counter create hit A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars

Availability: Ready to download

A NASA astrophysicist narrates his improbable journey from an impoverished childhood and an adolescence mired in drugs and crime to the nation's top physics PhD program at Stanford in this inspiring coming-of-age memoir. Born into extreme poverty and emotional deprivation, James Edward Plummer was blessed with a genius I.Q. and a love of science. But in his community, a you A NASA astrophysicist narrates his improbable journey from an impoverished childhood and an adolescence mired in drugs and crime to the nation's top physics PhD program at Stanford in this inspiring coming-of-age memoir. Born into extreme poverty and emotional deprivation, James Edward Plummer was blessed with a genius I.Q. and a love of science. But in his community, a young bookworm quickly becomes a target for violence and abuse. As he struggles to survive his childhood in some of the toughest cities in the country, and his teenage years in the equally poor backwoods of Mississippi, James adopts the hybrid persona of a "gangsta nerd"--dealing weed in juke joints while winning state science fairs with computer programs that untangle the mysteries of Einstein's relativity theory. When his prodigious intellect gains him admission to the elite Physics PhD program at Stanford University, James finds himself torn between his love of science and a dangerous crack cocaine habit he developed in college. With the encouragement of his mentor Art Walker, the lone Black faculty member in the physics department, James finally seizes his dream of a life in science and becomes his true adult self, changing his name to Hakeem Muata Oluseyi in honor--and celebration--of his African heritage. In the tradition of The Autobiography of Malcolm X and The Other Wes Moore, A Quantum Life is an uplifting journey to the stars fueled by hope, hustle, and a hungry mind. As he charts his development as a young scientist, Oluseyi also plumbs the mysteries of the universe where potential personal outcomes are as infinite as the stars in the sky.


Compare

A NASA astrophysicist narrates his improbable journey from an impoverished childhood and an adolescence mired in drugs and crime to the nation's top physics PhD program at Stanford in this inspiring coming-of-age memoir. Born into extreme poverty and emotional deprivation, James Edward Plummer was blessed with a genius I.Q. and a love of science. But in his community, a you A NASA astrophysicist narrates his improbable journey from an impoverished childhood and an adolescence mired in drugs and crime to the nation's top physics PhD program at Stanford in this inspiring coming-of-age memoir. Born into extreme poverty and emotional deprivation, James Edward Plummer was blessed with a genius I.Q. and a love of science. But in his community, a young bookworm quickly becomes a target for violence and abuse. As he struggles to survive his childhood in some of the toughest cities in the country, and his teenage years in the equally poor backwoods of Mississippi, James adopts the hybrid persona of a "gangsta nerd"--dealing weed in juke joints while winning state science fairs with computer programs that untangle the mysteries of Einstein's relativity theory. When his prodigious intellect gains him admission to the elite Physics PhD program at Stanford University, James finds himself torn between his love of science and a dangerous crack cocaine habit he developed in college. With the encouragement of his mentor Art Walker, the lone Black faculty member in the physics department, James finally seizes his dream of a life in science and becomes his true adult self, changing his name to Hakeem Muata Oluseyi in honor--and celebration--of his African heritage. In the tradition of The Autobiography of Malcolm X and The Other Wes Moore, A Quantum Life is an uplifting journey to the stars fueled by hope, hustle, and a hungry mind. As he charts his development as a young scientist, Oluseyi also plumbs the mysteries of the universe where potential personal outcomes are as infinite as the stars in the sky.

30 review for A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katie B

    Even though I know next to nothing about physics, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this memoir about NASA astrophysicist, Hakeem Oluseyi. As a Black male growing up poor, moving frequently and therefore bouncing around from school to school, Hakeem didn't have the easiest path to success. As an adult he battled addiction. But eventually he found his way and he made it. He made it big time! Obviously if you read the synopsis, you know he has a super smart job. What makes this memoir such a compelling Even though I know next to nothing about physics, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this memoir about NASA astrophysicist, Hakeem Oluseyi. As a Black male growing up poor, moving frequently and therefore bouncing around from school to school, Hakeem didn't have the easiest path to success. As an adult he battled addiction. But eventually he found his way and he made it. He made it big time! Obviously if you read the synopsis, you know he has a super smart job. What makes this memoir such a compelling read is his journey to get there. Throughout his academic career there were many people who thought he didn't belong due to the color of his skin. He was constantly having to prove himself to these people. You feel so frustrated on his behalf and of course you feel invested in him and root for his success. I would have loved to learn a bit more of about his life in recent years but I understand writing a memoir is personal and there might be certain things you wish not to share. Overall, it truly is an inspiring memoir and I highly recommend checking it out. Thank you to Ballantine Books for providing me with an advance digital copy! All thoughts expressed are my honest opinion.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karen R

