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Conservative talk radio's fastest-growing superstar is also a New York Times bestselling phenomenon: the author of the groundbreaking critique of the Supreme Court, Men in Black, and the deeply personal dog lover's memoir Rescuing Sprite, Mark R. Levin now delivers the book that characterizes both his devotion to his more than 5 million listeners and his love of our countr Conservative talk radio's fastest-growing superstar is also a New York Times bestselling phenomenon: the author of the groundbreaking critique of the Supreme Court, Men in Black, and the deeply personal dog lover's memoir Rescuing Sprite, Mark R. Levin now delivers the book that characterizes both his devotion to his more than 5 million listeners and his love of our country and the legacy of our Founding Fathers: Liberty and Tyranny is Mark R. Levin's clarion call to conservative America, a new manifesto for the conservative movement for the 21st century.In the face of the modern liberal assault on Constitution-based values, an attack that has steadily snowballed since President Roosevelt's New Deal of the 1930s and resulted in a federal government that is a massive, unaccountable conglomerate, the time for re-enforcing the intellectual and practical case for conservatism is now. Conservative beliefs in individual freedoms do in the end stand for liberty for all Americans, while liberal dictates lead to the breakdown of civilized society -- in short, tyranny. Looking back to look to the future, Levin writes "conservatism is the antidote to tyranny precisely because its principles are our founding principles." And in a series of powerful essays, Levin lays out how conservatives can counter the liberal corrosion that has filtered into every timely issue affecting our daily lives, from the economy to health care, global warming, immigration, and more -- and illustrates how change, as seen through the conservative lens, is always prudent, and always an enhancement to individual freedom.As provocative, well-reasoned, robust, and informed as his on-air commentary, Levin's narrative will galvanize readers to begin a new era in conservative thinking and action. Liberty and Tyranny provides a philosophical, historical, and practical framework for revitalizing the conservative vision and ensuring the preservation of American society.


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Conservative talk radio's fastest-growing superstar is also a New York Times bestselling phenomenon: the author of the groundbreaking critique of the Supreme Court, Men in Black, and the deeply personal dog lover's memoir Rescuing Sprite, Mark R. Levin now delivers the book that characterizes both his devotion to his more than 5 million listeners and his love of our countr Conservative talk radio's fastest-growing superstar is also a New York Times bestselling phenomenon: the author of the groundbreaking critique of the Supreme Court, Men in Black, and the deeply personal dog lover's memoir Rescuing Sprite, Mark R. Levin now delivers the book that characterizes both his devotion to his more than 5 million listeners and his love of our country and the legacy of our Founding Fathers: Liberty and Tyranny is Mark R. Levin's clarion call to conservative America, a new manifesto for the conservative movement for the 21st century.In the face of the modern liberal assault on Constitution-based values, an attack that has steadily snowballed since President Roosevelt's New Deal of the 1930s and resulted in a federal government that is a massive, unaccountable conglomerate, the time for re-enforcing the intellectual and practical case for conservatism is now. Conservative beliefs in individual freedoms do in the end stand for liberty for all Americans, while liberal dictates lead to the breakdown of civilized society -- in short, tyranny. Looking back to look to the future, Levin writes "conservatism is the antidote to tyranny precisely because its principles are our founding principles." And in a series of powerful essays, Levin lays out how conservatives can counter the liberal corrosion that has filtered into every timely issue affecting our daily lives, from the economy to health care, global warming, immigration, and more -- and illustrates how change, as seen through the conservative lens, is always prudent, and always an enhancement to individual freedom.As provocative, well-reasoned, robust, and informed as his on-air commentary, Levin's narrative will galvanize readers to begin a new era in conservative thinking and action. Liberty and Tyranny provides a philosophical, historical, and practical framework for revitalizing the conservative vision and ensuring the preservation of American society.

30 review for Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Conservative. That word is a bit over used you know? I mean I'm a conservative, but what does that mean to you and to anyone and everyone else for that matter? To Karen Finney on MSNBC we have been informed that "conservative Values" is code for "race". If you believe that, you don't understand what a conservative is (And I suspect Clarence Thomas, Condoleezza Rice, Thomas Sowell, etc., etc might disagree with you) maybe you could take just a few minutes to rethink? If you have an open mind and Conservative. That word is a bit over used you know? I mean I'm a conservative, but what does that mean to you and to anyone and everyone else for that matter? To Karen Finney on MSNBC we have been informed that "conservative Values" is code for "race". If you believe that, you don't understand what a conservative is (And I suspect Clarence Thomas, Condoleezza Rice, Thomas Sowell, etc., etc might disagree with you) maybe you could take just a few minutes to rethink? If you have an open mind and if you really want to know what a conservative is and what a conservative believes try reading this book. Whether you end by agreeing with the ideas laid out or not at least you'll understand what conservatives believe, what we think. This is readable and straight forward. The chapters are laid out giving a sort of thumbnail look at various forms of conservatism (social conservatism, fiscal conservatism even the so called neo-con). The chapters open with a statement of what you'll be looking at in said chapter. It's a concise look at conservatism and I think one of the best of its kind that I've read. Recommended and not only recommended but I urge you to read it especially if you really want to consider who conservatives are. Let me add one caveat', no label will cover the exact beliefs and views of each person. This book will give you a good idea of what the word Conservative means to the people who identify with said label.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Liberty and Tyranny by Mark R. Levin (pp. 256) Subtitled “A Conservative Manifesto”, Levin does a strong job of articulating a modern conservative perspective without a lot of the base pandering hyperbole. The first two chapters read much like an intro level Poly Sci class referencing Jefferson, de Tocqueville, the Declaration of Independence, and other origin classics. The problem with reviewing any political text, especially one by a popular TV/radio host, is that personal politics may greatly a Liberty and Tyranny by Mark R. Levin (pp. 256) Subtitled “A Conservative Manifesto”, Levin does a strong job of articulating a modern conservative perspective without a lot of the base pandering hyperbole. The first two chapters read much like an intro level Poly Sci class referencing Jefferson, de Tocqueville, the Declaration of Independence, and other origin classics. The problem with reviewing any political text, especially one by a popular TV/radio host, is that personal politics may greatly affect your review. I was genuinely surprised by the simplicity of his policy statements and the lacks of a lot of incendiary language one would typically expect. This is not O’Reilly, Coulter, or Rove. He doesn’t make his arguments by invoking the sentimental good old days, moral correctness, stating that religion is the answer, or that all people who disagree are lazy idiots. He provides 40-plus pages of footnotes and cites for 197 pages of actual text. Reviewing the footnotes, it’s interesting to see how 90% of his argument backup comes straight from quotes from the Founding Fathers or the governmental agencies that are considered expert gatherers of those data points. In the first two chapters and only occasionally through the rest of the chapters, does he get the snarky pundit tone. He keeps his TV voice largely in check. He’s presentation style is highly readable, succinct, and articulate. Whether he’s covering the judiciary, taxation, immigration, health care, or the welfare state, he makes some powerful arguments that whether you agree with them or not. He presents a classic Conservative perspective and how current politicos on both sides of the aisle are failing the American people, the founding fathers, and the Constitution that is likely to become a required reading in future college classes. Even if you find the word, “conservative”, a pejorative, it’s still an interesting read that’s nothing like a Fox News special.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Barry

