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Invasion of the Party Snatchers: How the Holy-Rollers and Neo-Cons Destroyed the GOP

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After four decades as a Republican insider, Victor Gold reveals how the holy-rollers and the Neo-Cons have destroyed the GOP. Now he's fighting to get his party back. As a man who served as press aide to Barry Goldwater and speechwriter and senior advisor to George H. W. Bush (in addition to coauthoring his autobiography), Victor Gold is absolutely furious that the Neo-Con After four decades as a Republican insider, Victor Gold reveals how the holy-rollers and the Neo-Cons have destroyed the GOP. Now he's fighting to get his party back. As a man who served as press aide to Barry Goldwater and speechwriter and senior advisor to George H. W. Bush (in addition to coauthoring his autobiography), Victor Gold is absolutely furious that the Neo-Cons and their strange bedfellows, the Evangelical Right, have stolen his party from him. Now he is bringing the fight to them. Invasion of the Party Snatchers is a blistering critique not only of the Bush-Cheney administration but also of the Republican Congress. Gold is ready to tell all about the war being waged for the soul of the GOP, including the elder Bush's opinion of his son's work domestically and abroad, the significance of the newly elected Congress, and how Goldwater would have reacted to it all. Gold reveals, among other explosive disclosures, how George W. has been manipulated by his vice president and secretary of defense to become, in Lenin's famous phrase, a "useful idiot" for Neo-Conservative warmongers and Theo-Conservative religious fanatics. Although there have been other books by dissident Republicans attacking the Bush-Cheney administration's betrayal of conservative principles, none have been by an insider whose political credentials include inner-circle status with Barry Goldwater and George H. W. Bush.


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After four decades as a Republican insider, Victor Gold reveals how the holy-rollers and the Neo-Cons have destroyed the GOP. Now he's fighting to get his party back. As a man who served as press aide to Barry Goldwater and speechwriter and senior advisor to George H. W. Bush (in addition to coauthoring his autobiography), Victor Gold is absolutely furious that the Neo-Con After four decades as a Republican insider, Victor Gold reveals how the holy-rollers and the Neo-Cons have destroyed the GOP. Now he's fighting to get his party back. As a man who served as press aide to Barry Goldwater and speechwriter and senior advisor to George H. W. Bush (in addition to coauthoring his autobiography), Victor Gold is absolutely furious that the Neo-Cons and their strange bedfellows, the Evangelical Right, have stolen his party from him. Now he is bringing the fight to them. Invasion of the Party Snatchers is a blistering critique not only of the Bush-Cheney administration but also of the Republican Congress. Gold is ready to tell all about the war being waged for the soul of the GOP, including the elder Bush's opinion of his son's work domestically and abroad, the significance of the newly elected Congress, and how Goldwater would have reacted to it all. Gold reveals, among other explosive disclosures, how George W. has been manipulated by his vice president and secretary of defense to become, in Lenin's famous phrase, a "useful idiot" for Neo-Conservative warmongers and Theo-Conservative religious fanatics. Although there have been other books by dissident Republicans attacking the Bush-Cheney administration's betrayal of conservative principles, none have been by an insider whose political credentials include inner-circle status with Barry Goldwater and George H. W. Bush.

30 review for Invasion of the Party Snatchers: How the Holy-Rollers and Neo-Cons Destroyed the GOP

