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Kennedy's Avenger: Assassination, Conspiracy, and the Forgotten Trial of Jack Ruby

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NOW A NATIONAL BESTSELLER New York Times bestselling authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher bring to life the incredible story of one of America’s most publicized—and most surprising—criminal trials in history. No crime in history had more eyewitnesses. On November 24, 1963, two days after the killing of President Kennedy, a troubled nightclub owner named Jack Ruby quietly NOW A NATIONAL BESTSELLER New York Times bestselling authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher bring to life the incredible story of one of America’s most publicized—and most surprising—criminal trials in history. No crime in history had more eyewitnesses. On November 24, 1963, two days after the killing of President Kennedy, a troubled nightclub owner named Jack Ruby quietly slipped into the Dallas police station and assassinated the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. Millions of Americans witnessed the killing on live television, and yet the event would lead to questions for years to come. It also would help to spark the conspiracy theories that have continued to resonate today. Under the long shadow cast by the assassination of America’s beloved president, few would remember the bizarre trial that followed three months later in Dallas, Texas. How exactly does one defend a man who was seen pulling the trigger in front of millions? And, more important, how did Jack Ruby, who fired point-blank into Oswald live on television, die an innocent man? Featuring a colorful cast of characters, including the nation’s most flamboyant lawyer pitted against a tough-as-Texas prosecutor, award-winning authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher unveil the astonishing details behind the first major trial of the television century. While it was Jack Ruby who appeared before the jury, it was also the city of Dallas and the American legal system being judged by the world.  


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NOW A NATIONAL BESTSELLER New York Times bestselling authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher bring to life the incredible story of one of America’s most publicized—and most surprising—criminal trials in history. No crime in history had more eyewitnesses. On November 24, 1963, two days after the killing of President Kennedy, a troubled nightclub owner named Jack Ruby quietly NOW A NATIONAL BESTSELLER New York Times bestselling authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher bring to life the incredible story of one of America’s most publicized—and most surprising—criminal trials in history. No crime in history had more eyewitnesses. On November 24, 1963, two days after the killing of President Kennedy, a troubled nightclub owner named Jack Ruby quietly slipped into the Dallas police station and assassinated the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. Millions of Americans witnessed the killing on live television, and yet the event would lead to questions for years to come. It also would help to spark the conspiracy theories that have continued to resonate today. Under the long shadow cast by the assassination of America’s beloved president, few would remember the bizarre trial that followed three months later in Dallas, Texas. How exactly does one defend a man who was seen pulling the trigger in front of millions? And, more important, how did Jack Ruby, who fired point-blank into Oswald live on television, die an innocent man? Featuring a colorful cast of characters, including the nation’s most flamboyant lawyer pitted against a tough-as-Texas prosecutor, award-winning authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher unveil the astonishing details behind the first major trial of the television century. While it was Jack Ruby who appeared before the jury, it was also the city of Dallas and the American legal system being judged by the world.  

30 review for Kennedy's Avenger: Assassination, Conspiracy, and the Forgotten Trial of Jack Ruby

  1. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Hayes

    Not written that well, and too many added facts/info that doesn't need to be there and the story drags on too long. An interesting story though. Not written that well, and too many added facts/info that doesn't need to be there and the story drags on too long. An interesting story though.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Julie Failla Earhart