    I hate to say it but I am really disappointed in this book, mostly because it was billed as being a strong defense of conservatism. As a student of political philosophy and an independent thinker, I'm disappointed with Levin's rhetorical duplicity and faux logic. The majority of the book is spent building up a straw-man “the Statist” which we are to understand is the modern liberal, at least at first. The problem is that by confronting this straw-man Levin doesn't challenge actual positions, he c I hate to say it but I am really disappointed in this book, mostly because it was billed as being a strong defense of conservatism. As a student of political philosophy and an independent thinker, I'm disappointed with Levin's rhetorical duplicity and faux logic. The majority of the book is spent building up a straw-man “the Statist” which we are to understand is the modern liberal, at least at first. The problem is that by confronting this straw-man Levin doesn't challenge actual positions, he challenges invented positions and wins handily. I think this was intended to show strength, but ended only with Levin as the anti-Statist. Unfortunately, after several chapters Levin convinced me that the Statist exists only in his mind as an amalgam of people who don’t embrace his dogma. This left me seeing Levin as more anti-“my-made-up-enemy”, than he is pro-liberty. My other beef is his use of phrases like "It is observed that..." and “According to some…” and "For the Statist..."; phrases that assert facts without attribution. Wikipedia calls these "weasel words". I agree. There is a reason William F. Buckley and George Will don’t write like this. If you can't state your argument clearly and defend it without relying on weasel words, your argument is suspect. Last, from his writing style I think Levin sees himself as a modern great-thinker/philosopher, like Locke or Mill. These guys are geniuses, I contend Levin is not. Like Locke and Mill, he uses evocative language and long strings of dependencies to make his points. Clearly he’s a smart guy. The problem is that if you read carefully, he’s not working forward from fundamental truths to their logical conclusion (whatever that may be) he’s working toward a predetermined set of conclusions using windy rhetoric to get there. Levin is smart enough to know that his syllogisms aren’t grounded. For me that’s when he moves from philosophy to dogma. He’s not arguing to convince, he’s arguing to convert. That said, his actual Manifesto (items 1-10 of the book’s epilogue) is excellent. It's too bad he waited so long to state it, and spent so little time elaborating on it. There is real meat here and lots to think about. Levin’s 10 points are an excellent contribution to public discourse on issues facing America today. He should move it to the front of the book and make the rest an epilogue. Bottom line, he's not a philosopher, he's an activist. Read this book, but prepare to have your intelligence insulted.

