it. It’s mostly the setting that I found unexpected, leading to a moment of revelation I really enjoyed. That’s a fair list of favorites, but it’s worth noting the hits resonate throughout. Brian Moreland’s opening number kicks things off exactly the way you hope it will. Kenneth McKinley follows up his entry in Graveyard with a lesson in how to keep the train running smooth for a time, then send it careening off the rails. Kenneth Cain’s entry guarantees you’re not reading another possession story quite like this. The humor lands and it doesn’t overstay its welcome. Like Wesley Southard’s story, Todd Keisling writes one that could only have come from his pen, or laptop I guess. Brian Keene’s entry is the most brutal thing in the book, bringing the blood and guts. As I mentioned before, most of the stories that didn’t work for me tiptoed into familiar territory without adding enough new material. One or two utilized humor in a way that just didn’t land. Others came from authors I’ve been lukewarm to in the past, and their entries didn’t do much to sway me. The one caveat I’ll add here is that with so many stories, there’s not a bland one in the bunch. Silver Shamrock’s Midnight anthologies are going to continue to be highly anticipated. They’ve only just announced Midnight From Beyond the Stars, and readers are already clamoring about the possibilities. If you enjoyed the variety presented in Midnight in the Graveyard, you’re going to enjoy this one too. Space out the stories. Read one every few days. There are some real unmissables in here. The kind that’ll have you avoiding dusty old books full of strange symbols and people who sacrifice animals. Well, maybe you should be avoiding those anyway. I received a copy from the publisher for review consideration.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elke

    Finally, the second Midnight anthology has arrived and just like 'Midnight in the Graveyard', it features a Best-Of of today's horror authors and also introduces some new authors I hope to read more of in the future. There is not one disappointing story to be found, only loads of well-written traditional, original and also unexpected ideas that lead you into the twisted land of demons, witches, possession and other horrors. The biggest strength of this volume is its widespread variety, though I Finally, the second Midnight anthology has arrived and just like 'Midnight in the Graveyard', it features a Best-Of of today's horror authors and also introduces some new authors I hope to read more of in the future. There is not one disappointing story to be found, only loads of well-written traditional, original and also unexpected ideas that lead you into the twisted land of demons, witches, possession and other horrors. The biggest strength of this volume is its widespread variety, though I especially enjoyed stories with a humorous streak. Among my favorites are 'The Corn Maidens', 'Legion Cast Forth', 'What I Wouldn't Give', 'Dog Eat God', 'Discovering Mr. Jones', 'The Gods of Our Fathers', 'Diminishing Returns' and 'Witches' Night'. My personal number one story is the hilarious 'A Night Above' - the first and only story that made me pity the demon...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aiden Merchant

