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30 review for Heaven Is a World of Love: "A World of Love" (Crossway Short Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ben Cook

    I will buy you this book. Seriously, just ask. This is one of the greatest and most soul enriching pieces of literature I have ever read. I am so saddened that it has taken me 27 years to reach it. What a great heaven awaits us, and what a great privilege is ours that we can speak straight into its heavenly throne room.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    Jonathan Edwards is an interesting figure. To the culture in general, he is the ultimate manifestation of the fire-and-brimstone preacher, due to the fact that his sermon 'Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God' is considered essential American literature. To the reformed wing of evangelicalism, due in part to the influence of John Piper, Edwards is a high-water mark of Biblical and spiritual insight, a key figure in the Great Awakening, and an all-around hero. To the academy, Edwards is the among Jonathan Edwards is an interesting figure. To the culture in general, he is the ultimate manifestation of the fire-and-brimstone preacher, due to the fact that his sermon 'Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God' is considered essential American literature. To the reformed wing of evangelicalism, due in part to the influence of John Piper, Edwards is a high-water mark of Biblical and spiritual insight, a key figure in the Great Awakening, and an all-around hero. To the academy, Edwards is the among greatest academic philosophers America has produced. To progressives, Edwards, whatever his merits, is irredeemably stained by his complicity in slavery and racism. Any honest consideration of Edwards' life must take this sombre truth fully into account. While Edwards recognized the evil of the slave trade and considered slaves as spiritual equals, he failed to confront the moral evil of slavery with fullness of conviction and purpose in his own life and ministry. But enough about the man and onto the book. Well, it's more of a lengthy booklet made up of what I assume to be more than one sermon. If that was one sermon, it was of monstrous length, and height, and girth, and every other possible dimension. But I am not complaining. I recognize that people in Edwards' time were able to sustain focused attention far better than we can today. For example, I paused halfway through writing this brief reflection to read some articles, look at twitter, and put my baby down for a nap. But folks in the 18th century were hardier. They didn't pause, they didn't tweet, and their babies certainly didn't nap like our pathetic babies. Hold on, I need to go put on another YouTube video for my baby. In truth I really appreciated this little book. Edwards slowly and thoroughly takes the reader through the implications of life in the heavenly state. While I don't remember his mentioning the new earth we find promised in Revelation, I took his descriptions to refer to life in that final place as well as the heavenly intermediate place to which we go when saints die in this church age. What was most helpful to me was the exploration of how the sinlessness of everyone there would change so fundamentally the dynamics of the relationships there. I knew it to be true in the abstract, but could not really imagine the experience of relationship that is entirely free from any envy, jealousy, pride, selfishness, and every other sin we inflict on one another. Edwards lingered on these realities long enough for such a thing to seem possible, and for the beauty and glory of it to impress itself on my mind and heart. That is the mark of a gifted thinker and writer: to be able to elucidate and bring to life what was previously known only in a shallow way. Believers often struggle to understand how heavenly rewards can be reconciled to a salvation by free grace. Further, believers often feel intuitively that anything but strict equality in heaven will lead inevitably to feelings of envy and jealousy. On earth, that would obviously be the case. But Edwards argues convincingly that, freed from the inner propensity towards sin, the saints of lesser glory will rejoice in the greater glory of their betters, and the highest saints will be necessarily greater in humility, and therefore in no way tempted to pride because of their greater glory. The cynic will certainly scoff as such a notion, but those who have had tastes of truly heavenly love both within themselves and from others will be able to imagine and long for such a thing. As for the experience of reading this book, it is still Jonathan Edwards and 18th-century English. It will require a bit of work and patience, but will be well worth it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Steele

