counter create hit Yokohama Station SF - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Yokohama Station SF

Availability: Ready to download

A WORLD INSIDE ​All Hiroto has ever known is a life on a tiny coastal speck of Japan. Much of the country has been swallowed by Yokohama Station, a mysterious, ever-growing series of buildings that's been around for as long as anyone can remember. The few who live outside its many entrances have never seen Inside and know only rumors and legends of the station's interior. T A WORLD INSIDE ​All Hiroto has ever known is a life on a tiny coastal speck of Japan. Much of the country has been swallowed by Yokohama Station, a mysterious, ever-growing series of buildings that's been around for as long as anyone can remember. The few who live outside its many entrances have never seen Inside and know only rumors and legends of the station's interior. That all changes when Hiroto is given an 18 Ticket, a mysterious item that lets him enter the massive complex for five days. The young man has always sought a purpose, but the one he finds may not be the sort he'd hoped for...


Compare

A WORLD INSIDE ​All Hiroto has ever known is a life on a tiny coastal speck of Japan. Much of the country has been swallowed by Yokohama Station, a mysterious, ever-growing series of buildings that's been around for as long as anyone can remember. The few who live outside its many entrances have never seen Inside and know only rumors and legends of the station's interior. T A WORLD INSIDE ​All Hiroto has ever known is a life on a tiny coastal speck of Japan. Much of the country has been swallowed by Yokohama Station, a mysterious, ever-growing series of buildings that's been around for as long as anyone can remember. The few who live outside its many entrances have never seen Inside and know only rumors and legends of the station's interior. That all changes when Hiroto is given an 18 Ticket, a mysterious item that lets him enter the massive complex for five days. The young man has always sought a purpose, but the one he finds may not be the sort he'd hoped for...

30 review for Yokohama Station SF

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was definitely an interesting book. It took some time for me to warm up to it, but once I was captured, I couldn't put this book down, I HAD to know how it was going to end. It didn't go the way I expected to, but that was ok. I like not always figuring out how the story ends. One thing though, the MC was blessed that everything he did and everyone he encountered helped get him closer and closer to his goal. He never really seemed to have to work for much. Other than that and the time it too This was definitely an interesting book. It took some time for me to warm up to it, but once I was captured, I couldn't put this book down, I HAD to know how it was going to end. It didn't go the way I expected to, but that was ok. I like not always figuring out how the story ends. One thing though, the MC was blessed that everything he did and everyone he encountered helped get him closer and closer to his goal. He never really seemed to have to work for much. Other than that and the time it took me to really get into the story, this was almost enchanting. I honestly don't want to say too much, if you are going to read this, you should go into it not knowing what to expect. I am going to get a copy of this for a family member who is into sci-fi that is different from what it out there, this fits that bill perfectly. Definitely one I will be recommending to our sci-fi readers at the store. 3.5 stars, rounded down to 3, because while I did enjoy it, it was a little too easy and streamlined for the MC and the jumps took a bit to get used to. Worth the time to read, recommended. My thanks to NetGalley and Yen Press/Yen On for an eARC copy of this book to read and review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emma Ito