  4. 5 out of 5

    TheQueensBooksII

    I have been a student of economics and free markets for awhile now. While I'm no professor, I do have a pretty clear grasp of what makes a healthy and strong economy and country, and what hurts one. I thought that reading Levin's book would be more preaching to the choir, but I was very pleasantly surprised. He is knowledgeable, factual, and presents things in a most refreshing way. I often have to revisit concepts I thought I was familiar with to really grasp what he was educating us about in h I have been a student of economics and free markets for awhile now. While I'm no professor, I do have a pretty clear grasp of what makes a healthy and strong economy and country, and what hurts one. I thought that reading Levin's book would be more preaching to the choir, but I was very pleasantly surprised. He is knowledgeable, factual, and presents things in a most refreshing way. I often have to revisit concepts I thought I was familiar with to really grasp what he was educating us about in his book. This book is on the front wave of a conservative revolution. Already 6 weeks and counting on the NYTimes Bestseller list, it has taken readers to a place that other books of the same subject have not managed to do. I'm sure a lot of that is due to his popularity as a radio talkshow host; nonetheless, if you are looking for a thoughtful read, and are willing to be engaged and possibly challenged, then this is a must read. Makes a great graduation gift.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    Three thoughts: 1. We really don't need whiney, radical conservatives who use their talk show to promote their books. 2. If you aren't old enough to rememeber Eugene McCarthy, you should give this book a read, and the radio show a listen. This guy is McCarthy all over again. 3. I had a nice conversation with an 80 year old woman last Sunday, a person that I really respect for her grace and experience. But I was shocked when the subject came around to Obama, and she said "you know, he really is a f Three thoughts: 1. We really don't need whiney, radical conservatives who use their talk show to promote their books. 2. If you aren't old enough to rememeber Eugene McCarthy, you should give this book a read, and the radio show a listen. This guy is McCarthy all over again. 3. I had a nice conversation with an 80 year old woman last Sunday, a person that I really respect for her grace and experience. But I was shocked when the subject came around to Obama, and she said "you know, he really is a fascist". I don't blame her... I blame Mr. Levin.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    From 1776 to 1781, the U.S. founding fathers worked to draft and ratify a document that established a limited government that would bring together a confederation of the states. Their goal in limiting the scope of government power was to protect the sovereignty of states and maximize individual freedom. It quickly became evident that the powers granted the Continental Congress were simply too weak for effective governing and our current Constitution had to be drafted. Their desire for a limited From 1776 to 1781, the U.S. founding fathers worked to draft and ratify a document that established a limited government that would bring together a confederation of the states. Their goal in limiting the scope of government power was to protect the sovereignty of states and maximize individual freedom. It quickly became evident that the powers granted the Continental Congress were simply too weak for effective governing and our current Constitution had to be drafted. Their desire for a limited government remained the same, though, and many on all side of the political spectrum have lost sight of this. Ronald Reagan famously said that "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." Too many feel that only government can solve all our problems, and this is exactly what Mark Levin addresses in his book Liberty and Tyranny. Levin sets up most of the book as a differentiation between two imaginary characters, The Statist and The Conservative. He provides an eye-opening summary of the battle of principles being played out in our own time. The first several chapters cover Faith, The Constitution, and Federalism, but by chapter 7, we start to recognize the very things that are happening in the U.S. today. Here he addresses the welfare state being promoted by the current administration, and all progressives over the last 100 years. "If the Statist were to devise a scheme whereby a grandparent would be stealing future earnings from his own grandchild, would the grandparent consent to such immoral behavior?" If you think not, maybe you just aren't paying attention. This week the congress has been planning to raise the debt ceiling another $1.9 trillion to a total of $14.3 trillion. What's the plan here? Spend the government into the ground. Create total dependence on government. Remake the government in your own image. Google: Cloward and Piven, or Saul Alinsky It's not just the massive spending programs that have taken place over the past year, but the unfunded liabilities from entitlement programs like Social Security. They've led people to believe that their taxes are being taken and put into a savings account on their behalf (that's what the privatization of social security would have done if the Dems hadn't killed it under Bush.) On the contrary, they simply take money from workers, write checks to retirees, and promise to pay workers back when it's their turn to retire. As of this writing, Social Security liabilities stand above $14 trillion. Total U.S. UNFUNDED liabilities stands over $107 trillion. If you're breathing and you are a U.S. citizen, you owe $347,000, even if you were literally born yesterday. Adding "free" health care into the mix is a guaranteed disaster. The last year should have been spent lowering taxes and allowing the private sector to create jobs, not raising taxes and spending more, while no jobs were created (or saved) and official unemployment soars past 10% (at least 17% when you add in people who have given up looking for a job). Chapter 8 is about enviro-statism. Whenever someone says the debate is over, and the science is settled, be very skeptical. Global warming continues to crumble under the weight of its own cover-ups, and the "scientists" just yell louder that the debate is over, calling skeptics "deniers". They simply don't have the science to show the Earth is warming, let alone to show that it's man-made. The greenies have doubled down on their efforts towards environmental control, translated into control of YOU. Cap and trade will not have any effect on the environment. What it would do if passed is make people who are invested in "green technology" like Al Gore and General Electric rich, and force the working man to pay double for energy, and eliminate cheap energy needed for developing countries. More government control. Less freedom. Decreasing prosperity. Chapter 9 is one of the most unsettling in the book. Illegal immigrants are literally changing the face and culture of the country. Continued unchecked mass immigration is unsustainable, just like current government spending. The preservation of our history and culture is impossible when illegals continue to flood over the border, refuse to assimilate or learn the language, set up their own communities, and reproduce at a rate higher than naturalized citizens, providing "anchor babies" in a distortion of U.S. law. It's estimated that 9 percent of the population of Mexico was living in the U.S. by 2004. For 40 years the flood has continued, and must be stopped. By the time 2010 is out, progressives will not doubt have a bill proposing citizenship for illegals who are already here. Those who began their association with the country by breaking the law, don't pay income taxes (the Fair Tax would force them to), and use facilities such as emergency rooms without paying, would become voters that ensure progressive (not to be confused with actual progress) control of government for generations to come. After a chapter about gun control, Mark Levin ends his relatively small volume with about 10 pages summarizing the basic conservative position on various aspects of politics. His book provides a potent counterpoint to those to say conservatives are simply a party of "no". Look closer at those things to which we say "no": Change for the sake of change, a government that insists we push a $1 trillion health care bill through congress in a matter of weeks, unconstitutional government control, higher taxes, higher energy costs, inaction on illegal immigration.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bracey

