counter create hit Red Station - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Red Station

Availability: Ready to download

There is a house overlooking the vast, rolling plains. A home station where a traveler will be welcomed with a piping hot meal and a downy bed. It is a refuge for the weary. A beacon for the lost. A place where blood and bones feed the land. For four stagecoach passengers... a doctor in search of a missing father and daughter... a newlywed couple on the way to their homeste There is a house overlooking the vast, rolling plains. A home station where a traveler will be welcomed with a piping hot meal and a downy bed. It is a refuge for the weary. A beacon for the lost. A place where blood and bones feed the land. For four stagecoach passengers... a doctor in search of a missing father and daughter... a newlywed couple on the way to their homestead... and a lady in red with a bag filled with secrets... Their night at the Station has only just begun.


Compare

There is a house overlooking the vast, rolling plains. A home station where a traveler will be welcomed with a piping hot meal and a downy bed. It is a refuge for the weary. A beacon for the lost. A place where blood and bones feed the land. For four stagecoach passengers... a doctor in search of a missing father and daughter... a newlywed couple on the way to their homeste There is a house overlooking the vast, rolling plains. A home station where a traveler will be welcomed with a piping hot meal and a downy bed. It is a refuge for the weary. A beacon for the lost. A place where blood and bones feed the land. For four stagecoach passengers... a doctor in search of a missing father and daughter... a newlywed couple on the way to their homestead... and a lady in red with a bag filled with secrets... Their night at the Station has only just begun.

30 review for Red Station

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann

    RED STATION by Kenzie Jennings is Book 7 in the Splatter Western series published by Death's Head Press. It now joins THE MAGPIE COFFIN by Wile E. Young as being the best in the bunch-both 5 star reads. If the Splatter Western genre is enticing to you but you're intimidated by the size of the series, it's useful for you to know that they are standalone novels and MAGPIE and RED STATION are my two 5 star reads so far. THE NIGHT SILVER RIVER RUN RED by Christine Morgan is up there as a standout as RED STATION by Kenzie Jennings is Book 7 in the Splatter Western series published by Death's Head Press. It now joins THE MAGPIE COFFIN by Wile E. Young as being the best in the bunch-both 5 star reads. If the Splatter Western genre is enticing to you but you're intimidated by the size of the series, it's useful for you to know that they are standalone novels and MAGPIE and RED STATION are my two 5 star reads so far. THE NIGHT SILVER RIVER RUN RED by Christine Morgan is up there as a standout as well. .. Now then! Kenzie Jennings has a legit flare for cinematic storytelling. I could see the story play out in my mind. The character development and authentic dialog made for easy investment right upfront. A group of weary travelers is offered a hot meal and the promise of a comfortable place to sleep for the night. Gracious to have rest on their long journey, they accept. The intensifying dread and suspense are delicious. Much like a well-paced horror movie, Jennings offers her audience little hints as to what's coming. It's so alluring. By the time the climax sounds off and chaos is in full swing, there is no way to put this book down. Some writers have a difficult time writing action sequences and the violence becomes muddy and hard to follow. What impressed me most about this book are the vivid, detailed, and colorful descriptions of all the nuanced movements so that the action is playing out with crystal-clear pictures. I can't stress how cinematic my experience was. My favorite character, the woman in the red dress, Clyde Northway, emerged as a new, all-time favorite literary badass. I fucking love her and I want more of her, now. Jennings assigns this woman an amazing backstory--just enough to entice readers and leave them longing for a prequel or a sequel or both (PLEASE). I feel like I must take this opportunity to express how exciting this Splatter Western series can be in the hands of capable writers. I'm sure there is an audience for Horror Westerns that skimp on story and character in order to give the spotlight to the violence but for me, I want some meat on my bones. I want something to sink my teeth into and let my heart get fully invested so that when horrible things happen, I feel it hard in my guts. I want flesh and blood characters that feel real so that every cut, every stab, all the torture is meaningful. I want to cheer for the good guys (and the baddies). I want justice and revenge. I need to feel my fucking feelings. If a writer's definition of "Splatterpunk" is just the splatter and none of the punk, it will always fall short for this reader. As for RED STATION, this is the gold standard by which all is measured.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Fowlow

    HOLY SHIT FOLKS! ✅ First book read in 2021 ✅ First 5⭐ read of 2021 RED STATION by Kenzie Jennings might just be the best thing I read this year. WOW! Stay tuned for full review...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janelle Janson