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peggy Bechko

    I'm avoiding political books right now with the election coming up. Even muting the TV whenever political ads com on, I'm so sick of it all. but, this book was on my 'to read' shelf, has been for a while. I glanced at it, wasn't too long, so I decided to 'get it over with'. Hmm, actually it was an excellent book. Victor Gold, the author, is a dyed-in-the-wool Goldwater Republican and he had a lot to say about the direction the GOP is currently heading, none of it good. He's unimpressed with the I'm avoiding political books right now with the election coming up. Even muting the TV whenever political ads com on, I'm so sick of it all. but, this book was on my 'to read' shelf, has been for a while. I glanced at it, wasn't too long, so I decided to 'get it over with'. Hmm, actually it was an excellent book. Victor Gold, the author, is a dyed-in-the-wool Goldwater Republican and he had a lot to say about the direction the GOP is currently heading, none of it good. He's unimpressed with the Holy-Rollers and the Neo-Cons frequently pointing out how Regan and Goldwater would be horrified by their stance and their policies. My own political thoughts aside, this was a fascinating insight into the whole evolving situation. It's been on my shelf for a while, so OBama wasn't even elected when this was published, but it doesn't detract from the read. Fascinating, a little frightening and at times downright chilling. Depending upon the total accuracy of this book (which I admit I always doubt when written by anyone, whether left or right when 'exposing' something) -- well then..... uh oh....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This may be the one and only book written by a GOP'er that I'll actually enjoy in a non-ironic way. The subtitle is "How the Holy Rolers and Neo-Cons Destroyed the GOP". I watched an interview with Gold on Bill Moyers last night (wow. I'm so my grandpa.) and he was talking about how the GOP totally fucked up when they basically sold themselves to the religious right for votes. Now we have a theocracy, and Gold is pissed (me too!). I'm interested to read this because I feel like there's a lot of p This may be the one and only book written by a GOP'er that I'll actually enjoy in a non-ironic way. The subtitle is "How the Holy Rolers and Neo-Cons Destroyed the GOP". I watched an interview with Gold on Bill Moyers last night (wow. I'm so my grandpa.) and he was talking about how the GOP totally fucked up when they basically sold themselves to the religious right for votes. Now we have a theocracy, and Gold is pissed (me too!). I'm interested to read this because I feel like there's a lot of parallels between what has happened to the GOP of yore and the modern 'liberal' democratic party.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Skylar Burris