    (4.5/5.0) It took me more than a month to read this anthology, because it is MASSIVE. Just shy of 500 pages of fiction, this horror collection features many notable authors in the community/genre, including Brian Keene, Owl Goingback, Laurel Hightower, Catherine Cavendish, Stephanie Ellis, Chad Lutzke, Tim Meyer, Todd Kesling, Robert Ford, and more. Considering its size, it’s easy to find a healthy amount of stories to love in here. Considering the amount you have to choose from, you could disli (4.5/5.0) It took me more than a month to read this anthology, because it is MASSIVE. Just shy of 500 pages of fiction, this horror collection features many notable authors in the community/genre, including Brian Keene, Owl Goingback, Laurel Hightower, Catherine Cavendish, Stephanie Ellis, Chad Lutzke, Tim Meyer, Todd Kesling, Robert Ford, and more. Considering its size, it’s easy to find a healthy amount of stories to love in here. Considering the amount you have to choose from, you could dislike half of these entries and still have a strong collection. That wasn’t the case for me, but it’s a point I wanted to make. In most collections, if you don’t like half the stories, you’re usually left with a hundred pages of good fiction, give or take. Here, it would be closer to 3x that, so you’d still come out a winner. I have a lot of favorites in Midnight in the Pentagram, so I will try highlighting a few here with quick notes as to why they stuck out for me. “The Corn Maidens” by Brian Moreland has a frightening premise that would serve well as a novel. “The Other” by Laurel Hightower had me curious throughout. The writing was good and the ending was quite interesting. “Legion Cast Forth” by Robert Ford was a lot of fun. Even though the ending was not what I expected, it was still satisfying. “The Oubliette of Elie Loyd” by Catherine Cavendish had a cool concept and was well written, but my favorite part was the Oubliette’s backstory (which was terrifying!). “The Gods of Our Fathers” by Todd Keisling was one of the top stories for me; it was grim and unsettling, and left me wanting more. “Family Reunion” by Stephanie Ellis has a horrific ending! The writing is great and I was left, again, wanting more. “Brujeria” by Michael Patrick Hicks was very well written, fun, and creepy (even if the concept of a haunted lost film is familiar). I think Hicks took a trope and gave it a unique enough spin to leave a lasting impression. “Black Jar Man” by Mark Steensland - which I think is being made into a movie - was very well done, but also very horrific and triggering. Put it this way - I wouldn’t go see this movie because it would bother me too much! “Babylon Falling” by Brain Keene was straight badass. It was very well written and engaging and horrific. The idea was cool and the ending had a bit of positivity. I haven’t read much of Keene at all yet, but this story made me want to purchase some of his other work. “Witches’ Night” by Owl Goingback was a really enjoyable story involving a group of kids getting into evil that don’t understand. With the exception of the “walkaway” ending, I loved it. Of course, with practically any anthology, there were disappointments along the way. But the good definitely outweighed the bad, and like I said before - with how many stories there are in this collection, even taking out what I didn’t like amounted to more than 300 pages of excellent content. I highly recommend this anthology for any horror fan. It’s probably the best one to arrive in 2020! ** Highlights: So much content … a lot of great authors are featured … this is an anthology you could easily read and read again over the years Shadows: Some stories had poor endings that ruined their ride … there are a couple of foul and dumb stories I really disliked For fans of: Demonic horror, folk horror, haunted things … anthologies of terror … stories that leave you unsettled and scared of the shadows Takeaway: Midnight in the Pentagram will likely be named the Best Anthology of 2020, if I were to guess. There is just so much to love (and fear) here! Would I read this author again? Yes, in reference to anthologies from Silver Shamrock specifically, seeing as this is a collection of authors. That being said, most authors within are authors I would gladly read again. REVIEW BY AIDEN MERCHANT → WWW.AIDENMERCHANT.COM CONTACT: [email protected] SOCIAL MEDIA: INSTAGRAM (AIDENMERCHANT.OFFICIAL) AND TWITTER (AIDENMERCHANT89)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark Towse