    I don’t even know where to start because Kenzie Jennings legit blew my mind with RED STATION. I cannot believe how exciting this Splatter Western series is! This is the seventh book in the lineup and one of the best books I’ve read. I am all about this series right now, but you can pick and choose because each book is a standalone. Trust me, I have my favorites! MAGPIE COFFIN, THE NIGHT SILVER RED RUN, RED STATION, and THE THIRTEEN KOYOTE for starters! Okay, let me catch my breath. Here we go...a I don’t even know where to start because Kenzie Jennings legit blew my mind with RED STATION. I cannot believe how exciting this Splatter Western series is! This is the seventh book in the lineup and one of the best books I’ve read. I am all about this series right now, but you can pick and choose because each book is a standalone. Trust me, I have my favorites! MAGPIE COFFIN, THE NIGHT SILVER RED RUN, RED STATION, and THE THIRTEEN KOYOTE for starters! Okay, let me catch my breath. Here we go...a small group of weary travelers riding a stagecoach stop at a station house, hungry, tired, and looking for a meal and a place to sleep. Right off the bat we read great dialogue between intriguing characters - the writing is superb. BAM, invested! Once they hit the station and spend a little time around their hosts, the Adler family, they realize something is awry. The Adler family isn’t exactly what they had in mind. Like every story I’ve read here, and rightfully so, we are immersed into old-timey dialogue, the Great Plains, and all the blistering heat the old west has to offer. However, unlike the other books, there are no monsters or supernatural elements to the story. It’s a slasher story my horror-loving friends! Blood and gore as far as the eye can see! The story is still a tribute to the splatter western sub-genre, but without all of the usual suspects (tropes, storylines, etc.) And yes, I love when my horror to contain monsters, ghosts, and goblins, but this book is a refreshing way to mix things up. Hands down my favorite character is the lady in red, Clyde Northway. She’s everything I love in a badass, sharp, take-no-prisoners type female protagonist. Her character development is crazy good! In fact, Jennings does a brilliant job writing tangible, three-dimensional characters and the depth of this story is no joke. It’s a cinematic adventure! I AM OBSESSED. I will admit the last couple of installments were not my favorite, but RED STATION totally makes up for it. Well done, Kenzie Jennings! Thank you to the Night Worms and Death’s Head Press for the free copy. #NightWormsBookParty

  4. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Rolfe

    Loved where this one went, and I enjoyed every turn it took to get there. RED STATION was a blast!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mindi

    Review to follow soon...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Serenity

    Good read! Enjoyable read. Nothing much happens until about the 50% mark, but the first half is still a good read. I didn't like the foreign words. Having to stop and look up each word to understand what it meant became frustrating. Some words you could guess what they meant, but still frustrating. A lot of the German words you couldn't even find easily to translate. Having a woman's name as Clyde was a little off putting. Having said all that... Good read! Dearly loved Clyde's character! Definit Good read! Enjoyable read. Nothing much happens until about the 50% mark, but the first half is still a good read. I didn't like the foreign words. Having to stop and look up each word to understand what it meant became frustrating. Some words you could guess what they meant, but still frustrating. A lot of the German words you couldn't even find easily to translate. Having a woman's name as Clyde was a little off putting. Having said all that... Good read! Dearly loved Clyde's character! Definitely suspenseful at times. Appreciated the gore. Would recommend!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard Martin