    A nerdy, poor, cognitively gifted young boy with an IQ off the charts passes time by counting all kinds of things, voraciously reading (including the entire Encyclopedia Brittanica and the Bible!), and dissecting small appliances. He is living an unstable, nomadic life of poverty with a mostly absent father and mother. Oluseyl’s path to becoming an award-winning astrophysicist was a rocky one with twists and turns that could have sent him down the wrong path numerous times. Thank goodness for th A nerdy, poor, cognitively gifted young boy with an IQ off the charts passes time by counting all kinds of things, voraciously reading (including the entire Encyclopedia Brittanica and the Bible!), and dissecting small appliances. He is living an unstable, nomadic life of poverty with a mostly absent father and mother. Oluseyl’s path to becoming an award-winning astrophysicist was a rocky one with twists and turns that could have sent him down the wrong path numerous times. Thank goodness for the mentors and teachers that came into Oluseyl’s life and believed in him. A powerful and inspiring memoir. I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kim McGee

    A gritty memoir of a man who rose out of a violent and transient childhood to become a scientist for NASA. Instead of falling into a downward spiral of poverty, abuse, violence and drugs Hakeem discovered early on that he had a super power that would save him - he was smart. The more he learned, the more he wanted to understand which got him countless whippings as a kid but gave his curious mind somewhere to go other than the streets. His life was a yo-yo which included gang trouble and drugs bu A gritty memoir of a man who rose out of a violent and transient childhood to become a scientist for NASA. Instead of falling into a downward spiral of poverty, abuse, violence and drugs Hakeem discovered early on that he had a super power that would save him - he was smart. The more he learned, the more he wanted to understand which got him countless whippings as a kid but gave his curious mind somewhere to go other than the streets. His life was a yo-yo which included gang trouble and drugs but education led him eventually to Stanford and a career at NASA. He is blunt and honest in his accounting of the challenges and triumphs and hopefully his story will inspire young people at a crossroads to succeed and appeal to those who have the power to lift up rather than force down. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ivana

    An incredible memoir, I wish he had gone more in depth about racism and classism that are so prevalent in academia. But nonetheless, an amazing read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sherrie

    ***I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway*** Do you ever just *like* a book? Like, there's no particular reason and nothing that makes you go AHA! That's the magic bit! But it's still just enjoyable and satisfying? That's how this one was for me. Maybe it's because the author and I have gone through parallel life experiences growing up dreaming of becoming scientists while living in places where that is rare at best. We both took the winding road to where we are. His graduate school experience w ***I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway*** Do you ever just *like* a book? Like, there's no particular reason and nothing that makes you go AHA! That's the magic bit! But it's still just enjoyable and satisfying? That's how this one was for me. Maybe it's because the author and I have gone through parallel life experiences growing up dreaming of becoming scientists while living in places where that is rare at best. We both took the winding road to where we are. His graduate school experience was incredibly relatable for me and I read the parts about his relationship with his advisor with a smile because they reminded me of Doc Wally so much. I'm glad Hakeem Oluseyi shared his story. Go read it, nerds.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Avolyn Fisher

    I received an advanced reader copy of this book, but was absolutely delighted when the publisher reached out because Oluseyi's story gripped me from the synopsis. Growing up in poverty, living in rough neighborhoods and having to fend for himself from day one on the streets, the story is at times heart-wrenching but still manages to grip the reader with hopeful moments of joy and curiosity as we witness Oluseyi's love for reading, science, and space unfold amongst the bleak backdrop of his child I received an advanced reader copy of this book, but was absolutely delighted when the publisher reached out because Oluseyi's story gripped me from the synopsis. Growing up in poverty, living in rough neighborhoods and having to fend for himself from day one on the streets, the story is at times heart-wrenching but still manages to grip the reader with hopeful moments of joy and curiosity as we witness Oluseyi's love for reading, science, and space unfold amongst the bleak backdrop of his childhood. I found this book surprisingly well-written considering the fact that Oluseyi isn't an established writer/author and sometimes autobiographical works written by regular people, can be hard to get into. But in this case I thought Oluseyi's writing was phenomenal and easy to get lost in. It was a page turner and such an incredible journey. I highly recommend picking up a copy if you want to feel inspired.

