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She was Emily Dickinson's maid, her confidante, her betrayer... and the savior of her legacy. An evocative new novel about Emily Dickinson's longtime maid, Irish immigrant Margaret Maher, whose bond with the poet ensured Dickinson's work would live on, from the USA Today bestselling author of Flight of the Sparrow, Amy Belding Brown. Massachusetts, 1869. Margaret Mah She was Emily Dickinson's maid, her confidante, her betrayer... and the savior of her legacy. An evocative new novel about Emily Dickinson's longtime maid, Irish immigrant Margaret Maher, whose bond with the poet ensured Dickinson's work would live on, from the USA Today bestselling author of Flight of the Sparrow, Amy Belding Brown. Massachusetts, 1869. Margaret Maher has never been one to settle down. At twenty-seven, she's never met a man who has tempted her enough to relinquish her independence to a matrimonial fate, and she hasn't stayed in one place for long since her family fled the potato famine a decade ago. When Maggie accepts a temporary position at the illustrious Dickinson family home in Amherst, it's only to save money for her upcoming trip West to join her brothers in California. Maggie never imagines she will form a life-altering friendship with the eccentric, brilliant Miss Emily or that she'll stay at the Homestead for the next thirty years. In this richly drawn novel, Amy Belding Brown explores what it is to be an outsider looking in, and she sheds light on one of Dickinson's closest confidantes--perhaps the person who knew the mysterious poet best--whose quiet act changed history and continues to influence literature to this very day.


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She was Emily Dickinson's maid, her confidante, her betrayer... and the savior of her legacy. An evocative new novel about Emily Dickinson's longtime maid, Irish immigrant Margaret Maher, whose bond with the poet ensured Dickinson's work would live on, from the USA Today bestselling author of Flight of the Sparrow, Amy Belding Brown. Massachusetts, 1869. Margaret Mah She was Emily Dickinson's maid, her confidante, her betrayer... and the savior of her legacy. An evocative new novel about Emily Dickinson's longtime maid, Irish immigrant Margaret Maher, whose bond with the poet ensured Dickinson's work would live on, from the USA Today bestselling author of Flight of the Sparrow, Amy Belding Brown. Massachusetts, 1869. Margaret Maher has never been one to settle down. At twenty-seven, she's never met a man who has tempted her enough to relinquish her independence to a matrimonial fate, and she hasn't stayed in one place for long since her family fled the potato famine a decade ago. When Maggie accepts a temporary position at the illustrious Dickinson family home in Amherst, it's only to save money for her upcoming trip West to join her brothers in California. Maggie never imagines she will form a life-altering friendship with the eccentric, brilliant Miss Emily or that she'll stay at the Homestead for the next thirty years. In this richly drawn novel, Amy Belding Brown explores what it is to be an outsider looking in, and she sheds light on one of Dickinson's closest confidantes--perhaps the person who knew the mysterious poet best--whose quiet act changed history and continues to influence literature to this very day.

30 review for Emily's House

  1. 5 out of 5

    MarilynW

    Emily's House by Amy Belding Brown The Emily of this historical novel is Emily Dickinson and the story is shown through the eyes of the Dickinson's longtime maid, Margaret Maher. The story is rich with family, both the family of Margaret, who depend on the Dickinson's in more ways than one, and the family of the eccentric, creative, reclusive Emily. The novel intersperses the "now" of 1916 with the earlier days, starting with 1869. Knowing of Margaret's excellent reputation as a hard working, de Emily's House by Amy Belding Brown The Emily of this historical novel is Emily Dickinson and the story is shown through the eyes of the Dickinson's longtime maid, Margaret Maher. The story is rich with family, both the family of Margaret, who depend on the Dickinson's in more ways than one, and the family of the eccentric, creative, reclusive Emily. The novel intersperses the "now" of 1916 with the earlier days, starting with 1869. Knowing of Margaret's excellent reputation as a hard working, dependable, discrete maid, Emily's father, Edward Dickinson, will not take no for an answer when he tells Margaret that she needs to come work for his family. Margaret agrees only if it's temporary, since she has already bought her train ticket to join her brothers in CA, to begin her dream of owning and operating her very own boarding house. Those plans are dashed thanks to manipulations by Mr. Dickinson. Margaret is obviously a much coveted employee of the Dickinson household but if she tries to leave, it will be a disaster for other members of her family. Once in the Dickinson household, Margaret can see where rumor and fact meet. While it first seems that the household was ruled by Edward Dickinson, it later becomes clear that most of his rules and admonishments are for the benefit of his daughter Emily. Despite his travels, Mr. Dickinson is very interested in the wellbeing of his family and Emily is given the setting she needs to write what is most dear to her heart. Margaret gives up much to do Dickinson's bidding although it does seem that she has found her place in life. After watching her older sister grow old quickly, due to birthing and raising children while doing all that needs to be done to run a poor household, Margaret long ago had given up dreams of a marriage and she knew it was best to never have children. She longed for her own boarding house, to be independent of others and despite being a part of the Dickinson domestic staff, Margaret is headstrong and outspoken when the need arises (or when she just can't hold her tongue). Eventually Emily and Margaret develop a bond and it's with the help of Margaret that Emily's legacy is preserved. We learn much about the struggles of Margaret's family, Irish immigrants that fled the potato famine. We also learn about Emily's extremely close friendship (was it more?) with her sister-in-law, Susan. There were men is Emily's life and there is the intrusion of an imposter in the form of Mabel Loomis Todd, the lover of Susan's philandering husband. Margaret insures that Emily's work sees the light of day. Published August 3, 2021 Thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and NetGalley for this ARC.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    Irish Immigrant Margaret Maher was Emily Dickinson’s maid and confidante. Did Margaret honor Emily’s only wish? Amherst, Massachusetts, 1869. Edward Dickinson is a lawyer, treasurer and founder among other titles, who has a reputation of being disagreeable and haughty. Margaret is about to “take the measure of the man for herself since she is to be working in his house.” It was supposed to be just a temporary position, but she is forced to postpone her dream of moving to California. Soon enough, Irish Immigrant Margaret Maher was Emily Dickinson’s maid and confidante. Did Margaret honor Emily’s only wish? Amherst, Massachusetts, 1869. Edward Dickinson is a lawyer, treasurer and founder among other titles, who has a reputation of being disagreeable and haughty. Margaret is about to “take the measure of the man for herself since she is to be working in his house.” It was supposed to be just a temporary position, but she is forced to postpone her dream of moving to California. Soon enough, she warms up toward the Dickinson women, including strangest one – Emily. Margaret never heard of a woman writing poems, which doesn’t sound proper at all, but that’s not what makes Emily strange. It’s her hiding behind the closed doors in her room most of the time, and hiding from people in general. “She had her ways of disappearing, she was like a ghost.” Nevertheless, Emily warms up to Margaret like to no other maid before. The layers of mystery surrounding Emily start to peel off with Margaret even noticing Emily’s eyes sparking with mischief at times. When Emily loses faith in her talent, Margaret is there rescuing Emily’s poems from the laundry or from fire. When Emily loses faith in printing her poems, Margaret is there to sort them and to keep them together. When Emily jests she’d rather have her poems as ashes rather than being exposed to others, Margaret makes sure the jest doesn’t become reality. Margaret being an Irish immigrant, her story is woven with brief actions of Irish fight for independence, including the radical approach of the Fenians and their dynamite bombings. Margaret is of restless nature, not one meant for doing man’s bidding and birthing his children, though one man makes her heart skip a beat. Once planning on staying single and free, now she struggles with her decision. From the reader’s perspective, it’s a pure joy to follow her thoughts and what rattles her at times, and her finding fulfillment in a different kind of adventure, adventures of the spirit, “and the hours with Emily on late-winter afternoons were mighty adventures, to be sure.” Written with awe-inspiring prose, peppered with humor and flashed-out heroines. Wonderful depiction of two strong women, one a solitary following her talent, the other restless cherishing her independence, both ahead of their time. Beautiful storytelling transports readers to a different time, well-depicted with properness between social classes, with convictions of two women reaching for something that seemed to be out of reach at the time; and struggles of immigrants which seems to be timeless. Authentic voice of Margaret connects readers directly to Emily, you get to know Emily personally and when the death claims her life it pierces you as it does Margaret. Source: ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Review originally posted at mysteryandsuspense.com