    “It was the hour of fresh blood, and the land was ravenous” The opening sentence of Kenzie Jenning’s new book, ‘Red Station’, part of Death’s Head Press’s ‘Splatter Western’ series, is perhaps my favourite opener of any book I have read this year. What I particularly like, other than it being a great line, is it also works as a declaration of what the reader is in for over the next 146 pages. Four weary travellers pull into a house seeking temporary respite from the sweltering heat and never-endi “It was the hour of fresh blood, and the land was ravenous” The opening sentence of Kenzie Jenning’s new book, ‘Red Station’, part of Death’s Head Press’s ‘Splatter Western’ series, is perhaps my favourite opener of any book I have read this year. What I particularly like, other than it being a great line, is it also works as a declaration of what the reader is in for over the next 146 pages. Four weary travellers pull into a house seeking temporary respite from the sweltering heat and never-ending plains of the old west. Weary and hungry, the owners offer them a comfortable room and a hot meal for the night. What at first appears to be an act of kindness soon transpires to be the beginning of the traveller’s worst nightmare. Isolated and trapped against overwhelming odds, a night at Red Station may turn out to be their last. This wasn’t my first Kenzie Jennings book (I previously reviewed her debut novel, ‘Reception’) but it was the first of the ‘Splatter Western’ line that I have tried (of which this is book seven). If ‘Red Station’ is any indication of the standard, then it appears I have some serious catching up to do. While I fully admit that a city dweller such as myself (and an English one at that) may not be the best judge of these things, the dialogue and the setting all felt very authentically Old West and it was very evocative of the westerns I’ve grown up watching. I certainly got the impression that Jennings has done a lot of homework to make the book feel like the real deal and it absolutely pays off. Much like ‘Reception’, ‘Red Station’ builds slowly until the midway point, after which all hell breaks loose. I like that we get to spend so much time getting to know the characters, and setting up the threat until the full extent of what is going on is revealed to us suddenly and without warning. It works very effectively and makes the stakes matter when things get going. There is a particular scene towards the middle of the book where all the characters are sat at a dinner table and we, the reader, suspect something isn’t quite right. The protagonists also think something’s amiss, and we start to get clued in on small but telling observations, and the tension just builds and builds until I had to stop reading and remember to breathe. Anyone who feels cheated by the slow burn first half can rest assured that they get their full books worth of the promised ‘splatter’ in the finale. For a relatively short book, there is certainly an impressive body count, especially considering they don’t start piling up until the midway point. Red Station reads like ‘The Devil’s Rejects’ in the wild west and the brutality is just as intense as you’d expect based on that comparison. Horror westerns are not a genre I can say I’ve read a great deal of in the past but Kenzie Jennings has made a convert of me. If you are yet to give the Splatter Western series a try, ‘Red Station’ is a highly recommended jumping on point. You can read more reviews of new and upcoming horror releases at https://www.myindiemuse.com/category/...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Richelle SheReadsHorror

    Review of “Red Station by Kenzie Jennings” This is the 7th book in the splatterpunk western series. They are all stand-alone books by different authors. You can jump in anywhere! If the western part scares you, then wipe that from your memory. This book is a straight up slasher with western undertones. Basically if you just love slashers then get on this, immediately!!! You won’t be disappointed. A group of travelers stop at a Station house to get some rest before they meet their final destinati Review of “Red Station by Kenzie Jennings” This is the 7th book in the splatterpunk western series. They are all stand-alone books by different authors. You can jump in anywhere! If the western part scares you, then wipe that from your memory. This book is a straight up slasher with western undertones. Basically if you just love slashers then get on this, immediately!!! You won’t be disappointed. A group of travelers stop at a Station house to get some rest before they meet their final destination. They are all on a mission whether it’s to go to their final homestead, find a missing person or just a mystery. Eating a warm meal and taking a lavish bath isn’t going to be all they are doing tonight. “𝐇𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐬𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐦𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐰𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐲. 𝐖𝐞 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐮𝐬𝐞 ‘𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐞’ 𝐮𝐧𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐰𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐲. 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐝𝐨 𝐰𝐞 𝐝𝐨 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐲? 𝐖𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐩𝐚𝐢𝐧.” We can talk about the western feel of the plains and the dress and mannerisms of the time period. Ladies are not to be rude, harsh or unlady like. Pish posh! We like our characters a little rough around the edges. My absolute favorite character was Clyde! There are little digs into her backstory and I want more of it. Another thing I loved was the set up of the story. It would go from being in action to in the mind of one of the characters watching the scenes play out. I didn’t realize how pivotal that was until the end of the book. My brain was leaking out of my ears from that explosive twist. Also, the fact that the inspiration for this story came from a true crime event is just insane! Kenzie straight up killed this book! 5/5 🩸 Thank you to Death’s Head Press , Kenzie Jennings and Nightworms for sending me this book in exchange for an honest review!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    My first foray into western horror turned out to be a hugely successful splatterfest!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ashley (bookishmommy)