    It seems each time there is a trial that the entire nation is watching, whether it be via newspapers, radio or television, it’s called “the trial of the century.” The 20th Century had a number of the sensational trials. First it was the 1905 trial of Henry K. Thaw, heir to coal and railway fortune, for the murder of renowned architect Stanford White. Following that was the 1924 trail of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb for the murder of fourteen-year-old Bobby Franks and their attempt to commit “t It seems each time there is a trial that the entire nation is watching, whether it be via newspapers, radio or television, it’s called “the trial of the century.” The 20th Century had a number of the sensational trials. First it was the 1905 trial of Henry K. Thaw, heir to coal and railway fortune, for the murder of renowned architect Stanford White. Following that was the 1924 trail of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb for the murder of fourteen-year-old Bobby Franks and their attempt to commit “the perfect crime.” Others that followed were the Lindbergh Baby kidnapping and murder (1932); the espionage trial of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg (early 1950s) and the O. J. Trial (1995). Those are the ones that come easily to mind; I’m sure there were others. However, there is one forgotten “the trial of the century.” One that had millions of eyewitnesses: The murder of JFK assassinator Lee Harvey Oswald by Jack Ruby. Television cameras showed Ruby step out of crowd, shove a pistol into Oswald’s stomach and pull the trigger. The writing team of Dan Abrams and David Fisher explores this trial in their new book, “Kennedy’s Avenger: Assassination, Conspiracy and the Forgotten Trial of Jack Ruby.” I admit that I have a rather morbid fascination with JFK and his death. One of the top questions I have on my to-ask-God list when I get to heaven is “who was behind the JFK murder?” There seems to be so many right answers to that question that they are all suspect. Abrams and Fisher’s book opens with an overview of the assassination. Fortunately they do not rehash JFK’s death all over again or Oswald’s reasons. They do a fabulous job staying focused on what Jack Ruby did and his attempt for justice both behind the gun and behind bars. Readers get a solid look at Jack Ruby and his life. I knew he was a nightclub owner and operator. He had bouts with depression and mental illness ran rampant through his family. To me, getting to know Ruby was far more interesting than the trial. And the trial! What a circus! It makes the O.J. Trial look like a church picnic. All during the trial, Ruby sat staring straight ahead, seemingly detached and not much interested. For the defense was the Melvin Belli, “the nation’s most flamboyant lawyer.” For the prosecution, the “tough-as-Texas” Henry Wade. Presiding over the shenanigans was Judge Joe B. Brown, who “had been elected (to) his position. He was not a lawyer and lacked legal knowledge.” Can you imagine someone with that lack of qualifications presiding over a high profile case today? Me either. The antics that went on in that truly gave me a headache. I cannot imagine being on that jury. Heck, it took Judge Brown seventeen minutes just to read the charge against Ruby. How they were able to return a verdict in two hours and nineteen minutes is beyond me. I would still be trying to look pass the all the antics. One thing that I did not care for, and subsequently glossed over, was when the authors gave a history of different things about and during the trial. That happened about five times, I believe. Therefore “Kennedy’s Avenger: Assassination, Conspiracy and the Forgotten Trial of Jack Ruby” receives 4 out of 5 stars in Julie’s world.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Indeed little attention has been paid over the years to the actual trial of Jack Ruby. The book is interesting but contains more detail than necessary so was somewhat a dry read and boring in places.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: March 27, 2021 Publication date: June 1, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave ( #thirdwave ?)is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for Date reviewed/posted: March 27, 2021 Publication date: June 1, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave ( #thirdwave ?)is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. No crime in history had more eyewitnesses. On November 24, 1963, two days after the killing of President Kennedy, a troubled nightclub owner named Jack Ruby quietly slipped into the Dallas police station and assassinated the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. Millions of Americans witnessed the killing on live television, and yet the event would lead to questions for years to come. It also would help to spark the conspiracy theories that have continued to resonate today. Under the long shadow cast by the assassination of America’s beloved president, few would remember the bizarre trial that followed three months later in Dallas, Texas. How exactly does one defend a man who was seen pulling the trigger in front of millions? And, more importantly, how did Jack Ruby, who fired point-blank into Oswald live on television, die an innocent man? Featuring a colourful cast of characters, including the nation’s most flamboyant lawyer pitted against a tough-as-Texas prosecutor, award-winning authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher unveil the astonishing details behind the first major trial of the television century. While it was Jack Ruby who appeared before the jury, it was also the city of Dallas and the American legal system being judged by the world. Dan Abrams was the perfect person to write this book as he is a legal expert and the research shows in this excellently written book. I don't know a lot about the JFK case (Canadian to the core, I am!) but I learned a lot and utterly devoured this book. I will highly recommend it to friends, family, strangers on mass transit (on both sides of the pond) who I see reading, book clubs and complete strangers walking down the street as it is that good and that enjoyable!!! :-) As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes / literally-like-overusers etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🔫🔫🔫🔫🔫