  3. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    She was Emily Dickinson's maid, her confidante, her betrayer... and the savior of her legacy. Amherst, Massachusetts - March 1869 Margaret (Maggie) Maher, an Irish immigrant accepted a temporary position in the Dickinson Household. She had plans to move to California where her brothers had moved. The Dickinson's house if large and she felt uncomfortable there. But she didn't plan to be there long, so she made do. Never did she imagine staying. She needed to make money and when she has earned She was Emily Dickinson's maid, her confidante, her betrayer... and the savior of her legacy. Amherst, Massachusetts - March 1869 Margaret (Maggie) Maher, an Irish immigrant accepted a temporary position in the Dickinson Household. She had plans to move to California where her brothers had moved. The Dickinson's house if large and she felt uncomfortable there. But she didn't plan to be there long, so she made do. Never did she imagine staying. She needed to make money and when she has earned enough, she planned to move to California. Best laid plans. Her move to California never happened. Instead, Maggie and the Dickinson's daughter, Emily formed a life changing and altering friendship. Maggie never imagined that when she accepted the temporary position as a maid that she would stay for thirty years. That her close friendship with the reclusive and eccentric Emily would put her in a position to refuse to do as her employer asked and that her act of insubordination would forever change both history and literature. Is there anyone who has not heard of Emily Dickinson? Is there anyone who has not read at least one of her poems? Perhaps it was required reading for a high school literature class? It was for me! But did you know that we are able to read and enjoy her work because of Margaret Maher.? Emily Dickinson wanted all her writing burned upon her death. She hid her finished work in her maid's trunk. Maggie refused to burn them. "It was Margaret Maher "whom Emily Dickinson judged capable of the disobedience necessary to bring her work to the world. Maher did not disappoint. Her act of insubordination worked the miracle for which posterity is in debt, turning the private genius of her mistress's poetry into a universal legacy." (quote from Wikipedia) This book has so many things going for it. Not only does it show us what life was like as an Irish immigrant and how they were treated, we are shown the hierarchy in society, and we are shown how a chance encounter turned into a lifelong friendship which changed history. This book shows how Emily had doubt in her work, how she was eccentric and how she was not always taken seriously being a woman who writes. Told through alternating timelines this book was a pleasure to read. There was a lot of research that went into the writing of this book. The author uses facts and shows us what life must have been like for both women. This book had me from page one. I only read two chapters and knew that I was going to enjoy this book. I was drawn by the writing, and it didn't hurt that I enjoy many of Emily Dickinson's poems. More is known about Emily Dickinson, but I enjoyed how Margaret/Maggie was written. "Emily described Margaret as "courageous", "warm and wild and mighty", and "good and noisy, the North Wind of the Family." (quote from Wikipedia) I really enjoy books that not only entertain but teach me as well. This was one of these books. I wanted to know more about both women - hence my looking on Wikipedia. I also found myself reading some of Emily's poems as well. Fans of Emily Dickinson, Historical fiction and books which blend facts with fiction will love this one. Beautifully written, interesting, and inspiring. Highly recommend. Thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own. Read more of my reviews at www.openbookposts.com

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews

    They are selling Emily’s house? That can’t be. Emily loved The Homestead and so did Margaret. Emily Dickinson’s maid, Margaret Maher, was her confidant, best friend, and was the one who kept Emily writing her poetry and kept Emily from disposing of her work. Margaret was with the Dickinson family for over 35 years. We follow Margaret as she becomes close with the Dickinson women and serves as their maid, and then the book moves back and forth from her time with the Dickinsons to present day where sh They are selling Emily’s house? That can’t be. Emily loved The Homestead and so did Margaret. Emily Dickinson’s maid, Margaret Maher, was her confidant, best friend, and was the one who kept Emily writing her poetry and kept Emily from disposing of her work. Margaret was with the Dickinson family for over 35 years. We follow Margaret as she becomes close with the Dickinson women and serves as their maid, and then the book moves back and forth from her time with the Dickinsons to present day where she owns her own boarding house. EMILY’S HOUSE had me glued to the pages because of the story line and because of Ms. Belding Brown’s writing. Her writing is pull you in and descriptive with interesting insight into the class structure and the plight of Irish Immigrants. EMILY’S HOUSE is a wonderful account of the lives of both Emily and Margaret. I didn’t know Emily Dickinson was so eccentric and was mostly reclusive. I also didn't know she didn't want her poetry published and hid her writings from everyone by hiding them throughout the house. Ms. Belding Brown did excellent research, and this book was a wonderful history lesson for me. I’m sure this is a book that could be classified as a memoir, but it definitely did not read as such. This book had me completely absorbed, and I totally enjoyed this book even though I am not a fan of poetry. Hands down a 5/5. This book was given to me by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    DJ Sakata

