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Religion, Class Coalitions, and Welfare States

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This book radically revises established knowledge in comparative welfare state studies and introduces a new perspective on how religion shaped modern social protection systems. The interplay of societal cleavage structures and electoral rules produced the different political class coalitions sustaining the three welfare regimes of the Western world. In countries with propo This book radically revises established knowledge in comparative welfare state studies and introduces a new perspective on how religion shaped modern social protection systems. The interplay of societal cleavage structures and electoral rules produced the different political class coalitions sustaining the three welfare regimes of the Western world. In countries with proportional electoral systems the absence or presence of state-church conflicts decided whether class remained the dominant source of coalition building or whether a political logic not exclusively based on socio-economic interests (e.g. religion) was introduced into politics, particularly social policy. The political class-coalitions in countries with majoritarian systems, on the other hand, allowed only for the residual-liberal welfare state to emerge, as in the US or the UK. This book also reconsiders the role of Protestantism. Reformed Protestantism substantially delayed and restricted modern social policy. The Lutheran state churches positively contributed to the introduction of social protection programs.


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This book radically revises established knowledge in comparative welfare state studies and introduces a new perspective on how religion shaped modern social protection systems. The interplay of societal cleavage structures and electoral rules produced the different political class coalitions sustaining the three welfare regimes of the Western world. In countries with propo This book radically revises established knowledge in comparative welfare state studies and introduces a new perspective on how religion shaped modern social protection systems. The interplay of societal cleavage structures and electoral rules produced the different political class coalitions sustaining the three welfare regimes of the Western world. In countries with proportional electoral systems the absence or presence of state-church conflicts decided whether class remained the dominant source of coalition building or whether a political logic not exclusively based on socio-economic interests (e.g. religion) was introduced into politics, particularly social policy. The political class-coalitions in countries with majoritarian systems, on the other hand, allowed only for the residual-liberal welfare state to emerge, as in the US or the UK. This book also reconsiders the role of Protestantism. Reformed Protestantism substantially delayed and restricted modern social policy. The Lutheran state churches positively contributed to the introduction of social protection programs.

19 review for Religion, Class Coalitions, and Welfare States

  1. 4 out of 5

    Titus Hjelm

    Extremely solid analysis of religion and welfare state formation. No fluffy claims that often surface in these discussions, but serious, sharp and theoretically informed analysis--just as the best kind of social science should be.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Henk

  3. 5 out of 5

    Daleaz

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex Cole

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed Amer

  6. 5 out of 5

    John

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alcione Gonçalves

  8. 4 out of 5

    Y.M.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Krishn Ramesh

  10. 4 out of 5

    William Krause

  11. 5 out of 5

    Will

  12. 5 out of 5

    Phil Kim

  13. 5 out of 5

    Simran

  14. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Mackell

  15. 5 out of 5

    Diciyayemotu

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carolina

  17. 5 out of 5

    MAY

  18. 5 out of 5

    Avram Some One

  19. 4 out of 5

    David

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