    “Happy, thrice happy those who shall thus be found faithful to the end and then shall be welcomed to the joy of their Lord! There they shall hunger no more, neither thirst anymore; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat, for the Lamb that is in the midst of the throne shall feed them and lead them to fountains of living waters, and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.” Thus, says Jonathan Edwards in his monumental work, Heaven is a World of Love.” Edwards's important book is “Happy, thrice happy those who shall thus be found faithful to the end and then shall be welcomed to the joy of their Lord! There they shall hunger no more, neither thirst anymore; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat, for the Lamb that is in the midst of the throne shall feed them and lead them to fountains of living waters, and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.” Thus, says Jonathan Edwards in his monumental work, Heaven is a World of Love.” Edwards's important book is a part of Crossway’s Short Classics. “Classic” in this case is an understatement. Edwards leads us to the very edge of the heavenly shore. Heaven is a World of Love was penned by the Puritan divine in the mid-18th-century. And while Edwards’s work is over 250 years old, it speaks directly to readers in our generation. Edwards has gained a reputation for preaching sermons focused on hellfire and brimstone. Indeed, messages like Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God do deal directly with the holy wrath of God. But what comes as a surprise to many is that Edwards took great delight in preaching and writing about our eternal place of rest. Heaven is a World of Love not only describes our heavenly resting place; it draws readers into the very presence of God. In typical fashion, Edwards uses Scripture to alert readers to the reality of heaven. In the end, they will not only learn more about their heavenly home; they will have a greater desire to go there. Highly recommended!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    This sermon is a masterpiece of joy and anticipation. It did my soul so much good to read. Very practical, encouraging, sobering, and peace-giving. Praise God He is preparing such a place for His ransomed people!! What love!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrzej Stelmasiak

    Unfortunately affirms gradation in heaven (i.e. how close you'll be to God in heaven depends on your life here). Otherwise excellent! Unfortunately affirms gradation in heaven (i.e. how close you'll be to God in heaven depends on your life here). Otherwise excellent!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nolan Fox

    Very insightful to the pleasures of heaven

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Pratt

    When you learn how to dig for gold, this sermon/book is one worth re-reading. In wonderful, typical Edwards style, He intensively describes the nature of heaven and experience of heaven. That nature includes the purity of that love which is in heaven (especially in contrast to the lack of love we experience on earth), and the relation to God and the experience of his presence. This love is defined both in positive light (labouring over example and wonderful descriptions of perfect heavenly love), When you learn how to dig for gold, this sermon/book is one worth re-reading. In wonderful, typical Edwards style, He intensively describes the nature of heaven and experience of heaven. That nature includes the purity of that love which is in heaven (especially in contrast to the lack of love we experience on earth), and the relation to God and the experience of his presence. This love is defined both in positive light (labouring over example and wonderful descriptions of perfect heavenly love), as well as from the negative comparison seeing the absence of all hatred and evil as is seen on earth and in hell. “And there, above all, we shall enjoy and dwell with God the Father, whom we have loved with all our hearts on earth; and with Jesus Christ, our beloved Savior, who has always been to us the chief among ten thousands, and altogether lovely; and with the Holy Ghost, our Sanctifier, and Guide, and Comforter; and shall be filled with all the fullness of the Godhead forever!” Nature of heavenly love: “it is a pure flame, directed by holy motives, and aiming at no ends inconsistent with God’s glory and the happiness of the universe. The saints in heaven love God for his own sake, and each other for God’s sake, and for the sake of the relation that they have to him, and the image of God that is upon them. All their love is pure and holy.” The character of the heavenly man includes: “They are changed, and, from being earthly, have become heavenly in their dispositions. The love of the world is mortified, and the love of God implanted. Their hearts are drawn to God and Christ, and for their sakes flow out to the saints in humble and spiritual love.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Coyle

    "I’m writing this review the week before the Nov. 3, 2020 election. I don’t know what will happen next week, but I do know that reading this little book in the aftermath–regardless of the outcome–is a good idea. We do not live in a world of love, and there are few occasions other than elections to better remind ourselves to look forward to the coming heavenly city. Joining Edwards in a walk through this aspect of that city is well worth your time, and a balm to soothe whatever lingering electora "I’m writing this review the week before the Nov. 3, 2020 election. I don’t know what will happen next week, but I do know that reading this little book in the aftermath–regardless of the outcome–is a good idea. We do not live in a world of love, and there are few occasions other than elections to better remind ourselves to look forward to the coming heavenly city. Joining Edwards in a walk through this aspect of that city is well worth your time, and a balm to soothe whatever lingering electoral pains we’ve got." Read the rest here: https://www.patheos.com/blogs/schaeff...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark A Powell

    This small book (an adaptation of Edward’s final sermon in a 16-part series on 1 Corinthians 13) examines heaven and the love of God that defines it. In solid fashion, Edwards discusses the purity of heavenly love, describing how we will relate to God and to one another in the absence of hate and evil. Drawing from Scripture, Edwards paints a beautiful picture of heaven as the eternal dwelling place of God and those He loves.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Trice