    Favorite Quotes: We love Aunt Elizabeth, but she’s a human corset, and a tight one at that. A person needs to breathe after a week of wearing her. I couldn’t think what she meant—it made no sense. But that’s how it was with Emily. She sometimes said things in a way made me think I should be writing down the words and saving them like gold coins. Thank you. You always wear the perfume of thoughtfulness. It’s hard work tending the grieving, for they don’t have their wits about them. And the dead alwa Favorite Quotes: We love Aunt Elizabeth, but she’s a human corset, and a tight one at that. A person needs to breathe after a week of wearing her. I couldn’t think what she meant—it made no sense. But that’s how it was with Emily. She sometimes said things in a way made me think I should be writing down the words and saving them like gold coins. Thank you. You always wear the perfume of thoughtfulness. It’s hard work tending the grieving, for they don’t have their wits about them. And the dead always leave troubles behind for the living to mend. Haven’t you ever noticed how certain scents flutter around us, Maggie! Like ribbons in a breeze. She turned and gave me a sad smile. “It’s the transitory nature of life that makes it so sweet, don’t you think, Maggie?” she said. “The knowing each moment that it will never come again.” I closed the window and drew the curtains so her spirit wouldn’t be coming back and making mischief. For I knew she would try. Emily had a talent for mischief and I wasn’t so foolish to think Death would be stopping her. It was Emily’s favorite time of day, an hour before sunset when the air turns gold. My Review: I enjoyed this insightfully written dual timeline tale weaving fact and fiction about the enigmatic Emily Dickinson. The writing was stellar and true to the period with amusing and profound perceptions of an often-disconcerted Irish maid who was initially coerced into working in the home of the revered family. The engaging storylines crossed several of my favorite genres including women’s fiction, historical fiction, and family drama with descriptions and observations that conjured sharp visuals to my gray matter. The Dickinsons were an odd family, each one being quite peculiar in their own way, yet Emily’s oddities were the most intriguing and sparked of brilliance. It feels an outrage that her haunting passages and clever wordcraft weren’t appreciated until after her death. I’d never heard or read of several of the Irish phrases used, such as “wet the tea,” yet the meaning was immediately clear with writing that was easy to fall into and engaged the senses. This was my first exposure to the talented scribe known as Amy Belding Brown, but it certainly will not be my last as I was impressed and consumed by her craft and fell into a Google wormhole looking up the characters and scandals she featured. The research and prep must have been massive, as is my adoration of her mad skills.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Literary Redhead

    I found EMILY’S HOUSE to be a compelling fictional look at the poet Emily Dickinson through the eyes of her Irish maid and confidant, Margaret. It is Margaret who ignores Emily’s wish to have her poetry burned upon her death and saves her writings, which are still impactful today. The author does a remarkable job describing the relationship between the two women, the social hierarchy of the time, and of the lasting trauma of Irish conflict and the devastating potato famine. A wonderful portrait I found EMILY’S HOUSE to be a compelling fictional look at the poet Emily Dickinson through the eyes of her Irish maid and confidant, Margaret. It is Margaret who ignores Emily’s wish to have her poetry burned upon her death and saves her writings, which are still impactful today. The author does a remarkable job describing the relationship between the two women, the social hierarchy of the time, and of the lasting trauma of Irish conflict and the devastating potato famine. A wonderful portrait of the poet and the savior of her work. 5 of 5 Stars Pub Date 03 Aug 2021 #EmilysHouse #NetGalley Thanks to the author, Berkley Publishing Group, and NetGalley for the review copy. Opinions are mine.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Grigsby

