counter create hit The Reading List - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Reading List

Availability: Ready to download

An unforgettable and heartwarming debut about how a chance encounter with a list of library books helps forge an unlikely friendship between two very different people in a London suburb. Widower Mukesh lives a quiet life in the London Borough of Ealing after losing his beloved wife. He shops every Wednesday, goes to Temple, and worries about his granddaughter, Priya, who hi An unforgettable and heartwarming debut about how a chance encounter with a list of library books helps forge an unlikely friendship between two very different people in a London suburb. Widower Mukesh lives a quiet life in the London Borough of Ealing after losing his beloved wife. He shops every Wednesday, goes to Temple, and worries about his granddaughter, Priya, who hides in her room reading while he spends his evenings watching nature documentaries. Aleisha is a bright but anxious teenager working at the local library for the summer when she discovers a crumpled-up piece of paper in the back of To Kill a Mockingbird. It’s a list of novels that she’s never heard of before. Intrigued, and a little bored with her slow job at the checkout desk, she impulsively decides to read every book on the list, one after the other. As each story gives up its magic, the books transport Aleisha from the painful realities she’s facing at home. When Mukesh arrives at the library, desperate to forge a connection with his bookworm granddaughter, Aleisha passes along the reading list…hoping that it will be a lifeline for him too. Slowly, the shared books create a connection between two lonely souls, as fiction helps them escape their grief and everyday troubles and find joy again. 


Compare

An unforgettable and heartwarming debut about how a chance encounter with a list of library books helps forge an unlikely friendship between two very different people in a London suburb. Widower Mukesh lives a quiet life in the London Borough of Ealing after losing his beloved wife. He shops every Wednesday, goes to Temple, and worries about his granddaughter, Priya, who hi An unforgettable and heartwarming debut about how a chance encounter with a list of library books helps forge an unlikely friendship between two very different people in a London suburb. Widower Mukesh lives a quiet life in the London Borough of Ealing after losing his beloved wife. He shops every Wednesday, goes to Temple, and worries about his granddaughter, Priya, who hides in her room reading while he spends his evenings watching nature documentaries. Aleisha is a bright but anxious teenager working at the local library for the summer when she discovers a crumpled-up piece of paper in the back of To Kill a Mockingbird. It’s a list of novels that she’s never heard of before. Intrigued, and a little bored with her slow job at the checkout desk, she impulsively decides to read every book on the list, one after the other. As each story gives up its magic, the books transport Aleisha from the painful realities she’s facing at home. When Mukesh arrives at the library, desperate to forge a connection with his bookworm granddaughter, Aleisha passes along the reading list…hoping that it will be a lifeline for him too. Slowly, the shared books create a connection between two lonely souls, as fiction helps them escape their grief and everyday troubles and find joy again. 

30 review for The Reading List

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paromjit

    This is a exquisite debut from Sara Nisha Adams that will resonate with anyone who loves books, their power to impart wisdom, open our eyes to the world and the lives of others, and the priceless role played by libraries in our communities. Set in Wembley in London with all its variety, colour, cultures, contrasts and contradictions, the still grieving Mukesh lost his beloved wife, Naina, 2 years ago. He has withdrawn into himself, a lonely man ruled by routines, with his protective daughters pl This is a exquisite debut from Sara Nisha Adams that will resonate with anyone who loves books, their power to impart wisdom, open our eyes to the world and the lives of others, and the priceless role played by libraries in our communities. Set in Wembley in London with all its variety, colour, cultures, contrasts and contradictions, the still grieving Mukesh lost his beloved wife, Naina, 2 years ago. He has withdrawn into himself, a lonely man ruled by routines, with his protective daughters playing an organising and protective role through the phone although failing to communicate with him, busy with their own lives. Mukesh is not a reader, but Naina was, and when he finds a library copy of The Time Traveler's Wife taken out from the Harrow Road Library, he reads it and finds it a revelation, discovering Naina within it, the story speaks to him about his love for Naina and the heartrending experience of losing her to cancer. This has Mukesh making his way to the library, where he has a problematic encounter with 17 year old Aleisha, not a reader either, working temporarily at the library on the recommendation of her book loving brother, Aiden. The two of them are bearing the heavy responsibility of caring for their mother, Leilah, round the clock, with no support for her mental health issues. Along with other people in the book, Aleisha discovers a crumpled reading list that begins with Just in case you need it. The list comprises of To Kill a Mockingbird, Rebecca, Life of Pi, The Kite Runner, Pride and Prejudice, Little Women, A Suitable Boy and Beloved, a selection that serendipitously I have read. Aleisha reads the books prior to recommending them to Mukesh, leading to the two of developing a close relationship that begins with their discussions over the books, and the surprising impact they make on their lives, with ghosts of the characters appearing in Mukesh's life. Mukesh becomes far more outgoing, letting in others into his life, getting close to his young granddaughter, Priya, as reading becomes an integral part of his life, feeling closer to Naina as a result. This is a beautiful and enthralling read, totally riveting, paying homage to books, libraries, readers and communities, a life affirming novel amidst the grief, death, loneliness and challenging circumstances that the characters find themselves in. I would like to suggest that anyone who has plans to read any of the books on the reading list that they do so before reading this, as there are major spoilers in it. I highly recommend this incredible debut to any and every reader. Many thanks to the publisher for an ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angela M