    Exceptional!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Soucy

    After reading (and loving) Midnight in the Graveyard, I could not wait for this book. And so many authors I already enjoy were on the ToC, so I had extra reason not to resist. This is an excellent collection, with each story being a total win. I would not only read each of these stories again, but I'm also eager to read more by these authors--well, again, those authors I hadn't read before. Several of these authors are already favorites of mine and their chilling, inventive tales only further pr After reading (and loving) Midnight in the Graveyard, I could not wait for this book. And so many authors I already enjoy were on the ToC, so I had extra reason not to resist. This is an excellent collection, with each story being a total win. I would not only read each of these stories again, but I'm also eager to read more by these authors--well, again, those authors I hadn't read before. Several of these authors are already favorites of mine and their chilling, inventive tales only further proved their awesomeness! For fans of short stories with demons/occult themes offering a mix of creepy, hilarious, moving, and downright horrific tales, I promise you cannot go wrong with this collection! "The Corn Maidens" by Brian Moreland - A young girl gets exiled from her hometown during the Depression era. But will Hannah Creed be able to start again and finally find acceptance in a new home? Loved this story and Hannah. This is a perfect start to the collection! "Father MacLeod" by Tony Tremblay - A priest fights to exorcise his nephew, but he's losing the battle. Until the demon makes him an offer he can't refuse. This story was terrific, a unique and horrific take on exorcisms but with surprising splashes of humor. "Opening the Door" by Kenneth McKinley - Two pickers hit up their next spot, an old cottage they hope is loaded with treasures. They hit the motherload, for sure, but one relic turns out to be far more than they bargained for. Not trying to spoil but the minute they found the record, I literally gasped knowing whatever else happened I would love this story--and I did! "The Other" by Laurel Hightower - A man experiences a vicious type of night terror/sleep paralysis, loss of time, and is growing increasingly estranged from his wife. What is happening? Well, I won't tell you. But this story, as with anything Ms. Hightower writes, is brilliant. The creeping dread is palpable, and it's one of my absolute favorites of the lot. "Legion Cast Forth" by Robert Ford - A pig farmer has a special relationship with the local priests, helping them out with some exorcism troubles. Again...no spoilers, but SERIOUSLY! I loved this story, such an original concept, and I will be looking to read more from Mr. Ford. "Angel Dust" by Shannon Felton - There's a new drug in town, sending a lost girl on a wild and dark adventure to find herself. This was so well written and again, something so original that I thoroughly enjoyed myself throughout. "What I Wouldn't Give" by Chad Lutzke - A man is trying to make a deal with a demon, but if you think you know how this story will unfold, think again. Chad's stories are always amazing, and this is simply a must-read, especially for fans of horror and rock music. I laughed out loud during many exchanges, even forcing my guitarist/metal fan boyfriend to read along because it was too good not to share. "Hellseed" by Tim Curran - A woman is about to give birth, but this is no ordinary baby... Creepy as hell, this story is definitely one that will keep you up at night. And maybe make one consider getting some birth control! "Devil's Ink" by Mark Towse - He just wants to write his story, why won't the world just let him be? Excellent story for people who love the writer as the MC trope in horror. "Baby Teeth" by Azzurra Nox - Melissa's tale begins with her in prison, sharing the story of her daughter's possession. This story... just wow. Another one of my favorites from the collection, it really messed my head up in so many ways. Absolutely brilliant work by another author who I am dying to read more of! "My Body" by Wesley Southard - Cynthia's a failed chef turned restaurant critic who has to visit the new French restaurant in her small town. How in the world do they make that food so tasty? As a 25yr restaurant veteran, I instantly love any tale in that setting. This one, though... I've rarely felt such simultaneous hunger and revulsion in my life lol--thank you, Mr. Southard! "The Red Butcher of Wroclaw" by Graham Masterson - Making a movie is hard, especially when the weather sucks and it seems like nothing will cooperate. Why not spend the time sharing scary local legends? It's all fun and games until it seems the story may be more than just a legend. Super fun story with entertaining characters! "Dog Eat God" by Kenneth W. Cain - Father Menendez isn't one's ideal priest, but his faith receives the test of a lifetime when Mrs. Brown and her dog visit. This story was another that hooked me with it's blend of horror and humor and totally original plot, so much fun to read! "The Oubliette of Elie Loyd" by Catherine Cavendish - Mia's on vacation with her boyfriend, but the trip isn't what she hoped for...until she makes a new friend. Elie Loyd is captivating, offering a proper sightseeing tour that's too good to resist--just what Mia wanted! Be careful what you wish for. Another win for Ms. Cavendish, who excels at chilling tales with unexpected twists. "Discovering Mr. Jones" by Cameron Ulam - A group of guys are hired to clean out a hoarder's home. What they find in the rubble will make your hair stand on end. This story... omg, scary as hell! This is my first time reading anything by Ms. Ulam but I'm definitely a fan now! "The Gods of Our Fathers" by Todd Keisling - It's bad enough Mary lost her mom and grandfather, but she also lost her connection to their religion. Instead she's stuck with her wicked Dad and Brother and their oppressive beliefs. My heart absolutely broke for Mary, even bringing tears to my eyes. Prepare yourself for reading this one because the emotions it generates will punch you. Beautifully written! "I Know He Loves Me" by James Newman - Any story that begins with quotes from Love, Actually and The Exorcist has already one me over. Excellent story and such a unique perspective. I've not read Mr. Newman yet, but this was a great introduction to him. I can't wait to read more! "Second Sight" by Allan Leverone - Rebecca Danvers (love the name!) has been blind for most of her life, but after an eye transplant her life should be perfect... except some side effects pop up that she cannot ignore. Such a great story, and I enjoyed the PoV shift between Rebecca and her husband. The end was super creepy, well done! "Family Reunion" by Stephanie Ellis - Agnes and her husband are Satanists, and it's time again for the big ritual. But Agnes isn't happy with how the coven is going and decides to do things a little differently this year. Pro-Tip, don't tattle to the Dark Mother unless you're fully prepared for her to get involved and sort out your problem. Loved this wickedly dark tale! "A Night Above" by John Quick - Just another summons, no big deal the demon thinks... until he's called to a room full of preteen girls eager to have the best satanic ritual ever! As a former preteen girl who played ridiculous occult games with my friends, I felt this story on many levels. A hilarious breath of fun amidst so many super-dark stories, loved it! "Brujeria" by Michael Patrick Hicks - Marcus Blake is invited to a screening at his much more successful best friend's house, a lost film showing an occult ritual. Tacos, beer, friends, movies--what could go wrong? Excellent story for fans of found footage, I enjoyed every minute! "White Walpurgis" by Tim Meyer - Marla's hired on to photograph a wedding, which should be a blast. The bride has cancer, so that's a bummer. And it is a little weird they asked for Marla specifically... Nah, it'll be great--everyone loves a wedding, right? Dark and wicked little story with a cool twist! "Family Business" by Charlotte Platt - Lisa's in charge of the family business now, which we soon realize is more than just the average antique shop. A cute guy brings in a family heirloom, asking for her help, but they're both in for a surprise when another pair of visitors come intent on causing trouble. This was another totally unique story with an exciting buildup to an awesome ending. I would love to read more from this author! "Flaking Red Paint" by Armand Rosamilia - A new neighbor moves in, creepy and old but he pays good money for lawn mowing and... cat fetching? Dark and twisted little tale that kept me on the edge of my seat! "Diminishing Returns" by P.D. Cacek - Father Paul is trying to help Miranda cope with the onset of Alzheimer's. But little do they both realize, there's a lot more going on with Miranda than the Alzheimer's... This story packs a good bit of emotion while also delivering the scares, brace yourselves! "The Story of a Lifetime" by JG Faherty - Nick Leiter's a pretty sleazy guy, a reporter with a drinking problem and a penchant for seducing his interviewees. His next assignment is with Demora Chow, a real high priestess who's more gifted than any other occult figure he's met. And oh boy does she have a surprise for him! "The Furious Pour" by Amanda Hard - Richard spends an evening drinking with his former brother in law, McLaren, as they mourn the loss of Alice. Both men have some hard truths to share before the night is over, but at least the whiskey will continue to flow. Loved where this story went, as I totally didn't expect it. "A Virgin Birth" by William Meikle - A student heads to Germanstown, frantic to finish his folklore paper before the deadline. But once he gets there, everything starts falling into place and the beer is fantastic! As a fan of folk horror and beer, I enjoyed this one! "Complex" by Jason Parent - Carrie and Liam are on a grand nature adventure, hiking with friends and... their messiah? Oh yes, expect some delicious cultish goodness in this one! "Black Jar Man" by Mark Steensland - Do you want to know about the Black Jar man? Well I sure did, and gobbled this story up so fast my head was spinning. Dark, brutal, terrifying... an amazing tale to keep you awake long after bedtime. I am definitely looking forward to more from this author. "Babylon Falling" by Brian Keene - It's 2003, war rages in Iraq, Led Zeppelin is playing in the background, and a group of soldiers stumble into a sandstorm... and since it's Brian Keene, you know to brace yourself for one terrifying ride through the darkness. This story is not for the fainthearted, and I'll never think of "Kashmir" the same! "Express" by Edward M. Erdelac - Dion's a security guard at the Sturgill Building, not a bad job and it's fun to watch the oddball characters go by. But when the oddest one goes upstairs and never comes back down, Dion fills with dread knowing soon enough he'll have to find out what happened. "Witches' Night" by Owl Goingback - It's 1974 and a group of teenagers begins talking about the biggest movie of the year, The Exorcist--who actually saw it and who's lying to make themselves seem cooler? Yep, I'm totally sold on this story already. Once it continues and the boys meet up with their one female friend, Sally, she invites them to the graveyard for some fun later. It's Witches Night, after all, so it's the time to experiment with her new spell book. Another one of my favorites, this story was so full of emotion and topics I completely related to. I loved Paul and Sally, and I had to see what sort of witchy trouble they got into. Beautiful story from the amazing Mr. Goingback, and a perfect end to the collection.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Weevil Dead