    "Is it a persuasive treatise? A call to action?" "A response," she said flatly. "A response to...?" "To those who believe women should not be expected to be rational thinkers." If there is ever a SplatterWestern you should read, this is it. THIS. IS. IT! Red Station is a winner. The dialogue! The characters! The gore! It's all right here waiting for you. "Is it a persuasive treatise? A call to action?" "A response," she said flatly. "A response to...?" "To those who believe women should not be expected to be rational thinkers." If there is ever a SplatterWestern you should read, this is it. THIS. IS. IT! Red Station is a winner. The dialogue! The characters! The gore! It's all right here waiting for you.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brennan LaFaro

    I don’t know how long this horror western trend is going to stick around, but I’m going to take full advantage while it’s here. Jennings’ addition to Death’s Heads Press’ line of splatter westerns is actually relatively light on splatter in the beginning of the book. When a group of travelers are taken in for the night, given a place to stay, we’re treated to pages and pages of character development, not resembling much of a horror novel. This might sound like a complaint, but the interaction is I don’t know how long this horror western trend is going to stick around, but I’m going to take full advantage while it’s here. Jennings’ addition to Death’s Heads Press’ line of splatter westerns is actually relatively light on splatter in the beginning of the book. When a group of travelers are taken in for the night, given a place to stay, we’re treated to pages and pages of character development, not resembling much of a horror novel. This might sound like a complaint, but the interaction is entertaining and the dialogue crackles, and the time spent with these characters, particularly Miss Clyde Northway, pays off in a big way later. When the book takes its turn into horror territory, it cuts the wheel viciously and doesn’t bother to ease the brakes at all. Jennings’ visceral descriptions and stark action scenes paint vivid pictures of gore and mayhem rooted in humanity, or I suppose lack thereof. The action does not let up for a moment until the very last page, and though the book feels complete, there could be more story to tell, and I’d show up for it. Red Station makes full use of the old west setting without leaning into familiar and overused tropes the genre is rife with. A fresh story that uses dialogue and setting to showcase what can be done in this extremely specific sub-genre. While I’ve only read short fiction by Kenzie Jennings to this point, I’ll need to rectify that now that I’ve seen what the author can do with a longer form.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erin Talamantes

    When I decided to read this book, I was nervous. A horror western? On top of that, a splatterpunk western. I haven’t ventured too heavily into the splatterpunk realm, mostly because I have to be very prepared before starting one. So, this book just felt like I was going into something I wasn’t going to like before I even read the first page. Our story starts with a group of travelers in need of a place to rest. They have the perfect place, it’s guaranteed to have good food and a warm bed to slee When I decided to read this book, I was nervous. A horror western? On top of that, a splatterpunk western. I haven’t ventured too heavily into the splatterpunk realm, mostly because I have to be very prepared before starting one. So, this book just felt like I was going into something I wasn’t going to like before I even read the first page. Our story starts with a group of travelers in need of a place to rest. They have the perfect place, it’s guaranteed to have good food and a warm bed to sleep in. But the gracious hosts are a little off, something seems weird about them. Before you can even blink, the chaos ensues and all hell breaks loose. I’m actually impressed by how much I ended up liking this book. The western aspect is very subdued in my opinion, which is good for me because I don’t really care for that genre. The blood and gore is very well done, it’s not too excessive, it feels like there is a purpose behind it, and it adds to the thrill of everything. Clyde Northway is such a cool main character. She’s mysterious and super badass, her kill scenes are glorious and all around she’s just awesome. I would love to see more about her in another story, especially to find out more of her backstory. Overall, really impressed with my first ever western splatterpunk book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nina The Wandering Reader

    “It was the hour of fresh blood, and the land was ravenous.” Kenzie Jennings deserves a standing ovation for the cinematically written perfection that is RED STATION. What a fantastic new addition to the Splatter Western Collection! Right off the bat, chapter one introduces you to a stage coach filled with endearing characters traveling west towards their future—the most interesting of them all being the lady in red, Clyde Northway. When our travelers break for the evening at a station home and ar “It was the hour of fresh blood, and the land was ravenous.” Kenzie Jennings deserves a standing ovation for the cinematically written perfection that is RED STATION. What a fantastic new addition to the Splatter Western Collection! Right off the bat, chapter one introduces you to a stage coach filled with endearing characters traveling west towards their future—the most interesting of them all being the lady in red, Clyde Northway. When our travelers break for the evening at a station home and are welcomed by the warm hospitality of the Adler family, all seems well and cordial. But our travelers are in for the nightmare of their lives when they discover their hosts aren’t who they seem. First of all, it’s no surprise that the protagonist is a serious badass and I loved reading every freaking page in which she graced us with her presence in her fashionable red dress. Second, this story really packs a killer punch, but with steady pacing and captivating players! Throughout the chapters, I found myself rooting for the survival of characters I’d come to like while simultaneously hoping others would get their asses handed to them and it was frightening, exhilarating and pretty fantastic. Plus, Jennings does not hold back on that gritty, pulpy, bloody gore. There’s blood splattered all over these pages, folks. I was hungry for it, and it was glorious. This was my first read by Kenzie Jennings but it will not be my last as I’m officially a fan. Bravo! As a reminder, each Splatter Western by Deaths Head Press is a stand-alone, so if you’re looking for a place to start, book #7 RED STATION is an excellent choice. (Special thanks to Deaths Head Press, Night Worms, and author Kenzie Jennings for this #NightWormsBookParty review copy!)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt (TeamRedmon)