  7. 4 out of 5

    ktfrns

    I couldn’t put it down!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vogelzang

    Loved this book! Great stories, great life, and a great example to us in perseverance! Thanks, Hakeem, for your excellent book and for being so true to yourself.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Noel

    Hakeem’s story is so inspiring and moving. The tone of the book is perfect—personal and intimate, raw and unflinching. And the balance between his personal life and his interest in science was just right for me. I’ve been thinking about this book nonstop since Saturday and I think readers are really going to connect with Hakeem. I watched Hakeem’s Ted Talk and a few of his videos online. He’s incredibly charismatic! I think you'll love this book if you enjoyed movies/books like Hidden Figures, Hakeem’s story is so inspiring and moving. The tone of the book is perfect—personal and intimate, raw and unflinching. And the balance between his personal life and his interest in science was just right for me. I’ve been thinking about this book nonstop since Saturday and I think readers are really going to connect with Hakeem. I watched Hakeem’s Ted Talk and a few of his videos online. He’s incredibly charismatic! I think you'll love this book if you enjoyed movies/books like Hidden Figures, The Theory of Everything, A Beautiful Mind, and The Imitation Game. I think this book will greatly appeal to readers of gritty coming-of-age books like Notes from a Young Black Chef by Kwame Onwuachi, Rabbit by Patricia Williams, and How We Fight For Our Lives by Saeed Jones. Will be thinking about Hakeem's story for a long time!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    How does James Plummer Jr. move from an impoverished and chaotic life shuffling between the mean streets of New Orleans, Houston and LA and the scramble of backwoods Mississippi to achievement at Stanford and a career as an astrophysicist at NASA? This is the story we all want to hear, right? How brilliance and hard work can overcome any obstacle. This book could be read that way but I think doing so misses the deeper and more interesting story. Oluseyi makes it clear throughout that our country How does James Plummer Jr. move from an impoverished and chaotic life shuffling between the mean streets of New Orleans, Houston and LA and the scramble of backwoods Mississippi to achievement at Stanford and a career as an astrophysicist at NASA? This is the story we all want to hear, right? How brilliance and hard work can overcome any obstacle. This book could be read that way but I think doing so misses the deeper and more interesting story. Oluseyi makes it clear throughout that our country’s systemic racism creates the conditions that keep his family in poverty and ignorance. Negligent public schools, casual racist assumptions about ability and trustworthiness and lack of economic opportunities not only make Oluseyi’s journey a strenuous climb, but destroy the lives of many of his friends and relatives. Undoubtedly, Oluseyi is brilliant and has the good fortune to meet a few people who recognize and promote his abilities, but he makes it clear that many, many equally talented friends are left behind. The writing was clear, unsentimental and had the mark of a scientific mind. As a mother of Black children in STEM fields (biochem, computer science, physics, biology) I will be buying several copies of this to share.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    A Quantum Life is the memoir of Hakeem Oluwesi, an astrophysicist who with his own extraordinary mind, hard work, and a few critical teachers went from poverty and crime to working for NASA. It is also an extraordinary example of capturing the mind of a child. In his book, Oluwesi talks of his childhood through a child’s eye. There is a hilarious scene where he’s watching an electric heater coils turn red and begins to wonder, as children do, what would happen if…and I won’t ruin it for you. I’l A Quantum Life is the memoir of Hakeem Oluwesi, an astrophysicist who with his own extraordinary mind, hard work, and a few critical teachers went from poverty and crime to working for NASA. It is also an extraordinary example of capturing the mind of a child. In his book, Oluwesi talks of his childhood through a child’s eye. There is a hilarious scene where he’s watching an electric heater coils turn red and begins to wonder, as children do, what would happen if…and I won’t ruin it for you. I’ll just say it was hilarious and so perfectly captured the avid curiosity without boundaries of a child. Oluwesi struggled with drug addiction, particularly with crack. He talks honestly about the euphoria it can engender, making its power over people easy to understand. He also talks about how it displaces everything else in priority. He fought a hard battle and succeeded, but it was very much thanks to critical interventions, when teachers took a chance on him, believed in him, and guided him. While much of his success is down to his own ability and hard work, he is scrupulous in crediting the many people who helped along the way. He also does not shy away from pointing out how racism was often an impediment and how hard he had to work to overcome the opinions of those who assumed he did not deserve his place in their schools. I loved A Quantum Life. It was fast-paced and captivating. I read it in two bites and would happily read a second about his career at NASA and in academia. He also explains things that may be confusing to non-physicists in clear terms. He should write a book on quantum physics for nonscientists. He worked with a ghost writer,, Joshua Horwitz, and together they are a great combination. I received an e-galley of A Quantum Life from the publisher through NetGalley. A Quantum Life at Penguin Random House Hakeem Oluseyi on Twitter https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Val