    What’s more lovely than discovering a list of books in a library book with the heading “Just in case you need it” ? Perhaps, it’s reading those books with someone who needs them and your friendship just as much as you need theirs. What could be more lovely than that? It’s that the characters are there for each other when they are most needed through grief and loss. Sweet and lovely story that touches both your heart and your literary heart. Sad, saccharine at times, but so uplifting. This book an What’s more lovely than discovering a list of books in a library book with the heading “Just in case you need it” ? Perhaps, it’s reading those books with someone who needs them and your friendship just as much as you need theirs. What could be more lovely than that? It’s that the characters are there for each other when they are most needed through grief and loss. Sweet and lovely story that touches both your heart and your literary heart. Sad, saccharine at times, but so uplifting. This book and the joy and inspiration that reading the books on the list brought to these characters, happened to be just what I needed. I received a copy of this book from William Morrow /HarperCollins through Edelweiss.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    I've never written a book review before and I don't really know how to go about it. I won an Advanced Reader's Copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. It arrived yesterday and I've just finished it with the tears still wet on my cheeks. I love this book! I could identify with every character in some way. And the way it describes the books on the reading list has made me want to read them all - even Pride and Prejudice - and I have never been interested in Jane Austen before! A book about the ma I've never written a book review before and I don't really know how to go about it. I won an Advanced Reader's Copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. It arrived yesterday and I've just finished it with the tears still wet on my cheeks. I love this book! I could identify with every character in some way. And the way it describes the books on the reading list has made me want to read them all - even Pride and Prejudice - and I have never been interested in Jane Austen before! A book about the magic of books. :-)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brandice

    I loved The Reading List, a story about an unlikely friendship between Aleisha, a teenager working at the library for the summer, and Mukesh, a widow trying to move forward with his life while still addressing his grief. Aleisha finds a reading list in one of the library books and decides to read the books on the list herself, as an escape from her challenging home life. She recommends the books to Mukesh too after he seeks suggestions at the library. Beyond their friendship, The Reading List is I loved The Reading List, a story about an unlikely friendship between Aleisha, a teenager working at the library for the summer, and Mukesh, a widow trying to move forward with his life while still addressing his grief. Aleisha finds a reading list in one of the library books and decides to read the books on the list herself, as an escape from her challenging home life. She recommends the books to Mukesh too after he seeks suggestions at the library. Beyond their friendship, The Reading List is a great reminder of why we read books — how we can find comfort in stories similar to ours, gratitude for our own families after reading about others, education when we learn about new perspectives — and why we love to read. I really enjoyed this story!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    4.5 * A stunning debut novel! Kudos to Sara Nisha Adams for writing such a beautiful story! I listened to this audio and it captured my attention from beginning to end. This is a story about two very different people. Mukesh, is an 80 year old man who has recently lost his wife. He is still grieving and trying to cope. Aleisha, is a 17 year old girl with problems at home. Mukesh has never been a reader but his wife was. Aleisha is not a reader but works at the front desk at the local library. Thes 4.5 * A stunning debut novel! Kudos to Sara Nisha Adams for writing such a beautiful story! I listened to this audio and it captured my attention from beginning to end. This is a story about two very different people. Mukesh, is an 80 year old man who has recently lost his wife. He is still grieving and trying to cope. Aleisha, is a 17 year old girl with problems at home. Mukesh has never been a reader but his wife was. Aleisha is not a reader but works at the front desk at the local library. These two people are joined together by books when Aleisha finds a reading list tucked away in one of the books. She decides to begin to read the books and passes the list onto Mukesh. What follows is a lovely story about friendship and family and how the love of books can bring people together even in the darkest of times. It was wonderful how each book was incorporated in the chapters and the lives of the characters. I've read some of the books but this has inspired me to read them all! Here is the reading list in case you are wondering. The time traveler's wife To kill a mockingbird Rebecca The kite runner Life of pi Pride and prejudice Little Women Beloved A suitable boy This is a story for everyone who loves books!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Val

    A book about books, about the connections we find through reading, and about the way a book can change the way we view the world and ourselves. "Sometimes, books just take us away fro a little while, and return us to our place with a new perspective." The story, set in London, centers around 2 main characters, Mukesh, a recently widowed older man whose wife, Naina, was an avid reader, and Aleisha, a new employee at the Harrow library, who has not been much of a reader. The exquisite way the chara A book about books, about the connections we find through reading, and about the way a book can change the way we view the world and ourselves. "Sometimes, books just take us away fro a little while, and return us to our place with a new perspective." The story, set in London, centers around 2 main characters, Mukesh, a recently widowed older man whose wife, Naina, was an avid reader, and Aleisha, a new employee at the Harrow library, who has not been much of a reader. The exquisite way the characters are developed brings you into their worlds and gives context for the rest of the story. Mukesh and Aleisha meet while Mukesh is visiting the library to return a library book checked out by his deceased wife, found under their bed. He decided to read the book, The Time Traveler's Wife, prior to returning it, and in doing so, he felt Naina close to him again. He wants to experience more of the same, and decides that reading, which was her passion, will help him achieve that. Aleisha took the job at the library through a recommendation from her brother, Aiden, who used to work at the same library. The big difference is that Aiden was a big reader, while Aleisha is not. The reader learns that Aleisha and Aiden's home life is suffocating, as they shoulder the extreme responsibility of caring for their mentally fragile and unstable mother. While preparing books to be re-shelved at the library one day, Aleisha finds a "reading list" in one of the books with the names of 8 books and a heading that reads, "Just in case you need it:". She sets out on an amazing reading journey beginning with the first book on the list. She shares the books on the list with Mukesh and as they discuss the books, they develop a friendship. During the course of their reading journey and bourgeoning friendship, they realize the impact that books and reading have on their lives. It enables them to connect with others at the library, to fend off their frequent feelings of loneliness and also teaches them about the world around them. Without going into too much detail, several characters get involved with the list and reading and discover the value of books, the library, a shared passion for reading and community. I really enjoyed the view into the Indian culture through Mukesh and his family. There are several minor characters who are also pivotal to the story including Mukesh's daughters, grandchildren and friends, Aiden and Leilah, Chris the thriller guy among other library patrons, Leonora, Nilakshiben and Zak . I loved watching the connections develop between all of these characters. The story portrays sadness, mental illness, death, loneliness and despair, but it is also uplifting, engaging, insightful and heartfelt. I can't recommend this book enough. I LOVED it! Thank you to NetGalley and William Morrow for my gifted advance copy to read and review. Pub date: August 2021

