counter create hit Economics in One Virus: An Introduction to Economic Reasoning Through Covid-19 - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Economics in One Virus: An Introduction to Economic Reasoning Through Covid-19

Availability: Ready to download

Have you ever stopped to wonder why hand sanitizer was missing from your pharmacy for months after the COVID-19 pandemic hit? Why some employers and employees were arguing over workers being re-hired during the first COVID-19 lockdown? Why passenger airlines were able to get their own ring-fenced bailout from Congress? Economics in One Virus answers all these pandemic-rela Have you ever stopped to wonder why hand sanitizer was missing from your pharmacy for months after the COVID-19 pandemic hit? Why some employers and employees were arguing over workers being re-hired during the first COVID-19 lockdown? Why passenger airlines were able to get their own ring-fenced bailout from Congress? Economics in One Virus answers all these pandemic-related questions and many more, drawing on the dramatic events of 2020 to bring to life some of the most important principles of economic thought. Packed with supporting data and the best new academic evidence, those uninitiated in economics will be given a crash-course in the subject through the applied case-study of the COVID-19 pandemic, to help explain everything from why the U.S. was underprepared for the pandemic to how economists go about valuing the lives saved from lockdowns. After digesting this highly readable, fast-paced, and provocative virus-themed economic tour, readers will be able to make much better sense of the events that they've lived through. Perhaps more importantly, the insights on everything from the role of the price mechanism to trade and specialization will grant even those wholly new to economics the skills to think like an economist in their own lives and when evaluating the choices of their political leaders.


Compare

Have you ever stopped to wonder why hand sanitizer was missing from your pharmacy for months after the COVID-19 pandemic hit? Why some employers and employees were arguing over workers being re-hired during the first COVID-19 lockdown? Why passenger airlines were able to get their own ring-fenced bailout from Congress? Economics in One Virus answers all these pandemic-rela Have you ever stopped to wonder why hand sanitizer was missing from your pharmacy for months after the COVID-19 pandemic hit? Why some employers and employees were arguing over workers being re-hired during the first COVID-19 lockdown? Why passenger airlines were able to get their own ring-fenced bailout from Congress? Economics in One Virus answers all these pandemic-related questions and many more, drawing on the dramatic events of 2020 to bring to life some of the most important principles of economic thought. Packed with supporting data and the best new academic evidence, those uninitiated in economics will be given a crash-course in the subject through the applied case-study of the COVID-19 pandemic, to help explain everything from why the U.S. was underprepared for the pandemic to how economists go about valuing the lives saved from lockdowns. After digesting this highly readable, fast-paced, and provocative virus-themed economic tour, readers will be able to make much better sense of the events that they've lived through. Perhaps more importantly, the insights on everything from the role of the price mechanism to trade and specialization will grant even those wholly new to economics the skills to think like an economist in their own lives and when evaluating the choices of their political leaders.

40 review for Economics in One Virus: An Introduction to Economic Reasoning Through Covid-19

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This is a great read, using a single event (the pandemic) to illustrate many key economic concepts, e.g. moral hazard, externalities, endogeneity, the price mechanism, free trade, the costs and benefits of regulation. It's based on top-tier academic research, which is particularly refreshing in a world in which authors just hand-pick whatever study they'd like to show the point they want to make (even if the study is flimsy). The book also dismisses many common misperceptions about economics, e. This is a great read, using a single event (the pandemic) to illustrate many key economic concepts, e.g. moral hazard, externalities, endogeneity, the price mechanism, free trade, the costs and benefits of regulation. It's based on top-tier academic research, which is particularly refreshing in a world in which authors just hand-pick whatever study they'd like to show the point they want to make (even if the study is flimsy). The book also dismisses many common misperceptions about economics, e.g. that it's about prediction/forecasting, that it only focuses on financial wealth/GDP not welfare etc. Over and above helping our understanding of economics in general, the book helps our understanding of the pandemic in particular. In particular, it explains how a better application of economic principles would have significantly improved responses to the pandemic. Even though the book takes a viewpoint, it is not dogmatic, and the views it takes are backed up by economic logic and evidence, rather than ideology or shooting from the hip.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wyatt Bush

    In my quest to find some more studies measuring causal impacts of various pandemic-specific policies, I stumbled across this excellent book - I rarely recommend or review books, but feel obligated to highlight how much I thoroughly enjoyed it. I devoured it in essentially one sitting - I don't normally even finish books let alone have them captivate me for that long! Its author, Ryan Bourne, is a libertarian (which I could fairly be called as well in a broad sense) and employee of the Cato Instit In my quest to find some more studies measuring causal impacts of various pandemic-specific policies, I stumbled across this excellent book - I rarely recommend or review books, but feel obligated to highlight how much I thoroughly enjoyed it. I devoured it in essentially one sitting - I don't normally even finish books let alone have them captivate me for that long! Its author, Ryan Bourne, is a libertarian (which I could fairly be called as well in a broad sense) and employee of the Cato Institute. Its inspiration and title are an allusion to Hazlitt's imo much inferior book, Economics in One Lesson. Unlike Hazlitt, I found Bourne to be incredibly impressive, empirical, and balanced - even if the author's libertarianism definitely shines through on more than one occasion. Not only did Bourne provide tons of citations to help get into the weeds on the most pressing angles of the pandemic, he did so in a way that effectively communicates how exactly economists go about analyzing the efficacy and tradeoffs of policies. Going in, I would have guessed there would be exposure to pretty basic concepts like analysis of marginal costs and benefits, externalities, etc. And those are in there, great. I would not have guessed there would be an explanation of something like difference in differences research design in a way I think any layperson would understand. Genuinely phenomenal! I thought the breadth and accessibility of economic and pandemic-specific concepts he covers in a relatively short space were very impressive, and I would heavily recommend it to anyone with tertiary interests in either of those subjects. It's also an excellent starting point into a bunch of great papers he cites throughout!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Danjw82

    A clear-eyed analysis of the worldwide pandemic and the lessons it can teach policy makers going forward. Lucid, methodical and written for the general reader and policy wonk alike, this is a much-needed examination of how Covid-19 effected the global economy and how we can escape its lasting effects. Highly recommended for those who wish to engage with data and not dogma.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Henry Hakamaki

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Mary

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura Scanlan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tessa

  9. 4 out of 5

    Roger Bourne

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Hughes

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eli

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Wadsworth

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo Viegas

  16. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kareem

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris Webster

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paritosh

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  21. 5 out of 5

    Arturo

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Ramirez

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pradyot Ghate

  24. 4 out of 5

    Suman Paul

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adam McCormick

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nick G

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rodrigo Affonso

  29. 4 out of 5

    Luke

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wallace Wallace

  31. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Bull Chafin

  32. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Finley

  33. 5 out of 5

    Nick Dale

  34. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Shaffer

  35. 4 out of 5

    Curtis Powell

  36. 4 out of 5

    Absolute Error

  37. 4 out of 5

    Peyton McCardwell

  38. 4 out of 5

    ZakyiaMarie

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sally Dixon

  40. 5 out of 5

    Kristoffer

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.