    This was a fun historical fiction about Emily Dickinson, told fro the perspective of her Irish maid who lived in the home for 30 years. Makes me want to read some of her poetry!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    While working as a maid for the Dickinson family, Margaret is befriended by Emily (yes the famous poet Emily). After decades of loyal friendship, how and why did she ignore Emily's dying wish? "Change is the one thing can be counted on in life, and it's no different if a person's rich or poor." The premise of this book was so promising, but unfortunately, I found it mundane and boring as it detailed chore after chore without much plot. I spent the entirety of this book waiting for something to hap While working as a maid for the Dickinson family, Margaret is befriended by Emily (yes the famous poet Emily). After decades of loyal friendship, how and why did she ignore Emily's dying wish? "Change is the one thing can be counted on in life, and it's no different if a person's rich or poor." The premise of this book was so promising, but unfortunately, I found it mundane and boring as it detailed chore after chore without much plot. I spent the entirety of this book waiting for something to happen. Spoiler: nothing happened ... until the last 15%, and even that was ho hum. The romance between Margaret and Patrick as well as Emily’s “quare” behavior was a bit interesting but overall, I'd recommend watching the Dickinson tv show on Apple TV+ instead! Location: Amherst, Massachusetts I received an advance copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    Though this is fictional it is based on the life of Emily Dickinson. I'll be truthful with you I knew nothing about Emily Dickinson besides she was a famous poet. In Emily's House we are treated to the extensive research efforts the author has put into finding out about the Irish maid that became a life long companion to Emily. Very interesting and insightful book. Time well spent reading it. Pub Date: 03 Aug 2021 I was given a complimentary copy of this book. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my Though this is fictional it is based on the life of Emily Dickinson. I'll be truthful with you I knew nothing about Emily Dickinson besides she was a famous poet. In Emily's House we are treated to the extensive research efforts the author has put into finding out about the Irish maid that became a life long companion to Emily. Very interesting and insightful book. Time well spent reading it. Pub Date: 03 Aug 2021 I was given a complimentary copy of this book. Thank you. All opinions expressed are my own.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    "She was Emily Dickinson’s maid, her confidante, her betrayer… and the savior of her legacy . . ." Welcome to Emily's House . . . the door's open, so please make yourself comfortable. Shall I wet the tea and we can have a chinwag? This was my first read by historical fiction author Amy Belding Brown, and I quite enjoyed this book as the writing style was very good. I liked that the novel was always from the viewpoint of the Irish maid Margaret "Maggie" Maher. The novel as mentioned above is from "She was Emily Dickinson’s maid, her confidante, her betrayer… and the savior of her legacy . . ." Welcome to Emily's House . . . the door's open, so please make yourself comfortable. Shall I wet the tea and we can have a chinwag? This was my first read by historical fiction author Amy Belding Brown, and I quite enjoyed this book as the writing style was very good. I liked that the novel was always from the viewpoint of the Irish maid Margaret "Maggie" Maher. The novel as mentioned above is from the first person narrative perspective, but provides a great insight into the relationship between Emily Dickinson and so to speak an 'outsider' of the family. Margaret Maher was an 'outsider' to the family for so long, but eventually she became like family. So much to the point that Emily trusted her Irish maid to be the keeper of her poems and made Margaret promise that she would destroy her poems after her death . . . would you do this yourself if you knew there was a chance that there could be a possibility of being connected to a famous person? Emily's House alternates between 1916 when Maggie Maher is looking back on her times as the maid to the Dickinsons, and the late 1800s (in Amherst, Massachusetts) telling the story of the comings and goings of the family and surrounding events that occurred in her servitude as maid. Before starting this novel, I was drawn in based on the synopsis alone as while I am familiar with Emily Dickinson, the story of the Irish maid is very new to me. I quite liked the author's authenticity in how Margaret Maher spoke, and can now say I learned some new Irish ways of speaking such as: wetting the tea = making a pot of tea chinwag = having a conversation quare = queer Now, we come to the other focus of the novel which is Emily Dickinson herself . . . the famous poet also known as according to the novel, the "Myth of Amherst". Emily Dickinson, American Poet (December 10, 1830-May 15, 1886) Here's a photo of Emily's house aka Homestead in Amherst, Massachusetts where the novel mainly takes place There is a bit of a romance in the novel, but very minor and very subtle but overall shouldn't take away from this novel and a wonderful story. Margaret Maher, Dickinson's long time maid I should also mention that not only does this novel have to do with the relationship between Emily & Margaret, but touches on some Irish politics as well. This novel talks about Ireland's war with Britain aka "War of Independence", and 'Fenians' - "They're a band of Irish lads who swore an oath to fight England after the War of the Rebellion". All, in all I recommend this novel if you're looking for a lighter read but a story that will leave you feeling satisfied. I conclude this review with a famous poem quote by Emily Dickinson I found when googling: "Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul - and sings the tunes without the words - and never stops at all. Unable are the loved to die, for love is immortality. Find ecstasy in life; the mere sense of living is joy enough"

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Hutchison

    I'm not a huge Emily Dickinson fan, but I enjoyed this novel that tells the story of the "Myth of Amherst." It's a racier and more conflict-ridden story than I would have guessed! (At least in this version, but it IS based on research, and the author shares some of her own discovery process at the end.) It's told in first person by the Dickinson's maid, Margaret Maher, a resilient Irish immigrant who has to cope with much that generation faced. Brown, whose FLIGHT OF THE SPARROW I also greatly e I'm not a huge Emily Dickinson fan, but I enjoyed this novel that tells the story of the "Myth of Amherst." It's a racier and more conflict-ridden story than I would have guessed! (At least in this version, but it IS based on research, and the author shares some of her own discovery process at the end.) It's told in first person by the Dickinson's maid, Margaret Maher, a resilient Irish immigrant who has to cope with much that generation faced. Brown, whose FLIGHT OF THE SPARROW I also greatly enjoyed, has a knack for writing historical fiction that feels natural, rather than like someone laboriously working their notes into a story. Now I'm a little annoyed at myself for attending UMass in Amherst for three years and never actually going to the Emily Dickinson house, except to walk past it fairly obliviously. However, I'm sure I'll find it way more interesting when I go now. It's time for a road trip! Highly recommended if Dickinson or any of this interests you.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jillian ❀‿❀

    ➳ Well, here is a perfectly lovely novel unearthing another forgotten woman in history: Margaret Maher of County Tipperary, who formed a friendship with Emily Dickinson while working for the family for years as a maid, & had a nearly forgotten hand in preserving the poems Dickinson wanted burned at her death (all of them). The work of another woman nearly lost to the archives! It's a novel about a WRITER: a woman who believes her singular viewpoint is forgettable. And the small, nearly forgotten ➳ Well, here is a perfectly lovely novel unearthing another forgotten woman in history: Margaret Maher of County Tipperary, who formed a friendship with Emily Dickinson while working for the family for years as a maid, & had a nearly forgotten hand in preserving the poems Dickinson wanted burned at her death (all of them). The work of another woman nearly lost to the archives! It's a novel about a WRITER: a woman who believes her singular viewpoint is forgettable. And the small, nearly forgotten woman who believes that it isn't. ❄ The writing style: Amy Belding Brown has a tremendously delicate hand as a novelist. Her works are always so poetic & gentle. ❄ The focus on female friendship. ❄ The way Brown handled this novel's love story: believable, charming, & not predictable. It stayed where it should within this narrative, adding to Margaret's experience in a natural way rather than taking it over. I liked it! It read real rather than tucked into the tale to be sure we tie off the female protagonist. ❄ The portrait of Emily Dickinson. I knew nearly nothing about her when I began this novel. Now I find her interesting and would like to explore more of her poetry. In this novel we see her as if through a window: never up close, always assessed from afar even when she's in the room. There's a sense Margaret never really understands her, though they speak together at length through the years. Yet the portrait of her is human. She's like a poem, a puzzle. Something strong, bright, and magnetic. Very well done. ❄ Margaret Maher's voice throughout: she's funny and matter of fact, a tad literal, a tad puzzled and even insulted by Dickinson's blunt humor at first, weighted by her own life experience, & colored in the best way by Dickinson's singular way of viewing the world. And her Irish brogue throughout is perfectly done. It's written with a gentle hand that touches just enough music to let you hear her. Just enough pride to imagine how it felt to be Irish in the nineteenth century, when to be such was basically the bottom for the social stack in the North. She's quite blunt, proud, charming, a little naïve. I like that Brown chose to tell the story of Dickinson through the maid's perspective. :-) ❄ The touches of Irish rebellion & history sprinkled throughout. ❄ The touches of poetry sprinkled throughout. ❄ The domestic focus of the story. It touches upon some politics, but mainly the story is told within the woman's space in that era: the home. I adore a cozy novel set in such a space. The novel's themes are regret, patience, hope, death, grief, betrayal, rebellion, & the bonds of female friendship. All delivered in quiet, gentle prose through the eyes of the maid who would give us Dickinson's poetry. It seems to ask: what is rebellion in the world of women? I cried at the end. x ❄ "'I must salute the crocuses,' [Emily] said. "Their pretty parade is as martial as a drum.'" ❄ "Sure, I don't know what to think about a man without the good sense to be wary of the spirit world. It's plain he's got no Irish in him." ❄ "'Hope is a clever glutton,' [Emily] said. 'It feeds on our dreams but leaves us empty in the end.'" ❄ "[Emily] was staring out the window, where the sunset was streaking the sky pink. Same color as her Damask roses just before the petals fall."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    While the idea of the book and the history behind it was interesting, I found the book slow moving.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hayley Sykes