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa (LifeFullyBooked)

    "...Books aren't always an escape; sometimes books teach us things. They show us the world; they don't hide it." Beautiful and heartfelt, this novel is an ode to book lovers everywhere. I just absolutely loved this book! It is more than a story of a found reading list, it's the story of family--both the one that is related to you and the one you create. It's the story of grief and learning how to deal with that grief. And it's the story of how books can help you hide and also can help you heal. Mu "...Books aren't always an escape; sometimes books teach us things. They show us the world; they don't hide it." Beautiful and heartfelt, this novel is an ode to book lovers everywhere. I just absolutely loved this book! It is more than a story of a found reading list, it's the story of family--both the one that is related to you and the one you create. It's the story of grief and learning how to deal with that grief. And it's the story of how books can help you hide and also can help you heal. Mukesh is a widower with three grown daughters who are worried about him. His young granddaughter Priya visits, but all she seems to do is read and Mukesh has never been a reader like his late wife Naina. He finds a copy of The Time Traveler's Wife while cleaning and connects with this epic love story so much that he goes to the local small library, in permanent danger of closure, to find more stories. He encounters teenager Aleisha, another non-reader who is grumpily working at the library for the summer. Chagrined at the way she treats him, Aleisha discovers To Kill a Mockingbird and it contains a list of other books stuck inside. Aleisha reads the book and then recommends it to Mukesh, and a friendship begins to develop between the two as they read through the books on the list. Both have issues in their home lives and these books help them to get through. I know that's a long synopsis, but it's just the setup for such a wonderful story. I laughed and cried at many of the events in the story and could not put it down until I was done, in the moments that I had to put it down I still thought about it and longed to pick it back up. I loved all of the characters and how much care and love they had for each other even when they were hurting. I think that the experience of reading this book is incredibly enhanced if the reader has read all or some of the books on the list. I personally had read all except one and I think it helped me to understand the depth of the lessons the characters were learning in their lives from those stories. I highly recommend this novel, it's such a beautiful picture of friendship and family. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  8. 4 out of 5

    La Crosse County Library

    Wow. This book broke my heart and then put it back together again! An ode to the power of books and libraries, Sara Nisha Adams's debut novel, The Reading List (2021), takes place in the London suburb of Wembley. Alternating between different characters, The Reading List features strangers whose lives intersect at the local library, brought together by a mysterious reading list. This reading list, author unknown, featuring a short list of classic novels, from Pride and Prejudice to To Kill a Moc Wow. This book broke my heart and then put it back together again! An ode to the power of books and libraries, Sara Nisha Adams's debut novel, The Reading List (2021), takes place in the London suburb of Wembley. Alternating between different characters, The Reading List features strangers whose lives intersect at the local library, brought together by a mysterious reading list. This reading list, author unknown, featuring a short list of classic novels, from Pride and Prejudice to To Kill a Mockingbird, tends to show up at serendipitous times in our characters' lives, usually when they're at a low point or feeling stuck. Almost showing up as if by magic. We have Mukesh Patel, a lonely grandfather and recent widower, who visits the library for the first time in an attempt to connect with his bookworm granddaughter, Priya. Ever since his wife Naina died (she was also an avid reader), he has been isolated from his family and wishes to reconnect with them. Then there's Aleisha, a library clerk working a summer job at the library before going off to college to study law. She and her brother, Aidan, are looking after their mentally ill mother, Leilah, without much support, and both of them struggle to keep it together. Both Mukesh and Aleisha are reluctant readers who strike up an unlikely friendship after Aleisha recommends various books to him from the reading list she found in a library book. Before they know it, they begin to see their worlds and their lives change. (Yes, it is somewhat of a cliché, the life-changing-magic-of-books, the ability to learn from stories and apply them to one's life, but it is well executed throughout The Reading List.) Mukesh reconnects with his granddaughter, finding unexpected joy in the books they read together, and Aleisha finds her mother coming out of her shell to enjoy the books she brings home from the library. Things appear to be getting better for both of our protagonists. Because this is a novel, things aren't always looking up. Grief, loneliness, and death creep up on our characters and test them and their newfound love of reading and sense of community with others at the library. (Make sure you have a box of tissues when you sit down to read this one. It is quite the tearjerker. Let's just say I practically dehydrated myself at various points while reading the book.) The Reading List is one of those rare books that resonates strongly with me at an emotional and spiritual level. Yes, this is a book about books, but it is way more than that. -Cora Find this book and other titles within our catalog. **September is National Library Card Sign-Up Month. Come to any La Crosse County Library location or visit us on our website to get your library card today! Happy reading!**

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ellery Adams

    This book is a wonderful example of bibliotherapy in action. A lonely, grieving widower and a young woman whose family is grappling with mental health issues form an unlikely friendship over books. Having read all the books but one on the list, I see the merit in each selection. The ending felt a little rushed and though predictable, it was still satisfying.

  10. 5 out of 5

    MicheleReader

    Mukesh has lost his beloved wife Naina, who was an avid reader. While not a reader himself, Mukesh decides to read the book Naina was reading before she died to feel more connected to her. The Time-Traveler’s Wife brings him great comfort. When he returns the book to the local library on Harrow Road in Wembley, London, he decides he’ll read some more and asks Aleisha for assistance. While she works in a library, Aleisha has little knowledge of books. When the seventeen-year-old finds a handwritt Mukesh has lost his beloved wife Naina, who was an avid reader. While not a reader himself, Mukesh decides to read the book Naina was reading before she died to feel more connected to her. The Time-Traveler’s Wife brings him great comfort. When he returns the book to the local library on Harrow Road in Wembley, London, he decides he’ll read some more and asks Aleisha for assistance. While she works in a library, Aleisha has little knowledge of books. When the seventeen-year-old finds a handwritten reading list hidden in one of the books, she offers them as suggestions to Mukesh. She decides to read the books herself: To Kill a Mockingbird, Rebecca, The Kite Runner, Life of Pi, Pride and Prejudice, Little Women, Beloved and A Suitable Boy. While reading and enjoying each book, the two form an unlikely friendship. Mukesh starts to slowly emerge from his dark days of mourning. Aleisha and her older brother struggle to help their troubled mother as reading provides Aleisha with a welcome escape. The Reading List starts slow and then grabs your heart. Author Sara Nisha Adams has created two very likeable characters who are dealing with extraordinary pain and you so want them to be happy. The intertwining of the plots of the wonderful books on the list provides a nice touch especially if you are familiar with them. Many thanks to William Morrow and Custom House / HarperCollins for the opportunity to read Adams’ impressive debut novel as part of the Book Club Girls Early Reads program. Book lovers, this one’s for you. Rated 4.25 stars. Review posted on MicheleReader.com.

