counter create hit Come Forth in Thaw: A Dark Fantasy Horror Novella about Trauma and Mental Illness - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Come Forth in Thaw: A Dark Fantasy Horror Novella about Trauma and Mental Illness

Availability: Ready to download

The Adrienne Forest State Park is one of many beautiful state parks in the White Mountains. It is a popular destination for tourists, painters, hikers and even weddings. Yet the forest is also a place of great pain and torment, and is an equally popular destination to end your own life. The only thing young mother Eleanor Jackson has left in her life is her son Alan-a troubl The Adrienne Forest State Park is one of many beautiful state parks in the White Mountains. It is a popular destination for tourists, painters, hikers and even weddings. Yet the forest is also a place of great pain and torment, and is an equally popular destination to end your own life. The only thing young mother Eleanor Jackson has left in her life is her son Alan-a troubled teenager who has gone to the forest to commit the unthinkable. As Eleanor goes to find him in the forest, she witnesses bizarre and fantastical happenings that try to manipulate and distract her from rescuing her child. When the sun goes down, the specters of the tormented emerge. She will come to discover so much more than just her son.


Compare

The Adrienne Forest State Park is one of many beautiful state parks in the White Mountains. It is a popular destination for tourists, painters, hikers and even weddings. Yet the forest is also a place of great pain and torment, and is an equally popular destination to end your own life. The only thing young mother Eleanor Jackson has left in her life is her son Alan-a troubl The Adrienne Forest State Park is one of many beautiful state parks in the White Mountains. It is a popular destination for tourists, painters, hikers and even weddings. Yet the forest is also a place of great pain and torment, and is an equally popular destination to end your own life. The only thing young mother Eleanor Jackson has left in her life is her son Alan-a troubled teenager who has gone to the forest to commit the unthinkable. As Eleanor goes to find him in the forest, she witnesses bizarre and fantastical happenings that try to manipulate and distract her from rescuing her child. When the sun goes down, the specters of the tormented emerge. She will come to discover so much more than just her son.

30 review for Come Forth in Thaw: A Dark Fantasy Horror Novella about Trauma and Mental Illness

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I received "Come Forth in Thaw" from the author in exchange for an honest review. Don't let this book's short length cause you to underestimate its impact, it's punching far above its weight class. Ducharme weaves a mysterious and haunting tale of a mother's journey to save her son. This story deals with the topics of suicide, depression, and mental health in general so know that going in. I will say, Jayson does a really respectful job of illuminating and really humanizing the discussion of sui I received "Come Forth in Thaw" from the author in exchange for an honest review. Don't let this book's short length cause you to underestimate its impact, it's punching far above its weight class. Ducharme weaves a mysterious and haunting tale of a mother's journey to save her son. This story deals with the topics of suicide, depression, and mental health in general so know that going in. I will say, Jayson does a really respectful job of illuminating and really humanizing the discussion of suicide. It is a difficult topic to write about and so often I find it is either done in a judgmental way or (given the horror genre flair for the dramatic) becomes merely a showpiece for the creepy allure it provides. This book chooses to walk a different path; instead exploring the human side, the pain and suffering that leads people to that place of desperation and uses the narrative to have a discussion about it. It's really quite moving! I'm always happy to books hitting the shelves that bring discussions of mental health topics to the fore and this is a great example of that. I hope to see and read many more as time goes on. Mental health issues are a fact of life. They are part of the human experience. Whether you life with them personally or not, reading about them is an important way to expand all of our understanding and empathy. The way Ducharme took that core message and wove it into a fantastic, nail-biting, psychological horror story is just 👌 I have specifically chosen with my review here to say next to nothing else about the plot itself. It's a short story, and I feel like it's best experienced by just sitting down and diving it. I promise you, you won't be disappointed...and you also won't be unchanged either. 4.5/5 Release Date: 2/2/2021