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rod Innis

    I remember where I was standing when the news came that President Kennedy had been assassinated. I was in high school. Perhaps for that reason, I bought this book when I first saw it. It is a well-written account of the trial of Jack Ruby, the man who killed Lee Harvey Oswald the man accused of killing President Kennedy. It included information about all the theories about who was actually behind the murder of the President. I have read a lot of information about most of the conspiracy theories I remember where I was standing when the news came that President Kennedy had been assassinated. I was in high school. Perhaps for that reason, I bought this book when I first saw it. It is a well-written account of the trial of Jack Ruby, the man who killed Lee Harvey Oswald the man accused of killing President Kennedy. It included information about all the theories about who was actually behind the murder of the President. I have read a lot of information about most of the conspiracy theories and personally, I am convinced that Lee Harvey Oswald, acted alone and that Jack Ruby acted alone when he shot Kennedy's assassin. This book did not change my mind about anything that happened, but it did fill in many details that I had either totally forgotten or never knew. Most of the world paid attention to all the events following the killing of the President and lots of people are still convinced that there was a cover-up of the actual events. I am not one of them and this book will not bolster that case. I wonder how many people born long after the events will be interested in this book. Perhaps some children of conspiracy theorists who talked long and loud about their theories and some history buffs.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    I have been fascinated with all things Kennedy assassination for some time now. I was so excited to get a copy of this book shortly after its release. It was an easy read that really laid out all of the players and information in a terrific and entertaining way. I felt like I was in the courtroom for every question and rebuttal.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Judy & Marianne from Long and Short Reviews

    The trial no one remembers, for the murder no one forgets. I had no idea how much time or how much effort went into the trial of Jack Ruby. When I learned about the man, it was in passing. He killed Lee Harvey Oswald. That was it. In the case of this book, there’s a lot more to the story. Abrams and Fisher mention the insanity defense that was used, the epilepsy defense and Ruby’s odd behavior to explain why he committed this murder. This isn’t a short book and one must be interested in the topic, The trial no one remembers, for the murder no one forgets. I had no idea how much time or how much effort went into the trial of Jack Ruby. When I learned about the man, it was in passing. He killed Lee Harvey Oswald. That was it. In the case of this book, there’s a lot more to the story. Abrams and Fisher mention the insanity defense that was used, the epilepsy defense and Ruby’s odd behavior to explain why he committed this murder. This isn’t a short book and one must be interested in the topic, otherwise in places, it drags. One must be a student of history or at least like history, or again, the overwhelming details can make this book a bit of a trudge. If you’re interested in the case, then it’s fascinating stuff. I’d suggest reading this book like you might a crime novel. It’s packed with details, makes one have to wonder if everyone is telling the truth and covers THE crime of the 20th century. If you’re interested in a crime novel, then this might be the one for you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    I thought the book was boring and it rambled. Too many unnecessary details.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maxine

    This non-fiction book is the in depth account of the trial of Jack Ruby, the man who killed Lee Harvey Oswald, who had assassinated President John F. Kennedy, in Dallas on November 22, 1963. The events of that day, and those immediately following it will never be forgotten by anyone who was alive then, and old enough to feel the horror that gripped the nation, if not the world. There was no possible doubt of Ruby's guilt, as the incident took place on camera and was broadcast live as it happened This non-fiction book is the in depth account of the trial of Jack Ruby, the man who killed Lee Harvey Oswald, who had assassinated President John F. Kennedy, in Dallas on November 22, 1963. The events of that day, and those immediately following it will never be forgotten by anyone who was alive then, and old enough to feel the horror that gripped the nation, if not the world. There was no possible doubt of Ruby's guilt, as the incident took place on camera and was broadcast live as it happened-to every TV set in America, and subsequently on televisions and in newspapers world-wide. Like everything connected with the Kennedy Assassination, Ruby's trial was controversial, the verdict was controversial, and it fueled the conspiracy theories that continue . This book shines the spotlight on the trial, with an almost word for word recitation of the witnesses testimonies, and the words of the judge, and the lawyers for both defense and prosecution. Ruby himself did not testify at his own trial, but the book offers plenty of insight into his life, his personality and his possible motives. Although at times the amount of detail, and the legal viewpoints can be tedious, it's worth reading because it evokes the atmosphere of the times--the early 60s--the "Camelot" days of the charismatic Kennedy and his glamourous wife, Jacqueline, the absolute shock and horror following the event that seemed like a bad dream shared by an entire country, as well as explaining as nearly as possible, the motive and mindset of Jack Ruby, the assassin of the assassin. Considering the preponderance of conspiracy theories still surviving more than five decades after that day in Dallas, I, as someone who does remember that day, and the sense of unreality that followed, found this factual book answered some of my questions.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Hoppe

