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Andrés Caicedo se había propuesto morir joven y dejar obra; así lo hizo. ¡Que viva la música! fue la única novela que concluyó y es, quizás, su mejor obra literaria, sorprendente por su consistencia narrativa y ritmo desbordante. Cuenta la historia de María del Carmen Huerta, una joven proveniente de una familia acomodada de Cali que conoce los barrios populares y reniega d Andrés Caicedo se había propuesto morir joven y dejar obra; así lo hizo. ¡Que viva la música! fue la única novela que concluyó y es, quizás, su mejor obra literaria, sorprendente por su consistencia narrativa y ritmo desbordante. Cuenta la historia de María del Carmen Huerta, una joven proveniente de una familia acomodada de Cali que conoce los barrios populares y reniega de los valores sociales establecidos para entregarse a los excesos y al delirio. Ella, como Caicedo, sigue despertando fascinación y asombro entre los lectores de todas las edades como símbolo de la trasgresión y el frenesí.


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Andrés Caicedo se había propuesto morir joven y dejar obra; así lo hizo. ¡Que viva la música! fue la única novela que concluyó y es, quizás, su mejor obra literaria, sorprendente por su consistencia narrativa y ritmo desbordante. Cuenta la historia de María del Carmen Huerta, una joven proveniente de una familia acomodada de Cali que conoce los barrios populares y reniega d Andrés Caicedo se había propuesto morir joven y dejar obra; así lo hizo. ¡Que viva la música! fue la única novela que concluyó y es, quizás, su mejor obra literaria, sorprendente por su consistencia narrativa y ritmo desbordante. Cuenta la historia de María del Carmen Huerta, una joven proveniente de una familia acomodada de Cali que conoce los barrios populares y reniega de los valores sociales establecidos para entregarse a los excesos y al delirio. Ella, como Caicedo, sigue despertando fascinación y asombro entre los lectores de todas las edades como símbolo de la trasgresión y el frenesí.

30 review for ¡Que viva la música!

  1. 4 out of 5

    Inderjit Sanghera

    The reader is swamped by a series of hallucinatory and increasingly violent and vituperative images as the narrator of 'Liveforever', Maria, descends into the dark depths of drug addiction. The novel vibrates with the vibrancy of the salsa dances which Maria attends; rambunctious and rowdy, the prose reverberates with the sensuality and energy, the lack of inhibitions  and febrile freedom of dancing, as the reader is pulled into the life of Maria at break-neck speed, from the waifs and losers sh The reader is swamped by a series of hallucinatory and increasingly violent and vituperative images as the narrator of 'Liveforever', Maria, descends into the dark depths of drug addiction. The novel vibrates with the vibrancy of the salsa dances which Maria attends; rambunctious and rowdy, the prose reverberates with the sensuality and energy, the lack of inhibitions  and febrile freedom of dancing, as the reader is pulled into the life of Maria at break-neck speed, from the waifs and losers she meets, such as Ricardito, to the increasingly unsavoury characters she associates with, culminating in the violent and vile Barbaro.  From the euphoric highs of drug use, to the drudgery of the come down, the relentless energy of dancing and how it makes Maria feel alive, to the emptiness which lies beneath the veneer of exhilaration, the shallowness of emotions engendered by drugs, masking the inner emptiness of Maria's life, 'Liveforever' is a novel of tremendous energy as Maria, like a crack-addled Holden Caulfield, seekss to question and upend the norms and values of society. Maria's deterioration is told in increasingly dream-like and surreal prose and images;  "The sky was murky, milk-coloured, harbouring both sun and moon at opposite extremes. Three feet above the ground, rising or falling-I do not know which-was a blanket of reddish mist and as I walked I felt my skin resist this strange, prickly air." Caicedo is able to capture the paranoia of addiction, the steady descent into madness experienced by Maria as she burrows into the deepest recesses of her psyche. 