    This book is so solid. I hadn't read it when it was in it's twitter and web-created infancy, but I loved reading it now. A great sci-fi read. This book is so solid. I hadn't read it when it was in it's twitter and web-created infancy, but I loved reading it now. A great sci-fi read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    I received a free e-ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. (Actual rating 3.5) [This review will be posted on my blog on April 18] Yokohama Station has a strange premise, but is a super compelling read. Basically, through genetic replication, Yokohama (train) Station has grown and taken over the entire island of Honshu. There were a lot of things about this book that I thought could have been done better, but I was completely hooked. I don't think this is going to b I received a free e-ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. (Actual rating 3.5) [This review will be posted on my blog on April 18] Yokohama Station has a strange premise, but is a super compelling read. Basically, through genetic replication, Yokohama (train) Station has grown and taken over the entire island of Honshu. There were a lot of things about this book that I thought could have been done better, but I was completely hooked. I don't think this is going to be a hugely popular book for audiences reading it in English, and I feel like this is a real shame, because it's a fascinating book. I am somewhat familiar with Japanese forms of storytelling, and the difficulties of translating between Japanese and English due to extensive study at uni. I want to say straight up that I think the translator has done an excellent job at balancing literal translation with free translation. It's not an easy thing to achieve. So even though the writing seems kind of dry in places, I still felt excited to find out what was going to happen. The story follows two main characters, Hiroto and Toshiro. Both have set out to explore Yokohama Station for different reasons. I want to say straight off the bat that this is not a character driven story. The characters really only exist to further the plot. As a result they are kind of flat. Hiroto, who was born outside Yokohama Station has a fascination with it, and is fortunate enough to receive to what amounts to a visitor's pass. He just sort of bumbles his way through Yokohama Station, and through no effort of his own, manages to luck upon allies when he needs them. Toshiro isn’t introduced until 40% of the way through, so that was somewhat jarring. He hates people, and I had no idea what motivated him to do anything. Some of the side characters, such as Keiha, Nepshamai, and Haikunterke were quite fascinating, and I would have liked to read more about them. Alas, there was not enough time to do so. The worldbuilding was probably the most interesting part of this book. Yokohama Station has, as previously mentioned, taken over all of Honshu. Most humans live inside the station, where all their needs are taken care of, provided they have a Suika - basically a little microchip that’s inserted into the body when you’re six years old (providing your parents or someone else will foot the bill for you). Using it you are able to earn points to use as currency. Order is kept by Automated Turnstiles, which enforce the basic rules of the station - don't harm other people, or cause damage to the station. Local human militia type organisations also try to enforce local rules. Some humans, like Hiroto, live outside the station on Honshu, clinging to the margins, and living off whatever the station ejects out. While others, like Toshiro, inhabit the other islands like Kyushu and Hokkaido, and actively try to repel the station’s expansion. The writing style is very straight forward, and fairly easy to read. Sometimes there is a bit of info-dumping/exposition, and it can take a bit of effort to understand what it means, but I wasn't too worried about it because it didn't feel out of place in the context of the story. Both characters, especially Hiroto, were unfamiliar with the world inside Yokohama Station, so we learned about it as they did. While the worldbuilding can seem quite complicated, the story itself isn’t overly complex. It’s a basic narrative that explores the question of what the world would look like if technology took over. One of the biggest difficulties I had while reading this book was I lacked a sense of geographical space. While I could recognise the islands, major cities and some of the prefectures, I didn't know the locations of smaller cities and towns. I think it would be really helpful for foreign readers to have a map included, especially considering so much ground is covered by the characters. I think this would be really cool if it was adapted to anime, and I would be interested to read more short stories or novellas set in this world (especially a prequel of some sort). I would recommend this to science fiction fans, especially those who like their sci-fi a bit quirky.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paula Lyle

