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Night Rooms

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“In a horror movie, an infected character may hide a bite or rash, an urge, an unwellness. She might withdraw or act out, or behave as if nothing is the matter, nothing has happened. Any course of action opposite saying how she feels suggests suffering privately is preferable to the anticipated betrayal of being cast out.” Night Rooms is a poetic, intimate collection of per “In a horror movie, an infected character may hide a bite or rash, an urge, an unwellness. She might withdraw or act out, or behave as if nothing is the matter, nothing has happened. Any course of action opposite saying how she feels suggests suffering privately is preferable to the anticipated betrayal of being cast out.” Night Rooms is a poetic, intimate collection of personal essays that weaves together fragmented images from horror films and cultural tropes to meditate on anxiety and depression, suicide, body image, identity, grief, and survival. Whether competing in shopping mall beauty pageants, reflecting on childhood monsters and ballet lessons, or recounting dark cultural ephemera while facing grief and authenticity in the digital age, Gina Nutt’s shifting style echoes the sub-genres that Night Rooms highlights—spirit-haunted slow burns, possession tales, slashers, and revenge films with a feminist bent. Refracting life through the lens of horror films, Night Rooms masterfully leaps between reality and movies, past and present—because the “final girl’s” story is ultimately a survival story told another way.


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“In a horror movie, an infected character may hide a bite or rash, an urge, an unwellness. She might withdraw or act out, or behave as if nothing is the matter, nothing has happened. Any course of action opposite saying how she feels suggests suffering privately is preferable to the anticipated betrayal of being cast out.” Night Rooms is a poetic, intimate collection of per “In a horror movie, an infected character may hide a bite or rash, an urge, an unwellness. She might withdraw or act out, or behave as if nothing is the matter, nothing has happened. Any course of action opposite saying how she feels suggests suffering privately is preferable to the anticipated betrayal of being cast out.” Night Rooms is a poetic, intimate collection of personal essays that weaves together fragmented images from horror films and cultural tropes to meditate on anxiety and depression, suicide, body image, identity, grief, and survival. Whether competing in shopping mall beauty pageants, reflecting on childhood monsters and ballet lessons, or recounting dark cultural ephemera while facing grief and authenticity in the digital age, Gina Nutt’s shifting style echoes the sub-genres that Night Rooms highlights—spirit-haunted slow burns, possession tales, slashers, and revenge films with a feminist bent. Refracting life through the lens of horror films, Night Rooms masterfully leaps between reality and movies, past and present—because the “final girl’s” story is ultimately a survival story told another way.

30 review for Night Rooms

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Night Rooms is a collection of essays that is like nothing I have experienced before. Personal, vulnerable, almost like journal entries, poetic and ornate. It took me a bit to get used to the structure but once I got familiar with the flow I surrendered myself to Nutt's lovely, fragmented pieces, with such keen and precise prose, letting her show me the way though different themes of death, grief, anxiety, body image, suicide and more using horror films as a conduit. This was a stirring collecti Night Rooms is a collection of essays that is like nothing I have experienced before. Personal, vulnerable, almost like journal entries, poetic and ornate. It took me a bit to get used to the structure but once I got familiar with the flow I surrendered myself to Nutt's lovely, fragmented pieces, with such keen and precise prose, letting her show me the way though different themes of death, grief, anxiety, body image, suicide and more using horror films as a conduit. This was a stirring collection I shall not soon forget! This will be available March 23rd. Thank you to @twodollarradio for sharing this ARC with me, opinions are my own. • For more of my book content check out instagram.com/bookalong