    Reading this book is something like listening to an old man sitting in a rocking chair on the porch spinning yarns about what life used to be like, back in the day, before the whippersnappers screwed it all up. It's only entertaining because the old man knew some pretty famous people, because he's cantankerous enough to say whatever he thinks without a filter, and because he knows a few great anecdotes. The author has a biting wit, but he's not nearly as funny as he seems to think he is. (I had Reading this book is something like listening to an old man sitting in a rocking chair on the porch spinning yarns about what life used to be like, back in the day, before the whippersnappers screwed it all up. It's only entertaining because the old man knew some pretty famous people, because he's cantankerous enough to say whatever he thinks without a filter, and because he knows a few great anecdotes. The author has a biting wit, but he's not nearly as funny as he seems to think he is. (I had an occasional chuckle.) He levels his barbs at politicians such as George W. Bush, Newt Gingrich, Dick Cheney, and Donald Rumsfield. Victor Gold is angry at what he considers to be the destruction of the GOP by "theocrats" (religious/moral conservatives) and "neocons" (foreign policy hawks). He's clear about what he thinks the GOP shouldn't be, but he's not nearly as expansive about what he thinks the GOP should be (this he defines only in a short, bulleted list toward the end of the book, and I tend to agree that what he outlines is the Republican party I would like to see; I just don't know that it's a party that could ever win a national election). At times, Gold's criticisms sounded more like those of a liberal than a conservative; there is, of course, plenty for a conservative to object to in the Bush administration, but conservatives have a different set of reasons for their objections than liberals, and Gold seems almost, on occasion, to be spewing liberal soundbites, even some that are canards (such as the ridiculous idea that a Sunni and Shiite, being of different religious persuasions, therefore couldn't or wouldn't work together against a common enemy). The book provides a voyuerstic and sometimes entertaining, but decidedly unreassuring, glimpse into the inner workings of the political machine. It may possibly be enjoyed by a certain brand of liberals who simply like to salivate over any attack on George W. Bush, even if that attack suggests he resembles Democrat politicians of the past more than Republican politicians of the past, particularly in his Wilsonian foreign policy approach (a reflection of "neocon" influence, the neocons being those who came over from the Democrat party with Regan). It should also provide some satisfaction to those who loathe the so-called religious right (the "holly rollers" and "theocons" Gold derides). It's a slightly cathartic book for the many conservatives who disagree with the Bush administration on policies such as spending and Iraq and who think they see the GOP turning into just another leviathan, but he levels such a shotgun blast, that Gold ends up hitting more targets than most conservatives would like. I am at least glad someone finally said this plainly and starkly: "So it is that [in the Bush Administration], what Americans have learned about [the] 'new kind of conservative politics' is that it's merely a recycled model of the old Liberal politics that led to the decline-and-fall of the Democratic party in the 1960s: a fiscally irresponsible, ever-expanding federal government presided over by an imperial executive imbued with a messianic view of America's right to 'democratize' the heathen." Ever since Bush first ran for the Republican presidential nomination under the slogan of "compassionate conservatism," I suspected he wasn't really a conservative. People who believe in the principles of conservatism don't have to qualify it with the word compassionate, because they already believe conservatism is the best (political) way to expand prosperity for all, to raise up the poor, and to supply greater opportunity. His choice of a qualifier clued me in that he would not offer small-government conservatism, but increased federal spending on failing social programs and an expansion of the role of the federal government. What I did not foresee is that he would do this to a greater extent even than previous Democrat presidents. I am frustrated by the utter lack of an option of a viable small-government party in the U.S., and so I walked into this book sympathetically. And although Victor Gold offered interesting insight into the history and evolution of the GOP, I don't ultimately buy the idea that the GOP has been hijacked. The truth is, the GOP has NEVER been a predominantly small-government party. Other than cutting taxes, what have the Republicans done to reduce the overall size of government or stop its growth? The conservative Congress under Clinton did engage in some real cost cutting and political reform; they reduced the federal welfare system and created a budget surplus, but Gold has nothing but contempt for Gingrich, and in the expanse of Republican history, that sort of government reduction was a mere flash-in-the-pan (or, as Gold himself says, a "blip"). Every Republican president—yes, even Reagan—has presided over a growth in the federal government and a growth in spending, and it can't all be blamed on the Democrats in Congress. Who does Gold point to as a representative of true conservatism? Barry Goldwater. But Goldwater couldn't win. The libertarian-republican contingent in the United States simply isn't big enough to form a viable party on its own. The truth is that while the Democrat party is somewhat more of a political monolithic, the Republican party is a diverse amalgam of political groups with competing priorities that have come together in hope of accomplishing their own agendas; none of the groups is large enough to win elections on its own. The party combines small-government, free-market, fiscal conservatives (Gold's "real GOP"?), moral conservatives (Gold's "theocons"), and foreign policy hawks (the "neocons."). The last two groups must perforce strain against the goals of the first, because implementing those goals often requires spending and/or increased government interference. And thus we are left with an inevitable reality: overall, government will continue to grow, one way or another, no matter what party is in power. One virtue of this book is that it makes me want to run out and read Barry Goldwater's "The Conscience of a Conservative," or his biography. Most people who read this book, including myself, will be too young to know much about Barry Goldwater. Such readers may only be familiar with a false caricature of Goldwater as a far right-winger warmonger, and so they may be surprised to find what his brand of conservatism really entailed as well as what it didn't. As Goldwater himself said, "If all I knew about that fella Goldwater was what I read in the papers, I wouldn't have voted for the sonofa- myself." The book is, by and large, a tirade with many exaggerations, and too much spite. So why give it three stars? Because it is occasionally amusing, always interesting, breezily short, sometimes insightful, and, most of all, because I do think people need to know that the Bush administration and the previous Republican Congress did not, in fact, represent the goals and principles of the GOP as many conservatives understand them to be, but instead embodied many of the vices Republicans have previously ascribed to Democrats.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mastiff