  11. 4 out of 5

    ~~ preeti~~

    "Sometimes the sky is grey Sometimes the day’s grey too  But behind every grey sky There’s always some blue". A beautifully written contemporary fiction about the beauty of books. The impact of books on us and how books not only enable us avoid reality but also give us a new perspective towards our problems.  Summary Mukesh, a widower in his 70s, lost his wife two years back and even though he has three grown-up daughters and grandkids, his life is still at a standstill. His wife was an avid reade "Sometimes the sky is grey Sometimes the day’s grey too  But behind every grey sky There’s always some blue". A beautifully written contemporary fiction about the beauty of books. The impact of books on us and how books not only enable us avoid reality but also give us a new perspective towards our problems.  Summary Mukesh, a widower in his 70s, lost his wife two years back and even though he has three grown-up daughters and grandkids, his life is still at a standstill. His wife was an avid reader and she cultivated the same habit in their granddaughter, Priya. In a way to connect with Priya and his deceased wife, Mukesh started reading his wife's returned library copy of 'A time traveller's wife' and then visited the library for some book recommendations.  Here he meets Aleisha, a teenage girl who hates books but is working in the library as part of her summer job. She is struggling with a lot of familial issues. But, then she finds a reading list.  This list has a collection of books from different genres. Most of them are pretty popular and well-loved.  An unlikely friendship developed between the two and we see the effects of books on their life and vice versa. Things I loved about the books 1. We have two major Mcs but the books revolve around their families, friends and a lot of other people who were directly/ indirectly influenced by the library or the list. 2. The book is well researched because the author has successfully included tiny details of the everyday life of minorities and POC. I was not surprised to see the author's ancestry.  3. How the plots of the book are aligned with the plots of these famous books so our characters' connection with the book does not feel superfluous.  4. The MCs are well developed and they go through different phases during the book. And, come out as a strong and improved version of themselves.  5. The emphasis on friendship. We have potential romantic relationships but most prominently, it's a book about the importance of community and friendship. As per issues go, I do not have many. It's true, I felt the book was a bit slow-paced in the middle but then suddenly came to the boom and I understood the reason.  Even though it's contemporary fiction/literary fiction the book is quite engaging and the narration reminds us 'Why do we actually love books'.  "Sometimes, books just take us away for a little while and return us to our place with a new perspective".

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kari Ann Sweeney

    This was like a balm to my bookish soul. As a book lover and library advocate it will come as no surprise that this book hit all the right notes. UpLit, BritLit, libraries, books, found family and grief. Sometimes books about books can be a little too syrupy for me. But this story wasn't superficial. It was a well-crafted story about the way books can heal, inspire, guide, enlighten and empower. I loved watching the characters evolve and connect with each other and build a community through thei This was like a balm to my bookish soul. As a book lover and library advocate it will come as no surprise that this book hit all the right notes. UpLit, BritLit, libraries, books, found family and grief. Sometimes books about books can be a little too syrupy for me. But this story wasn't superficial. It was a well-crafted story about the way books can heal, inspire, guide, enlighten and empower. I loved watching the characters evolve and connect with each other and build a community through their local library and a common reading list. As I read this passage I looked over my shoulder to see if Adams was in the room because this is 100% me. 𝘕𝘰𝘸, 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘯𝘪𝘯𝘨, 𝘴𝘩𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘥 𝘢 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘱𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘰𝘳 𝘵𝘸𝘰- 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘭𝘶𝘯𝘤𝘩𝘵𝘪𝘮𝘦 𝘴𝘩𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘥 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦- 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥𝘯'𝘵 𝘴𝘭𝘦𝘦𝘱 𝘶𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘭 𝘴𝘩𝘦'𝘥 𝘵𝘶𝘳𝘯𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘱𝘢𝘨𝘦𝘴, 𝘳𝘦𝘷𝘪𝘴𝘪𝘵𝘦𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘢𝘤𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘰 𝘸𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘣𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘮𝘰𝘳𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘭 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘱𝘢𝘴𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘱𝘵𝘦𝘳. ⁣

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kate Olson

    Nourishment for the book-lover’s soul. I read a library copy of this book, which is so appropriate given the story is essentially one long love letter to libraries, but I’ll definitely be buying a copy to add to my “favorite books about books” forever collection. I was surprised at how sad parts of the book are, and the grief and trauma are palpable, but the sweetness of the rest of the story counteract it well. This is going to be my top recommendation for quite awhile!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Clif Hostetler