    For a man who committed a historic crime on live television, Jack Ruby remains an enigmatic figure. Was he a crazed loner who shot Oswald out of overwhelming grief? Was he a mobbed-up conspirator assigned the suicidal hit by the Trafficante crime family? Was he a furious Jew who wanted to show anti-Semites once and for all that his people "had guts?" The answers to all those questions are in this book. Or rather, they were answered by his 1964 trial. Conspiracy nuts will be disappointed. There i For a man who committed a historic crime on live television, Jack Ruby remains an enigmatic figure. Was he a crazed loner who shot Oswald out of overwhelming grief? Was he a mobbed-up conspirator assigned the suicidal hit by the Trafficante crime family? Was he a furious Jew who wanted to show anti-Semites once and for all that his people "had guts?" The answers to all those questions are in this book. Or rather, they were answered by his 1964 trial. Conspiracy nuts will be disappointed. There is way less to Jack Ruby from that standpoint than they need to support their theories. On a human level, I found there was more to him than I knew (or ever bothered to think about). Yes, he shot Oswald. Of course. But if I were a juror back then, I doubt I would have found him guilty of pre-meditated murder. I'll let the book explain why. America in 1964 was a very different place than it is today. People were not, in the main, sympathetic to psychological explanations (which were seen as excuses). It doesn't help that Ruby's lawyer, Melvin Belli, was too clever by half in his defense. And Dallas! Those jurors were told that their city was on trial, that the world was watching and the American judicial system was on trial, too. JFK had been murdered during a parade. Then Oswald had been shot while handcuffed and in police custody. As a nation, we looked bad. Somebody had to pay for all that. I believe that somebody was Jack Ruby, and I don't think it was fair. So I found myself more emotionally involved with the fate of this rather unlikeable man than I ever dreamed I would be. For that, I credit Abrams and Fisher. I learned a lot, and felt a great deal more, as I read this book than I thought I would.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Harris

    I found this book interesting because it details aspects of our nation's history that uses transcripts to place the reader in the courtroom. My biggest complaint was that there was more information than necessary - there was an entire chapter and possibly more devoted solely to all the testimony pertaining to the defense's motion for change of venue. I personally didn't need to read all of it to get the point that this case shouldn't have been tried in Dallas. Testimony from minor, bit players s I found this book interesting because it details aspects of our nation's history that uses transcripts to place the reader in the courtroom. My biggest complaint was that there was more information than necessary - there was an entire chapter and possibly more devoted solely to all the testimony pertaining to the defense's motion for change of venue. I personally didn't need to read all of it to get the point that this case shouldn't have been tried in Dallas. Testimony from minor, bit players shows how thorough and comprehensive the research was to write this book, but I would have preferred to have that edited out. From a legal perspective, there was definitely some entertaining and extremely fine lawyering exhibited through the cross-examinations. It boggles the mind that the objections and accompanying barbs and arguments were allowed to be made in front of the jury. It showed that Judge Brown had absolutely no control over the proceedings and a high degree of unprofessionalism from both the prosecution and the defense. I agree with Dan Abrams's opinion at the beginning that Melvin Belli did Jack Ruby a disservice with his theory of defense. He certainly did a commendable job of bringing in a cavalry of experts to support his claim that Jack Ruby was insane at the time of killing Lee Harvey Oswald. However, he shouldered an unnecessary burden and took an incredible risk by trying to make himself the spotlight of the trial to show his vast knowledge on the subject as opposed to a defense that would have mitigated the penalty and may have ultimately been in the best interests of his client.

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Bradford

    This was an interesting read that tried to showcase the trial of Jack Ruby sans the conspiracy theory that he had any connection to Oswald or the assassination of President Kennedy. Taken from the court transcript, the authors do a good job of showing the drama and conflict between the prosecution and the defense as the defense argues an insanity plea for Jack Ruby. You will learn a little history of the law and Texas law as you read through this narrative. The authors do a good job of distancin This was an interesting read that tried to showcase the trial of Jack Ruby sans the conspiracy theory that he had any connection to Oswald or the assassination of President Kennedy. Taken from the court transcript, the authors do a good job of showing the drama and conflict between the prosecution and the defense as the defense argues an insanity plea for Jack Ruby. You will learn a little history of the law and Texas law as you read through this narrative. The authors do a good job of distancing the conspiracy theories from the trial but, of course, it does come up from time to time. Ruby was depicted as a lonely, confused, mentally depressed man (among other things) whose mind was in a constant turmoil. As the trial continued, I couldn't help but to think that our legal system was in many ways as dysfunctional as Ruby's mind as the attorneys nearly went fist-to-cuffs over their legal battlements. It was a comparison I kept making with each chapter. Apparently this trial is somewhat overlooked among the volumes of information that has been documented about the Kennedy assassination, which is hard to believe. It's a good read if you want an objective look at the man who killed Oswald.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Scheese