    Mark Levin begins his masterpiece by meticulously detailing the idea of American Sovereignty which is rooted in a belief that God has given man a desire for liberty. In so doing he describes how liberals reject this notion of American Superiority and how they seek to surrender voluntarily the sovereignty that our forefathers fought and died for. According to Levin the desire of the founders was to give their posterity a free nation, unencumbered of political weights that always run any nation ag Mark Levin begins his masterpiece by meticulously detailing the idea of American Sovereignty which is rooted in a belief that God has given man a desire for liberty. In so doing he describes how liberals reject this notion of American Superiority and how they seek to surrender voluntarily the sovereignty that our forefathers fought and died for. According to Levin the desire of the founders was to give their posterity a free nation, unencumbered of political weights that always run any nation aground. Levin makes the case that conservatives should be familiar and know the philosophical, historical, and theological foundations for the principles they wish to disseminate in order to defend liberty from the tyranny of good intentions by the liberal left. There are many on the political right who find themselves unable to articulate conservative ideas. Aside from Ronald Reagan, Pat Buchanan, and Alan Keyes have you ever encountered an articulate presentation of just what is a conservative? In Liberty and Tyranny Mark Levin outlines a conservative primer where he states in no uncertain terms what precisely a conservative believes regarding social progress, the role of government, rights of individuals as being derived from God, free market enterprise, general welfare based on the decisions of individuals and not the State, eco extremism, the power of representative government being usurped by an activist judiciary, uncontrolled illegal immigration, and so much more. In what I regard as the best part of the book, Levin interweaves the disciplines of philosophy, logic, and history to define “statism” as the longing for complete control of all human activity by a collective group of humans who supposedly know better, these generally comprise workers of the State or the federal government. As you read further and encounter other parts of the book you will notice that Levin uses another definition to describe the statist mindset, as that which believes that the federal government is supreme, correct and the first place whereby all individuals should turn to have their everyday problems solved. If you are thinking Great Society, Obama bailouts and government control of car companies, and banks, then you are not far in your understanding of how deep the modern ideology of liberal “statism” has permeated our culture and society. I trust you will find this tome a worthy read and may you always fight for freedom and liberty.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    "Poorly argued" would be the short way I would describe my dissatisfaction with this book. As for the longer version... I guess my biggest problem would be that the "opposition" the author describes appears to be a creation entirely of his own imagining. Everything from their background to their ideologies to their political agenda is outlined, yet nowhere does the author provide any evidence that there exists a group that actually matches the provided description. The author provides these imagin "Poorly argued" would be the short way I would describe my dissatisfaction with this book. As for the longer version... I guess my biggest problem would be that the "opposition" the author describes appears to be a creation entirely of his own imagining. Everything from their background to their ideologies to their political agenda is outlined, yet nowhere does the author provide any evidence that there exists a group that actually matches the provided description. The author provides these imaginary people with a label - "Statists" - and then proceeds to argue why they and their vision for the future will be the destruction of America and the birth of a real-world system of government straight out of Orwell's "1984." This sort of hyperbolic approach might have been just fine, if the author had actually used it to help illustrate his point of view and to show how the policies he's in favor of would help keep America from that terrible fate. But instead, everything discussed had the tone of: "The Statist wants you to believe 2+2=5, but I'm here to tell you it does not: it equals 4! But he is out there, and he is doing everything he can to convince us that the answer is 5... and thus we must be ever vigilant to keep him from achieving his dastardly goals." (Ok, maybe that was a bit of an exaggeration, but the book really does read like that: here's an imaginary group of people who believe these imaginary things that are clearly detrimental to freedom in our country, and so we need to oppose them every chance we get.) I was hoping for a more reasoned approach, one that might actually explain how rational people can legitimately be concerned about the possibility of tyranny emerging in our country, but this book simply doesn't provide that. P.S. If you do go ahead and read it anyway, I'd suggest an exercise: every time the author describes an aspect of "the Statist," write it down. Then, when you've finished the book and have probably 5-10 pages of notes, type them up and post them here and we'll see if we can't figure out just who the heck this book was actually discussing! :-)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Probably the best book I have read recently for my liberal friends to read to understand conservatism, and why we believe the "state" is not your friend. For my unaffiliated or independent friends, a great read on why you can't stay on the sidelines. For my libertarian friends, a solid reminder and primer on why conservatism is the current home of liberty. For my conservative friends, an excellent primer on the why's and how's of conservative thought and action. The thing I like most about this book Probably the best book I have read recently for my liberal friends to read to understand conservatism, and why we believe the "state" is not your friend. For my unaffiliated or independent friends, a great read on why you can't stay on the sidelines. For my libertarian friends, a solid reminder and primer on why conservatism is the current home of liberty. For my conservative friends, an excellent primer on the why's and how's of conservative thought and action. The thing I like most about this book for the casual reader is it is very skimmable. The paragraphs and chapters are organized so that you can dig as deep as you want, and skim over the details that you don't need. The sad thing is that many of my liberal friends and family, based on conversations and letters, cannot leave the "CNN Bubble" long enough to seek out alternative views enough to understand them.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    OK, I have to start by saying there was only one or two things I didn't agree with in this book. This is the conservative's bible. I already felt everything in this book, and now I know why and am armed with the facts behind my beliefs. I love how everything is footnoted so if you want to read the original copy of Levin's information you can get right to it. So much history I never learned because we aren't taught it. I should have gone after it myself. We are following in histories footsteps an OK, I have to start by saying there was only one or two things I didn't agree with in this book. This is the conservative's bible. I already felt everything in this book, and now I know why and am armed with the facts behind my beliefs. I love how everything is footnoted so if you want to read the original copy of Levin's information you can get right to it. So much history I never learned because we aren't taught it. I should have gone after it myself. We are following in histories footsteps and making the same mistakes FDR made with the new deal. I hope everyone reads this so we can do something before it is too late.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kipi