    Emily's House by Amy Belding Brown is the heart warming yet tragic tale of what goes on behind closed doors. The story is told by Margaret Maher, an Irish immigrant maid, to an infamous American family, The Dickinsons'. Most of us through our high school years have read at least one of Emily Dickinson's poems, she is considered one of America's greatest poets. Being as Emily was a woman in the late 19th century she was never really taken seriously about her poetry during her lifetime. It was onl Emily's House by Amy Belding Brown is the heart warming yet tragic tale of what goes on behind closed doors. The story is told by Margaret Maher, an Irish immigrant maid, to an infamous American family, The Dickinsons'. Most of us through our high school years have read at least one of Emily Dickinson's poems, she is considered one of America's greatest poets. Being as Emily was a woman in the late 19th century she was never really taken seriously about her poetry during her lifetime. It was only after her death that her poems became widely circulated and she in a sense has become a household name in American literature. The opening of the novel introduces the reader to Margaret Maher, the story narrator. She is an Irish immigrant that has found employment in America through domestic housekeeping. The story begins in what is present day, 1916. Margaret is currently the proud owner of a boarding house and is being informed that the family estate of the family she was formerly employed by, the Dickinsons', is being sold. Normally individuals would take no notice of a property being sold, but Margaret feels a deep connection to this household because of the relationship she created over a twenty year servitude for the family and the bond she created with Emily Dickinson. The book is broken down into present and past flash backs that are easy to follow, as each chapter is clearly labeled with the date that is currently being presented. Not only does Emily's House give the reader a glimpse of the daily domestic life of a late 19th century home, it also highlights the way immigrants to our country were treated and what it meant physically and emotionally to be a domestic servant. My heart hurt for some of the situations Margaret found herself in. Amy Belding Brown did an amazing job portraying her emotions clearly throughout the story. Personally, throughout my school career, most of my literature teachers talked about how reclusive and peculiar Emily Dickinson was. Emily's House gives the reader an idea of what her life could have been like inside the walls of her own home. One would guess at home Emily would have been most comfortable and more free to be herself. Amy Belding Brown paints a picture of Emily being a shy individual that was truly in tune with her emotions and appreciated the beauty in every person and thing she came in contact with. A beautiful individual that truly took time to appreciate every thing that surrounded her. Again the author does a wonderful job of portraying the emotional conflict Emily dealt with inside herself daily. I greatly enjoyed Emily's House. It's a historical fiction tale about an author that most of us have heard of and are very familiar with. I enjoyed the "inside view" that Amy Brown Belding created through the eyes of Margaret. The story left me with the sentiment to not make judgements about someone until you know their full story and background. Amy Brown Belding has created a classic with Emily's House that I feel gives a respectful glimpse into the life of Emily Dickinson. Thanks to Netgalley and Berkley Publishing Group for an advanced copy for an honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Reeca Elliott

    Emily Dickinson is an eccentric young lady. Her father hires a new maid, Maggie, to help around the house. Maggie is determined to move to California to be with her brothers. She is saving money but it will take her quite a while to accrue what she needs. So, when Mr. Dickinson comes in with his lucrative offer, Maggie is still hesitant. However, he is very insistent. Maggie ends up staying her whole life with Emily. Maggie and Emily develop a strange relationship. And it is a relationship which Emily Dickinson is an eccentric young lady. Her father hires a new maid, Maggie, to help around the house. Maggie is determined to move to California to be with her brothers. She is saving money but it will take her quite a while to accrue what she needs. So, when Mr. Dickinson comes in with his lucrative offer, Maggie is still hesitant. However, he is very insistent. Maggie ends up staying her whole life with Emily. Maggie and Emily develop a strange relationship. And it is a relationship which no one can sever. Maggie is a character I enjoy. She is just a plain, hardworking woman. But she has dreams and the intelligence to achieve them. Then there is Emily. Emily is completely fascinating. She is creative and emotional but she is also sometimes cruel. This story has a lot of mundane details in it. I enjoyed the history and the story around Emily. Just did not have enough “meat” in the content. Now, this is just my opinion. If you love real historical people that are eccentric…you will enjoy this one! Grab your copy today! I received this novel from the publisher for a honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan Licht

    Always happy to learn what I can about the brilliant and elusive Emily Dickinson. Seeing her through the eyes of her maid, Margaret Maher, brought an interesting and personal perspective. Amy's writing drew me in from the start. I now look forward to wetting the tea and having a chinwag with my book group around this wonderful heartfelt story. I also look forward to visiting The Homestead in Amherst when the renovations are complete in the spring of 2022. Always happy to learn what I can about the brilliant and elusive Emily Dickinson. Seeing her through the eyes of her maid, Margaret Maher, brought an interesting and personal perspective. Amy's writing drew me in from the start. I now look forward to wetting the tea and having a chinwag with my book group around this wonderful heartfelt story. I also look forward to visiting The Homestead in Amherst when the renovations are complete in the spring of 2022.

  17. 5 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    Brown is a master writer of historical fiction. Her research is thorough, and her characters are very much fact-based. But she also takes the proper license as a fiction writer to create a memorable protagonist who opens a window into the heart and soul of a fascinating and brilliant poet. Read our full review here: https://booktrib.com/2021/08/03/an-ir... Brown is a master writer of historical fiction. Her research is thorough, and her characters are very much fact-based. But she also takes the proper license as a fiction writer to create a memorable protagonist who opens a window into the heart and soul of a fascinating and brilliant poet. Read our full review here: https://booktrib.com/2021/08/03/an-ir...