    Can a city be classified as a living entity? If so, can it then be killed? That is the problem posed by this short novel. An interesting story peopled by surprising characters. I received an eARC through NetGalley.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ Yokohama Station is a novella (175 pages) deeply rooted in Japanese culture. Japan is, after all, is a country intricately and expansively connected by trains and so it is no surprise that the maguffin here is a train station. Those who have travelled to Japan will appreciate the references of course (Suica - Suika) as well as the very disenfranchised and disaffected nature of the protagonists. None are admirable and More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ Yokohama Station is a novella (175 pages) deeply rooted in Japanese culture. Japan is, after all, is a country intricately and expansively connected by trains and so it is no surprise that the maguffin here is a train station. Those who have travelled to Japan will appreciate the references of course (Suica - Suika) as well as the very disenfranchised and disaffected nature of the protagonists. None are admirable and most just shuffle through the book as coincidences allow the plot to develop. It makes for a somewhat stilted read but there are, of course, interesting sci fi references within (from Asimov to Philip K. Dick). Story: As a devastating war destroyed most of the world, a few outlier countries developed radical technology in order to survive. In Japan, a self replicating station evolved and slowly began to take over Japan. The main island of Honshu was soon completely covered by the station, pushing people to the outer limits or to other islands. Inside the station, residents continued life as normal, as long as they had a very expensive Suika implant that allowed them to do transactions and communicate within the station. Hiroto lives outside the station and wonders about what's inside. Toshiro is in the army in the south island of Kyushu - they are charged with stopping the halt of Yokohama Station onto their island. In the north, AI is being used to stop Yokohama from invading Hokkaido. When Hiroto comes into possession of a pass into the station, all will change. Both protagonists are rather dull - neither has much in the way of social skills and it was very hard to get into/behind either character. For the most part, life just happened to them rather than the other way around. Toshiro doesn't much care about humanity, his superiors are self serving, and he has a very clinical POV. Hiroto, the scavenger, just bumbles around most of the book and manages to meet only people who can help further the plot to find the mystery of Yokohama station. For those reasons, this felt very deus ex machina and not organic at all. Yokohama Station isn't really a character and the idea of it being intelligent is glossed over and ignored. It just replicates, poorly, and that's all we know about it. Because the station never became anything more than an 'it', the ending and reveals were very anticlimactic and the journey (even as easy as it was) uninteresting. Honestly, a drone could replace Hiroto or Toshiro and have about the same impact on the story. This is a quick and easy read. There are illustrations at the beginning of each chapter (and there are under 10 chapers) in black and white. As well, there are explanations in the back of various ideas by the author. As a sci fi piece, it did feel a bit flat. But as a glimpse of Japanese culture, it has a lot to say. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Hiroto, an outsider, ventures into Yokohama Station with a temporary ticket. His mission is to free the leader of the Dodger Alliance. Will he make it out in time? “Hiroto let Keiha finish her story, although at least half of it was beyond his comprehension.” The above quote perfectly illustrates how I feel about science fiction in general. I think I thought this book was a graphic novel when I requested it, plus I’m always interested in reading works from Japanese authors. That being said, scienc Hiroto, an outsider, ventures into Yokohama Station with a temporary ticket. His mission is to free the leader of the Dodger Alliance. Will he make it out in time? “Hiroto let Keiha finish her story, although at least half of it was beyond his comprehension.” The above quote perfectly illustrates how I feel about science fiction in general. I think I thought this book was a graphic novel when I requested it, plus I’m always interested in reading works from Japanese authors. That being said, science fiction tends to go a little over my head. I feel like I’m a pretty smart person, but science fiction almost never seems to click with me. I want to give this novel 3.5 stars. I would’ve rated it higher, even though some of it didn’t make sense to me, but it felt like something was missing. I know that something always goes missing in translation (this book was originally published in Japan in 2016), but this was different. A lot of things happened in Hiroto’s journey, but not a lot of things actively advanced the plot. There were also a couple of characters that seemed not-quite-pointless, existing only as a way to give background information (and a deus ex machina, of sorts). There’s a map at the beginning, which is always useful. There’s also an appendix at the end that I wish I would’ve known about when I started the book (definitely my own fault for not checking the contents); it’s not necessary but definitely helpful. Thank you so much to NetGalley and Yen Press, LLC (and Kadokawa Corporation) for the ARC in exchange for an honest review (sorry it’s late. I’m finally catching up!).

  7. 5 out of 5

    ShingetsuMoon

    An interesting and fascinating concept let down by a loose plot and thin characters. Yokohama Station as an entity and as a concept is a fascinating one. I loved learning more about the station, how it expanded, how it came to exist, and how it interacts with the world and those who live Inside. However, the fascinating concept is dragged down a bit by the main character Horioto. Everything his village needs is provided by the station leftovers leaving many without work or anything purposeful to d An interesting and fascinating concept let down by a loose plot and thin characters. Yokohama Station as an entity and as a concept is a fascinating one. I loved learning more about the station, how it expanded, how it came to exist, and how it interacts with the world and those who live Inside. However, the fascinating concept is dragged down a bit by the main character Horioto. Everything his village needs is provided by the station leftovers leaving many without work or anything purposeful to do with their lives. So when an opportunity to do something more presents itself, Hiroyuki seizes it and embarks inside Yokohama Station to see what it’s like and try to find the place known as Exit 42. Along the way more characters weave in and out of the story and blank spots of history are filled in. Most of the book though felt like a journey in search of a destination. Hiroto even admits that he’s just going where he’s told, searching for something others have that he can’t quite find himself. Other characters like Toshiru and Okuma were harder to get a read on. I could never really tell what was real with them or whether they were deflecting attention and lying about what they were doing. Their parts were interesting but generally ended up just leaving me confused about their personal goals in relation to the story. Overall this was a decent book, with a strong central idea, but with characters that weren’t particularly interesting outside of the Station itself. Worth reading for the concept, but not necessarily the plot in my opinion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Whimsy Dearest