    Interesting and Intriguing Just finished "Kennedy's Avenger" and I highly recommend it. As a history nerd, I was intrigued by the subtitle "Assassination, Conspiracy and the Forgotten Trial of Jack Ruby". Wait. Hold on. There was a Jack Ruby trial? Whatever became of Jack Ruby? Somehow lost on me in the circle on 11/22/63 documentaries, books and movies I realized I had no clue whatever happened to Jack Ruby. Authors Abrams & Fisher do an excellent job weaving the social, political and conspiracy Interesting and Intriguing Just finished "Kennedy's Avenger" and I highly recommend it. As a history nerd, I was intrigued by the subtitle "Assassination, Conspiracy and the Forgotten Trial of Jack Ruby". Wait. Hold on. There was a Jack Ruby trial? Whatever became of Jack Ruby? Somehow lost on me in the circle on 11/22/63 documentaries, books and movies I realized I had no clue whatever happened to Jack Ruby. Authors Abrams & Fisher do an excellent job weaving the social, political and conspiracy environment into the fact-based examination of Jack Ruby's trial for Lee Harvey Oswald's murder in the Spring of 1964 as well as subsequent appeals. While predominantly a legal non-fiction account, the book also appeals to any history geek as well. Easy to read and follow. The authors take the time for character development which adds to the narrative. 5 of 5 stars for this most interesting and intriguing read. The added bonus is I now know what happened to Jack Ruby.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    I enjoy the collaborations between Dan Abrams and David Fisher. Through them, I've learned a lot about the evolution of the US legal system, even if, at times, the details of trials can become a bit tedious. But that is also part of what's important in the legal process. This title is similar to their others, but seems different because it deals with a very well-known event: Jack Ruby's murder of Kennedy's killer, Lee Harvey Oswald. I'd never been interested in all of the conspiracy theories aro I enjoy the collaborations between Dan Abrams and David Fisher. Through them, I've learned a lot about the evolution of the US legal system, even if, at times, the details of trials can become a bit tedious. But that is also part of what's important in the legal process. This title is similar to their others, but seems different because it deals with a very well-known event: Jack Ruby's murder of Kennedy's killer, Lee Harvey Oswald. I'd never been interested in all of the conspiracy theories around the two murders, so I read this book without much knowledge about Ruby and his possible motives. There are no surprising conclusions in this title, but I found reading about the trial itself within its historical setting fascinating. Recommended for those who enjoy history and legal intricacies.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David

    Jack Ruby is one of the most fascinating criminals in US history - although you’d never know that from this drab book. Having shot the alleged killer of the President, Ruby’s subsequent legal history has long remained unexplored. With literally thousands of books focussed on Kennedy and Oswald, a book comprehensively exploring Ruby has been long overdue. But this is not that book, and, regretfully it is merely a lost opportunity. The bulk of the book covers Ruby’s trial for killing Oswald, but i Jack Ruby is one of the most fascinating criminals in US history - although you’d never know that from this drab book. Having shot the alleged killer of the President, Ruby’s subsequent legal history has long remained unexplored. With literally thousands of books focussed on Kennedy and Oswald, a book comprehensively exploring Ruby has been long overdue. But this is not that book, and, regretfully it is merely a lost opportunity. The bulk of the book covers Ruby’s trial for killing Oswald, but it quickly becomes bogged down in the dull medical minutiae of the trial and rarely mentions Ruby’s reactions, motivations, or general sensibility. It is imperative to the Kennedy assassination that we understand Jack Ruby but, frustratingly, this book fails in that regard.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hugh Atkins