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lolly K Dandeneau

    via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/ 𝑴𝒚 𝒅𝒓𝒆𝒂𝒅 𝒉𝒂𝒔 𝒏𝒐 𝒐𝒓𝒊𝒈𝒊𝒏. 𝑰𝒕 𝒆𝒙𝒕𝒆𝒏𝒅𝒔 𝒃𝒂𝒄𝒌 𝒂𝒔 𝒇𝒂𝒓 𝒂𝒔 𝑰 𝒓𝒆𝒎𝒆𝒎𝒃𝒆𝒓. Moments in life can induce emotions not unlike those horror movies provoke. Unsure what’s creeping around the corner, insidious illnesses, dangerous strangers, being swallowed by the dark… stage fright. Maybe so many people gravitate towards horror films because it is an escape from all the real things in life that give us the "heebie jeebies, the creeps”. In this collection of essays, via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/ 𝑴𝒚 𝒅𝒓𝒆𝒂𝒅 𝒉𝒂𝒔 𝒏𝒐 𝒐𝒓𝒊𝒈𝒊𝒏. 𝑰𝒕 𝒆𝒙𝒕𝒆𝒏𝒅𝒔 𝒃𝒂𝒄𝒌 𝒂𝒔 𝒇𝒂𝒓 𝒂𝒔 𝑰 𝒓𝒆𝒎𝒆𝒎𝒃𝒆𝒓. Moments in life can induce emotions not unlike those horror movies provoke. Unsure what’s creeping around the corner, insidious illnesses, dangerous strangers, being swallowed by the dark… stage fright. Maybe so many people gravitate towards horror films because it is an escape from all the real things in life that give us the "heebie jeebies, the creeps”. In this collection of essays, Gina Nutt examines moments in her own life and scenes from horror movies, translating distress, deflecting misfortune, mulling over displays at the Pharmacy Museum in New Orleans and the many instruments of horror from days of old. Nature isn’t off the hook, it can devastate too- as she ponders the many disaster rides at theme parks. There are the terrors particular to women, our biological clock, sometimes faulty. How we feel about our bodies, desire, our very sexuality which can be both pleasure and pain. Sickness that hits us from nowhere, feeling like a specimen before the doctor, wondering if something lethal is inside of you, the sickness of stress. Obsessive focus on worst case scenario scenes, and having filled up on horror movies supplies endless fodder for that. The mad feeling of an unquiet mind, the torment of knowing death waits for us all and how do we live happy lives while that hangs over our heads? Okay, so going to the Morbid Anatomy Museum is a little, well… morbid- but one has to wonder, if yesterdays science and norms are todays horrors, doesn’t it translate that the same will one day be said of our norms? We humans are strange creatures, and Gina Nutt indulges all the things that people are meant to avoid. It truly is the distance watching horror films provide that makes it ok to enjoy them, right? Life has it’s grim moments, if you live long enough you will house illness, be party to grief, loss, have your own dark night of the soul, but there is always poetry and hope. There is balance, there will be sunny days, but remember too much light can be brutal too! As Gina Nutt writes, “Horror movies are contained catastrophes.” That could be it. We can live out our biggest fears and walk away alive. This was an interesting, unique collection- I watched a lot of horror movies as a teenager. It was fun to be spooked, scared stupid! She takes intimate moments from her own life and intertwines the memories with pieces of horror films she has feasted on. It’s not all dark humor, there are tender and heartbreaking incidents, one involving suicide. Yes, a solid read for anyone who loves personal essays or horror. Publication Date” March 23, 2021 Available now TwoDollar Radio

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I chalk this up to user error. This was like abstract literary pointillism: in miniature there were beautiful, surprising strokes. Once the eye was no longer specifically affixed to it, it vanished. And as I pulled my view further out to try to take in the whole, nothing adhered together, no insight or meaning apparent. These cultural observations paired in these specific ways with the author's personal vignettes likely has meaning to the author, but they sure didn't to me. Just a big ol' mess of I chalk this up to user error. This was like abstract literary pointillism: in miniature there were beautiful, surprising strokes. Once the eye was no longer specifically affixed to it, it vanished. And as I pulled my view further out to try to take in the whole, nothing adhered together, no insight or meaning apparent. These cultural observations paired in these specific ways with the author's personal vignettes likely has meaning to the author, but they sure didn't to me. Just a big ol' mess of personal and cultural musings that grasped for poetics and meaning. I found neither. But I chalk this up to user error.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sam Glatt