    This is a heartwarming feel good novel that shows the therapeutic potential of books to heal, guide, inspire, and calm the soul. The core plot follows the growing relationship between a young summertime library employee and an elderly widower who is at a loss of how to communicate with his granddaughter. The book's narrative also introduces the reader to a host of other characters who all appear to have their own stories of loss, stress, trauma or loneliness. There's also a suggested reading lis This is a heartwarming feel good novel that shows the therapeutic potential of books to heal, guide, inspire, and calm the soul. The core plot follows the growing relationship between a young summertime library employee and an elderly widower who is at a loss of how to communicate with his granddaughter. The book's narrative also introduces the reader to a host of other characters who all appear to have their own stories of loss, stress, trauma or loneliness. There's also a suggested reading list that keeps mysteriously appearing in different locations, beginning in 2017, again in 2018, and then in the book's present of 2019. As these various pieces of the story are introduced it is apparent that the authorships of this "reading list" is its own mystery that needs to be solved. Another question that might arise in the mind of the reader is to wonder if and when this diverse collection of characters are going to reappear—is there going to be a big gathering? The book's narrative does a good job of showing ways that the stories within these novels relate to the challenges faced by the book's characters and their developing relationships. Then the plot reveals a tragic incident that causes the loss of a loved one for one of the book's characters. Angry reaction of the subsequent grief causes blame to be placed partly on the time spent reading books because it had diverted attention from the pending real life loss. That anger eventually evolves into an acknowledgement that books can be an aid in recovery from loss. Reading a few lines from The Time Traveler's Wife "had been like stepping into someone else's world, letting their emotions merge with your own, letting someone else guide you for a moment ..." The book helped provide ideas for finding a path toward working out how best to guide oneself. The relationships among the book's characters that developed through this story enabled them to support each other when a crisis occurred. The book's ending can generally be considered a happy one, but not all problems in the world have been solved. That is how it should be. I was the lucky recipient of an advance reader's edition of this book through Goodreads.com's giveaway program. In case you're wondering about the contents of the mysterious reading list, you can read it here. (view spoiler)[ "Just in case you need itTo Kill a Mockingbird Rebecca The Kite Runner Life of Pi Pride and Prejudice Little Women Beloved A Suitable Boy" As noted in my review, The Time Traveler's Wife also plays a role in the story. Various other book titles are mentioned in the book as well, and at the very end of the book the author has provided her personal list of eleven favorite books. (hide spoiler)] I predict that this book will become a favorite for many book groups. Review by Book Reporter: https://www.bookreporter.com/reviews/...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews

    Books and libraries bring people together, and in this sweet, heartwarming read, Alisha and Mukesh bond over books and help others do the same. Alisha had never liked books, but she worked in a library. Mukesh had never read a book in his life, but his wife was an avid reader. When he met Alisha she wasn't too friendly, but then one day they bonded. Alisha found a reading list with books that she read and that she shared and discussed with Mukesh. In fact, that reading list was found all over town Books and libraries bring people together, and in this sweet, heartwarming read, Alisha and Mukesh bond over books and help others do the same. Alisha had never liked books, but she worked in a library. Mukesh had never read a book in his life, but his wife was an avid reader. When he met Alisha she wasn't too friendly, but then one day they bonded. Alisha found a reading list with books that she read and that she shared and discussed with Mukesh. In fact, that reading list was found all over town tucked in books, in grocery stores, and in any place where someone would likely find it. The mystery is who wrote “The Reading List.” THE READING LIST is an alluring, uplifting book that proves the magic power of books and their ability to connect people in so many ways. It also addresses the importance of libraries to help bring people and ideas together. Readers who enjoy a feel-good, sweet, clever read will want to add this book to their "reading list" this summer. What can be better than a book promoting the love of books and libraries and how they change your life and can bring you closer to others. 5/5 This book was given to me by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carol (Bookaria)

    I loved the books mentioned in the story’s “reading list” and enjoyed the characters’ thoughts about them. In some sections, I felt the story dragged a bit and could have been shortened. Overall, if you love books, you will probably enjoy this novel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    ABookwormWithWine

    4.5/5 I love basically anything about books and reading, and The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams gave me a lot to love. Mukesh and Aleisha are our two main viewpoints, but there was also the addition of a few other characters who find the reading list in various years. I loved that each section was broken up by a book title from the reading list and the way everything tied together at the end was just beautiful. Mukesh had to be my favorite viewpoint of all, and I loved the unlikely bond he and 4.5/5 I love basically anything about books and reading, and The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams gave me a lot to love. Mukesh and Aleisha are our two main viewpoints, but there was also the addition of a few other characters who find the reading list in various years. I loved that each section was broken up by a book title from the reading list and the way everything tied together at the end was just beautiful. Mukesh had to be my favorite viewpoint of all, and I loved the unlikely bond he and Aleisha end up having. Both are dealing with pain and grief, and the way they ended up connecting through the reading list was quite lovely. This was both a heartwarming and heartbreaking read at the same time, and it deals with some pretty heavy subjects. I found myself tearing up throughout the whole thing, so I recommend keeping some tissues handy! It is one of those books that will make you laugh through your tears and make you want to give every single character a big hug and tell them everything will be alright. The audiobook for The Reading List was fabulous and narrated by Tara Divina, Sagar Arya & Paul Panting. Each narrator felt perfect for their character and gave all of the characters life in the best possible way. I felt really connected to Aleisha and Mukesh and I felt all of their pain and all of their happiness throughout the entire book. I think the audio really brought a lot of life to this story and I highly recommend it if you like audiobooks. I usually listen around a 3x speed and I slowed this one down to about a 2.5x so I wouldn't miss anything. I never wanted the story to end and am incredibly impressed that this is Adams' debut. There is a lot of heart and soul put into this work of fiction and it felt more real than fictional. The connections, characters, books, and friendships added so much and I loved how each character learns something about themselves by reading the books on the list. Unfortunately, I have only read Little Women and To Kill a Mockingbird, so I couldn't fully comprehend the things they were learning, but I felt it all the same. Do be warned that there are possible spoilers if you haven't read the books on the list yet, but I didn't mind, and it actually made me want to read or reread them all! I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Natalie "Curling up with a Coffee and a Kindle" Rampling