    Satan, Devil worshipers, witchcraft, exorcisms, demons, soul-selling, weird religion, and more fill these 490 pages while summoning your darkest fears. This is a work that belongs on every horror-lovers bookshelf and is worth the time and read. There are 33 stories in this collection, but here I will discuss the ones that have stuck with me the most. Opening the Door by Kenneth McKinley – Two college kids who have a lucrative side hustle going into homes seized by banks for whatever reason, and c Satan, Devil worshipers, witchcraft, exorcisms, demons, soul-selling, weird religion, and more fill these 490 pages while summoning your darkest fears. This is a work that belongs on every horror-lovers bookshelf and is worth the time and read. There are 33 stories in this collection, but here I will discuss the ones that have stuck with me the most. Opening the Door by Kenneth McKinley – Two college kids who have a lucrative side hustle going into homes seized by banks for whatever reason, and cleaning out the belongings. They then sell the most valuable finds to auctions and collectors. On this recent job, the two friends find they have stumbled upon the home, and belongings of someone very important. After some digging they find a treasure trove of some belongings with the name A. Crowley on them. You would be correct, these are satanic! Next they find a set of rare records, which play some mesmerizing chanting, and that is when the real trouble begins. I really enjoyed the way this story played out from beginning to end. It was quickly paced, had enjoyable characters, and truly catastrophic ending. I would’ve enjoyed a novel out of the premise of his one. Legion Cast Forth By Robert Ford – A man with a pig farm is in the business of exorcisms, with The Vatican. When he grows tired of the unfair pay, he decides to take matters into his own hands, which never ends well in stories like this. I thought this was a really unique take on the classic exorcism/possession stories. I can’t reveal to many plot points because I think it would ruin the premise, but it took me a while to figure out exactly what was taking place here, and once I did I was very spooked! Plus bonus points for having a main character named Cletus! My Body by Wesley Southard – A new French restaurant opens in a small town in Indiana. The residents of the town can’t get enough, and soon a food critic for the local newspaper is hooked too. The Devil sure is delicious. This story was an interesting deviation from the rest of the collection so far in this work. Again, I wasn’t sure where this story was leading, but it was very well planned and the ending was executed nicely. A Night Above by John Quick – This is a story about a demon summoned from hell to grant a group of girls at a sleepover anything they command of him. This demon is out to teach some life lessons, however, there is always a catch. This was a humorous a quick story, that I enjoyed from the first line to the last. Just when you think this demon might not be so bad, the ending reminds you that he is still a spawn of the Devil. Brujeria by Michael Patrick Hicks – An actor and his girlfriend gather at his more successful, A-list director friend’s mansion in Los Angeles for a dinner and movie watch party. The movie they are viewing is a long lost feature called Brujeria, in which the director wanted to capture the Devil on film. He also used real witches for the film. The legend is that the film is cursed, and these Hollywood actors are about to find out the truth of that legend. I thought this story was intriguing, because I’m sure that I’m not alone in finding cursed movies interesting. Films like The Omen, Poltergeist, The Twilight Zone, and The Exorcist all have the stigma of being cursed, and I found this was an interesting topic to read about here in Brujeria. Express by Edward M. Erdelac – A man who works the front desk at a large office building sees many people going to a corporate office, I think real estate developers, but none as strange as Dr. Kind, who owns and operates a mystic bookstore. He’s had enough of the raised rent and has come to raise hell with the big men on top. This story was different for me because it involved some different elements; wealthy businesses vs. the working man. A nice, and Lovecraftian take. Very original. Witches’ Night by Owl Goingback – On April 30th, 1974, The Exorcist is all the rage, and a group of friends are about to practice a little witchcraft on their own. I won’t reveal more of this story, as I imagine it is a common favorite. I will definitely be reading more work by Owl Goingback.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bianca (Belladonnabooks)

