counter create hit When Women Ruled the World: Making the Renaissance in Europe - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

When Women Ruled the World: Making the Renaissance in Europe

Availability: Ready to download

Library Journal • "Books and Authors to Know: Titles to Watch 2021" Sixteenth-century Europe was a time of destabilization of age-old norms and the waging of religious wars—yet it also witnessed the remarkable flowering of a pacific culture cultivated by a cohort of extraordinary women rulers who sat on Europe’s thrones, most notably Mary Tudor; Elizabeth I; Mary, Queen of Library Journal • "Books and Authors to Know: Titles to Watch 2021" Sixteenth-century Europe was a time of destabilization of age-old norms and the waging of religious wars—yet it also witnessed the remarkable flowering of a pacific culture cultivated by a cohort of extraordinary women rulers who sat on Europe’s thrones, most notably Mary Tudor; Elizabeth I; Mary, Queen of Scots; and Catherine de’ Medici. Recasting the dramatic stories and complex political relationships among these four women rulers, Maureen Quilligan rewrites centuries of scholarship that sought to depict intense personal hatreds among them. Instead, showing how the queens engendered a culture of mutual respect, When Women Ruled the World focuses on the gift-giving by which they aimed to ensure female bonds of friendship and alliance. Detailing the artistic and political creativity that  flourished in the pockets of peace created by these queens, Quilligan’s lavishly illustrated work offers a new perspective on the glory of the Renaissance and the women who helped to create it.


Compare

Library Journal • "Books and Authors to Know: Titles to Watch 2021" Sixteenth-century Europe was a time of destabilization of age-old norms and the waging of religious wars—yet it also witnessed the remarkable flowering of a pacific culture cultivated by a cohort of extraordinary women rulers who sat on Europe’s thrones, most notably Mary Tudor; Elizabeth I; Mary, Queen of Library Journal • "Books and Authors to Know: Titles to Watch 2021" Sixteenth-century Europe was a time of destabilization of age-old norms and the waging of religious wars—yet it also witnessed the remarkable flowering of a pacific culture cultivated by a cohort of extraordinary women rulers who sat on Europe’s thrones, most notably Mary Tudor; Elizabeth I; Mary, Queen of Scots; and Catherine de’ Medici. Recasting the dramatic stories and complex political relationships among these four women rulers, Maureen Quilligan rewrites centuries of scholarship that sought to depict intense personal hatreds among them. Instead, showing how the queens engendered a culture of mutual respect, When Women Ruled the World focuses on the gift-giving by which they aimed to ensure female bonds of friendship and alliance. Detailing the artistic and political creativity that  flourished in the pockets of peace created by these queens, Quilligan’s lavishly illustrated work offers a new perspective on the glory of the Renaissance and the women who helped to create it.

44 review for When Women Ruled the World: Making the Renaissance in Europe

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    At the dawn of the Renaissance, there were an unprecedented number of women occupying the thrones of Europe. This book specifically looks at the two Tudor queens, their Stuart cousin, Catherine de Medici, and how the Hapsburgs fit into the mix. We see how, “…a quartet of Renaissance queens whose crowded lives were intertwined by complex blood and marriage ties, by changing allegiances and the fractures of religion, by their premier places in the world of a few dozen European monarchs, and by the At the dawn of the Renaissance, there were an unprecedented number of women occupying the thrones of Europe. This book specifically looks at the two Tudor queens, their Stuart cousin, Catherine de Medici, and how the Hapsburgs fit into the mix. We see how, “…a quartet of Renaissance queens whose crowded lives were intertwined by complex blood and marriage ties, by changing allegiances and the fractures of religion, by their premier places in the world of a few dozen European monarchs, and by the great worlds that those neighboring monarchs ruled…” It is how these women engaged with one another that is the central theme here, especially in the context of gifts they bequeathed. “The reciprocity of [gift] exchanges is fundamental to most social connections and so gift-giving is a signal ritual in demonstrating… loyalty.” By examining the underlying meaning of these gifts, we can see where their affections lie. Historically, rivalry often trumps support and cooperation, but regardless of how the history books portray these sovereigns’ attitudes towards one another, they still demonstrated thoughtful generosity. I was especially intrigued by the significance of tapestries as inalienable possessions. There were some redundancies in the narrative, and I thought perhaps that Catherine de Medici’s section should have been presented first. It started with Mary Tudor, then Elizabeth I, followed by Mary of Scots, and then her former mother-in-law, Catherine. Despite that, I got a good sense of how each sovereign ruled, what her priorities were, and how she felt about her sister queens. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the GoodReads First Reads program.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tracie