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Ay ay ay, my head is a whirlwind of exhaustion, headaches, and thoughts after finishing this bad-boy. At less than 200 pages, this cult novel really does pack a surprisingly strong punch. It's like the equivalent of a heavy night out. The novel doesn't have much of a plot, instead following María del Carmen Huerta, a 17 year old girl who misses class one day, and suddenly decides that regular life isn't for her. Instead, she decides her calling in life is to attend rhumbas, get high, and dance ti Ay ay ay, my head is a whirlwind of exhaustion, headaches, and thoughts after finishing this bad-boy. At less than 200 pages, this cult novel really does pack a surprisingly strong punch. It's like the equivalent of a heavy night out. The novel doesn't have much of a plot, instead following María del Carmen Huerta, a 17 year old girl who misses class one day, and suddenly decides that regular life isn't for her. Instead, she decides her calling in life is to attend rhumbas, get high, and dance til she drops. Essentially. María's character is a tour-de-force, her narrative voice frenetic and vibrant. And she's a total bitch, let's be real here. The way she treats the people in her life is frankly shocking, but it's also kind of exciting in a way to turn the tables and have a female character in this position of sexual power. However, her blasé attitude to other people's feelings and emotions does give her moments of pure coldness, despite her simmering personality. And for the love of god, could she have stopped going on about how hot she was and her blonde hair for even a minute? I got it after the first five times. The writing is non-stop and beautiful, and feels undulating and sensuous, very much like the music that is so eternally present throughout the book. The inclusion of a song list for the book is also great, as I can look up the music that I found so difficult to hear in my head. I'm not familiar with salsa music, so this provides a great introduction. Here's a sample: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-a2U... I've heard this book is being made into a movie, so I'm now eagerly awaiting its release.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ismael Mejia

    Andres Caicedo has been presented as the colombian 'poet maudit', This novel has a lot of interesting elements that come from the crazy and chaotic life of him and its circle in Cali in the 70s. However the teenage excess of his literature makes this book impossible to read again. I think people love this book more because of the charm of the chaotic life of Andres than because of its literary value. Andres Caicedo has been presented as the colombian 'poet maudit', This novel has a lot of interesting elements that come from the crazy and chaotic life of him and its circle in Cali in the 70s. However the teenage excess of his literature makes this book impossible to read again. I think people love this book more because of the charm of the chaotic life of Andres than because of its literary value.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    I can still read children's books, and enjoy them, because the good ones are just stories, like all but the most dessicated litfic husks enjoy (albeit stories with less swearing than some). But to come fresh to an adolescent classic...apparently in Colombia this is something like The Catcher in the Rye, if Salinger had topped himself the day he got the first copy, and if it hadn't suffered death by set text. A big deal. And I wish the youth of Colombia every happiness in it, but even without cou I can still read children's books, and enjoy them, because the good ones are just stories, like all but the most dessicated litfic husks enjoy (albeit stories with less swearing than some). But to come fresh to an adolescent classic...apparently in Colombia this is something like The Catcher in the Rye, if Salinger had topped himself the day he got the first copy, and if it hadn't suffered death by set text. A big deal. And I wish the youth of Colombia every happiness in it, but even without counting the distancing effect of translation on the sort of book which surely relies on catching the young ear just right, I am simply too old for this shit.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Santiago Tinjacá

    Overwhelmingly fresh and chaotic, Maria del Carmen's story is a joyful but also painful ride through the despair nights of party, drugs, sex and salsa (most of it salsa) in 70's Cali. Caicedo accomplishes a very unique narrative style that is compelling to every young in the world, and the characters and idiosyncratic culture displayed on the book are wonderful, is a very well crafted piece of writing that as the surname of the protagonist won't ever perish Overwhelmingly fresh and chaotic, Maria del Carmen's story is a joyful but also painful ride through the despair nights of party, drugs, sex and salsa (most of it salsa) in 70's Cali. Caicedo accomplishes a very unique narrative style that is compelling to every young in the world, and the characters and idiosyncratic culture displayed on the book are wonderful, is a very well crafted piece of writing that as the surname of the protagonist won't ever perish