    My thanks to the author, the publisher, and NetGalley for the ARC!! " I learned that the OCD traits I'd been struggling with for the most of my life - the compulsive counting, the need to have things orderly and lined up in neat rows - were actually an asset in a research lab. I could hyperfocus on small, detailed tasks for hours" A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars has been described as alternately heartbreaking and hopeful - and that it was! Reading of Dr. Oluseyi's My thanks to the author, the publisher, and NetGalley for the ARC!! " I learned that the OCD traits I'd been struggling with for the most of my life - the compulsive counting, the need to have things orderly and lined up in neat rows - were actually an asset in a research lab. I could hyperfocus on small, detailed tasks for hours" A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars has been described as alternately heartbreaking and hopeful - and that it was! Reading of Dr. Oluseyi's childhood was truly heart-wrenching. He grew up with a mother who had mental health issues and who physically abused him. She moved Hakeem and his sister whenever a job made her angry or she had broken up with a boyfriend. I can't imagine what it must have been like to enter new schools once or twice a year - especially as most of those schools were in some of the toughest cities in the country, where Hakeem faced bullying and abuse. There were times of grinding poverty, with little to eat. There were times Hakeem was addicted to crack cocaine. However, this book is also an epic journey filled with hope. It was determined that Dr. Olusyi had a genius IQ. During high school, he created a computer program that did relativity calculations and it won first prize in physics at the state science fair. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from Stanford University. It was at this time he changed his name from James Plummer, Jr to Hakeem (wise) Muata (he who speaks the truth) Oluseyi (God has done this). A Quantum Life tells of how this amazing man became an astrophysicist, cosmologist, educator, inventor, public speaker, and TV personality. In case you can't tell, I recommend this book!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thus Kvothe The Raven

    Some memoirs are less than honest looks at the author’s past. Some are self-aggrandizing or simply a vehicle to let you know how important the author thinks they are. Others are droll strolls through the gently rolling hills of an unremarkable past. “A Quantum Life” is the other type; one which is brutally honest about bad decisions, ugly family dynamics, and the realities of growing up black in the United States. There are bright points in this stellar look into the rear view mirror of Dr. of As Some memoirs are less than honest looks at the author’s past. Some are self-aggrandizing or simply a vehicle to let you know how important the author thinks they are. Others are droll strolls through the gently rolling hills of an unremarkable past. “A Quantum Life” is the other type; one which is brutally honest about bad decisions, ugly family dynamics, and the realities of growing up black in the United States. There are bright points in this stellar look into the rear view mirror of Dr. of Astrophysics Oluseyi’s life. We see color through the comedic lens he often uses. He and Horwitz can turn a phrase! Many times my wife looked at me sideways because of a sudden burst of laughter coming from my side of the bed. Warmth also reaches us because of the vulnerability the author shows. Many of the events Oluseyi experienced were unpleasant or downright tragic. He even made some colossally boneheaded decisions, but did not shrink away from their telling or their consequences. For “A Quantum Life” I give five stars. There is a sense of wonder imparted to the reader, and not merely because of the scientific discoveries in which the author takes part. We get a view into a complicated life that has a broad spectrum of experiences and potential for either great achievements or a meteoric fall. You’ll have to read it for yourself to see which occurs. My thanks to Ballantine books. The opinions expressed are my own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Powerful and provocative. I highly recommend A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars. Hakeem Oluseyi started his life as James Plummer Jr. No one in his family had ever finished high school. As a child, he faced poverty, instability, violence at home and in the streets, and drug abuse by family members. He knew his brain worked a bit differently than those around him, but he had few role models and was completely bored throughout much of his schooling. However with the he Powerful and provocative. I highly recommend A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars. Hakeem Oluseyi started his life as James Plummer Jr. No one in his family had ever finished high school. As a child, he faced poverty, instability, violence at home and in the streets, and drug abuse by family members. He knew his brain worked a bit differently than those around him, but he had few role models and was completely bored throughout much of his schooling. However with the help of books and a few mentors, starting with the band director who introduced him to the tuba and the discipline of practicing, the scientists/teachers who suggested he submit a project to the science fair, a navy recruiter, and many others, and a lot of very hard work, he rather miraculously managed to go to college and then graduate school in physics (at Stanford). All the while continuing to face many challenges, including his own drug habit and at least a couple of powerful professors in graduate school who did not believe in him. The book is honest and raw about racism, classism, and Hakeem's own mistakes. It raises so many issues that you will want to discuss it with others. Would be a good pick for a book group, for high schoolers, for professors and university administrators, and for incoming college classes to discuss. Beautifully written, too.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sara Broad