  2. 4 out of 5

    John

    I received "Come Forth in Thaw" from the author, Jayson Robert Ducharme, in exchange for an honest review. After I finished it I wrote him and told him how much I loved it. I also told him how much trouble I was having finding the right words for a review.  I'm still having trouble.  At its core "Come Forth in Thaw" is about suicide, despair and anguish and the author's disdain on how the media trivialized them; especially the Aokigahara Forest in Japan, which features in films and games,even).  In I received "Come Forth in Thaw" from the author, Jayson Robert Ducharme, in exchange for an honest review. After I finished it I wrote him and told him how much I loved it. I also told him how much trouble I was having finding the right words for a review.  I'm still having trouble.  At its core "Come Forth in Thaw" is about suicide, despair and anguish and the author's disdain on how the media trivialized them; especially the Aokigahara Forest in Japan, which features in films and games,even).  In "Come Forth in Thaw" Ducharme uses the fictional Adrienne Forest State Park as a substitute for Aokigahara Forest. The park has a reputation for being a hot spot for suicides and Ellie Jackson ventures into there in the hope of finding her troubled teenage son before he goes through with taking his own life. While she is there she meets an enigmatic man known only as Tinker and other fantastical creatures that seem determined to keep her from finding her son before it's too late. All of this occurs in Part 1 of the novella and that where I'm going to end the synopsis. At the end of Part 1 I was nearly in tears. By the end of Part 2 I felt like I'd been punched in the gut by the events.  To me "Come Forth in Thaw" is Ducharme's angry response to how some parts of society treat suicide so flippantly. A forest that's famous for people going there to kill themselves? Let's make a movie about it. Or a game. Ducharme doesn't see it that way. He sees as someone needing help, crying out in a forest of their own despair. "Come Forth in Thaw" is at times horrifying, disturbing and gut-wrenching. At all times is it brilliant and thoughtful. Highly recommended. 

  3. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Read this book This book will stick with me for the rest of my days. I felt so many things while reading it; sadness, despair, anger, fear. Above all of those was the feeling of hope that filled my heart at the end. I don't want to say too much about this because I feel that this is one of those books that you have to read for yourself. It needs no introduction. It will tug at your heart. Read it anyway; you won't be disappointed that you did. Read this book This book will stick with me for the rest of my days. I felt so many things while reading it; sadness, despair, anger, fear. Above all of those was the feeling of hope that filled my heart at the end. I don't want to say too much about this because I feel that this is one of those books that you have to read for yourself. It needs no introduction. It will tug at your heart. Read it anyway; you won't be disappointed that you did.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Benavidez

    trigger warning for the book as well as this review if anyone is sensitive to suicide. As one can possibly tell from the book cover this book centers on suicide. It's not a passing mention, it's not a scene or two, it's thr entire 104 pages of Come Forth in Thaw. This book really hit me in a sensitive area. As someone who's attempted that, and has struggled with thoughts of it for as long as I can remember (thinking it was a part of normal life up until not too long ago, I'm ashamed to admit), t trigger warning for the book as well as this review if anyone is sensitive to suicide. As one can possibly tell from the book cover this book centers on suicide. It's not a passing mention, it's not a scene or two, it's thr entire 104 pages of Come Forth in Thaw. This book really hit me in a sensitive area. As someone who's attempted that, and has struggled with thoughts of it for as long as I can remember (thinking it was a part of normal life up until not too long ago, I'm ashamed to admit), this hit me and hit me hard. As someone who has a loving family and would be missed, it hurt knowing I could have possibly put them in these shoes. I say/admit this because I can't seperate my experiences and feelings and review this book. The two are tied and this book made me feel some shit. The story itself is well written, everything is clear, everything is expressed so fluently that I ached with the mother. The fantastical elements are interesting, but weren't in existence long enough to care or to give me more than what they're meant to represent, which they do well. And of course there's the final third. As a novella it suffers from being too short, and usually that's the reader just wanting more. And while I did, it was more about wanting more from that final piece of the puzzle. It just seemed rushed through to give us the final scenes. While those are absolutely fantastic and gut wrenching, leaving tears sprinkled on the remaining pages, I NEEDED more from that ending. So two ratings. 3 stars On a book level, maybe I think? But a whole 5stars from an emotional standpoint. I guess it's safe to give this an in-between of 4 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly| Just Another Horror Reader

    “What is hidden in snow will come forth in thaw”. Come Forth in Thaw is the story of a mother looking for her son in a forest known for suicides. During her search she encounters some otherworldly beings and reflects on the life of her son. To put it mildly, this isn’t an easy read. It deals with depression, suicide and other mental health issues. Being a sufferer of depression myself, it really hit home. The author handled these issues with compassion and grace that I truly appreciated. Part two “What is hidden in snow will come forth in thaw”. Come Forth in Thaw is the story of a mother looking for her son in a forest known for suicides. During her search she encounters some otherworldly beings and reflects on the life of her son. To put it mildly, this isn’t an easy read. It deals with depression, suicide and other mental health issues. Being a sufferer of depression myself, it really hit home. The author handled these issues with compassion and grace that I truly appreciated. Part two of this novella wrecked me. I never saw the twist coming and it was absolutely heartbreaking. To say more would spoil it but just be sure to keep the tissues handy. "There comes a point when something can affect you so profoundly that it takes everything from you." That’s a quote from page 95 and it’s how I felt after reading this very special book.I’ll be looking out for more of this author’s work. Note: triggers for depression, mental illness, suicide, and loss of a child.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Darya Silman