    I've read a lot of books on the Kennedy assassination, so there really wasn't a lot of new information here. I was not really familiar with much about the trial of Jack Ruby, so this book filled in some gaps. There is a lot of courtroom procedure in this book, and it goes into detail about the strategy of Ruby's original defense team. There are enough tidbits in here to make it interesting to those who continue are interested in knowing all they can about the Kennedy assassination. One criticism I've read a lot of books on the Kennedy assassination, so there really wasn't a lot of new information here. I was not really familiar with much about the trial of Jack Ruby, so this book filled in some gaps. There is a lot of courtroom procedure in this book, and it goes into detail about the strategy of Ruby's original defense team. There are enough tidbits in here to make it interesting to those who continue are interested in knowing all they can about the Kennedy assassination. One criticism is that the authors spend almost a fourth of the book on jury selection, and then as if realizing what they've done, pack the rest of the trial and appeals in the remaining three fourths of the book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Non lawyers may get a little confused with some of the description and historical trial background throughout which at times reads like a text book for law students studying a criminal trial. Readers who are familiar with the events during this period will probably not find out anything new but will get a more detailed explanation as to what occurred during Ruby's trail. I found this to be an interesting and informative read but left me wanting for some information that would either promote or dis Non lawyers may get a little confused with some of the description and historical trial background throughout which at times reads like a text book for law students studying a criminal trial. Readers who are familiar with the events during this period will probably not find out anything new but will get a more detailed explanation as to what occurred during Ruby's trail. I found this to be an interesting and informative read but left me wanting for some information that would either promote or dispell any of those theories that have been surrounding this case since day one.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joe Slavinsky

    Interesting reading for me, as I was in high school during the trial, and my parents were preparing to move to a different house, so I wasn't paying a lot of attention to it. During the appeal process, and it's aftermath, I was in the service, and when Ruby died, I was in Viet Nam. So not knowing much about the subject, this book satisfied my curiosity. Interesting reading for me, as I was in high school during the trial, and my parents were preparing to move to a different house, so I wasn't paying a lot of attention to it. During the appeal process, and it's aftermath, I was in the service, and when Ruby died, I was in Viet Nam. So not knowing much about the subject, this book satisfied my curiosity.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bobby Hattaway

    As an 11 year old, I was heavily focused on JFK's assassination and Oswald's murder but I have no memories of Jack Ruby's trial which took place within a few months of the event. Reading this book is a lot like reading the transcripts of the trial but with very many references to how things were said and by whom. A fascinating book. As an 11 year old, I was heavily focused on JFK's assassination and Oswald's murder but I have no memories of Jack Ruby's trial which took place within a few months of the event. Reading this book is a lot like reading the transcripts of the trial but with very many references to how things were said and by whom. A fascinating book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    A fascinating look at a truly forgotten piece of history. Excellent read. My one quibble was three typos, but that seems to be the trend in today's world of publishing. Highly recommend if you are a fan of history, legal trials, and/or all that deals with the assassination of JFK. A fascinating look at a truly forgotten piece of history. Excellent read. My one quibble was three typos, but that seems to be the trend in today's world of publishing. Highly recommend if you are a fan of history, legal trials, and/or all that deals with the assassination of JFK.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joni Williams

    It wasn’t what I really thought it would be but I learned a lot. I was in the third grade when all this happened and have always been fascinated by these events. Did learn that the DA Wade that Prosecuted Ruby was the same man in Roe v Wade. Never knew.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Fraleigh

    This covers the trial and appeals of the charge against Jacky Ruby in the death of Lee Harvey Oswald. Was there a conspiracy - did Oswald (assassinating President Kennedy) and/or Ruby (shot and killed Oswald) act alone.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jquick99

    This would have been better as a magazine article. Wayyy too much minutea. Where was his editor? DNF.

  24. 4 out of 5

    erik nerdalen

    I thought it was very interesting. I really enjoyed learning about this aspect of the president’s assassination.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bookclubbish

    Categories Legal History, Presidents & Heads of State Biographies & Autobiographies, 20th Century United States History

  26. 4 out of 5

    Austin Moore

    95/100 5 stars - 90/100 4 stars - 80/100 3 stars - 70/100 2 stars - 60/100 1 star - 50/100

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mam

    Good reporters write books that I appreciate. This is one of them. Although I knew peripherally the story of Jack Ruby, the detail in this book is absolutely fascinating. Good job.

  28. 4 out of 5

    B.

    3.5 stars

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Nothing gained, nothing learned. Conspiracy theories were never explained as to why they were held, or why people claimed to hear things that had never occurred.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robert Holmes

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