    Review to come

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lars (theatretenor) Skaar

    What an absolutely enjoyable horror novel! I love horror novels the best when they don’t have any supernatural elements. Just good old fashion human on human horror, and that’s what we find here. Fun little twist in the last handful of paragraphs, I did see part of it coming, but I don’t mind that! Because I enjoyed this one so much, I have downloaded Kenzie Jenning’s other book, Reception. Looks forward to that too as it’s supposed to be a cannibal horror book, which is more human on human horr What an absolutely enjoyable horror novel! I love horror novels the best when they don’t have any supernatural elements. Just good old fashion human on human horror, and that’s what we find here. Fun little twist in the last handful of paragraphs, I did see part of it coming, but I don’t mind that! Because I enjoyed this one so much, I have downloaded Kenzie Jenning’s other book, Reception. Looks forward to that too as it’s supposed to be a cannibal horror book, which is more human on human horror!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matt Holder

    This review is hosted on my blog here https://uponyourmarrowbones.wordpress..., and I've copied it below. I’ve been silent on here for a minute, busy with my teaching load or my own PhD studies or any of the other million things that 2020 has wrought. But when it came time for Kenzie Jennings’s entry in Death’s Head Press’s Splatter Western series, I knew I had to write something for it. Her debut novel, Reception, demonstrated a keen ear and eye for characterization and married (get it?!?!?) its This review is hosted on my blog here https://uponyourmarrowbones.wordpress..., and I've copied it below. I’ve been silent on here for a minute, busy with my teaching load or my own PhD studies or any of the other million things that 2020 has wrought. But when it came time for Kenzie Jennings’s entry in Death’s Head Press’s Splatter Western series, I knew I had to write something for it. Her debut novel, Reception, demonstrated a keen ear and eye for characterization and married (get it?!?!?) its horrific elements to the characters’ own trauma to give the whole piece a compelling thematic depth that I found fresh and exciting. Jennings’s horror grows organically out of her characters’ struggles, external manifestations of some internal conflict that is either self-imposed or socially obligated; because of this, her work is always honest and actually about something other than the blood and guts. I’m happy to say that Red Station continues that trend. On the surface we have the story of stagecoach passengers taking refuge at a station house, only to slowly realize that things are a bit stranger than they expected. Before you know it, the body count stacks up and the whole thing descends into a hellscape of death and carnage. If I were doing the pitch thing, I’d call this a mix of Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight with a dash of Wes Craven’s The Hills Have Eyes if you swapped out the mutant radiation for religious fanaticism, all filtered through a decidedly feminist lens that in some ways recalls Valerie Solanas’s SCUM Manifesto (in terms of its punk spirit, not necessarily in terms of its more problematic forced sterilization and mass murder message). Our protagonist here is “Clyde Northway, soon to be Darrow,” on her way to marry a man she’s only communicated with through letters and is not without his own social stigma (11). We’re introduced to her through the eyes of a doctor, who immediately notices what she’s wearing: “She wore red well, a deep, rich red much like garnet” (5). The doctor thinks “she was out of her element there, it seemed. A lady of refined society, one more inclined to find herself at ease at evening soirees” (5). And if the red dress weren’t enough for the doctor to initially dismiss Clyde as just another woman “out of her element,” she’s also reading (gasp!) A Vindication of the Rights of Women (double gasp!), one of the earliest articulations of a feminist philosophy (written by Mary Wollstonecraft, mother to Mary Shelley of Frankenstein fame — horror connections!). It’s a testament to Jennings’s economy of storytelling that, within the first few pages, she not only introduces the key symbols of the novel (the color red and the dress), but also that she tethers these symbols to their thematic referents, in this case feminism and its fight for equality and the rights over a woman’s body and mind. Because as the novel develops, Clyde becomes increasingly interesting and dynamic, always an active and powerful agent in the storytelling (but she still gets knocked out a few times, which adds a layer of believability and reality to her), and as she fights and claws and scrapes her way through one obstacle after another, the red dress holds constant. It’s definitely