    I'd strongly recommend abstaining from reading 'Come Forth in Thaw: A Dark Fantasy Horror Novella about Trauma and Mental Illness' by Jayson Robert Ducharme to different categories of people, namely those who went through suicide, violence, sudden loss of the loved one, and traumas. I can't recommend the book to those who are not familiar (or don't want to be aware of) with stages of the human body's decomposition. Individuals who don't take seriously mental illnesses or would love the topic to I'd strongly recommend abstaining from reading 'Come Forth in Thaw: A Dark Fantasy Horror Novella about Trauma and Mental Illness' by Jayson Robert Ducharme to different categories of people, namely those who went through suicide, violence, sudden loss of the loved one, and traumas. I can't recommend the book to those who are not familiar (or don't want to be aware of) with stages of the human body's decomposition. Individuals who don't take seriously mental illnesses or would love the topic to be veiled by euphemisms and, in the best case, hidden under the carpet should not purchase the book. The chosen ones excluded from the categories mentioned above would find themselves in the fascinatingly disturbing story with multiple layers of interpretations, unexpected plot developments, and reasons to cry out loud. The book's strong side is its ability to describe the twists and turns of the main heroine's struggles with herself in frightening detail. Along with her, readers alternately shiver from horror, disgust, and piercing feelings of love. There is no sugarcoating of ugly truths, like how devastating the loss of the loved one can be to mental health and how easily we get consumed by inner demons. The style of the book can be compared to Stephen King's way of narration. Due to a shorter literary form than King's novels, the author puts forth terror and confusion on the first pages without giving a reader time to analyze the situation. The author intends to scare, with descriptions going more gruesome as the story proceeds, culminating in an unexpected yet (spoiler alert!) positive ending. The book would be perfect in its dark performance if not for need of additional editing. There are traces of an initial text like a repetition of one word twice in a sentence, a pair of typos, and a problem with line space (I used the Kindle app for Android, and space changed in the span of one page.). Excluding editing, the book is a product of hard work and kindness, the author fully opening up the topic of mental illness.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aiden Merchant

    4.5 ⭐ - Being a parent (and one that suffers from depression and anxiety), this novella pulled the floor out from under me several times. For this story, Ducharme has created a fictional (American) version of the Suicide Forest from Japan. A mother has gone there in search of her depressed son, in hopes to save him from himself. However, there's more to it than meets the eye. Unfortunately for me, I can't say much of anything here without revealing secrets best learned in the moment of reading (a 4.5 ⭐ - Being a parent (and one that suffers from depression and anxiety), this novella pulled the floor out from under me several times. For this story, Ducharme has created a fictional (American) version of the Suicide Forest from Japan. A mother has gone there in search of her depressed son, in hopes to save him from himself. However, there's more to it than meets the eye. Unfortunately for me, I can't say much of anything here without revealing secrets best learned in the moment of reading (and not early from a book blogger), but I will say I didn't see it coming. In fact, I wasn't even suspecting a twist; so when it happened, I was very pleasantly surprised. It helped strengthen the couple small things that felt weak to me, making them no longer an issue. I really liked the Tinker. He had a personality to him that was creepy, and the way he was presented was very predatory and timeless. The Donneur Vie felt underdeveloped by comparison, but was still an interesting idea. I especially liked the location you see on the cover of this novella - there's this place where people hang and there are pieces of them sewn into the trees. Very cool and very horrific! For me, the second part to this story - after you've learned the trick to it - was more emotional and striking. Even though not much happens in it besides looking back at the past (and that final sequence of leaving the forest), those final chapters were what made the story come together for me in such a way that I was left haunted and anxious. I'm not an easy person to stoke an emotional response out of, so I know a story has done something right when I'm left in such a state. Come Forth in Thaw marks my third novella from Ducharme, but it won't be my last. This story will cause your heart to sink and your feet to kick up and run as the world drops from beneath you. *** Highlights: Sets out to “elevate” the exploited setting of Aokigahara Forest (Japan’s “suicide forest”) … emotional and gripping … intense ending … unexpected plot twist … features a great enemy in the forest, as well some horrifying locations Shadows: Parts of the end sequence felt a little weak, but not enough to ruin the finale … the Donneur View seems underdeveloped by comparison to the Tinker FFO: Emotional horror … stories about overcoming depression and surviving great loss Takeaway: Ducharme flexes his writing muscles with Come Forth in Thaw, an emotional and tragic story of horror that will both break and heal you. Would I read this author again? Yes *** REVIEW BY AIDEN MERCHANT → WWW.AIDENMERCHANT.COM CONTACT: [email protected] SOCIAL MEDIA: INSTAGRAM (AIDENMERCHANT.OFFICIAL) AND TWITTER (AIDENMERCHANT89)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Feli

