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Road Allowance Era

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In the Road Allowance Era, Echo’s story picks up again when she travels back in time to 1885. The bison are gone. The Manitoba Act’s promise of land for the Métis has gone unfulfilled, and many Métis flee to the Northwest. As part of the fallout from the Northwest Resistance, their advocate and champion Louis Riel is executed. As new legislation corrodes Métis land rights, In the Road Allowance Era, Echo’s story picks up again when she travels back in time to 1885. The bison are gone. The Manitoba Act’s promise of land for the Métis has gone unfulfilled, and many Métis flee to the Northwest. As part of the fallout from the Northwest Resistance, their advocate and champion Louis Riel is executed. As new legislation corrodes Métis land rights, and unscrupulous land speculators and swindlers take advantage, many Métis begin to settle on road allowances and railway land, often on the fringes of urban centres. For Echo, the plight of her family is apparent. Burnt out of their home in Ste. Madeleine when their land is cleared for pasture, they make their way to Rooster Town, squatting on the southwest edges of Winnipeg. In this final instalment of Echo’s story, she is reminded of the strength and resilience of her people, forged through the loss and pain of the past, as she faces a triumphant future.


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In the Road Allowance Era, Echo’s story picks up again when she travels back in time to 1885. The bison are gone. The Manitoba Act’s promise of land for the Métis has gone unfulfilled, and many Métis flee to the Northwest. As part of the fallout from the Northwest Resistance, their advocate and champion Louis Riel is executed. As new legislation corrodes Métis land rights, In the Road Allowance Era, Echo’s story picks up again when she travels back in time to 1885. The bison are gone. The Manitoba Act’s promise of land for the Métis has gone unfulfilled, and many Métis flee to the Northwest. As part of the fallout from the Northwest Resistance, their advocate and champion Louis Riel is executed. As new legislation corrodes Métis land rights, and unscrupulous land speculators and swindlers take advantage, many Métis begin to settle on road allowances and railway land, often on the fringes of urban centres. For Echo, the plight of her family is apparent. Burnt out of their home in Ste. Madeleine when their land is cleared for pasture, they make their way to Rooster Town, squatting on the southwest edges of Winnipeg. In this final instalment of Echo’s story, she is reminded of the strength and resilience of her people, forged through the loss and pain of the past, as she faces a triumphant future.

59 review for Road Allowance Era

  1. 4 out of 5

    nitya

    I am so glad books like this exist; not only to protect indigenous/First Nation history but also to show that colonization never ended. And I loved seeing Echo's character growth and her supportive and beautiful family. The artwork was lovely and done with a lot of sensitivity. Even though this was a short series, I hope this isn't the last we will hear from the author and artists! Content warning: violence, anti-indigenous racism, death, police brutality, colonization, genocide I am so glad books like this exist; not only to protect indigenous/First Nation history but also to show that colonization never ended. And I loved seeing Echo's character growth and her supportive and beautiful family. The artwork was lovely and done with a lot of sensitivity. Even though this was a short series, I hope this isn't the last we will hear from the author and artists! Content warning: violence, anti-indigenous racism, death, police brutality, colonization, genocide

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    The Metis people were the decedents of people of the Cree nation and French settlers. Although currently they are considered to be Indigenous people, the same way the Inuit and First Nations people are, during the 19th and most of 20th century they were not considered anything at all. Because they weren't "pure" natives, the government of Canada didn't think they needed to do anything with them, neither give them reserves, or help them in any way. This is background for understanding this series The Metis people were the decedents of people of the Cree nation and French settlers. Although currently they are considered to be Indigenous people, the same way the Inuit and First Nations people are, during the 19th and most of 20th century they were not considered anything at all. Because they weren't "pure" natives, the government of Canada didn't think they needed to do anything with them, neither give them reserves, or help them in any way. This is background for understanding this series of books, which concludes with this one. Echo is Metis, and doesn't know anything about the Metis history. She begins a class on the same, and suddenly finds herself traveling back in time to her ancestors experiencing things such as the Pemmican wars (the first book), Red River Resistance (the second book), Northwest Resistance and the advent of Louis Riel who fights for his people (the third book), to this fourth and final book, where, spoiler alert, Louis Riel is hanged, along with the other Metis who fought back, and Echo finds that her people are living in the margins. The name of this volume refers to the only place that the Metis could find to live, land that the Crown (meaning the government), wasn't currently using, Road Allowance Land. Echo travels back to this time, and learns more about how her people resisted and survived, as best they could. All this is to say this is a great way to talk about the history of the Metis, and their fights with the Canadian government. Easy to read, and very well explained story. Echo begins with being bewildered about all that is happening, but by this, the fourth book, she realizes that the people that she has been visiting are her direct ancestors, and she understands a bit more of her history. Well written, well researched. It is good to have a female teenage character helping us learn about history.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    My favorite of the series, this installment answers the question (kind of) of how/why Echo is able to visit moments in history. The stories highlight just how absolutely appallingly the indigenous people of Canada (and everywhere) have been treated, even into present day. I’m sad to see a Echo go, though it definitely felt like a good end of the story. #90graphicdays