    4.5 stars. I LOVED this anthology! It was a chunky read but thoroughly enjoyed! Those who love the occult, possession stories, folk horror and cult horror are sure to love this! I genuinely enjoyed the majority of the stories but my favourite are below! 😈The Corn Maidens - a folk horror story of a girl who possesses the gift of bringing the dead back to life, and is shunned from her home town, only to stumble into a small town that has its own horrors. 😈Father MacLeod - a possession story where a P 4.5 stars. I LOVED this anthology! It was a chunky read but thoroughly enjoyed! Those who love the occult, possession stories, folk horror and cult horror are sure to love this! I genuinely enjoyed the majority of the stories but my favourite are below! 😈The Corn Maidens - a folk horror story of a girl who possesses the gift of bringing the dead back to life, and is shunned from her home town, only to stumble into a small town that has its own horrors. 😈Father MacLeod - a possession story where a Priest is forced to choose between his nephew or offering the demon a sacrifice. 😈Hellseed - a couple of forced to sacrifice their unborn child to a group of hags. 😈Baby Teeth - a mother is convinced her newborn baby is possessed by something sinister and evil. 😈The Red Butcher or Wroclaw - a chilling holocaust story of a butcher who made sausages from children. 😈The Gods of our Fathers - a cult horror story of family trauma, sacrifice and revenge. 😈Second Sight - a blind woman gets the gift of vision from an eye doner only to realise she has also received the woman’s traumatic last memories. 😈Witches’ night - because, witches.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Admittedly I have a story in this but my rating is genuine. A range of styles offering pure entertainment and some stories I know I will revisit. Favourites include Laurel Hightower's 'The Other', Brian Moreland's 'Corn Maidens' and the wonderful humour of Chad Lutzke's 'What I Wouldn't Give ' and John Quick's 'A Night Above'. Having said that, I enjoyed all the stories and would offer a completely unbiased 'highly recommend '! Admittedly I have a story in this but my rating is genuine. A range of styles offering pure entertainment and some stories I know I will revisit. Favourites include Laurel Hightower's 'The Other', Brian Moreland's 'Corn Maidens' and the wonderful humour of Chad Lutzke's 'What I Wouldn't Give ' and John Quick's 'A Night Above'. Having said that, I enjoyed all the stories and would offer a completely unbiased 'highly recommend '!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    I can honestly say this is a great collection of stories, each and everyone was a joy to read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Fitch