    I really enjoyed this one. A book about books! So many times I read 'books about books' and end up disappointed, but this was very well executed. I liked the characters, although did struggle at first with Mukesh's chapters. I listened to the audiobook and this narrator had a strong accent that took a little time to get used to. I loved the books on the reading list, and actually feel like I want to read them for real! They were well chosen and kept in line with the story. This was a little bit o I really enjoyed this one. A book about books! So many times I read 'books about books' and end up disappointed, but this was very well executed. I liked the characters, although did struggle at first with Mukesh's chapters. I listened to the audiobook and this narrator had a strong accent that took a little time to get used to. I loved the books on the reading list, and actually feel like I want to read them for real! They were well chosen and kept in line with the story. This was a little bit of a struggle at times with the story around loss (I lost my sister in April 2020 and found this part of the book difficult but very true to reality), and it brought me to tears this morning. Would definitely recommend this book for readers who love a book about books!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Heather~ Nature.books.and.coffee

    Well this book will definitely be one of my favorite reads this year. What a lovely story about how libraries and books can bring people together. Such a heartfelt book that has some serious topics, such as death, greif, mental health, sadness and hopelessness, but yet was so uplifting, and made me feel so warm inside reading about the connections these characters made through read books. I'm I just LOVED this book so much! The two main characters are Aleisha, a 17 yr old girl who is working at Well this book will definitely be one of my favorite reads this year. What a lovely story about how libraries and books can bring people together. Such a heartfelt book that has some serious topics, such as death, greif, mental health, sadness and hopelessness, but yet was so uplifting, and made me feel so warm inside reading about the connections these characters made through read books. I'm I just LOVED this book so much! The two main characters are Aleisha, a 17 yr old girl who is working at the library and not a big reader at all, and Mukesh, a 90 yr old Indian man who just lost his wife who was a huge reader. They become friends when Mukesh is returning a book at the library, that his wife had, and decides he wants to read more to feel closer to his wife. Aleisha finds a reading list in one of the books in the library and decides to look up these books and read them. This list is also found by secondary characters, and they all go about reading the books on the list. I loved how this reading list brought these very diverse people together. The friendship between Aleisha and Mukesh was beautiful and endearing. I loved the descriptions of the library, and the characters felt so real. Made me want to go to library and stay all day! 🤣 Just a fantastic read! Thank you to the publisher for the gifted copy. All opinions are my own!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Shindler

    This wonderful debut novel is a paean to the wonder of books and to libraries, which are the repositories that preserve these words. The stories of Murkesh and Alesha illustrate how books can transform lives, forge bonds and connect readers to heretofore undiscovered worlds. Murkesh is a widower who is grieving the loss of his wife who was an avid reader.His existence has become a narrowly circumscribed routine,dictated by his grown daughters, his Indian community and his temple.He feels emotiona This wonderful debut novel is a paean to the wonder of books and to libraries, which are the repositories that preserve these words. The stories of Murkesh and Alesha illustrate how books can transform lives, forge bonds and connect readers to heretofore undiscovered worlds. Murkesh is a widower who is grieving the loss of his wife who was an avid reader.His existence has become a narrowly circumscribed routine,dictated by his grown daughters, his Indian community and his temple.He feels emotionally disconnected from his family and wants to forge a stronger bond with his young granddaughter.Murkesh stumbles upon a copy of “ The Time Traveler’s Wife,” that his wife had neglected to return to the library.Longing to feel a connection to her, Murkesh reads the book and discovers a new type of attachment to his departed spouse. When Murkesh returns the book to the library, he has an unpromising encounter with Aleisha,, a fractious teenager who has a summer position at the library.She also is beset with challenges in her life.Along with her older brother, she is struggling to care for her mother, who is plagued by debilitating bouts of depression. Aleisha finds a list of eight books within the returned book and decides to read the books and recommend them to Murkesh by way of apologizing for her surly behavior. Thus begins a tentative connection between these two people from disparate backgrounds and stages of life.Gradually, their relationship blossoms into one of mutual support and trust.They find, for different reasons, that they can connect to the characters in the novels they are reading and find guidance that helps them navigate their life challenges.The insight they gain from reading helps them cope with the difficult circumstances that arise at their respective stages of life. This list also is sequestered at various locations in the diverse Wembley community.Several other people discover the list and are drawn to the books.Murkesh and Aleisha both, in their own fashion, become more outgoing and trusting and are able to connect with other members of the community. The description of their development is heartwarming and shows that reading is a possible portal that can connect people, diminish loneliness and cohere a diverse group.It is not necessary to have read the eight novels in order to enjoy this book.Anyone who loves to read will be enriched by the this charming affirmation of the power of literature.4.5 stars

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    What could be better than a book about books and libraries! This book has well written characters, a great plot and great books that helped to change the characters lives. Mukesh is a widower. He misses his wife desperately and he sees her everywhere. His daughters try to help him by the end up overprotecting him. He wants to find a way to connect with his young granddaughter. All she wants to do is read but then he realizes books were what made her close with her grandmother. So he makes the tr What could be better than a book about books and libraries! This book has well written characters, a great plot and great books that helped to change the characters lives. Mukesh is a widower. He misses his wife desperately and he sees her everywhere. His daughters try to help him by the end up overprotecting him. He wants to find a way to connect with his young granddaughter. All she wants to do is read but then he realizes books were what made her close with her grandmother. So he makes the trek to the library that is far outside his neighborhood and when he gets a reading list that was left by an anonymous person, he decides to read all of the books on the list. Aleisha is a teen ager who works at the library. When she finds the reading list, she decides to read all of the books on the list hoping that they will help her deal with her life at home. Mukesh and Aleisha started off as strangers but the more they discussed the books that they were reading, the more their friendship grew and they begin to realize that there was a whole world outside of what had been their dreary lives. As readers we all know how books can affect your life and the way you view the world around you. This book was so great because it showed how two non-readers were affected by the books on the reading list and the changes that the books helped make in their lives. This is a heart-warming novel about the magic of books! Thanks to goodreads for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lori Sinsel Harris