    "A Quantum Life" by Hakeem Olusey is a memoir about the author's transformation from a young boy moving around the country and trying to fit into his surroundings to earning a PhD from Stanford in physics. With an above average IQ and the boredom to match never being challenged in school, Olusey uncovers the science behind everything he encounters. He always travels his own path and fortunately finds a few people to push him forward in the hardest moments, in a field where he is presumed to be n "A Quantum Life" by Hakeem Olusey is a memoir about the author's transformation from a young boy moving around the country and trying to fit into his surroundings to earning a PhD from Stanford in physics. With an above average IQ and the boredom to match never being challenged in school, Olusey uncovers the science behind everything he encounters. He always travels his own path and fortunately finds a few people to push him forward in the hardest moments, in a field where he is presumed to be not as smart or as worthy of scientific discovery as his more fortunate peers and professors. There were many times in the story that I cringed about how Olusey's actions were just a stone's throw by ruining his chances from achieving his goals. This is a great story told in a way that makes you want to not put the book down until you finish.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Rosenblum

    While the book itself is not a tough read the subject matter can be. Starting when the author is but a young child the environment and choices made are against his surviving to become the Dr. he is. I liked that the author took the time with each stage of his maturing to dive deep into his experiences. While the author is an intelligent person, sometimes the choices he makes aren’t really a choice but rather a response to his external life. At the heart is a great story about trying, giving up, While the book itself is not a tough read the subject matter can be. Starting when the author is but a young child the environment and choices made are against his surviving to become the Dr. he is. I liked that the author took the time with each stage of his maturing to dive deep into his experiences. While the author is an intelligent person, sometimes the choices he makes aren’t really a choice but rather a response to his external life. At the heart is a great story about trying, giving up, trying again, and finding or refinding your path. The direct route is not always the way our lives go and adapting and being responsive can lead you on a twisting path but a path nonetheless. At times memoirs can be through rose-colored glasses, that is not the case with this book. Warts and all this is Dr. Oluseyi’s life.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    This is a brutally honest autobiography by a man who could have fallen through the cracks but did not despite a very unstable childhood, race issues, failures of the educational system, honorable discharge from the Navy dream, poor personal choices, depression/alcohol/drugs. He was on a lot of precipices and it took a long time and the help of others to land on his feet. I am very impressed by this man and his accomplishments even if I am not Black. This is a demanding read but well worth the ti This is a brutally honest autobiography by a man who could have fallen through the cracks but did not despite a very unstable childhood, race issues, failures of the educational system, honorable discharge from the Navy dream, poor personal choices, depression/alcohol/drugs. He was on a lot of precipices and it took a long time and the help of others to land on his feet. I am very impressed by this man and his accomplishments even if I am not Black. This is a demanding read but well worth the time and money. I requested and received a free temporary ebook from Random House Publishing Group/Ballantine via NetGalley. Thank you!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    It's often hard to review memoirs because it feels as though you are judging someone's life or life choices. That's not the case here. Oluseyi has written a memoir which lays bare his tumultuous past as well as his journey through academia to cosmology. His early years were marked by chaos which he coped with by plunging into books. The books didn't keep him from drugs, however. Luckily, he had mentors, most notably Art Walker, at Stanford, who kept him moving forward. This is a story of determi It's often hard to review memoirs because it feels as though you are judging someone's life or life choices. That's not the case here. Oluseyi has written a memoir which lays bare his tumultuous past as well as his journey through academia to cosmology. His early years were marked by chaos which he coped with by plunging into books. The books didn't keep him from drugs, however. Luckily, he had mentors, most notably Art Walker, at Stanford, who kept him moving forward. This is a story of determination and resilience. I'm hopeful younger readers will find this one. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. Highly recommend.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Blaney Momhuirnín