    After a self-replicating train station has taken over all of Honshu, Hiroto tries to track down the leader of a hidden alliance that’s determined to free humanity. Yokohama Station SF by Yuba Isukari is a visionary sci-fi novel that explores our relationship to technology and … well, public transportation. The station itself is truly its own living, sentient character in this story and most of Japan is now dependent on it. At the age of 6, children have a Suica (a type of point card) installed in After a self-replicating train station has taken over all of Honshu, Hiroto tries to track down the leader of a hidden alliance that’s determined to free humanity. Yokohama Station SF by Yuba Isukari is a visionary sci-fi novel that explores our relationship to technology and … well, public transportation. The station itself is truly its own living, sentient character in this story and most of Japan is now dependent on it. At the age of 6, children have a Suica (a type of point card) installed in them. They use those points to buy things like food or to continue living in the station. Those who commit the most minor of infractions may be expelled from the station and left to fend for themselves. It’s really a fascinating world that Isukari has built here, and I think it’s important to note this is a very conceptually-driven and exposition-heavy story. This is both its greatest strength and its weakness. Due to the novel’s short length, there isn’t room for much asides from learning how the world works. I wish we could have seen more descriptive imagery in regards to its setting and seen a little more from its human (and non-human) characters. All in all though, I still definitely recommend this book if you’re looking for a short but sweet sci-fi with innovative worldbuilding and cool AI. Thank you, Netgalley and Yen Press, for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Balistreri

    Yokohama station was a 3.5 for me, but I rounded up. I’m being lenient here because the characters are pretty one dimensional and there isn’t much character development as well. The book is very focused on Yokohama station itself rather than the people we are reading about. Which is fine- because I found the entire concept to be very interesting. The Station itself acts like a living organism, and keeps growing and rebuilding itself to the point where it is covering almost all of Japan. Just the Yokohama station was a 3.5 for me, but I rounded up. I’m being lenient here because the characters are pretty one dimensional and there isn’t much character development as well. The book is very focused on Yokohama station itself rather than the people we are reading about. Which is fine- because I found the entire concept to be very interesting. The Station itself acts like a living organism, and keeps growing and rebuilding itself to the point where it is covering almost all of Japan. Just the setting itself and the “coolness” of the plot carries this book for me. It’s a quick and simple read, where there isn’t much world building or character development at all. However, I still found it fun and enjoyable.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Blerdy.Mama

    The story mainly follows two individuals, born outside the station and their experiences going inside for the first time. Yakihara station went rogue with its technology and started doing things on its own without anyone to intervene/ stop it. That’s how it ended up covering majority of Japan. We get to see how the station makes rules/ prioritizations vs the humans choices, as they are both different beings so of course difference ideals. This was a refreshing Science fiction read, I would to se The story mainly follows two individuals, born outside the station and their experiences going inside for the first time. Yakihara station went rogue with its technology and started doing things on its own without anyone to intervene/ stop it. That’s how it ended up covering majority of Japan. We get to see how the station makes rules/ prioritizations vs the humans choices, as they are both different beings so of course difference ideals. This was a refreshing Science fiction read, I would to see it as an anime adaptation! Thank you NetGalley and Yen Press for providing a free advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John

    Over and over, I find myself enjoying these stand-alone light novels much more than the popular serial ones. While Yokohama Station SF is not a particularly strong or even original story concept and the execution of plot elements feels very convenient and contrived rather than organic, I still enjoyed it. I really like the chapter title page illustrations, the call backs to SF predecessors, and the author’s afterward. Some of the expository moments cured my insomnia, but there is enough here tha Over and over, I find myself enjoying these stand-alone light novels much more than the popular serial ones. While Yokohama Station SF is not a particularly strong or even original story concept and the execution of plot elements feels very convenient and contrived rather than organic, I still enjoyed it. I really like the chapter title page illustrations, the call backs to SF predecessors, and the author’s afterward. Some of the expository moments cured my insomnia, but there is enough here that’s interesting to get a reader through this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lucien Welsh