    4.5 stars Most of the polls I’ve been able to find have our country fairly split 45% conservative/ 10 middle-of-the-road/45% liberal. The levels of conviction of those two groups of 45% vary from “very” to “moderate, leaning” on both sides. While most of the mainstream TV media (with the exception of Fox News) leans left, talk radio leans right, and that’s where Mark Levin has found his niche. Here in the DFW area you can hear his show every afternoon on WBAP 820 from 5:00 - 8:00. With all the dr 4.5 stars Most of the polls I’ve been able to find have our country fairly split 45% conservative/ 10 middle-of-the-road/45% liberal. The levels of conviction of those two groups of 45% vary from “very” to “moderate, leaning” on both sides. While most of the mainstream TV media (with the exception of Fox News) leans left, talk radio leans right, and that’s where Mark Levin has found his niche. Here in the DFW area you can hear his show every afternoon on WBAP 820 from 5:00 - 8:00. With all the driving of children to this activity or that, I have heard his show often. I will admit that I don’t usually listen for long. Either we get to where we are going so the radio is turned off, the Rangers game starts or I get a little tired of hearing Mark yell. And he yells a lot. Not that I don’t agree with most of what he says. I just don’t like the yelling. When it comes to writing, though, he is quite articulate, and his latest work is Liberty and Tyranny: A Conservative Manifesto. Anyone who has spent time listening to his radio show can have no doubt as to where he stands on the issues, and he lays it out here precisely, piece by piece. He is an attorney, so he makes his arguments well. He does, in fact, say what most conservatives wish that their Republican congressmen would say, and he says it with passion. The 45% of Americans that consider themselves conservative will read this book and be more certain of their convictions. The 45% who are liberal, whom Levin calls “statists,” will probably find nothing here that will change their minds. I don’t believe, though, that the intent of the book was to win over those who vehemently disagree with him, any more than Al Franken or Michael Moore believe that they could win over a true conservative. It just isn’t going to happen. That 10% in the middle could be another matter. I…from my starting point as a conservative…found the logic of his arguments compelling. It is laid out well, making one point after another in clear concise language. The only chapter that was sort of lawyer-sounding was the one on the Constitution. He refers back to that magnificent document throughout the book, but it is only that one section that was a tad too lawyer-ese-y for me. For anyone who is uncomfortable with the socialist direction in which our country seems to be heading, I would highly recommend this book. Read it and then write your representatives at all levels of government, and let them know how you feel. If you lean more to the left, I would still recommend it as a well-written book…I’m just pretty sure you won’t like it. Whether you agree with his stance or not, he is resonating with American readers. The book has been #1 on the New York Times Bestseller list (non-fiction) since it was published five weeks ago. It is also the #1 non-fiction seller at Amazon.com.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This is a well written text that explores the intricacies, history, and future of true conservatism. Mark Levin writes with a lawyers understanding of law, clarity, and logic. Although this text is not written in incomprehensible lawyer speak, neither is it dumbed down. If you read and think about this work it will yield benefits to the close reader. Regardless of one's political affiliation, Mr. Levin provides more than enough reference notes to assure the reader that this is not unreferenced pr This is a well written text that explores the intricacies, history, and future of true conservatism. Mark Levin writes with a lawyers understanding of law, clarity, and logic. Although this text is not written in incomprehensible lawyer speak, neither is it dumbed down. If you read and think about this work it will yield benefits to the close reader. Regardless of one's political affiliation, Mr. Levin provides more than enough reference notes to assure the reader that this is not unreferenced propaganda. He also lays out the statist /liberal arguments in their own words. This nifty device gives even more credence to Mr. Levin's proposals, as he does not have to resort to the personal name calling that so many on the left employ. Think Letterman's obscene and sexist Palin jokes, Garafalo's racist spews, Matthews' name calling on MSNBC, etc. This list could go on and on, but I digress. Levin simply has to engage liberal arguments and through deductive and inductive reasoning prove them to be the fallacies that they are. The extensive 'Notes' section can lead the reader to even more treasures if they take the time to check out the veracity of his sources. Although the entire text is well done Mr. Levin hits his stride in the chapter on the US Constitution, and his chapter on Enviro-Statism. This is a book that needs to be shared, if only for the intellectual debate it will stir. Those of you who hate (in itself ridiculous) Mr. Levin or his ideas (I have not heard Mr. Levin's radio show, I knew nothing of him until I read this text) then you need to show the strength of your ideas based on the ideas themselves. This reader would have much more respect for you if you could. Intellectual debate is needed. This text provides it. Read it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    As promised, an excellent read, laying down the foundation for Conservatism, it's history, why it's essential to preserve it, and ways of preserving it. Levin methodically and empirically submits the case of liberalism (i.e. statism) versus conservatism and why conservatism is THE only ideology (historically and presently) that exists to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States and the people of this great land. Statism is a stealth and dangerous ideology and one that cannot "def As promised, an excellent read, laying down the foundation for Conservatism, it's history, why it's essential to preserve it, and ways of preserving it. Levin methodically and empirically submits the case of liberalism (i.e. statism) versus conservatism and why conservatism is THE only ideology (historically and presently) that exists to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States and the people of this great land. Statism is a stealth and dangerous ideology and one that cannot "defeat" conservatism, so long as conservatives engage in the fight and stay true to its originally defined characteristics. Conservatism has a much greater and more pronounced history in the United States and is the dominant set of beliefs behind individualism, free markets and capitalism, private property, and liberty and freedom overall. As such, the modern day statist is obsessed with systematically destroying and debunking it -- so that their ideals of collectivism, equality, and a "utopian" state can come into existence. All impossible, unrealistic, and dangerous pursuits -- and which Levin thoroughly rebuts in this book. A must read for all conservatives, independents, historians (who want the REAL truth), and other seekers.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    This was a very good book, with the exception of some confusions in chapter 10 -- the one on national self-defense. The warfare state gobbles liberty just like the welfare state does. And in terms of competence, why is it that conservatives think that the feds can't run the Post Office, and yet are somehow fully up to the challenge of running Afghanistan? This was a very good book, with the exception of some confusions in chapter 10 -- the one on national self-defense. The warfare state gobbles liberty just like the welfare state does. And in terms of competence, why is it that conservatives think that the feds can't run the Post Office, and yet are somehow fully up to the challenge of running Afghanistan?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Allow me to summarize this book for you: Conservative = liberty = good Non-convservative = tyranny = bad There. Now you don't have to read this book. I only wish I'd had the luxury of having someone summarize it for me that way. This was picked for book club. I would not have chosen to read this book. That said, my primary arguments with this book have nothing to do with the author's political views. My problems with this book are based on the ridiculous rhetoric and style of argument. The author co Allow me to summarize this book for you: Conservative = liberty = good Non-convservative = tyranny = bad There. Now you don't have to read this book. I only wish I'd had the luxury of having someone summarize it for me that way. This was picked for book club. I would not have chosen to read this book. That said, my primary arguments with this book have nothing to do with the author's political views. My problems with this book are based on the ridiculous rhetoric and style of argument. The author continually demonizes his opponent. He makes claim after claim with no proof. And the writing is rife with fallacies. Non-sequitors, red herrings, and straw man arguments just to name a few. I understand that he worked as an attorney. This book is definitely written to appeal to a jury rather than a judge. It uses emotion and scare tactics to try to prove points that do not have actual foundation. And while the book has copious end notes, this should not be miscontrued to mean that the claims made in this book are historically accurate. Much of his "proof" is taken from highly partisan documents. And let's not miss the fact that he cites himself. Claiming something is true because it's in a different book that you wrote doesn't really give me confidence in your objectivity. If you are a far-right-wing conservative, you may enjoy this book. You are his type of conservative. But please don't read this book thinking that it will teach you anything about history. And the only things that it teaches about government are the partisanship and hate-mongering that keep our government from getting anything done.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Wise

    Billed as a "manifesto", key terms are made proper nouns (e.g., "the Conservative", "the Statist") to flag the right-wing code words. The things Levin likes are of course "Liberty", and everything else is equated to "Tyranny", sometimes with no supporting logic except that he does a short rant about something and concludes the paragraph with, "and that is tyranny." There's nothing new in this book you won't find in Glenn Beck, Bill O'Reilly, or Jonah Goldberg, except for more recent examples of O Billed as a "manifesto", key terms are made proper nouns (e.g., "the Conservative", "the Statist") to flag the right-wing code words. The things Levin likes are of course "Liberty", and everything else is equated to "Tyranny", sometimes with no supporting logic except that he does a short rant about something and concludes the paragraph with, "and that is tyranny." There's nothing new in this book you won't find in Glenn Beck, Bill O'Reilly, or Jonah Goldberg, except for more recent examples of Obama's evils, and that Levin frames his Good-vs-Evil battle as between the Conversative and the Statist. If you like to base your moral code on what was thought 2000 years ago and your political analysis on what was written 200 years ago, you may find some well-selected quotes here. There are even some statistics and quotes relevant to today in the later chapters, if you can trust their use by someone who is out to prove everything related to government is part of a Statist plot to tyrannize everyone.

