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A Mosque in the Jungle

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Othman Wok left an indelible mark on Singaporean politics and society, and was “steadfast and unwavering in believing in a multiracial, multi-religious, meritocratic Singapore” (in the words of PM Lee Hsien Loong). In addition, he pioneered the writing of ghost stories and horror fiction in Malay while working as a young reporter in the 1950s. These stories made him a hous Othman Wok left an indelible mark on Singaporean politics and society, and was “steadfast and unwavering in believing in a multiracial, multi-religious, meritocratic Singapore” (in the words of PM Lee Hsien Loong). In addition, he pioneered the writing of ghost stories and horror fiction in Malay while working as a young reporter in the 1950s. These stories made him a household name in the Malay-speaking world, years before his political career took off. In fact, these tales were arguably the first examples of horror fiction in either Singapore or Malaysia, in any language. A Mosque in the Jungle assembles two dozen of the best stories from his three fiction collections in English: Malayan Horror (1991), The Disused Well (1995) and Unseen Occupants (2006). Curated by award-winning poet and fictionist Ng Yi-Sheng, this book provides an entry point into Othman’s fiction, and a window into the work of a “literary genius” (Farouk A. Peru, Malay Mail Online).


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Othman Wok left an indelible mark on Singaporean politics and society, and was “steadfast and unwavering in believing in a multiracial, multi-religious, meritocratic Singapore” (in the words of PM Lee Hsien Loong). In addition, he pioneered the writing of ghost stories and horror fiction in Malay while working as a young reporter in the 1950s. These stories made him a hous Othman Wok left an indelible mark on Singaporean politics and society, and was “steadfast and unwavering in believing in a multiracial, multi-religious, meritocratic Singapore” (in the words of PM Lee Hsien Loong). In addition, he pioneered the writing of ghost stories and horror fiction in Malay while working as a young reporter in the 1950s. These stories made him a household name in the Malay-speaking world, years before his political career took off. In fact, these tales were arguably the first examples of horror fiction in either Singapore or Malaysia, in any language. A Mosque in the Jungle assembles two dozen of the best stories from his three fiction collections in English: Malayan Horror (1991), The Disused Well (1995) and Unseen Occupants (2006). Curated by award-winning poet and fictionist Ng Yi-Sheng, this book provides an entry point into Othman’s fiction, and a window into the work of a “literary genius” (Farouk A. Peru, Malay Mail Online).

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