    Thank you to YenPress and NetGalley for the eARC See the full review and more on my blog :: lucienwelsh.ca Yokohama Station SF is a futuristic dystopian novel akin to something like Space Odyssey 2001 (which is funnily enough referenced several times throughout the novel) as it involves a self-functioning station that has taken over the majority of Japan after starting out as a system meant to be used to assist with the efficiency of subways stations constantly under construction for upgrades and Thank you to YenPress and NetGalley for the eARC See the full review and more on my blog :: lucienwelsh.ca Yokohama Station SF is a futuristic dystopian novel akin to something like Space Odyssey 2001 (which is funnily enough referenced several times throughout the novel) as it involves a self-functioning station that has taken over the majority of Japan after starting out as a system meant to be used to assist with the efficiency of subways stations constantly under construction for upgrades and the likes. The station has gotten out of control and people unable to afford the special chip implants needed in order to stay within the station are dying of starvation or otherwise forced out of their homes by the ever-expanding station. A young boy from one of these settlements end up entering the station with a special limited pass, on a mission of someone else’s to see to stopping the expansion once and for all. Right away, I loved the concept of this station going haywire, and appreciated the author’s note in the back of the book that mentioned it was inspired by constant construction in large cities, referencing Yokohama subway station specifically. Being from Southern Ontario, it reminded me of the horrors that are the construction closures constantly effecting the Gardener Expressway as well as Union Station in Toronto. As much as I loved the concept, I felt something was lacking at times. It is a slow burn of a story that follows a few different characters but I felt each of them lacked the depth needed to create a sense of caring for them. I was more interested in the rest of the world building rather than the mission at hand for the cast or the stakes they were facing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cay

    Thank you NetGalley and Yen Press for providing a free advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. Yokohama Station SF lays out an interesting premise, but doesn't quite deliver. I was looking forward to reading about the station as a character unto itself, but it was often glossed over. Overall this was an interesting read, but I would have liked to see more character development and more tension (pacing was pretty quick, but things seemed to fall into place a little too easily at times). Thank you NetGalley and Yen Press for providing a free advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. Yokohama Station SF lays out an interesting premise, but doesn't quite deliver. I was looking forward to reading about the station as a character unto itself, but it was often glossed over. Overall this was an interesting read, but I would have liked to see more character development and more tension (pacing was pretty quick, but things seemed to fall into place a little too easily at times).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shona

    Thank you to NetGalley and to the Publisher, Yen Press, for this ARC. What a fun read! I couldn't put it down once I started it. Read it if you like sci-fi; can also be read by teens, if yours is into that kind of thing. Lots of fun characters (human, and other) and ideas. Rated: High 4/5 :) Some concepts were truly beyond me, but still fun. My tags: Science fiction, adventure, artificial intelligence Thank you to NetGalley and to the Publisher, Yen Press, for this ARC. What a fun read! I couldn't put it down once I started it. Read it if you like sci-fi; can also be read by teens, if yours is into that kind of thing. Lots of fun characters (human, and other) and ideas. Rated: High 4/5 :) Some concepts were truly beyond me, but still fun. My tags: Science fiction, adventure, artificial intelligence

  15. 5 out of 5

    O. U.

    Do you want to read 200+ pages of boring characters info dumping as conversation? Then this book is for you. 2/5, I don't even have a pun for this one. >:( Do you want to read 200+ pages of boring characters info dumping as conversation? Then this book is for you. 2/5, I don't even have a pun for this one. >:(

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steve Heaps

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kate Downton

  18. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dani

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  23. 4 out of 5

    David

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steve Farmer

  25. 4 out of 5

    hrynn

  26. 4 out of 5

    Todd

  27. 4 out of 5

    Timo

  28. 4 out of 5

    Austin Allen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt Giddings

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.