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jonti

    An incredibly intoxicating tale about Maria del Carmen Huerta and her descend into a ‘kingdom of recklessness’ The music element of this book was great. I loved that they included a discography at the end of the book. I spent the second half of reading this while playing Ricardo Ray and Bobby Cruz albums in the background. The intoxicating Latin records really emphasised the unrelenting energy of the story. There were some confusing elements to the story. I don’t get how she claims to being uncult An incredibly intoxicating tale about Maria del Carmen Huerta and her descend into a ‘kingdom of recklessness’ The music element of this book was great. I loved that they included a discography at the end of the book. I spent the second half of reading this while playing Ricardo Ray and Bobby Cruz albums in the background. The intoxicating Latin records really emphasised the unrelenting energy of the story. There were some confusing elements to the story. I don’t get how she claims to being uncultured in music one day and then she’s pouring out her grief over the inner politics of the Rolling Stones and Brian Jonestown the next. In addition, Maria is never truly likeable. So it’s hard to connect with her story sometimes However, Caicedo’s evocative writing about 1970’s Columbia and the music will transport you into a wild world that you will devour in an instant

  7. 4 out of 5

    Professor Weasel

    I can't believe I didn't hear about this author until I went to Bogotá last year (or maybe I had heard of him earlier, and had just forgotten). The book is a "Catcher in the Rye"/Cat Marnell-esque novel about a young woman who deliberately abandons her middle class life to descend into debauchery and evil. The part where she takes mushrooms and attacks two gringo tourists is ... a memorable sequence (to put it delicately). I can definitely see why my conservative high school would have not given I can't believe I didn't hear about this author until I went to Bogotá last year (or maybe I had heard of him earlier, and had just forgotten). The book is a "Catcher in the Rye"/Cat Marnell-esque novel about a young woman who deliberately abandons her middle class life to descend into debauchery and evil. The part where she takes mushrooms and attacks two gringo tourists is ... a memorable sequence (to put it delicately). I can definitely see why my conservative high school would have not given this to us to read, which is a real shame. A deeply interesting and intriguing author with a "mythologized" backstory (he killed himself at 25) - very into movies and not political at all, which apparently made him get criticised by his Marxist friends for his useless, pointless, non-political art. Mainly it was fascinating for me to read something set in my hometown city during the 1970's, a decade before I was born. This book makes me think about how some people see literature as something that needs to be moral and political, and yet we consistently have writers/artists who insist that it's just about transmitting a voice, an expression, a particular way of being in the world, and inserting morality or politics is contrary to the purpose of art coz that makes it didactic.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Antonia

    You'll have to wait until the second part of the book to actually have something to look foward to. That would explain why it took me over a month to finish such a short novel, otherwise I would have read it in two weeks (I'm a very comitted reader...) You'll have to wait until the second part of the book to actually have something to look foward to. That would explain why it took me over a month to finish such a short novel, otherwise I would have read it in two weeks (I'm a very comitted reader...)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    QUE FRITERA

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    4.5 stars. Oh my God, this was maybe one of the most depraved things I've ever read (and I mean that both as a compliment, and in a clutching-my-pearls way). There are so many insanely memorable set pieces in this book. Maria Carmen getting ready to go out, for a night on the town, in the very first pages. The party where she hooks up with a rock and roller and takes acid for the first time, where she goes upstairs and bounces on a bed, where the bodies of the host's dead family are. When she han 4.5 stars. Oh my God, this was maybe one of the most depraved things I've ever read (and I mean that both as a compliment, and in a clutching-my-pearls way). There are so many insanely memorable set pieces in this book. Maria Carmen getting ready to go out, for a night on the town, in the very first pages. The party where she hooks up with a rock and roller and takes acid for the first time, where she goes upstairs and bounces on a bed, where the bodies of the host's dead family are. When she hangs out with the 13-year-old who is a professional at injecting cocaine. When she trips on mushrooms and her lovers bashes in the head of a gringo, then kills himself (I'm pretty sure he killed himself? This scene was hard to follow!). When she ends up having sex (penetrative, oral, both? It's unclear, does it matter?) with a team of volleyball players; they go on an epic rager and they end up begging her for a break—"'Pelada, mañana entramos a la Universidad. Hora de dormir. Nadie aguanta más'". Her epic rely? "'Yo si aguanto...'" I thought one of the most subversive parts of the book was when we temporarily start following one of her lovers, Ruben, when he goes to the Richie Ray concert at the 1968 Feria de Cali. He is drugged out (of course) and ends up crawling "like a pig" between the legs of the concertgrowers, and when he throws up, he notices the colors of his vomit are "the same as the Colombian flag." Man... there is a lot to unpack there. What an image. So many characters die horrible deaths in this book. It reminded me a bit of all the Generation Z songs about climate change—how are you supposed to deal with being young in a world that feels like it's ending? Mariangela, Maria Carmen's early girl friend and who is presented as the original "Kali partygirl," throws herself off a building. Ruben, it is implied, kills himself by banging his head against the wall. In the manifesto that closes out the book, the writing feels especially raw, personal, and powerful, given how we know how Andres Caicedo's life turned out. This was so memorable, hilarious, shocking, original and—despite all the nihilism—quite life-affirming. Que viva la musica, do not go gentle into that good night, long live life!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vic