    A book about books, what is there not to love right? I am sorry I have tried and tried to really like this book. I was very excited to receive the ARC from Goodreads and the publisher. I thought I would really enjoy it since I love reading books about books. Try as I might I just could not get into it. I have had this book for a while now and have tried on several occasions to really sit and read it, but I ended up having to force myself. Forcing myself to read a book is never a good sign. I fe A book about books, what is there not to love right? I am sorry I have tried and tried to really like this book. I was very excited to receive the ARC from Goodreads and the publisher. I thought I would really enjoy it since I love reading books about books. Try as I might I just could not get into it. I have had this book for a while now and have tried on several occasions to really sit and read it, but I ended up having to force myself. Forcing myself to read a book is never a good sign. I feel it was too slow paced, something just didn't click with me. I really enjoyed the chapters about the character Mukesh, his character took center stage to me. The chapters about Aleisha were just not relatable. I found no connection to her story at all, I really just didn't like her. The book is well written I believe, it just wasn't a good fit for me. I did enjoy the descriptions of the reading list and the books on it. I want to go back and read some of them again now. I just didn't connect with this one. I am sure many people will love this story. It has all the right ingredients for a success, just not for this reader. Thank you to the publishers at Harper Collins and Goodreads for the free ARC of this novel. I am leaving my honest review in return.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I read the first eight chapters then felt it was too soapy. I’d lost interest as the style of the writing lacked any flair. However, I did go to the end chapters to see what happened to Aidan, Aleisha and Mukesh; so it’s clear the author has created characters readers will care about. I enjoyed the descriptions of the library and reading. They were spot on, but overall the style of the book just wasn’t for me. I’m sure others will enjoy it. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the opport I read the first eight chapters then felt it was too soapy. I’d lost interest as the style of the writing lacked any flair. However, I did go to the end chapters to see what happened to Aidan, Aleisha and Mukesh; so it’s clear the author has created characters readers will care about. I enjoyed the descriptions of the library and reading. They were spot on, but overall the style of the book just wasn’t for me. I’m sure others will enjoy it. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read an ARC.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    A charming story set around a library and some classic novels. The story features Mukesh, a recently widowed father and grandfather and Aleisha, a teenage girl having to deal with her ailing mother. Despite the age difference, the two main characters build a relationship around a reading list that has been left lying around. I really wanted to love this story ; it appeared to have all the right ingredients, books, a library, feel-good vibes. However, I found that as hard as I tried, I just could A charming story set around a library and some classic novels. The story features Mukesh, a recently widowed father and grandfather and Aleisha, a teenage girl having to deal with her ailing mother. Despite the age difference, the two main characters build a relationship around a reading list that has been left lying around. I really wanted to love this story ; it appeared to have all the right ingredients, books, a library, feel-good vibes. However, I found that as hard as I tried, I just couldn't find the book particularly good. The opening chapters of the book were confusing as it flitted between 2017 and 2019. It was difficult to work out how the minor characters fitted into the story until much later on. The only character I found interesting was Mukesh. Compared to the other characters he leapt off the page as a well-drawn individual. The other characters just didn't appear fully-formed. Overall the plot of the story was very contrived and a bit disappointing for me. I received a free review copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for my honest and unedited review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    smalltownbookmom

    To say I've been excited for this bighearted debut about saving a small community library and the power of books to bring people together would be a gross understatement! Mukesh is a lonely widower living in the small West London community of Wembley. In an attempt to feel closer to his dead wife he picks up The time traveller's wife - one of her favorite books (and mine!). The book sparks a new love of reading and leads him to check out his local library where he meets Aleisha, a reluctant libr To say I've been excited for this bighearted debut about saving a small community library and the power of books to bring people together would be a gross understatement! Mukesh is a lonely widower living in the small West London community of Wembley. In an attempt to feel closer to his dead wife he picks up The time traveller's wife - one of her favorite books (and mine!). The book sparks a new love of reading and leads him to check out his local library where he meets Aleisha, a reluctant librarian spending her summer trying to make a little extra cash and help out her brother. Though Aleisha and Mukesh get off to a rocky start, the two quickly form a bond making their way reading through a list of 8 books Aleisha found. These books and the list circulate through the community finding people at the moment when they need the comfort and escape only good books can provide. I honestly loved everything about this book! The characters are so well developed, dealing with real life problems I just wanted to give them big hugs. Aleisha's mom struggles with mental illness and she and her brother Aiden are trying to hold the family together. When a tragedy befalls Aleisha and she loses all hope only Mukesh is able to inspire her to keep going with a campaign to save the library. HIGHLY recommended for fans of UpLit stories like The brilliant life of Eudora Honeysett, All the lonely people or The last chance library (coming Aug/31/21). I can't believe this was a debut book, the writing and characters are ones that will stay with me forever! If you enjoy lists, books about books and heartwarming, feel-good stories this is a MUST READ! CW: cancer, mental illness, depression, suicide, loss of loved ones Favorite quotes: "Sometimes, books just take us away for a little while, and return us to our place with a new perspective." "This library had come to mean something to him. It had begun to feel like home. And a place is only what it is because of the people who make it."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sonali Dabade

    4,5 stars! Review soon!