  17. 5 out of 5

    L-V

    Haven't read it yet, but I'm going to buy it tomorrow. I seriously worry about the future of our personal liberties. I do not want to be slowly assimilated into a socialist society. I don't believe in big government and I choose not to be passive anymore. I need to educate myself on what to watch out for. I haven't read any books like this before - I hope I learn something. Haven't read it yet, but I'm going to buy it tomorrow. I seriously worry about the future of our personal liberties. I do not want to be slowly assimilated into a socialist society. I don't believe in big government and I choose not to be passive anymore. I need to educate myself on what to watch out for. I haven't read any books like this before - I hope I learn something.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    If you want to know the difference between being a Conservative and being a Liberal you must read this book. After you read it you will have a better understanding of what a Statist is and does and how it effects you. It's one of the best books I've ever read and one of the most important. If you want to know the difference between being a Conservative and being a Liberal you must read this book. After you read it you will have a better understanding of what a Statist is and does and how it effects you. It's one of the best books I've ever read and one of the most important.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam Wiggins

    === Synopsis The Conservative believes that there is an underlying moral order: an interlocking set of virtues, duties, and rights. The (often unwritten) rules of cooperation that promote the betterment of individual and society are what the author calls "civil society." Civil society and the moral order are encoded in, and executed through, the collection of culture, language, family, religion, and local, state, and federal government. When these pieces interlock smoothly, it creates maximum pros === Synopsis The Conservative believes that there is an underlying moral order: an interlocking set of virtues, duties, and rights. The (often unwritten) rules of cooperation that promote the betterment of individual and society are what the author calls "civil society." Civil society and the moral order are encoded in, and executed through, the collection of culture, language, family, religion, and local, state, and federal government. When these pieces interlock smoothly, it creates maximum prosperity and liberty for all. When one or more of these pieces are absent or corrupted, the system starts to falter, and people suffer. The author asserts that most parts of of civil society cannot be executed at the level of national government. Political philosophies such as monarchism, fascism, and socialism attempt to concentrate all of civil society's parts (and therefore, all of its power) in the national government. The author lumps all such philosophies together under the label "Statist," and views them all equally as tyranny. An oppressive king, a state-enforced religion, or a high income tax -- all pull resources and responsibilities away from families, communities, and local governments. One of the greatest sins of the modern Statist (by which the author means liberals / Democrats in the US) is the burdening of future generations with massive debt used to fund today's social programs. Social security and medicare are two examples of programs which provide benefits to current generations at huge cost to subsequent generations. He regards this as a criminal act of a people against its own children and their children. Faith is an important part of civil society, because belief in a divine creator is the basis for natural law. Without a God, we cannot have God-given rights, only State-given ones. This opens the door to chaos because "rights" are something that can be granted, revoked, or changed on the whim of whoever happens to be in power at the moment. The Conservative sees the Athiest as someone with the same potential to damage society as the Statist -- and in fact, they can often be one and the same, as in as the USSR's replacement of religious dogma with its own nationalist dogma. The Conservative believes that America is the greatest society and culture ever created by mankind. The evidence is in the huge amount of wealth, art, science, technology, culture, and ideas which have flourished in the the US for the last two hundred years; and by the large number of people who wish to immigrate here from other nations. It's something that is worth protecting, and it is thus the first duty of the national government as well as its citizens to protect all of the elements that make America great. The increased flow of immigration since a change in immigration law in 1965 risks diluting (and possibly even destroying) this greatness by introducing new people faster than they can acclimate to the culture and become native members of it. The concept of multiculturalism as a virtue and anything which blocks immigrants learning the native language (such as bilingual schools or government forms) are harmful to both the immigrants and natives because they block this acclimation. If civil society is a great machine, one whose parts have been discovered slowly over the course of hundreds or thousands of years, changes introduce entropy which risk throwing it off-balance. Unchecked immigration, abandonment of the family unit and religion, massive fiscal irresponsibility to fund social programs, violations of or changes to the Constitutional values which guide governance at a national level -- all of these introduce entropy into the known-working system of America society. The Conservative urges that we be aware of the potential impact of these changes, and to understand what is at stake: the most prosperous, happy, healthy society ever known to mankind. American society is a rare and precious thing, and deserves both our respect and our caution when we engage in activities which have the potential to disrupt or injure it. === Some quotes "so numerous are liberty's treasures that they defy cataloging" "the New Deal breached the constitution's firewalls" "the free market creates more wealth and opportunities for more people than any other economic model" "all cultures are not equal, as evidenced, in part, by the alien fleeing his own country for the American culture and the American citizen staying put" "The Statist believes that Americans are gluttonous and wasteful, taking from the world that which belongs to others, whereas the Conservative believes Americans are successful and productive, contribution to their own preservation and improvement." === Analysis I read this book hoping to understand the mind of the conservative, and I came away with more respect for their position. In particular, it had been hard for me to see what first principles drive modern US conservatism. The answer, I believe, is: historical evidence shows the overwhelming success of American civil society. We should do everything possible to preserve and continue that extraordinary success, from protecting American interests with a strong military, to keeping the culture unified though controlled immigration. A reductionist approach won't work. The free market, Judeo-Christian faith, family units, federalism, the English language -- these are all gears in the vast machine of American civil society, and removing or changing any of them causes the entire machine to falter and break down. My counter-argument to this stance is that there are unavoidable changes happening the world. Globalization, increased individual mobility, the internet, an increasingly-connected world economy -- these things are happening surely as forces of nature, and the conservative's quest to resist these changes seems quixotic. Young professionals are moving to cities and leaving behind religion and the family unit. This clearly leads to moral decay in the conservative's perspective, but what do we do, try to talk those people to move back to their hometown and switch professions to working the family farm? Perhaps conservatives would argue there is a middle ground, but it's unclear to me what it would be, or how we could achieve it. Moreover, there is something that feels icky about the conservative viewpoint. I generally agree that the society created in America 200 years ago was the best governmental and societal innovation of its time, and we continue to reap the benefits to this day. But the insular, us-vs-them vibes that seem to emanate from the conservative's stance on immigration, military, and faith are a severe turn-off. I have been a part of many insular cultures, from underground music scenes to silicon valley startups; I understand that these cultures display "us" as a fundamental unit which is unique, special, and better in some way from "them" (everyone else -- the muggles). This us-vs-them perspective is both a symptom and a cause of a strong culture. But I hope that the cultures I participate in have a slightly more balanced view of those outside the walls of their stronghold. === Conservatism vs Liberalism I read this book immediately after "The Conscience of a Liberal," which I read to try to