    Great anthology Rarely read anthologies because I only end up liking a couple of the stories. This anthology was great, enjoyed most, if not all ,of the stories.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shelly Campbell

    Something for every horror fan. Midnight in the Pentagram has such a rich variety of short horror stories. It was a surreal dip into the imaginations of some fantastic authors. If you enjoy horror, you need this creepy anthology on your list ASAP!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    As a note, I end up giving most multiple-author anthologies a 4/5 largely as a result of the fact that most people’s personal tastes won’t wholly match up with those of the editor, but the stories have usually gone through an editor who has motivation for finding the good stuff. It balances out a bit. Midnight in the Pentagram, edited by Kenneth W. Cain, fits that pattern. I have a handful of favorites in here. Brian Moreland’s “The Corn Maidens” involves a young woman with a disturbing power, an As a note, I end up giving most multiple-author anthologies a 4/5 largely as a result of the fact that most people’s personal tastes won’t wholly match up with those of the editor, but the stories have usually gone through an editor who has motivation for finding the good stuff. It balances out a bit. Midnight in the Pentagram, edited by Kenneth W. Cain, fits that pattern. I have a handful of favorites in here. Brian Moreland’s “The Corn Maidens” involves a young woman with a disturbing power, and a village with equally disturbing traditions. I absolutely love how this one played out. Top billing (in my mind) should go to Laurel Hightower’s “The Other.” It’s a fascinating look at a possessed man’s life. He’s losing time, his wife suddenly seems to hate him, and his things get moved around. This is an incredibly powerful story. “Angel Dust,” by Shannon Felton, is a bizarre story of drugs, possession, and demons that’s oddly intriguing. James Newman’s “I Know He Loves Me (He Just Has a Funny Way of Showing It)” is another possession story that takes things in an unexpected and fascinating direction. There seems to be a bounty of excellent possession stories, like P.D. Cacek’s “Diminishing Returns,” in which a woman with Alzheimer’s seems to be possessed. Todd Keisling’s “The Gods of Our Fathers,” set in the same universe as his “Devil’s Creek,” is absolutely beautiful, and very dark. A girl whose father turned away from the Old Gods to the Christian god tries to find a way out of her life of pain and terror. “A Night Above,” by John Quick, is a hilarious (and oddly touching!) story of a demon summoned to a slumber party, and I loved it! Charlotte Platt’s “Family Business” introduces us to Lisa, who has followed in her family’s business of restoring and repairing antiques. A mysterious visitor named Levi brings her an artifact to be repaired, and things get strange from there. Action, horror, and a nice shiver down your spine! Many other stories are quite good–there are plenty of possessions, summonings, and other intriguing stories to read. Things that made some of the other stories not as good for me included one in which an aging aunt is completely and utterly stereotypical, right down to magically taking a pie out of the oven just as her unexpected visitors arrive (there are a couple of other stories with very stereotypical characters, but not many). Some stories feel like they end just a tad bit too soon, not quite taking us to an adequate resolution. One story has an odd clumsy rhythm; I think it’s because typically high-stress parts of a story have at least some shorter sentences to help convey that choppy feeling, and this story just kept the same “normal” pace throughout (it takes away from the tension and drama). A few stories seem to hurry their way through, and could have used a bit more detail. Content note for: self-harm, racial slurs, child molestation and abuse, animal harm, rape, abuse and murder of slaves, death of a baby, highly detailed torture, xenophobia, and of course, since this book contains a wide range of horror stories, gore. I definitely recommend reading this one. Many stories are just wonderful, and most of the rest are very good. The theme is covered very well, and all of the stories feel as though they fit. Original review posted on my blog: http://www.errantdreams.com/2020/11/r...