  27. 4 out of 5

    LoneStarWords Deb Coco

    Mukesh turned to the front page of To Kill A Mockingbird and noticed the Brent Council Libraries sheet, full of black splotchy dates…It was strange, the idea that this book wasn't just for him, it was for everyone. All these people who had taken it out before him, people who would take it out after him....Every reader unknowingly connected in some small way. The Reading List Sara Nisha Adams • To Kill a Mockingbird Rebecca The Kite Runner Life of Pi Pride and Prejudice Little Women Beloved A Suitable Boy • W Mukesh turned to the front page of To Kill A Mockingbird and noticed the Brent Council Libraries sheet, full of black splotchy dates…It was strange, the idea that this book wasn't just for him, it was for everyone. All these people who had taken it out before him, people who would take it out after him....Every reader unknowingly connected in some small way. The Reading List Sara Nisha Adams • To Kill a Mockingbird Rebecca The Kite Runner Life of Pi Pride and Prejudice Little Women Beloved A Suitable Boy • What do these books have in common other than being incredible classics? They are the very original framework for The Reading List, a book I devoured and would tell any book lover to grab. • I don't read a lot of books that fall into the "feel good" category, and yet I already have All the Lonely People in my top reads, and TRL joins it. • This is the story of a widower named Mukesh, who grabbed at my heartstrings and never let go. He is living in the wake of his wife's passing and while taking his granddaughter to the library, he forges a friendship with a young librarian, Aleisha. She is eager to share and discuss the books she discovered on a slip of paper tucked inside To Kill A Mockingbird. Mukesh's wife had been a voracious reader so he decides to embark on reading the books on "The Reading List" too, to honor her memory, and they forge their own little book club. • This is one of those books about books that hits all the right notes. It's a love letter to the ways they bond, connect and heal us. I've honestly never read a book that so perfectly illustrated what a comfort reading can be. Adams puts into words what we all feel like when we walk into a bookstore or library, or find a kindred spirit in a beloved book. • This is a book about empathy and community, and BOOKS. If you've been wondering about this one, it's got my stamp of approval in a big way. It's just perfect. And no it’s not saccharine like some of these books can be! Thank you William Morrow Books and Bibliolifestyle for this gifted copy!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica LatestBookCrush

    Thank you to William Morrow and Harper Audio for gifting me review copies of The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams. This book made me feel all the feels. All of them. The Reading List follows the lives and stories of multiple characters who intersect at a local library (whether past or present) and have a reading list of classics in common. Each book on the list teaches them something different, depending on who they are and where they are in their lives. The list: To Kill a Mockingbird Rebecca The Ki Thank you to William Morrow and Harper Audio for gifting me review copies of The Reading List by Sara Nisha Adams. This book made me feel all the feels. All of them. The Reading List follows the lives and stories of multiple characters who intersect at a local library (whether past or present) and have a reading list of classics in common. Each book on the list teaches them something different, depending on who they are and where they are in their lives. The list: To Kill a Mockingbird Rebecca The Kite Runner Life of Pi Pride and Prejudice Little Women Beloved A Suitable Boy This book really highlights the importance of libraries in a community and the ability of books to both help bring us together and transport us to new places entirely. It deals with difficult family situations, mental health, grief, lost dreams, loneliness, aging…but in such a beautiful way. Although I should warn you that sobbed like a baby through part of the story. It’s such a beautiful, heartbreaking, moving book and I’m jealous of anyone who gets to read this one for the first time. I started by reading the physical book but switched to the audiobook halfway through. The audio is so beautifully performed by Tara Divina, Sagar Arya, and Paul Panting. It comes in at 12 hours and 47 minutes.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erica (sand_between_pages)

    A book for book lovers! If you love books, which I suspect you might as you are here, then you need to add The Reading List to your reading list! . This book has some very sad moments, but ultimately, I found it uplifting. At its core, The Reading List is about bringing people together and providing community and solace through books. Books can help you get to know yourself better, bring you closer to a loved one, console you in grief, and be a companion in loneliness. I know that I love books bec A book for book lovers! If you love books, which I suspect you might as you are here, then you need to add The Reading List to your reading list! . This book has some very sad moments, but ultimately, I found it uplifting. At its core, The Reading List is about bringing people together and providing community and solace through books. Books can help you get to know yourself better, bring you closer to a loved one, console you in grief, and be a companion in loneliness. I know that I love books because they allow me to escape, but I also love finding myself in characters, understanding how to be a better listener, and garnering empathy through others' experiences. The Reading List hit on a lot of those subject. . Read it, folks! And be warned, it has a slower start. Don't DNF, just keep going - the end is worth it!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    A book set mainly in a library and about the joy to be gained from reading, that’s got to be the literary equivalent of catnip hasn’t it? It certainly was to this reader, along with the gorgeous cover that made me slightly sad I was reading a digital copy. I may just have to visit a bookshop soon and treat myself… The Reading List is eloquent about the benefits to be gained from reading, whether that’s the power of books to inform, to distract from everyday worries, to evoke memories, to prompt d A book set mainly in a library and about the joy to be gained from reading, that’s got to be the literary equivalent of catnip hasn’t it? It certainly was to this reader, along with the gorgeous cover that made me slightly sad I was reading a digital copy. I may just have to visit a bookshop soon and treat myself… The Reading List is eloquent about the benefits to be gained from reading, whether that’s the power of books to inform, to distract from everyday worries, to evoke memories, to prompt discussion or to provoke connections with others. It’s also a passionate advocacy for the value to communities of public libraries. Talking of communities, the author certainly creates a vivid picture of the area of London (Wembley) in which Mukesh lives and that is the location of the Harrow Road Library. I also admired the creative ways the author used the reading list to give us an insight into the lives of other secondary characters. I developed a great affection for Mukesh and his willingness to try new things, inspired by what he believes his late wife, Naina, would have wanted him to do. Although there is plenty of humour in the book, it tackles more serious issues such as bereavement, the burden of caring responsibilities, loneliness and mental illness but in such a way that you always feel there is a glimmer of hope, a possible way out of the situation. However, as with some of the books on the reading list, it has moments of sadness. When it comes to the books on the reading list of the novel’s title, the author carefully treads the fine line between revealing enough of each book’s content to demonstrate its relevance to the situations her characters find themselves in, and not giving away so much that readers who might want to follow the example of Mukesh and Aleisha and read the eight novels on the list think there’s no point in reading them now. As it happens, I’ve only read four of the eight on the list but am intrigued enough to add the remainder to my wishlist. As well as being a thoroughly engrossing read, what The Reading List has showed me is there’s no shame in peeking at what others are reading on the bus or train, and that if your local library is under threat of closure you should join (or start) the campaign to save it now.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.