understand the modern liberal's mind and first principles. It's easy to see why the two big political groups in the US talk past each other: they start from fundamentally different places. In many cases, there is very direct disagreement about the evidence: Conscience of a Liberal cited numbers showing that immigrant households use fewer welfare services than their native counterparts; Liberty and Tyranny cited numbers showing the opposite. It would be an interesting exercise to dig in and try to figure out if one or both sides are spinning the numbers, or if the best available information is simply inconclusive. Both books have the same issue, though: their most aggressive statements come with the least evidence. They both rely heavily on opinion pieces and news articles as their backing evidence for smaller points, and typically don't provide any citations whatsoever for their boldest claims. In this sense, they are both pure philosophy. The authors have observed the world, thought upon their observations, and generated their viewpoints. Rigor, evidence, and a scientific approach rarely enter the equation. Perhaps it is difficult or impossible to apply these modes of analysis to these vast societal questions, but it does leave me with the sense that political discourse boils down to a matter of who can talk the loudest and longest. This leaves little in the way of debate that I will find useful for forming my own opinions on these issues.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Mark Levin’s epic treatise on what conservatism is explains that the main differences in American politics are not left vs. right but are liberty – provided by established law that is understood, available, and impartially (although imperfectly) applied – versus tyranny (which is the preference of statists, those who seek to use the power of government to control others and rule over them). Through numerous examples and detailed research, Levin makes a strong argument that the statist has already Mark Levin’s epic treatise on what conservatism is explains that the main differences in American politics are not left vs. right but are liberty – provided by established law that is understood, available, and impartially (although imperfectly) applied – versus tyranny (which is the preference of statists, those who seek to use the power of government to control others and rule over them). Through numerous examples and detailed research, Levin makes a strong argument that the statist has already been able to take much of our liberty as a nation, and recovery from these thefts will not be quick and certainly not easy. Particularly troubling is the advocacy of climate change and the “science” that is used to justify what would be destruction of the United States (something the UN’s “World Health Organization” or “WHO” would be in favor of). Another huge issue is immigration, and Levin shows how allowing illegal immigration burdens both government and private sectors of the U.S. and – more alarmingly – has sown the seeds that the Mexican government hopes will one day become a revolution to reclaim territory it still claims as part of Mexico. Because illegal immigrants are slow to assimilate and tend to use welfare in high percentages, they bring many of the problems from their homeland and, when able to vote, choose candidates that Levin says are destructive to the United States’ existing laws and mores. More than just a recap of what the conservative believes, the manifesto part of the book is a call to action with resources named and specific instructions given to preserve liberty from the creeping statism prevalent in the U.S. I recommend this book to anyone that is serious about “securing the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity,” even if you don't like Levin or agree with him generally.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Mark Levin has crafted an outstanding summary of the heart of conservatism. Possibly the most striking approach is that he does not identify "liberals" as the antithesis of conservatives, but rather Statists. In doing so, he frames a poignant argument that provides a valuable yardstick to identifying Statists dressed in conservative clothing. Far from simply being a summary of conservative principles, Mark Levin draws from today's national scene and compares and contrasts Conservative and Statist Mark Levin has crafted an outstanding summary of the heart of conservatism. Possibly the most striking approach is that he does not identify "liberals" as the antithesis of conservatives, but rather Statists. In doing so, he frames a poignant argument that provides a valuable yardstick to identifying Statists dressed in conservative clothing. Far from simply being a summary of conservative principles, Mark Levin draws from today's national scene and compares and contrasts Conservative and Statist approaches, and looks at the hard facts of the results of each school of thought. Liberty & Tyranny proves to be a concise resource for facts and figures that illustrate how the two schools of thought function in the real world. The only thing the books seems to be lacking is a definitive guide on how to effectively articulate the argument against the Statist agenda, and a well-described game plan for deconstructing the Statist machine that has been assembled over the past 100 years. However, this is hardly a deficiency on the part of the author. Mark Levin himself admits in the book that such a guide would be impractical to include in a book, especially in today's dynamic information environment. Still, he closes his book by charting a course, and by providing a list of ways to get started. The rest is up to us. As Mark Levin says at the end of Liberty & Tyranny: "We Conservatives need to get busy."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Do you believe that our country is moving in the wrong direction and has been for quite a while now? Mark Levin, a radio talk show host and constitutional lawyer, spells out his insights into the actions taken by government officials and presidents in recent years. He speaks of "Statism" or the belief that the state (government) is far superior in administering rights, freedoms and possessions than the individual as a dangerous movement in United States politics. He also defines what Conservatis Do you believe that our country is moving in the wrong direction and has been for quite a while now? Mark Levin, a radio talk show host and constitutional lawyer, spells out his insights into the actions taken by government officials and presidents in recent years. He speaks of "Statism" or the belief that the state (government) is far superior in administering rights, freedoms and possessions than the individual as a dangerous movement in United States politics. He also defines what Conservatism really is a compassionate belief that equality before the law, liberty, and freedom are more important than the radical egalitarianism growing throughout the world and our country. The strongest point he makes is that liberty and individualism is superior to state controlled welfare. My older brother who is quite political introduced me to this book on our way down to New Mexico, and as I identify with conservatives and hold my freedoms and liberties to be god given sacred rights I was thoroughly interested, and was not disappointed. I would recommend this to anyone seeking to better understand conservatism, or the nature of some of our recent administrations. Those not interested in politics won't necessarily enjoy the book but I highly recommend it regardless.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    I liked this book because it was succint and to the point. Each chapter takes a general political ideology and breaks it down to the facts of how we got to where we are today on the topic (like gloabal warming) and describes how a conservative (not a Republican) would/should deal with the topic. Growing up I always heard about DDT and how it was a terrible chemical that caused deformities and contaminated food and water. Come to find out there has never been any evidence of deformity and the dru I liked this book because it was succint and to the point. Each chapter takes a general political ideology and breaks it down to the facts of how we got to where we are today on the topic (like gloabal warming) and describes how a conservative (not a Republican) would/should deal with the topic. Growing up I always heard about DDT and how it was a terrible chemical that caused deformities and contaminated food and water. Come to find out there has never been any evidence of deformity and the drug actually saves up to 50 million lives world wide from Malaria deaths. Despite the evidence the drug has been banned world wide and the non-use of the drug has led to untold deaths of millions in Africa. Meanwhile, I noticed there are charities to buy mosquito nets for Africans. It begs the question, why not use DDT and many of these children will not die of a death that is fully preventable. Frustrating and sad. I especially liked the Conservative Manifesto. Truly, we need another Ronald Reagan.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Don Incognito