  18. 5 out of 5

    The Bookend Diner

    Thank you, Berkley Publishing, for the gifted copy of Emily's House {partner} Genre: Historical Fiction Author: Amy Belding Brown Pub Date: 8.3.21 Star Rating: ☆☆☆☆ "Change is the one thing that can be counted on in life, and it's no different if a person's rich or poor." It's been a while since I read a Historical Fiction book, and Emily's House has been high up on my reading list since I read the synopsis a few months ago. I know very little about Emily Dickinson and her life, so I thought this woul Thank you, Berkley Publishing, for the gifted copy of Emily's House {partner} Genre: Historical Fiction Author: Amy Belding Brown Pub Date: 8.3.21 Star Rating: ☆☆☆☆ "Change is the one thing that can be counted on in life, and it's no different if a person's rich or poor." It's been a while since I read a Historical Fiction book, and Emily's House has been high up on my reading list since I read the synopsis a few months ago. I know very little about Emily Dickinson and her life, so I thought this would be a great introduction to the poet. Well…. I should have realized this story would be more about Margaret Maher than Emily. I did enjoy learning more about Margaret. Still, I was a bit disappointed that I didn't read more about Emily Dickinson. There were A LOT of characters to keep track of (two that had the same name), so it took me a while to get into the rhythm of the book. I loved how Amy Belding Brown made the story feel realistic by adding the proper dialogue for that time. It surprised me as some of the words referenced throughout the book seemingly have a different meaning in today's society. It was an adjustment, but I grew accustomed to it quickly. 👥 Lots of characters to keep track of 👩🏽 More about Maher than Emily 🐌 Slower paced and overly detailed ⏰ Present and past flashbacks (1869 - 1916) I recommend you read Emily's House if you're a fan of novels by Marie Benedict! Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thebookend.... Follow my blog: https://thebookenddiner.com/

  19. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I love historical fiction and when this became available on netgalley I jumped at it. I know nothing about Emily Dickinson so I was excited to read this. This book is told through the eyes of The Dickinson's long time maid, Margaret. The book also goes back and forth from when she was a maid in the late 1880s to 1916 after Emily's death. Margaret was an Irish immigrant so besides seeing Margaret as a maid, we also see what life was like for an Irish immigrant in that time period. Margaret lived I love historical fiction and when this became available on netgalley I jumped at it. I know nothing about Emily Dickinson so I was excited to read this. This book is told through the eyes of The Dickinson's long time maid, Margaret. The book also goes back and forth from when she was a maid in the late 1880s to 1916 after Emily's death. Margaret was an Irish immigrant so besides seeing Margaret as a maid, we also see what life was like for an Irish immigrant in that time period. Margaret lived through the potato famine and was one of the fortunate ones to go to America. There were many uprisings about the Irish wanting a free Ireland. Emily Dickinson was a recluse so it was fun to see what the author thought she did in her home and what kind of character she would be. Emily's house is now a museum and I hope to see it one day. "It's a quare and wondrous thing, how a book can change the way a person sees the world." "And life has taught me that a woman's true family is vaster than those she's related to."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    “That long strange night a bond formed between us, mistress and maid. Thin as a thread it was at first, loose as a ribbon in the wind. But over time it grew sturdy and limber and strong.” Can you imagine a world in which Emily Dickinson’s long time maid Margaret “Maggie” Maher followed her wishes and destroyed her poetry upon her death? Everything. Lost to the fire and never to be read again? What a travesty that would have been. This historical fiction novel dives head first into the lives of th “That long strange night a bond formed between us, mistress and maid. Thin as a thread it was at first, loose as a ribbon in the wind. But over time it grew sturdy and limber and strong.” Can you imagine a world in which Emily Dickinson’s long time maid Margaret “Maggie” Maher followed her wishes and destroyed her poetry upon her death? Everything. Lost to the fire and never to be read again? What a travesty that would have been. This historical fiction novel dives head first into the lives of the Dickinson family, including reclusive Emily, and the Irish immigrant maid who took a “temporary” position in their home in an attempt to make money for her intended travels out west. As the story unfolds, though, you see her becoming as much a part of their household as the beams in the house itself. And just as strong. These are my favorite types of novels. The ones that have you scouring the internet when you have finished them trying to dig deeper into the story and find out any extra information that you can. *adds visit Emily Dickinson museum to to do list* When they met Emily was a reclusive, strange young girl and Maggie was a brash Irish woman. But they formed a strong bond, and watching that unfold as I read was just wonderful. Historical fiction is the genre that I tend to sprinkle in in between thrillers and contemporary fiction, and what a sweet treat this was. Thank you so much to Berkley Publishing and the author for the invitation to read this book. All opinions are my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie Rogers

    Emily's House - Amy Belding Brown Margaret is given an opportunity for a temporary maid position at the Dickinson's Homestead and it's much easier than she ever expected. A perfect way to pass the time until she's ready to follow her brothers to California. Unfortunately for Margaret, she does such a great job that they are not willing to let her go. She ends up building such a connection with the family, and the now famous Emily Dickinson, that she continues to work for the family for the next 3 Emily's House - Amy Belding Brown Margaret is given an opportunity for a temporary maid position at the Dickinson's Homestead and it's much easier than she ever expected. A perfect way to pass the time until she's ready to follow her brothers to California. Unfortunately for Margaret, she does such a great job that they are not willing to let her go. She ends up building such a connection with the family, and the now famous Emily Dickinson, that she continues to work for the family for the next 30 years. During her time she sees a side of Emily that many never had, and soon puts the pieces together that the eccentric Emily has a talent for writing poetry upon finding tidbits of writing in the laundry. As their relationship builds, Margaret (who they soon nicknamed Maggie), finds herself being one of Emily's closest confidants and entrusted with her deepest thoughts. Instead of holding up her end of a promise to Emily upon her passing, Maggie finds a way to ensure Emily's words live on forever. I remember learning about Emily Dickinson and reading her work when I was in both elementary school and highschool. Reading the story from her maids point of view was quite enlightening and really shows how ahead of her time Emily was. The author did incredible research and found such a way to bring Maggie and her story to life. I fell in love with her struggles as an Irish woman, loved watching her fall in love, and even better, making decisions based on what was best for her. And best of all, I loved watching her realize that dreams aren't set in stone and can easily be tweaked for someone's current situation. I know Maggie's story wasn't 100% real, but I really want to believe that it could be. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5.