not an accident that, apart from the prologue, the novel opens and closes with the red dress, from the first line (quoted above) to the last, where (spoilers!) Clyde emerges from the night’s wreckage “looking, quite frankly, like the devil in what was once a really lovely red dress” (135). Red Station, in many ways, is about a woman navigating through and within the strictures imposed by an oppressive system, but instead of being smothered she upends the rules and makes her own way; in other words, Clyde can wear the dress and slaughter the crazies at the same time. (this idea of liberation-through-strictures is reinforced through an arm brace that Clyde wears, but I’ll let you discover that surprise on your own) And there’s still so much more going on! But I don’t want to deep dive into everything, although there’s also an intriguing angle in here about the perils of manifest destiny and westward expansion and the associated hubris, but I digress. With Red Station, Jennings continues to foreground a level of critical and political engagement that can sometimes go missing in a lot of titles. While I love indie horror, I’ve noticed a trend where authors pursue the grotesque for its own sake, without addressing seriously any of the ramifications of their violence, either in their worlds or for their characters. And I get it, not every book needs to be some philosophical meditation, and I don’t want to give the impression that Red Station isn’t a blast of gory fun, because it is. But the point is you can do both, as Jennings does here. And, to don my literary snob hat, you should do both. If you want your book to last, then it better be about more than its plot. Or you better be a stylistic wizard. In one of the more gross scenes in the book, one of our villains masturbates all over the pulpy remains of his victim’s skull. It’s an act of depravity motivated by a lust for sex and violence, and it’s ultimately a vapid display. I’ll just say, as with a lot in this book, there might be more going on here. Red Station is another strong showing for Jennings. Her characterizations are always compelling and sharply observed. Every action, every word, reveals some interior motivation, such that at times reading it can feel like experiencing a game in tactics, which is exactly how our characters understand each social interaction and how they evaluate threats. There are people to love and people to hate, but they’re all recognizable and intriguing in their own way. I loved my time with this book, and if you enjoy westerns or horror or just good writing, you will too.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    This was both my first Splatter Western and the first book I’ve read by Kenzie Jennings. I really enjoyed it. I’ve read quite a few horror westerns before by other authors, but everyone seems to be talking about this series. I had planned to pick a few of them up and after seeing a great review for this one on Instagram I grabbed it. The only criticism I have is the build up was a bit lengthy for the length of the book. I’d have preferred if it kicked in sooner and then there was a bit more back This was both my first Splatter Western and the first book I’ve read by Kenzie Jennings. I really enjoyed it. I’ve read quite a few horror westerns before by other authors, but everyone seems to be talking about this series. I had planned to pick a few of them up and after seeing a great review for this one on Instagram I grabbed it. The only criticism I have is the build up was a bit lengthy for the length of the book. I’d have preferred if it kicked in sooner and then there was a bit more back story on the bad guys. That being said, it’s a fun read and I enjoyed the authors writing style.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Josh reading

    This is my first read by Kenzie Jennigs, what a really wonderful voice this author has. Having read a previous entry in the Splatter house Western series, I knew I was in for a treat. The thing about this short, violent western horror that I really loved was the sheer boldness and bravery by the female protagonist. Clyde comes across as a cultured woman with a heart of steel. I really would love to read further adventures starring Clyde, what other terrors she might face and vanquish. Interestin This is my first read by Kenzie Jennigs, what a really wonderful voice this author has. Having read a previous entry in the Splatter house Western series, I knew I was in for a treat. The thing about this short, violent western horror that I really loved was the sheer boldness and bravery by the female protagonist. Clyde comes across as a cultured woman with a heart of steel. I really would love to read further adventures starring Clyde, what other terrors she might face and vanquish. Interesting characters in this short book, well worth your time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tara Losacano