    When you miss buying a masterpiece, you get a friend to give it to you. I spent almost fifteen years delaying my date with María del Carmen Huerta: soulful woman, complex mindset, amazing hips and her words could destroy the walls of nowhere. The story is insane, the characters are dark, the playlist is remarkable (salsa and rock ‘n roll); sometimes you can’t see clearly if you are reading a horror story, or a love square (no triangles allowed) story, or if it’s Caicedo’s will before committing When you miss buying a masterpiece, you get a friend to give it to you. I spent almost fifteen years delaying my date with María del Carmen Huerta: soulful woman, complex mindset, amazing hips and her words could destroy the walls of nowhere. The story is insane, the characters are dark, the playlist is remarkable (salsa and rock ‘n roll); sometimes you can’t see clearly if you are reading a horror story, or a love square (no triangles allowed) story, or if it’s Caicedo’s will before committing suicide. . On the other hand, MCH days seem less important when she’s not enraptured, and no one can keep up at her pace. Whether love or admiration, chance or likelihood, fear or rage, doesn’t matter what you see if you don’t feel the ache in every pore, if your eyes don’t burn with sunlight, if your mouth ain’t dried after sex. You can’t say you’re alive if you haven’t cheated death. . No god, no devil. MCH knows she’s above. Music is her lightness. Music is her cross, a bearable one, with more needles than blood. . Now go and read ¡Que viva la música! by Andrés Caicedo.

  12. 4 out of 5

    James

    This is another difficult book to review as I'm not sure whether the protagonist was intended to be utterly dislikable, or whether it was lost in translation. The story is of a respectable girl who decides that she can live the rest of her life partying as nothing motivates her as much as the right music. Seemingly correctly, she sees herself as a beautiful woman who has men wrapped around her little finger, and discards friends male or female whenever she's bored of them. Nobody gets to spoil h This is another difficult book to review as I'm not sure whether the protagonist was intended to be utterly dislikable, or whether it was lost in translation. The story is of a respectable girl who decides that she can live the rest of her life partying as nothing motivates her as much as the right music. Seemingly correctly, she sees herself as a beautiful woman who has men wrapped around her little finger, and discards friends male or female whenever she's bored of them. Nobody gets to spoil her mood when dancing! Later on there are at least hints that she has become a degenerate, but she still gets money from her parents and can continue to lead her hedonistic life without serious consequence - it's not as though she's lost friends as she didn't seem to have any in the first place. The style of the book seems to glamorise music and drugs, but it's not clear why - the protagonist is just a female version of a waster, who looks down on her other waster (generally male) acquaintances. About thebest I could say is that Caicedo's writing about drug-taking was at least original.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julian Gallo

    I've been wanting to read this novel for some time. Outstanding. The prose is alive and the tone of this novel is far ahead of its time. It clearly signaled a break from the 'Latin American Boom' of the 1960s towards new horizons (and I wonder if writers like Roberto Bolano were influenced by this novel). A story about a teenage girl obsessed with music (salsa), partying, and breaking with convention, the novel is a window into the Colombian counter-culture of the 1970s. I was surprised by the v I've been wanting to read this novel for some time. Outstanding. The prose is alive and the tone of this novel is far ahead of its time. It clearly signaled a break from the 'Latin American Boom' of the 1960s towards new horizons (and I wonder if writers like Roberto Bolano were influenced by this novel). A story about a teenage girl obsessed with music (salsa), partying, and breaking with convention, the novel is a window into the Colombian counter-culture of the 1970s. I was surprised by the very dark turn the novel takes just after the middle of the novel but I suppose that was the whole point. A highly recommended read. Makes me wonder what Andres Caicedo would have achieved had he lived. (He tragically committed suicide at the age of 25, shortly after this novel was published). Now I eagerly await his short stories to be published in English translation...otherwise I'm going to have to brush up on my Spanish.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joey Carney