    It can be jarring to read pieces from a writer that are ultimately incredible vulnerable, but that's exactly what makes this book so special. It's a short one, but still manages to contain a full and expansive world within its pages. It's admittedly one of those books that is, truly, made for me—filled with a longing to understand the darkest things that could happen to us by interrogating the things we cherish most—and I think everyone will find that there's something for them in these pages, t It can be jarring to read pieces from a writer that are ultimately incredible vulnerable, but that's exactly what makes this book so special. It's a short one, but still manages to contain a full and expansive world within its pages. It's admittedly one of those books that is, truly, made for me—filled with a longing to understand the darkest things that could happen to us by interrogating the things we cherish most—and I think everyone will find that there's something for them in these pages, too. TDR, thank you so much for the early read of this one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Foster

    Pretty cool. It's considered a book of essays although it's really just a bunch of short paragraphs/stream of conscious thoughts that are all vaguely tied together. Lots of interesting things here to think about but reading a book like this can be exhausting. Fear, death and loathing all tied together with horror movies. Pretty cool. It's considered a book of essays although it's really just a bunch of short paragraphs/stream of conscious thoughts that are all vaguely tied together. Lots of interesting things here to think about but reading a book like this can be exhausting. Fear, death and loathing all tied together with horror movies.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Bruning

    NIGHT ROOMS is a collection of essays that are tied to horror films, which I definitely would have appreciated more if I knew even the teeniest bit about horror films. The writing was fine, even poetic at some points. The flavor of the book as a whole though was just kind of bland.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Lewis

    Like a bunch of notes passing back and forth.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dea Spears

    Such a great masterpiece! You can publish your work on NovelStar Mobile App.

  9. 4 out of 5

    CJ Alberts

    DNF

  10. 5 out of 5

    Raelyn Torngren

    Full review to come: but the short of it is this is one of the best things I’ve ever read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Review for Little Village Magazine

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe Anderson

    Please publish your work on NovelStar. For sure a lot of readers will love your work. There are also a lot of talented writers in the platform that you might want to work with.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gary Lee

    Some really, truly beautiful moments throughout, but a bit too unfocused for my taste.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Beth M.

    “What do you get when you take a grouping of personal essays, infuse them liberally with horror and other pop culture references, then sprinkle in a dash of ‘90s nostalgia? The answer is simple: the best new release this reviewer has read so far in 2021! With a stunningly original concept and precise execution, Gina Nutt’s debut essay collection NIGHT ROOMS is absolutely captivating! A series of compositions covering the landscape of a life in progress, NIGHT ROOMS puts feelings to experiences in “What do you get when you take a grouping of personal essays, infuse them liberally with horror and other pop culture references, then sprinkle in a dash of ‘90s nostalgia? The answer is simple: the best new release this reviewer has read so far in 2021! With a stunningly original concept and precise execution, Gina Nutt’s debut essay collection NIGHT ROOMS is absolutely captivating! A series of compositions covering the landscape of a life in progress, NIGHT ROOMS puts feelings to experiences in a way readers never would have imagined possible … and one they have likely never seen before! Nutt shies away from nothing in her writing, taking bold chances with both the structure and the way she lays herself bare to the reader. From participating in childhood beauty pageants in a shopping mall to the adult milestone of buying a home, from sleepovers with high school friends to the loss of her father-in-law by suicide, Nutt’s essays weave back and forth through time, deconstructing everything from the most ordinary life events to the most painful. Using what may at first appear to be an odd lens, Nutt has chosen to reflect upon these experiences primarily through a parallel with horror films. Jumping back and forth — often as frequently as every paragraph — between her own life and snippets of horror subgenres or oblique film references, Nutt weaves a thread between these two seemingly disparate points, pulling them closer and closer together with every word ... It is difficult to put into words how Nutt combines these elements together to create a genuine, reflective experience without it coming across as overwritten, self-indulgent, or even ridiculous. But she does it, and does it oh so well! Perhaps it all works because ... the best scary stories are not those with empty thrills and jump scares, but those which lay bare the horrors of the human condition.” Go to www.thenerddaily.com to read the full review! So many thanks to Two Dollar Radio for gifting me an advance copy!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tessy Consentino

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gauraa Shekhar

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steven Harbaugh

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  21. 4 out of 5

    David Nutt

  22. 4 out of 5

    Misty

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kalyn

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Meinzer

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joe Byrne

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lydia A.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katrina Bright-Yerges

  28. 5 out of 5

    May Steinberg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anne Kumer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elena

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