  4. 5 out of 5

    Child960801

    Echo continues her journey of self discovery. She learns more about her time travel powers and tries to come to terms with what she has learned about her family and her people.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    A Girl Called Echo has been a wonderful series to read, and Road Allowance Era is no exception. The art is on point, the history is informative, and Echo is a relatable character whose time-travelling journeys into the history of her recent ancestors and the Metis people in general is devastating, fascinating, and engaging. As far as I'm aware, this is intended to conclude the series, and it was a great end to a great journey. Recommended! A Girl Called Echo has been a wonderful series to read, and Road Allowance Era is no exception. The art is on point, the history is informative, and Echo is a relatable character whose time-travelling journeys into the history of her recent ancestors and the Metis people in general is devastating, fascinating, and engaging. As far as I'm aware, this is intended to conclude the series, and it was a great end to a great journey. Recommended!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Brown

    Final instalment of Girl Called Echo. Very satisfying yet thought provoking ending to the series. - I enjoy Vermette’s retelling of Indigenous history. Sadly, I didn’t know about road allowance. It got me on a research bender after to learn more about it. That’s one of he strengths of this series: calling you to dive deeper. - Echo is a very sympathetic character. Approachable for YA readers. And her journey through the series is easily traceable. - I liked the ending as it calls the reader to b Final instalment of Girl Called Echo. Very satisfying yet thought provoking ending to the series. - I enjoy Vermette’s retelling of Indigenous history. Sadly, I didn’t know about road allowance. It got me on a research bender after to learn more about it. That’s one of he strengths of this series: calling you to dive deeper. - Echo is a very sympathetic character. Approachable for YA readers. And her journey through the series is easily traceable. - I liked the ending as it calls the reader to be part of the ending of the story. Leads to questions about future roles of reconciliation. - illustrations are always beautiful. - Even though I like the time travel narratives (and that’s the whole point of the series), I wish I could have more present day scenes. Perhaps it’s me, but I wanted to know about Echo’s family. - Love the cultural representation throughout. I did notice this is more intentional than past instalments Solid way to end the series. Will be recommending this graphic novel to my students.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Libra

    When big government Canada promises land to the Metis people then reneg on the deal, it shows how powerful white privilege is. With a pen stroke here and a pen stroke there, they can make law and changes to law that weakens the Metis strength. It was there land. It should be as simple as that. When big government wants something, they can move mountains to make it happen regardless of who it displaces. It's sad. It continues to happen. The fight hasn't gotten easier. When big government Canada promises land to the Metis people then reneg on the deal, it shows how powerful white privilege is. With a pen stroke here and a pen stroke there, they can make law and changes to law that weakens the Metis strength. It was there land. It should be as simple as that. When big government wants something, they can move mountains to make it happen regardless of who it displaces. It's sad. It continues to happen. The fight hasn't gotten easier.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emilie

    3.5 stars for the series. it’s hard to give it more as readers are given the tiniest of introduction into each conflict involving the métis in what is now canada, with a textual timeline attached to the end of each volume. the stories are so fascinating and I would gladly have read four 200+ page volumes on each, but 50 page skims of the time periods just didn’t give me a full picture. the pros: gorgeous illustrations, really good layout, and storylines that left me wanting to learn more.