    In "When Women Ruled the World: Making the Renaissance in Europe" by Maureen Quilligan, the focus is on the gifts exchanged between European women in the 16th century and a fresh look at old misconceptions about women rulers. These women in particular: Mary Tudor, Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, and Catherine de’ Medici created themselves or had created, gifts of poems, cloth, embroidered items, and golden and silver fonts. The four women all faced hardships in their childhood and as rulers mo In "When Women Ruled the World: Making the Renaissance in Europe" by Maureen Quilligan, the focus is on the gifts exchanged between European women in the 16th century and a fresh look at old misconceptions about women rulers. These women in particular: Mary Tudor, Mary Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I, and Catherine de’ Medici created themselves or had created, gifts of poems, cloth, embroidered items, and golden and silver fonts. The four women all faced hardships in their childhood and as rulers most of them worked toward peace and religious tolerance, more than their male counterparts, like William Cecil, John Knox, and the Pope. Many Hapsburg women had assumed positions of great authority over the family's lands with the backing of Phillip II of Spain. and gifts tied them together as family heirlooms as well. Tapestry was the most expensive form of art and revealed much about family and history. The author brings together recent scholarship by various people and there is a nice bibliography and notes section. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an advanced copy in exchange for a honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Louise

    Recorded history is often dominated by men. Particularly Western History. But there are times, often pivotal times in Western History where women, not men, are the primary movers and shakers of the age. This book takes a look at one such time -- the 1500s and four rulers who were rulers in their own right: Mary Tudor, Elizabeth Tudor, Mary Stuart, and Catherine deMedici. -- If you know me, you know that this is a time period that is near and dear to my heart. It was my focus in college and it's so Recorded history is often dominated by men. Particularly Western History. But there are times, often pivotal times in Western History where women, not men, are the primary movers and shakers of the age. This book takes a look at one such time -- the 1500s and four rulers who were rulers in their own right: Mary Tudor, Elizabeth Tudor, Mary Stuart, and Catherine deMedici. -- If you know me, you know that this is a time period that is near and dear to my heart. It was my focus in college and it's something I've studied extensively afterwards. I absolutely adore these disparate queens but I'm not sure I fully adore this book. First off, it's definitely an interesting choice to only focus on four queens three of whom rule countries on one small island. Especially since there were other queens ruling at this time including: Joan I (Juana la Loca who ruled Spain until 1555), Anna (Queen of Poland), or even Mary of Hungary (who is mentioned in this book but not as someone who ruled... more of as an extension of Philip II of Spain). And one of the queens focused on isn't technically a queen regnant but instead a queen regent... the choice definitely had me tilting my head a bit. As did the choice to focus so much time and page space to Philip II, who I will grant was super important and powerful... but by devoting so much time to him and by calling him the true ruler of the world the author not only leans very heavily into colonialism and Eurocentrism schools of thought but also negates her own thesis that the ruling women of this time were just as powerful and worthy of ruling as the men. For instance in the sections on Mary Tudor, more time is spent on Mary's relationship with Philip and Philip's wooing of Elizabeth than on Mary's accomplishments as queen. While there are a few tantalizing sections on how Mary influenced her sister, there isn't nearly enough focus on the deeds and acts of Mary and how she ruled. Indeed, there's more on confusion regarding a piece of jewelry - La Peregrina. That isn't to say that this book is bad, it isn't. I found the writing readable and the topics well researched. I particularly liked the inclusion of relevant artwork to bolster the author's claims. But that said, I also found the book meandering, repetitive, and occasionally contradictory. For example, the author states that the pearl that Mary Tudor is well known for wearing in many of her portraits and even on the currency bearing her image is not "La Peregrina" which was found off the coast of Panama and is part of the Spanish crown jewels. That it was La Peregrina that ended up in the collection of Elizabeth Taylor's jewels and not Mary Tudor's pearl. And the author proceeds to show us this with some pretty compelling circumstantial evidence. But then the author ends this chapter by essentially contradicting the whole thrust of her argument that saying that Mary Tudor's pearl would have been a good addition to Elizabeth Taylor's collection. On the good side, the author while light on Mary's acts does take the more recently accepted viewpoint that Mary Tudor was a kinder and more popular monarch than most people would think. I would have liked more on this, but what is there is definitely more in line with modern historical thought. For the most part, I enjoyed this book. It didn't make me angry and it's clear that the author cares about the subject. That said, I feel that this needed at least one more pass through with a red pen to weed out all of the repetitiveness, contradictions, and to add a little more rationale on why focus on ONLY these four queens when there were other strong female rulers that are also worthy of the spotlight. I think I'm going to give this: Three Stars I received an ARC of this book via NetGalley