    I wasn't planning to read this book, but someone gave it to me as a gift. "A Conservative Manifesto" is a pretty apt title. It's a thoughtful discussion of various issues important to conservatives, and then a short list of relatively general suggestions for what to do about them, mostly at the political level. This is a fairly short book--just over 200 pages--and is thoughtful but not extremely deep or revelatory. If you've been a conservative for a while, you won't learn much that you don't alr I wasn't planning to read this book, but someone gave it to me as a gift. "A Conservative Manifesto" is a pretty apt title. It's a thoughtful discussion of various issues important to conservatives, and then a short list of relatively general suggestions for what to do about them, mostly at the political level. This is a fairly short book--just over 200 pages--and is thoughtful but not extremely deep or revelatory. If you've been a conservative for a while, you won't learn much that you don't already know; there was only one piece of information, somewhere near the end, that I didn't know at all (it slips my mind at the moment, though). Author Mark Levin is fairly polite in his rhetoric, and holds insults to a minimum. Therefore, reading this book is not at all like reading a book by self-described polemicist Ann Coulter. It makes a great primer on conservatism.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    All I can say is, the facts - no matter what fancy language Levin cloaks them in - don't support the hyperbole. All I can say is, the facts - no matter what fancy language Levin cloaks them in - don't support the hyperbole.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Not my cup of tea, but a strong statement on what a really conservative person believes. I have never listened to Levin's radio show, but a few folks have told me that he is sharp-tongued there, which isn't surprising for ideologue radio. His book is more straight-forward. Basically, I think he is like any other hardcore ideologue of any type: they talk in strong terms about a utopia that will never come to pass, because a nation of 300 million people is an inherently complicated thing, and no o Not my cup of tea, but a strong statement on what a really conservative person believes. I have never listened to Levin's radio show, but a few folks have told me that he is sharp-tongued there, which isn't surprising for ideologue radio. His book is more straight-forward. Basically, I think he is like any other hardcore ideologue of any type: they talk in strong terms about a utopia that will never come to pass, because a nation of 300 million people is an inherently complicated thing, and no one REALLY wants to party like its 1929 anymore, which is when, it seems, Levin thinks the US went down the bad path (the New Deal). Hardcore ideologues have another thing in common: they can strongly critique all of the compromising politicians because the ideologue will never truly be in the position to have to make real or difficult decisions impacting a nation. Don't get me wrong: politicians have their flaws too, but they enter the arena and TRY. My critique isn't over Levin's conservatism, though I'm not a conservative. And I also found the book to be interesting and readable. For whatever the hell that's all worth.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

    I am neither condervative nor liberal. I got the book from the libary, becuase I listen to his talk show and he is very loud and rude. However, The book was interesting and gave a lot of historical facts; but, it truly shows how america has not grown. This book has been on the best sellers list for four weeks. Mr. Levin actually has the audacity to state that we need to force Latino people to assimilate. Does Mr. Levin not forget what happen the last time this country forced assimilation on a ra I am neither condervative nor liberal. I got the book from the libary, becuase I listen to his talk show and he is very loud and rude. However, The book was interesting and gave a lot of historical facts; but, it truly shows how america has not grown. This book has been on the best sellers list for four weeks. Mr. Levin actually has the audacity to state that we need to force Latino people to assimilate. Does Mr. Levin not forget what happen the last time this country forced assimilation on a race of people? It is called "Slavery" of the Black Race!!! - and Genocide of the American Indians. He also states that the Civil Rights Movement went too far--is he joking? What scares me the most is that this country is heading in a direction in which a lot of innocent people will be hurt--a Race War! I suggest that anyone who reads this book should read "Healing the Soul of America" by Marianne Willimason. Once you have read this book, look into your heart and tell me you still think Mr. Levin's idealologies are substainable for the future of America.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    Very interesting book by conservative talk-radio host. TONS of good information in here, plus so many quotes...he reviews the Constitution-based values, etc. Chapter topics include: liberty and tyranny, prudence and progress, faith and the founding, federalism, the free market, welfare, immigration, self-preservation, etc. At the end, he gives his own Conservative Manifesto which makes a lot of sense. We are SO FAR away from the values our Founding Fathers intended for this country, it's time we Very interesting book by conservative talk-radio host. TONS of good information in here, plus so many quotes...he reviews the Constitution-based values, etc. Chapter topics include: liberty and tyranny, prudence and progress, faith and the founding, federalism, the free market, welfare, immigration, self-preservation, etc. At the end, he gives his own Conservative Manifesto which makes a lot of sense. We are SO FAR away from the values our Founding Fathers intended for this country, it's time we got them back. It's a very current book, since President Obama took office. Some very good quotes by President Lincoln and President Reagan. Only about 200 pages, worth the read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Timothy McCluskey

    One of the silliest books I have ever read. Pure rant and absolutely no understanding of historical conservative thought. A shame

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paul Taske

    You do not need to read this book. It reads like long-winded propaganda without substantive arguments to support its claims—particularly in its early chapters. This undermines any valid points made in the book and shows a distinct lack of rigor on Levin’s part as he attempts to outline his “conservative manifesto.” The best parts of the book? (1) the quotes from other people (e.g. George Washington, John Adam’s, etc.) and (2) his critique of an address Obama gave in 2007 (though the critique here You do not need to read this book. It reads like long-winded propaganda without substantive arguments to support its claims—particularly in its early chapters. This undermines any valid points made in the book and shows a distinct lack of rigor on Levin’s part as he attempts to outline his “conservative manifesto.” The best parts of the book? (1) the quotes from other people (e.g. George Washington, John Adam’s, etc.) and (2) his critique of an address Obama gave in 2007 (though the critique here also highlights the fact that his entire book could be easily picked apart for its own glaring errors, over-generalizations, and platitudes as he does to Obama). Again, this really is not worth reading.

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