  22. 5 out of 5

    K.M.

    The basic premise behind this book is that you follow Margaret Maher during her time as Emily Dickinson’s maid. That was enough to keep me interested, but I found this book to be particularly rich and moving, and not just because we got a peek inside the famous poet’s mysterious life. Instead, it was her maid who stole my heart and kept me reading. A note at the back of the books tells us that the author spent seven years researching and writing this book. Emily Dickinson was a mysterious figure The basic premise behind this book is that you follow Margaret Maher during her time as Emily Dickinson’s maid. That was enough to keep me interested, but I found this book to be particularly rich and moving, and not just because we got a peek inside the famous poet’s mysterious life. Instead, it was her maid who stole my heart and kept me reading. A note at the back of the books tells us that the author spent seven years researching and writing this book. Emily Dickinson was a mysterious figure during her time, and that certainly hasn’t changed in the century since her passing. But it was Margaret’s words that caught Brown’s attention, and once you meet her, it’s clear why. Margaret is a spirited character, with a sharp tongue, a quick wit, and notions about her place in the world that one could only interpret as modern. It’s true that Emily steals the show from time to time, but Margaret has no trouble holding her own place in the spotlight. Despite not typically reading historical novels, I found this one to be an easy read, both because of the subject matter and the evocative writing. Though it covers many decades of Margaret’s life, I never once felt like the story dragged. If you want a different perspective on Emily’s life, as well as a peek into what it was like to live as an Irish immigrant in America during the 1800s, I’d highly recommend Emily’s House.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    Ok, I am a sucker for all things Emily Dickinson (ED) so I was preset to enjoy this, but even without a fondness for the subject, the writing and story will captivate you. The novel is told through the eyes of Dickinson's longtime maid, Margaret Maher. Who better to see the family interaction than a person who is there for the unvarnished day-to-day life. I learned a lot about the Irish struggles of the time and the family division within the publishing of ED's work. I do have mixed feelings abo Ok, I am a sucker for all things Emily Dickinson (ED) so I was preset to enjoy this, but even without a fondness for the subject, the writing and story will captivate you. The novel is told through the eyes of Dickinson's longtime maid, Margaret Maher. Who better to see the family interaction than a person who is there for the unvarnished day-to-day life. I learned a lot about the Irish struggles of the time and the family division within the publishing of ED's work. I do have mixed feelings about the sense of nasty sense of humor(?) that the author gave ED. I don't know of that being recorded as a real characteristic that ED exhibited. But maybe? Overall immense credit to the remarkable Margaret Maher who did not burn ED's poems as she was told but saved them so we can enjoy them...so I am in favor of giving Margaret Maher the recognition she deserves.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    “Emily’s House” sounded exactly like the type of historical fiction I love. Plus, I’d read Amy Belding Brown’s novel “Flight of the Sparrow” several years ago and enjoyed it, so I was really looking forward to her new novel. Unfortunately, I’m going to set it aside after slogging through 130 pages. I certainly don’t mind books that have a slower pace, but this one just wasn’t capturing my interest at all. We just seemed to be following the main character, who is a house maid, around while she do “Emily’s House” sounded exactly like the type of historical fiction I love. Plus, I’d read Amy Belding Brown’s novel “Flight of the Sparrow” several years ago and enjoyed it, so I was really looking forward to her new novel. Unfortunately, I’m going to set it aside after slogging through 130 pages. I certainly don’t mind books that have a slower pace, but this one just wasn’t capturing my interest at all. We just seemed to be following the main character, who is a house maid, around while she does her various chores. I’m sure things would have picked up a bit once she had established more of a relationship with Emily, which is the point of the book, but it was just taking too long for things to get moving. Perhaps I’ll give it another try at a later date.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    No connection.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Wallace Kaufman

    Who was the real Emily Dickinson? That is the subject of several recent non-fiction books, none as successfully convincing as Amy Belding Brown's fictional portrait. (And some of those lesser books are admirable and we'll say "speculative" which sometimes means fictional.) Brown uses here very deep personal knowledge of New England and her deep research to capture in fiction the most plausible portrait of Dickinson I've read yet. And she does it in a unique way. The narrator is Margaret Maher, wh Who was the real Emily Dickinson? That is the subject of several recent non-fiction books, none as successfully convincing as Amy Belding Brown's fictional portrait. (And some of those lesser books are admirable and we'll say "speculative" which sometimes means fictional.) Brown uses here very deep personal knowledge of New England and her deep research to capture in fiction the most plausible portrait of Dickinson I've read yet. And she does it in a unique way. The narrator is Margaret Maher, who in real life as in this novel, served for years as a maid in the Dickinson house in Amherst, MA. Those were years when the Irish immigrants were stereotyped as lazy, drunkards, stupid, uneducated, and violent. They were often treated as poorly as blacks. (Side note: I had an uncle who in the 1920s in NY joined the Klan and burned a cross on a Long Island beach to keep off the Irish.) The Dickinson's were a wealthy family with all the privileges that race and wealth brought in mid 19th C. Massachusetts. The Margaret of the novel gives us a perspective on Emily Dickinson and her family that none of our contemporary middle and upper class scholars have been able to do. Brown herself is from an old but modest New England family. For decades she had to write between raising several children and attending all the duties of a pastor's wife. She also served as a guide in the Alcott house in Concord. (That's Alcott as in Louisa May Alcott and "Little Women". Brown began her writing with romance novels but made her first mark in historical fiction with Mr. Emerson's Wife, a novel about Lydian Emerson and her famous husband and their friend Henry David Thoreau. She followed that with Fall of the Sparrow, a narrative of Mary Rowlandson's captivity by Indians during America's most devastating war in terms of percent of combatants and civilians killed and injured. Both of these novels are meticulously researched and the times and cultures understood as only a fine scholar and born New Englander could do. Emily's House, however, is Brown's very best book. Forget whether or not you have any deep interest in Emily Dickinson. Of course, when you are finished you will know this woman as we never have before, and you can talk knowledgeably to people who are interested in American literature. However, you will also learn a lot about roots of America's social life and values. And there's not a weak page or dull paragraph in the book. I recommend the audio book with an Irish native reading Margaret Mehan's narrative.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aimee Dars