    Yess!! I loved this book, definitely one of my favorites of the splatter western series. Clyde aka the lady in red was such a fascinating character and I just couldn't get enough of her badassery (is that a word? lol)! Kenzie Jennings totally hit the mark on the splatter and on the western of this splatter western and I can't wait to read more from her. 5/5 Adler skulls💀 Yess!! I loved this book, definitely one of my favorites of the splatter western series. Clyde aka the lady in red was such a fascinating character and I just couldn't get enough of her badassery (is that a word? lol)! Kenzie Jennings totally hit the mark on the splatter and on the western of this splatter western and I can't wait to read more from her. 5/5 Adler skulls💀

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    A wordy, seemingly aimless first third reverse course almost instantly into a well-told tale of madness and terror on the plains.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Lynch

    2020 had been many different things for many different people. I want to look back at 2020 as the year of the Splatter Western. Deaths Head Press came out of nowhere with these. Each author has created a different piece of art all in their own universes. Throughout the year, I eagerly anticipated each new book. Magpie Coffin kicked the door open, Red Station tossed a stick of dynamite through it. From a start to finish, Kenzie Jennings crafts a story that demands attention. We start off getting t 2020 had been many different things for many different people. I want to look back at 2020 as the year of the Splatter Western. Deaths Head Press came out of nowhere with these. Each author has created a different piece of art all in their own universes. Throughout the year, I eagerly anticipated each new book. Magpie Coffin kicked the door open, Red Station tossed a stick of dynamite through it. From a start to finish, Kenzie Jennings crafts a story that demands attention. We start off getting to now the characters through banter and dialogue on a stage coach, giving you just enough to spark the interest. When we reach our destination, you start to realize SOMETHING is up, and not soon after the story takes off like a bat out of hell. Red Station is a book full of excellent writing and brutal gore. The action is fast pace, it’s violent. It wears is splatter proudly. This is a book that if you want, you can easily finish in a day. Trust me, you’ll want to. Clyde is an interesting character, and I hope that this isn’t the last we hear from her. A few things that stick this book out from the pack. The writing. Off the top of my head, I think the writing here is the best it’s been so far in the series. Jennings and Deaths Head should be commended for putting this out there. Secondly, because I’ve personally brought this up in the pat previously, Jennings wisely avoids the pitfalls that other extreme books fall into, including things I’ve knocked other book for. It doesn’t use the time period as an excuse for its characters to spew racist stuff throughout. Right off the bat, one of the characters said something and another character immediately shut it down. It was refreshing,as was the fact that it doesn’t just throw rape in the plot as a means to make the book more extreme. Instead, Jennings puts her characters in a tough setting and let’s the blood fly. One more thing I’d like to put out there, and I won’t say much more as to avoid spoilers, but it was also refreshing to have a splatter western where we stay away from creatures, gods, and the supernatural. Not that there is anything wrong with that stuff, but again, it’s just something that puts Red Station ahead of the pack. Quite simply, it’s in a league of its own. In the indie publishing scene, 2020 was the year of the splatter western. Highly readable, tons of fun. Red Station by Kenzie Jennings represents the absolute pinnacle of what the series has to offer and I would say that this is my personal favorite of the series. BUY THIS BOOK

  22. 4 out of 5

    T.J. Tranchell

    Wild! From the first sentence to the final word, Jennings has given us H.H. Holmes on the prairie with a blazing dash of the Black Widow. From the introduction of Clyde Northaway--reading Wollstonecraft's feminist treatise, no less--we get a solid heroine set about her business. The "Red Station" feels like a distraction as she is out to pursue greater challenges but it is a distraction worth the time spent there. It's tight action leaves no room for filler as even the asides and brief moments o Wild! From the first sentence to the final word, Jennings has given us H.H. Holmes on the prairie with a blazing dash of the Black Widow. From the introduction of Clyde Northaway--reading Wollstonecraft's feminist treatise, no less--we get a solid heroine set about her business. The "Red Station" feels like a distraction as she is out to pursue greater challenges but it is a distraction worth the time spent there. It's tight action leaves no room for filler as even the asides and brief moments of backstory add clarity and depth to the action at hand. Will we see Clyde and her delightful personal armament (read the book, that's a pun) again? Only Jennings knows for sure. Mad props to the layout and cover team from Death's Head Press, too. All in all, a great book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tony Gragg