  9. 5 out of 5

    H

    Echo learned at the end of the last volume that the people she had been slipping thru time to see are her ancestors. Here she is learning how to travel thru time at will. Nice conclusion to the series and how Echo is herself an echo of all those who came before her.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mary Bronson

    I thought this was a great I think conclusion to the A Girl Called Echo series. I liked how everything all came together and we continue to learn what happens during 1855. Echo is growing as a character and how she is trying to learn what happened.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey

    Another important but infuriating part of history, and I loved how it explained how even though the trauma and scars are a part of Echo’s history and present, the strength and resiliency of her ancestors are too.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Picking up right after the third volume in 1885, Echo discovers that the Métis community she has been visiting, one that is closer to Echo than she realizes, is in the process of fighting for their land. Good conclusion to this quick, underrepresented story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marisa Gettas

    And excellent end to this series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Really loved this ending to Echo's story! I'm sad the series is over but hope Vermette will keep writing stories - because I'll keep reading them! Really loved this ending to Echo's story! I'm sad the series is over but hope Vermette will keep writing stories - because I'll keep reading them!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    “The way I see it, indigenous nations survived genocide. That pretty much makes us superheroes don’t you think.” Road Allowance Era is the fourth and final instalment in the A Girl Called Echo graphic novel series by Kathrena Vermette and illustrated by Scott Henderson and coloured by Donovan Yaciuk. Road Allowance Era sees Echo travelling back in time to see her Métis relatives in Manitoba. We see the execution of Louis Riel as well as members of the Cree community. Métis people are not offered t “The way I see it, indigenous nations survived genocide. That pretty much makes us superheroes don’t you think.” Road Allowance Era is the fourth and final instalment in the A Girl Called Echo graphic novel series by Kathrena Vermette and illustrated by Scott Henderson and coloured by Donovan Yaciuk. Road Allowance Era sees Echo travelling back in time to see her Métis relatives in Manitoba. We see the execution of Louis Riel as well as members of the Cree community. Métis people are not offered treaties and have no space they can call home. The villages they do live in are either burned down or they are evicted. Many live on federal road allowance areas near cities temporarily. Vermette has in a short book highlighted the racism by the Canadian government to indigenous peoples. I have not yet read the three previous volumes of this series but will be seeking them out now. I would like to see this book series in all school libraries. The illustrations are meticulous, modern and show emotion. The colours are thought provoking on the historical scenes. Thank you to @zgstories for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest opinions. Road Allowance Era is available now.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    Echo continues to take us on a journey into the past to learn about the continued injustices faced by the indigenous peoples in Canada after Riel.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Miller

    A fantastic conclusion to the riveting series

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tina Evans

    A girl called Echo v 4 is a graphic novel about a Metis girl that lives a isolated life with a mother that is not able to be around much. She does not know much about her heritage. But has become very engaged in the lessons that her teacher has been teaching about the Metis people and the struggles an injustices that they encountered. As a result she is transformed into another era, at a time when she wants to be anywhere but home. It is a short read, but packed full of history told through deta A girl called Echo v 4 is a graphic novel about a Metis girl that lives a isolated life with a mother that is not able to be around much. She does not know much about her heritage. But has become very engaged in the lessons that her teacher has been teaching about the Metis people and the struggles an injustices that they encountered. As a result she is transformed into another era, at a time when she wants to be anywhere but home. It is a short read, but packed full of history told through detailed and engaging illustrations in the format of a graphic novel.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paige

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adelina Esquibel

  23. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dana

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Mook-Sang

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alissa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cara

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tash

  30. 4 out of 5

    Justyss

  31. 4 out of 5

    Clara

  32. 4 out of 5

    Hope

  33. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  34. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

  35. 5 out of 5

    Arlene

  36. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  37. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  38. 5 out of 5

    Susan Hampe

  39. 5 out of 5

    Martin Gil

  40. 5 out of 5

    Anika

  41. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  42. 5 out of 5

    rara

  43. 4 out of 5

    Caralen

  44. 4 out of 5

    Michaelyn Howard Mullan

  45. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

  46. 5 out of 5

    Gillian Dawson

  47. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  48. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Bradshaw

  49. 4 out of 5

    Tim Brown

  50. 5 out of 5

    Fiona Watson

  51. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  52. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  53. 4 out of 5

    SZ

  54. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  55. 4 out of 5

    Ginny

  56. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Adams

  57. 5 out of 5

    Merossy

  58. 5 out of 5

    E

  59. 5 out of 5

    Jo

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