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Lynch

    Silver Shamrock Publishing exploded onto the scene last year. One of the first releases, an anthology, Midnight in a graveyard. Best anthology of 2019 in my opinion. So, how do you top that? By putting out the best anthology of 2020. From start to finish, this anthology is a work of excellence. There isn’t a bad story in the lot, which is something that I rarely find myself saying. In any anthology, there’s likely to be a few misses, but as usual, Silvershamrock shows a keen eye for good stories. Silver Shamrock Publishing exploded onto the scene last year. One of the first releases, an anthology, Midnight in a graveyard. Best anthology of 2019 in my opinion. So, how do you top that? By putting out the best anthology of 2020. From start to finish, this anthology is a work of excellence. There isn’t a bad story in the lot, which is something that I rarely find myself saying. In any anthology, there’s likely to be a few misses, but as usual, Silvershamrock shows a keen eye for good stories. Some of my personal favorites were As follows. The other- Laurel Hightower Discovering Mr. Jones- Cameron Ulam Brujeria- Michael Patrick Hicks The corn maiden- Brian Moreland A night above- John Quick Father Macleod- Tony Tremblay I’m not telling you to pick up just one anthology this year. That would be insane, this has been a great year for anthologies. What I WILL tell you, is that this needs to be among very top of your list. This is one CHUNK of a book with tons of stories by both new and established horror authors. This tome absolutely oozes value

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maralie Toth

    this was a 4 out of 5 star read for me, there was most defiantly a lot of blood and a lot of gor, but there was some really good stories within there too. I found that there was a little bit of everything within this collection of short stories, ranging from the exorcist concepts to the witches concept. I found that they were all very short and to the point making it easier to jump from story to story because you did not really get attached to anything on an emotional level. Some of the stories this was a 4 out of 5 star read for me, there was most defiantly a lot of blood and a lot of gor, but there was some really good stories within there too. I found that there was a little bit of everything within this collection of short stories, ranging from the exorcist concepts to the witches concept. I found that they were all very short and to the point making it easier to jump from story to story because you did not really get attached to anything on an emotional level. Some of the stories made me laugh, some of them were a little silly while some had a decent moral concept to it and I would love to see some of these stories develop into something more. if you would like to see more of a detailed review of this book, please be sure to check out my book blog. skysbookblog.wordpress.com

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Bollinger

    Much like midnight in the graveyard, this was a fantastic anthology! It was a homerun just like the first. Every story was excellent!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zachary

  21. 4 out of 5

    Miranda miranda_crites

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Dawn Drenning

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chandler

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian Berry

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  26. 4 out of 5

    Honora14

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  29. 4 out of 5

    Betty Wilkins

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Dusterwald

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