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wide-ranging tour of his life from New Orleans East, rural Mississippi, addiction and recovery, achievement and regret, West Coast elite academia, mentorship, family, and friendship, whatever the opposite of mentorship is (in the setting of academic racism), code-switching, all the way to (enhanced visualization of) the surface of the sun. Really worthwhile read. Quite readable, too. The narrative really moves! It doesn’t linger that much in New Orleans East, but I’ve been working my way through Wide-ranging tour of his life from New Orleans East, rural Mississippi, addiction and recovery, achievement and regret, West Coast elite academia, mentorship, family, and friendship, whatever the opposite of mentorship is (in the setting of academic racism), code-switching, all the way to (enhanced visualization of) the surface of the sun. Really worthwhile read. Quite readable, too. The narrative really moves! It doesn’t linger that much in New Orleans East, but I’ve been working my way through Sarah Broom’s “The Yellow House” and the scenes there described in this book add another layer to life in that part of NOLA.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This memoir is frank and up front about everything that took place that got Oluseyi to where he is today. It clearly and succinctly highlights the differences between those with privilege and opportunity which act a as a tailwind that ably pushes them along, and those trying to forge the same path as they turn into a strong headwind, fighting and battling without the same advantages. I appreciate that he did not hold back telling his story, though a few times I found it lacked affect when needed This memoir is frank and up front about everything that took place that got Oluseyi to where he is today. It clearly and succinctly highlights the differences between those with privilege and opportunity which act a as a tailwind that ably pushes them along, and those trying to forge the same path as they turn into a strong headwind, fighting and battling without the same advantages. I appreciate that he did not hold back telling his story, though a few times I found it lacked affect when needed (i.e., when talking about his first son.)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    This is a heartfelt, uplifting story of a young man’s journey from the worst conditions to the elite PHD program at Stanford. I didn’t take any notes while reading it. I just enjoyed it. I am in awe of Dr Oluseyi; of everything he overcame and also of his extreme vulnerability in how he told his story. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with the an early release in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    When I received this book from Goodreads Firstreads I was very excited because my son is a physicist and all I saw was the word “ Quantum “ on the cover. This book is SO much more than a science memoir though! Dr. Oluseyi went through so much to get to where he is today. I kept thinking that his memoir would make a good movie. Bonus: he got his PhD at Stanford University which is local for me and I could envision many of the places on campus that he mentioned.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Molock

    Really Interesting What an interesting true story of the unusual journey an African American young man took to become an Astrophysicist. Gives lot of hope to people and parents of you g people who are brilliant but can’t seem to be all that they can be. Very honest depiction of his life. The odds were stacked against him, some of which was due to self sabotaging behavior. But he persevered. Inspiring story!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Groucho42

    Autobiography of a black man who struggled but ended up as an astrophysicist. As someone who has known poverty, but not his level, and struggled in a similar fashion in some ways, I found it interesting. The one weak point is that the focus on drug abuse bored me. I know it'd be good for others to understand, but I'm not an addictive person. I knew others who went very hard into it, but I never understood them and I really don't understand Oluseyi's issues. Still, overall an interesting story. Autobiography of a black man who struggled but ended up as an astrophysicist. As someone who has known poverty, but not his level, and struggled in a similar fashion in some ways, I found it interesting. The one weak point is that the focus on drug abuse bored me. I know it'd be good for others to understand, but I'm not an addictive person. I knew others who went very hard into it, but I never understood them and I really don't understand Oluseyi's issues. Still, overall an interesting story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Seann Haver

    Intense! Excellent book. So sad that black and people of colour are treated with such disrespect and disregard! Some white people are racist and mean which make the lives of coloured people at a great disadvantage in life! I hope that people who read this book have their eyes opened to the ugliness of racism and strive to correct their own racism. When people are given equal opportunities their lives can grow and flourish!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nelda Brangwin

    If you like astrophysicist Neil Degrasse Tyson, you need to meet Hakeem Oluseyi who despite a life that should have lead to being a gang member, he became professor at MIT, UC, Berkeley and the University of Cape Town. You will come away with a new appreciation of the combination of brains and determination as Oluseyi became one of a handful of black astrophysicists.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carol Dass

    Inspiring and moving, this story will stay with you long after you finish the book. Brilliantly written, I will be highly recommending this book. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ann Kuhn

    Good read but what happened to his wife and their baby? He just disappeared them when he got successful.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    Wonderful rags to riches story. I think everyone will enjoy this story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shana Yates

    3.5 stars

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.