    On the translation: Well researched, filled with notes to the songs and music constantly referenced in the book, and easy to understand even if you don't know a lot about Colombia. Sometimes a little dry, and not always accurate, but did do a good job on a difficult book. On the story: Not everyone will get this book, but it's good. It's about music and life and love and being young, written at a time when Salsa was still new in Colombia, from the Rolling Stones to Richie Ray. Caicedo lived by wh On the translation: Well researched, filled with notes to the songs and music constantly referenced in the book, and easy to understand even if you don't know a lot about Colombia. Sometimes a little dry, and not always accurate, but did do a good job on a difficult book. On the story: Not everyone will get this book, but it's good. It's about music and life and love and being young, written at a time when Salsa was still new in Colombia, from the Rolling Stones to Richie Ray. Caicedo lived by what he wrote. It's not easy to follow but the book is deep.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy Mora

    Not what I was expecting. Boring.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Mejia

    Definitely, this one became one of my favorite books ever read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Villa

    A very difficult book! Maybe to understand it better you must speak caleño...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ana Menendez

    If you speak Spanish and love Salsa then this is MUST

  19. 5 out of 5

    Air Knight

    ¡Que viva la música! is a novel that has quite a reputation, thanks to the elements it captures, the way the author does so and to the parallels that can be drawn with the author itself. Coming from his own environment, the environment he wished to had experienced and possibly his own feelings at the time (Caicedo would commit suicide the same day this novel was published for the first time) The setting itself is nothing special (or it doesn't seem to be anything special nowadays), a girl from a ¡Que viva la música! is a novel that has quite a reputation, thanks to the elements it captures, the way the author does so and to the parallels that can be drawn with the author itself. Coming from his own environment, the environment he wished to had experienced and possibly his own feelings at the time (Caicedo would commit suicide the same day this novel was published for the first time) The setting itself is nothing special (or it doesn't seem to be anything special nowadays), a girl from a wealthy family in Cali finds in music, parties, drugs and sex a life with the intensity she enjoys and relishes, a carefree hedonist life where she is always the center of the "rumba", addicted to music and always ready to a new party or event, youth lived to its fullest always guided by the pleasure of music and dance. The frenetic style is fully compatible with the protagonist's character (haughty, reckless and of seemingly unlimited energy), and the author smartly uses her trip to describe some zones in Cali, the lifestyle of the groups she mixes up with and, with a lot of references, mainly to the Rolling Stones and Richie Ray & Bobby Cruz, how is the music experienced in Cali in the decade of 60s and 70s, and you can tell this works well because it's fun to read for both profiles, for the people familiar with the Stones and with Salsa music or with those less fortunate who haven't been introduced yet to those 2 types of music. Most editions even have a tracklist with all the songs referenced in the novel. ¡Que viva la música! is an interesting read thanks to all of this, but it's hardly memorable or of lasting impact as expected from a simple hedonist adventure. Skilled as he is, Caicedo struggles on both halves on the book because of the obvious restrictions: People getting drugged up for the sake of getting drugged up is never going to be something worth reading about, and the best parts in the second half of the book have the protagonist as a mere witness betraying the facade the style tries to build from the start. This goes to the extent of Caicedo being forced to do some frankly tragic transliterations of 2 songs ("Lo Atara La Arache" and "Lluvia con Nieve") Bottomline is a fun book with a lot of correct decisions, enough to get a minor cult following, but that's about it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sven Munch-Petersen