    I was very interested to read this book since I'm also a libertarian leaning Republican, and was interested to hear about Goldwater who seems to fit that mold. The book ended up being a lot more about political "gossip" (for lack of a better word) than policy stuff. I never did get a solid grasp of what Goldwater, or this author, stood for exactly. For the vast middle of the book he was just bashing on GW Bush in a manner indistinguishable from the way liberals did for 6-8 years straight. It's m I was very interested to read this book since I'm also a libertarian leaning Republican, and was interested to hear about Goldwater who seems to fit that mold. The book ended up being a lot more about political "gossip" (for lack of a better word) than policy stuff. I never did get a solid grasp of what Goldwater, or this author, stood for exactly. For the vast middle of the book he was just bashing on GW Bush in a manner indistinguishable from the way liberals did for 6-8 years straight. It's marginally interesting to hear about how Cheney or Rumsfeld backstabbed people to get where they got, or whatever, but I was really interested in how Republican ideas/policy changed since Goldwater and I didn't get that.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James Hatton

    Some of my friends don't grasp that I have supported the Republicans in the past: 1980, 1984, and 1988. I'm a more sophisticated voter now. I do my homework. It's unlikely I'll support the Republicans again. But the reason I did not vote for George H. W. Bush in 1992 was not due to electoral sophistication. It was that I observed, and was repulsed by exactly what Victor Gold writes about in this book: neoconservatives and theocrats basically controlling the Republican party; and government when Some of my friends don't grasp that I have supported the Republicans in the past: 1980, 1984, and 1988. I'm a more sophisticated voter now. I do my homework. It's unlikely I'll support the Republicans again. But the reason I did not vote for George H. W. Bush in 1992 was not due to electoral sophistication. It was that I observed, and was repulsed by exactly what Victor Gold writes about in this book: neoconservatives and theocrats basically controlling the Republican party; and government when they win. Victor Gold is a conservative. He is a Republican. And he is correct. The author of this book is worth listening to. I recommend this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Not much surprising here. Is it a mystery that the Bushies don't believe that the rights of the individual should take precedent over the rights of the state? Or that human rights are not rights for all humans, only for those that meet some US loyalty test? Or that they don't believe in limited government, but that government should be used to further enrich the rich? Or that Barry Goldwater would have been their greatest critic? Or that John McCain is no Barry Goldwater? Nope. But it was still Not much surprising here. Is it a mystery that the Bushies don't believe that the rights of the individual should take precedent over the rights of the state? Or that human rights are not rights for all humans, only for those that meet some US loyalty test? Or that they don't believe in limited government, but that government should be used to further enrich the rich? Or that Barry Goldwater would have been their greatest critic? Or that John McCain is no Barry Goldwater? Nope. But it was still fun to see it all in writing, coming from a former staunch Republican. If you're tempted, get it from the library.

  7. 4 out of 5

    What Exit?

    I am about half way and I find this a terrific read. Written by an old fashioned Goldwater conservative, he is as disgusted with the current admin, Dick Cheney and the Neo-Cons and Theo-Cons as I am. Well worth reading, it is also a quick read. I find it interesting that Rummy appears to be an even bigger jerk than I gave him credit for. Jim

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris Seals

    WOW! OH WOW! I always knew Dick Cheney was a DICK, (along with Newt Gingrich), but this book tells just how much of a tyrant he is. Truly scary!

  9. 5 out of 5

    William

    So good. Tony Compolo was right back in 1986 in Discipleship Journal. What a prediction!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    Great book for young politically interested people (republican and democrat) who think only of the republican party as religious nation builders.

  11. 5 out of 5

    pavao

    A "useful idiot". Man, that describes Dubya to a "T", no?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    subtitled: How the Holy-Rollers and the Neo-Cons destroyed the GOP. Funny, but also appalling. Excellent, learned a lit. Recommended.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    It's a highly informative book but a little dry so 4 out of 5 stars. I'll definitely read it again just to absorb the knowledge for conversation.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Redskullduggery

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sk0t

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Northrup

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert Kenyon

  19. 4 out of 5

    Barry

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Windham

  22. 5 out of 5

    Simon

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Ihms

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Mitchell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Neil

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cody

  27. 5 out of 5

    John Massarini RHIT

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amber Molholm

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