    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo... http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Great sermon!!! Highly recommend!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Glen

    Reading Jonathan Edwards is a rewarding challenge that an intentional thinker should include in their reading regiment. This particular work is notably short yet consistent with Edwards' distinctive viewpoints on God's character, sin's pervasiveness and the impending day of reckoning that awaits us all in the end times. While I will admit that the style is dense, requiring added effort, what we miss by omitting such texts from our theological reflections is a much needed corrective to many modern Reading Jonathan Edwards is a rewarding challenge that an intentional thinker should include in their reading regiment. This particular work is notably short yet consistent with Edwards' distinctive viewpoints on God's character, sin's pervasiveness and the impending day of reckoning that awaits us all in the end times. While I will admit that the style is dense, requiring added effort, what we miss by omitting such texts from our theological reflections is a much needed corrective to many modern sensibilities about sin's consequences. Specifically, this work addresses the chasm between an eternity of perfect love (heaven) or unceasing hatred (hell). There is no curbing the edges off this worldview. Here is a book that lacks timidity on the topic of holiness. A writing that refuses to modify the view of God's holiness into something less that the biblical presentation of a Divine Father who abhors all forms of sin. It is not theology à la mode, but it is thoroughly rooted in the Scriptures. All theology is an imperfect reflection of God's revelation, yet, that doesn't diminish the fact that here is a powerful argument for the believer's call to utter surrender before a holy God. For this reason, we need to listen to this voice that spoke for God in past generations and glean whatever abiding truths the Spirit may be saying to us today as we continue the march of God's people through history.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eleazar Maduka

    "There shall be no pollution, or deformity, or unamiable defect of any kind seen in any person or thing, but everyone shall be perfectly pure and perfectly lovely in heaven." Found it difficult to read at certain points. But that doesn't take away the good that this sermon did to my soul. Biblical, practical, logical--this is quintessential Edwards. "There shall be no pollution, or deformity, or unamiable defect of any kind seen in any person or thing, but everyone shall be perfectly pure and perfectly lovely in heaven." Found it difficult to read at certain points. But that doesn't take away the good that this sermon did to my soul. Biblical, practical, logical--this is quintessential Edwards.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Prydden

    Edwards' portrayal of heaven as a world of charity and love left me not only with an increased desire to experience heaven in its fullness in the future, but also with an increased desire to experience more of heaven through the love and charity we give to each other in the present. This is definitely one of my favourite of Edwards' works so far. Edwards' portrayal of heaven as a world of charity and love left me not only with an increased desire to experience heaven in its fullness in the future, but also with an increased desire to experience more of heaven through the love and charity we give to each other in the present. This is definitely one of my favourite of Edwards' works so far.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Heavenly portrait This is a beautiful portrait by one of America's greatest intellects of God's destination for His beloved in Christ. This writing is not long and laborious, and yet filled with much on which to meditate. Heavenly portrait This is a beautiful portrait by one of America's greatest intellects of God's destination for His beloved in Christ. This writing is not long and laborious, and yet filled with much on which to meditate.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    Excellent!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hank Pharis

    This might be the best work on heaven in 2,000 years of church history. A beautiful and inspiring vision.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert Luff

    Wow! No better book on this subject. It makes me long to be in Heaven with the Lord Jesus and my loved ones!

  19. 4 out of 5

    J.T.

    4/5 Remarkable work on heaven. It gets a 4 only because it is not the most accessible read and takes more effort than modern works. But hey, that's Edwards and not to be discouraged! 4/5 Remarkable work on heaven. It gets a 4 only because it is not the most accessible read and takes more effort than modern works. But hey, that's Edwards and not to be discouraged!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joefus Donaldson

    This is a great little book on what we look for in heaven. Characterizing it as a world of love, Edwards focuses our attention on it and applies it to our hearts. He also provides exhortation on hell being the opposite. This is also a beautiful little book and I look forward to more of these short classics.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Justin Dillehay

    A classic. Crossway has done the church a great service in reprinting these short sermons in an attractive and readable print version.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wade

    This is a very solid and biblical view of heaven (as well as a containing a short theological discussion on hell).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Werner Peters

    Wow!

  24. 4 out of 5

    benebean

    can be found here: http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo... can be found here: http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aliyah

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Shaw

  27. 5 out of 5

    Austin Kim

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

  29. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kolby

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