    When I first came across this author, was pure accident, as he just happened to be on a list of writers on Wikipedia. When I first read the summery i was deeply intrigued, learning later that the writer had committed suicide at the age of 25 I was only more interested in getting my hands on some of his works. Sadly only this one book has been translated to English and so my chances of reading more of his hands is unfortunately limited. The book itself is a tour De force of South American music a When I first came across this author, was pure accident, as he just happened to be on a list of writers on Wikipedia. When I first read the summery i was deeply intrigued, learning later that the writer had committed suicide at the age of 25 I was only more interested in getting my hands on some of his works. Sadly only this one book has been translated to English and so my chances of reading more of his hands is unfortunately limited. The book itself is a tour De force of South American music and dances, along with the culture and party-life of the Columbia youth doing the 70's. You feel both fascinated and horrified at the amount of drugs mentioned, which are also being digested around and by the main character María del Carmen Huerta, who in the end become the obvious mouthpiece of Andrés Caicedo and his philosophical view of life, society and the time he lived in - if he had read Friedrich Nietzsche or not, then this novel stands as a monumental tribute to music and dance and indeed it could be summarized by Nietzsche himself who has written "life without music would be a mistake" and "those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane" - for that is indeed what one feels when reading this book. So if you by any chance has an interest in Colombia in the 70's, or just would like to enter a world unknown to many, which will fascinate you as well make you want to dive deep with the music of this culture, or that you simply just want to read a novel beyond that of the ordinary, then by all means pick up this book and read it - I promise you that you will not be disappointing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    One of the great drop-out coming of age novels with plenty of sex, drugs and rock and roll. As it is a short novel there is little to say that won't spoil the story (such as it is) but it does need some attention paid as it moves about in the style of dance and if you do pay attention to how it moves you will soon be lost. I do feel I would have got more out of it if I was a fan of Ray and Cruz fan as their music is so embedded within the text. As such my knowledge of The Rolling Stones probably One of the great drop-out coming of age novels with plenty of sex, drugs and rock and roll. As it is a short novel there is little to say that won't spoil the story (such as it is) but it does need some attention paid as it moves about in the style of dance and if you do pay attention to how it moves you will soon be lost. I do feel I would have got more out of it if I was a fan of Ray and Cruz fan as their music is so embedded within the text. As such my knowledge of The Rolling Stones probably made them more prominent than they should have been.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    Nice tone and great depiction of Colombian youth in the 70s. However the original writing makes it really hard to get a proper translation and despite the translator amazing work the reader needs to revert back to numerous notes which makes it hard to follow. The heavy emphasis on drug use and lack of morals of the protagonist did not make the book very pleasant to read. In short: I liked the first 50 pages. After that, I got bored.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rodrigo Azuero

    This book tells the story of María del Carmen Huerta's -an upper class teenage girl from Cali, Colombia- obsession with music-party. I found the book fascinating. However, it might be difficult for a reader not familiar with Rock and Roll and Salsa music to go through the book smoothly. I encourage the potential reader to go through the book's "playlist" available on youtube thanks to a kind user: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSG3u... This book tells the story of María del Carmen Huerta's -an upper class teenage girl from Cali, Colombia- obsession with music-party. I found the book fascinating. However, it might be difficult for a reader not familiar with Rock and Roll and Salsa music to go through the book smoothly. I encourage the potential reader to go through the book's "playlist" available on youtube thanks to a kind user: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSG3u...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marcela Urbano

    He was high on something while writing this book...maybe coke?, definitely not marihuana. There is almost no punctuation, no pause, that makes one read the book in one day. I tried to read it two times until i finally found out that in order to enjoy it one must read it at the same rythm as he wrote it. Brilliant.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Oli Jordan

    This book is fantastic. The pace is frantic, the style gritty and occasionally dark, yet the text always made me feel positive. With little plot or structure, this novel may put some readers off, but the flow and textures/colours used are just beyond. Amazing novel.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Miguel

    Actual rating: 2.5/5 I felt a bit disappointed about this book. Even though the prose is interesting and different, having a sense of hurry as I would expect the author had, it never fully captivated me, neither I ever cared about the main character.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aitxo No te quiere

    WOW

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessica O'brien

    It's one of those that you might not love the entire book but the final pages tell you some kind of truth and it's worth it and without the rest it wouldn't mean a thing. It's one of those that you might not love the entire book but the final pages tell you some kind of truth and it's worth it and without the rest it wouldn't mean a thing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    James M

    COLUMBIA

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carolina

    reads like On the Road

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