    “Forever – is composed of Nows.”—Emily Dickinson Once again, historical fiction shows me how little I know! Emily’s House by Amy Belding Brown is told through the perspective of Margaret Maher, an Irish immigrant who worked as a domestic in the Dickinson household for over thirty years. She’s such a fitting narrator for the story! Though very close to Emily and her family, Maggie, as they called her, was also slightly confounded by Emily, and through her eyes, Brown has developed a realistic thro “Forever – is composed of Nows.”—Emily Dickinson Once again, historical fiction shows me how little I know! Emily’s House by Amy Belding Brown is told through the perspective of Margaret Maher, an Irish immigrant who worked as a domestic in the Dickinson household for over thirty years. She’s such a fitting narrator for the story! Though very close to Emily and her family, Maggie, as they called her, was also slightly confounded by Emily, and through her eyes, Brown has developed a realistic through ethereal portrait of the poet. I loved the images of her with scraps of writing in pockets and tucked away randomly. According to current research (which is echoed in the book), Emily had entrusted her manuscripts to Maggie and entreated her to burn the papers upon her death. Because Margaret didn’t follow through with that promise, Dickinson’s poetry is available to us today. Just as interesting is the depiction of Margaret herself, a headstrong and independent woman who was planning to move to California before becoming entrenched with the Dickinsons. Her experiences in the book showed not only the treatment of domestics at the time but the stereotypes of and discrimination against Irish as well as the fight for home rule. Brown did an excellent job infusing her research into a lively narrative, and I thought she did an excellent job with Margaret’s voice. I could imagine her speaking in a delightful Irish lilt. Historical fiction based on the lives of well-known figures is always attractive to me, but at times, I don’t like it because I feel the authors take too many liberties. Because the book was narrated by Margaret, Emily’s House did not have this issue. Thanks to Berkley Publishing for inviting me to participate in the book tour and for a digital reading copy of the novel. Historical fiction lovers and fans of Emily Dickinson will want to pick up this book! Now, I want to visit the Emily Dickinson Museum in Amherst, MA, but it is closed for major renovations until sometime next year (2022).

  28. 4 out of 5

    Theodene

    Margaret Maher takes on a temporary position as the maid for the Dickinson Homestead. She plans to leave for California to meet her brothers. This temporary position turns into practically being given no other choice but to serve there and allow her brother’s to continue their work with the Dickinson support. Emily Dickinson is the lass who is a bit eccentric and is allowed to do her own thing for whatever reason. She has her expectations and yet seems to float throughout the Homestead quietly an Margaret Maher takes on a temporary position as the maid for the Dickinson Homestead. She plans to leave for California to meet her brothers. This temporary position turns into practically being given no other choice but to serve there and allow her brother’s to continue their work with the Dickinson support. Emily Dickinson is the lass who is a bit eccentric and is allowed to do her own thing for whatever reason. She has her expectations and yet seems to float throughout the Homestead quietly and she seems quite observant. Emily keeps to herself a lot, but also has tons of friends who visit her or she writes to. It’s an interesting relationship Margaret has at the Homestead. She is Irish born and fled the potato famine years ago. The challenges of the Irish on American soil is discussed a bit in this novel. It’s Margaret’s relationship with Emily throughout the years that encourages her to attempt to buy the Homestead from Emily’s niece decades later, but encounters some challenges along the way. Will Margaret be able to acquire the property? I am reminded of several other books that mention the Irish potato famine and the challenges the Irish face in America. I’m also reminded of a secret group who are helping the black slaves find the Underground Railroad in another historical fiction. It’s interesting how one book can stir up so many memories of reading all these other books as well! A special thank you to Berkeley Publishing Group and NetGalley for access to Emily’s House by Amy Belding Brown. I give this book 4 out of 5 tiaras as it was a challenge for me to get through just the first half of the book. There’s loads of characters and situations mentioned that I struggled to keep up with until about halfway through. Otherwise the main characters are portrayed beautifully.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lain | readingwithpointers

    4 ⭐️ Review Pages: 384 Pace: steady Genre: historical fiction Themes: immigrant experience, connections across social classes, family drama and scandal, love/motherhood versus independence, love for your homeland My thoughts: this was a unique premise and story, and I really enjoyed it. The narrator—Emily Dickinson’s longtime maid and confidant—had such a strong and sweet voice that immediately drew me to her. I loved how ahead of her time she was, and how clearly she saw that motherhood and marriage 4 ⭐️ Review Pages: 384 Pace: steady Genre: historical fiction Themes: immigrant experience, connections across social classes, family drama and scandal, love/motherhood versus independence, love for your homeland My thoughts: this was a unique premise and story, and I really enjoyed it. The narrator—Emily Dickinson’s longtime maid and confidant—had such a strong and sweet voice that immediately drew me to her. I loved how ahead of her time she was, and how clearly she saw that motherhood and marriage would oftentimes rob women of their independence. I also loved learning about Emily through her eyes, and thought it was a unique take on the poet’s personality and life. In addition to learning about Emily’s life, I loved the take on the Irish immigrant experience, and I thought the romance was also done well. Overall, I recommend this one to historical fiction fans who are intrigued by the woman that many consider to be America’s greatest poet! Who should read: fans of Arctic Fury, the Mystery of Mrs. Christie, Brooklyn Thank you @berkleypub for the advanced readers copy in exchange for an honest review

  30. 5 out of 5

    ShanKL (ShopCoffeeKids - Instagram)

    The Author's Notes open with "Every Novel has a History." Emily's House is the story of the women who salvaged Dickinson's works from the flames. For more than 100 years, these works have served as a source of inspiration to artists, particularly feminist-oriented artists. Brown has taken liberties in giving the maid a story as little is known of her life other than she is described as "wild and warm and mighty" by Emily Dickinson herself. Brown, also, accurately depicts the hierarchy and plight The Author's Notes open with "Every Novel has a History." Emily's House is the story of the women who salvaged Dickinson's works from the flames. For more than 100 years, these works have served as a source of inspiration to artists, particularly feminist-oriented artists. Brown has taken liberties in giving the maid a story as little is known of her life other than she is described as "wild and warm and mighty" by Emily Dickinson herself. Brown, also, accurately depicts the hierarchy and plight of Irish Americans in this book, as the maid has immigrated to America after the Irish Potato Famine. Emily's House also provides wonderful insight into the reclusive poet and her eccentric behavior. The pages will give the reader a glimpse into the most important figure in American poetry. #EmilysHouse #NetGalley Thank you to Berkley Publishing Group and NetGalley for the advanced reader copy of Emily's House.

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