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    This was a well-researched and scholarly/academic reexamination of our understanding of the animosity between four monarchical-connected women who were ruling at the same time: Mary Tudor, Elizabeth I, Mary Stuart (Queen of Scots), and Catherine de Medici. The central thesis is incredibly intriguing and I think a testament to the different perspectives we get in academic thinking when we expand the scope of WHO is doing the analysis. The glances at, for example, how the gifts these women gave ea This was a well-researched and scholarly/academic reexamination of our understanding of the animosity between four monarchical-connected women who were ruling at the same time: Mary Tudor, Elizabeth I, Mary Stuart (Queen of Scots), and Catherine de Medici. The central thesis is incredibly intriguing and I think a testament to the different perspectives we get in academic thinking when we expand the scope of WHO is doing the analysis. The glances at, for example, how the gifts these women gave each other hinted at less hostility and more attempts at friendship, camaraderie, and peace were compelling. However, these pieces never really coalesced for me, unfortunately, feeling rather unfocused in many places to me. There was a point only mentioned in the epilogue that better supported the thesis than many others in the majority of the book. Why?There was also a good chunk of the last part of the book dedicated to Philip II (Mary Tudor's husband and, later, Catherine de Medici's son-in-law) because "he ACTUALLY ruled the whole world." Like, what? Okay, I guess. Quilligan even called out herself that it was strange she was addressing this in a book ostensibly focused on four women, but then proceeded to do so anyway. I get wanting to look at that moment in history holistically, EXCEPT that's not the stated purpose of the book. I had high hopes for this one, and I think there was some solid analysis and historical interrogation here, but overall I think it didn't quite live up to its promise. Also, I'm not going to judge this too harshly or include it in my rating consideration, because I read an arc of the book, but there was a story retold almost verbatim about Mary Stuart being abducted and raped by her third husband, so that just felt like the editing hadn't quite been finished or something. I'm not sure what happened there, but it left me with some unenjoyable deja vu.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    ***I received this audiobook from netgalley in exchange for an honest review*** This book held a lot of promise for my feminist heart. It had so much thorough research and you can tell that the author deeply cares about this topic. The book was just a tad bit dry. If you are looking for an intelligent book with a lot of facts and sources, I would 10/10 recommend. If you are looking for an amusing audiobook to entertain and educate, you are better off looking elsewhere.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I thought this was interesting and I very much appreciated the deeper dive into the woman's relationships to each other. It goes far beyond they "they were rival queens they must have hated each other" and gets deeper into the nuance of relationships, using gifts that were exchanged by the women to illustrate the points. Well done and a nice quick read. I received a copy of this book from Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I thought this was interesting and I very much appreciated the deeper dive into the woman's relationships to each other. It goes far beyond they "they were rival queens they must have hated each other" and gets deeper into the nuance of relationships, using gifts that were exchanged by the women to illustrate the points. Well done and a nice quick read. I received a copy of this book from Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Palmisano-dillard

    These four women,Mary Tudor, Elizabeth Tudor, Mary Stuart and Catherine de Medici, lived incredible lives. I didn’t realize just how entwined they all were. I appreciated the author’s notice of ‘womanly’ interactions that have often gone unattended by other historians. Thanks to NetGalley for the advanced copy!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    An interesting and well researched book that look at women who were ruler during Renaissance and how their relationships differ from how they are usually told. It's an informative book and I learned something new about this women. Recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine An interesting and well researched book that look at women who were ruler during Renaissance and how their relationships differ from how they are usually told. It's an informative book and I learned something new about this women. Recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  9. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Palmer

    A fascinating piece of scholarship about the rule of women in Renaissance Europe. However, there are some glaring inconsistencies and inaccuracies, like naming Charles V Mary I’s uncle in one section (he was a cousin). I suggest that a more careful editing could have fixed these problems.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I won this book on goodreads. While I didn’t enjoy it, it is a very detailed account of the life on Queens in the 1500’s.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Izzy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lira

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Fox

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maria Vakmann

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda King

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maryelizabeth

  17. 5 out of 5

    An

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  19. 4 out of 5

    Umheimlichkeit

  20. 5 out of 5

    Israa

  21. 4 out of 5

    Igorina

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jen (Pop! Goes The Reader)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Patterson

  24. 4 out of 5

    Star

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tara

  26. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Strolle

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anna Gajecka

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karla Rosado

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Bianchi

  30. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  31. 4 out of 5

    Meg

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  33. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Riener

  34. 4 out of 5

    Clarissa Light

  35. 5 out of 5

    Dubravka

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  37. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  38. 4 out of 5

    Morgiana

  39. 4 out of 5

    Lía Hermosillo Rojas

  40. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  41. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

  42. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Ridgway

  43. 4 out of 5

    Annie Garvey

  44. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.