    Clyde, the main protagonist in this story, to me seems to be a female James West. Yes, I'm old, and he is one of the main characters from TV's The Wild, Wild West. This is a short, very violent, and well written story. I loved it, and would like to read more about Miss Northway. How she came to be, and her upcoming marriage. More Clyde please Kenzie! Clyde, the main protagonist in this story, to me seems to be a female James West. Yes, I'm old, and he is one of the main characters from TV's The Wild, Wild West. This is a short, very violent, and well written story. I loved it, and would like to read more about Miss Northway. How she came to be, and her upcoming marriage. More Clyde please Kenzie!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Mangum

    With her 2nd horror effort, Kenzie Jennings cements herself as a bigtime player in the genre. RED STATION unfolds like a classic western, but with the added bloodshed and grime of exploitation flicks like TEXAS CHAINSAW and FRONTIERS. A lean, mean book and a worthy entry to the popular Splatter Western series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    VICKI HERBERT

    The perils of Clyde Northway... No spoilers. 3 stars. Clyde Northway AKA the lady in red or the soon-to-be Mrs Darrow, is traveling by stagecoach to join her fiancé... The coach stops for the night to allow the weary travelers to have dinner and rest up at an isolated house in the middle of nowhere... Their hosts, a German family, are welcoming enough... yet something seems amiss and off to the observant Clyde ... Welcome to the perils of Pauline... I mean Clyde... This Splatter Western wasn't at all The perils of Clyde Northway... No spoilers. 3 stars. Clyde Northway AKA the lady in red or the soon-to-be Mrs Darrow, is traveling by stagecoach to join her fiancé... The coach stops for the night to allow the weary travelers to have dinner and rest up at an isolated house in the middle of nowhere... Their hosts, a German family, are welcoming enough... yet something seems amiss and off to the observant Clyde ... Welcome to the perils of Pauline... I mean Clyde... This Splatter Western wasn't at all what I expected. The story was very simplistic in a "smack! bang! pow!" comic book kind of way. I didn't read the preceding 6 installments so some of the story was lost on me. It wasn't a bad story but I found it highly unbelievable. BTW I hit a mental roadblock each time I encountered the name Clyde. It seemed more appropriate for a cowpoke gunslinger or a plowhorse than a beautiful lady in red!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Hobbs

    This book reminded me of Texas Chainsaw Massacre but without the chainsaw. Has a lot of fighting and blood and gore.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Deem

    It left me wanting more!!! Please tell me I’ll get the read more about the Lady in Red!!!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janine Pipe

    Review coming but bloody brilliant. Kenzie is legit amazing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    Red Station is Kenzie Jennings' second book, and it is even stronger than her first. I spent an enjoyable evening devouring this book. The characters are well drawn, and there is a good balance of action, suspense, and story. The characters drive this book, and they drive it hard and fast when the action begins. Clyde Northway was a fascinating character, one I hope to read more about in the future. Highly recommended. Red Station is Kenzie Jennings' second book, and it is even stronger than her first. I spent an enjoyable evening devouring this book. The characters are well drawn, and there is a good balance of action, suspense, and story. The characters drive this book, and they drive it hard and fast when the action begins. Clyde Northway was a fascinating character, one I hope to read more about in the future. Highly recommended.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Lee

    Red Station by Kenzie Jennings is a strong story with surprising layers and nuance. Yes, Extreme Horror, Splatter Western, with layers and nuance. It is a story that both holds true to and defies the accepted history of the time. The setting and characters are both simple and complex, the story, flowing and captivating. Suspense and mystery masterfully combine with vivid action as the reader is pulled into the characters and their journey. Additionally … Red Station is everything Extreme Horror sh Red Station by Kenzie Jennings is a strong story with surprising layers and nuance. Yes, Extreme Horror, Splatter Western, with layers and nuance. It is a story that both holds true to and defies the accepted history of the time. The setting and characters are both simple and complex, the story, flowing and captivating. Suspense and mystery masterfully combine with vivid action as the reader is pulled into the characters and their journey. Additionally … Red Station is everything Extreme Horror should be: driving, brutal, graphic, evocative, entertaining on many twisted levels. Kenzie Jennings has outdone herself with this bloody jewel in the Splatter Western Collection. This is a good story full of surprises and tension and action, a shelf-worthy, highly recommended read for extreme horror lovers. (Not for the squeamish)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.