    Come Forth in Thaw is a novella I picked completely without context. I didn't know anything about it and went in blind. Normally, I need a few pages to get into a story. But DuCharme already had me with his author's note in the very beginning of the book. The rest was a quick read in one sitting. This novella is about suicide, it's really tense and sad and there are some dark and creepy characters in it. It's a sad story and thus I wouldn't recommend it for everyone. For me, the atmosphere was jus Come Forth in Thaw is a novella I picked completely without context. I didn't know anything about it and went in blind. Normally, I need a few pages to get into a story. But DuCharme already had me with his author's note in the very beginning of the book. The rest was a quick read in one sitting. This novella is about suicide, it's really tense and sad and there are some dark and creepy characters in it. It's a sad story and thus I wouldn't recommend it for everyone. For me, the atmosphere was just right and it felt like I was with Ellie right there in the woods. It felt like a ride in a ghost train. A novella can be a tricky thing to write, but Jayson Robert Ducharme did a good job here, it wasn't too long or to short, it was well written. I won't say I loved it, because a book that deals with suicide in such a way can't really be 'loved'. But it was very good and an interesting approach to the topic. Won't be my last book by this author.

  9. 5 out of 5

    melanie moore

    I was captivated by this powerful story that I read in a single sitting. At just over 100 pages, this little book delivers a solid punch of emotion and horror. At first, a story of a desperate mother searching for her runaway teen son in New England's (fictionalized) version of Japan's suicide forest, the author takes the reader on an often chilling journey of mental illness and lost souls, orchestrated by the strange and creepy Tinker man, before turning the reader on their head with an expert I was captivated by this powerful story that I read in a single sitting. At just over 100 pages, this little book delivers a solid punch of emotion and horror. At first, a story of a desperate mother searching for her runaway teen son in New England's (fictionalized) version of Japan's suicide forest, the author takes the reader on an often chilling journey of mental illness and lost souls, orchestrated by the strange and creepy Tinker man, before turning the reader on their head with an expert twist of fate, revealing the protagonist's true reason for being in the dark forest. I truly enjoyed this book and its important message about mental health and suicide. Looking forward to checking out more titles by the author!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patty (IheartYA311)

    A very interesting read, and so well written. Pacing, characterization, and world building were on point. The case file at the end kinda threw off the vibe or the voice of the book but I understand why it had to be included. Throw in some more details, twists, turns and bumps, and you'd have a full length novel. Kudos. A very interesting read, and so well written. Pacing, characterization, and world building were on point. The case file at the end kinda threw off the vibe or the voice of the book but I understand why it had to be included. Throw in some more details, twists, turns and bumps, and you'd have a full length novel. Kudos.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sonny March

    It’s hard to properly say how good a story is when the story deals with as sensitive a subject as mental illness and the disturbing and heartbreaking factors that can lead up to it. This author took care to paint this delicate picture in a considerate light, but that doesn’t mean that this story won’t bring you to tears because of just how tragic and real it is.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cass

    Overall, I enjoyed this story, if enjoyed is the right word to use with this subject matter. We follow Ellie, a woman who knows her son has gone to the (fictional) Adrienne Forest to commit suicide, and her journey through mental and physical anguish. Ducharme definitely manages to tackle this "taboo" subject with the sensitivity and gentleness that it requires to prevent any glorification, or even judgement, on those affected. He weaves fantastical and supernatural themes into a very raw and vi Overall, I enjoyed this story, if enjoyed is the right word to use with this subject matter. We follow Ellie, a woman who knows her son has gone to the (fictional) Adrienne Forest to commit suicide, and her journey through mental and physical anguish. Ducharme definitely manages to tackle this "taboo" subject with the sensitivity and gentleness that it requires to prevent any glorification, or even judgement, on those affected. He weaves fantastical and supernatural themes into a very raw and visceral situation, where you come out the other end knowing that this could affect anyone. My only real gripe, was something that was said near the start, that makes sense once you get to the final third, and I can't say it without spoiling the book. But this was playing in the back of my mind the entire time I was reading, I couldn't stop thinking there was a glaring mistake that nobody seemed to have picked up on. As I say, it then becomes clear why as you come to the conclusion, so it's not that big of a deal. It just pulled me out the narrative occasionally. For such a short story, it packs a punch of horror. The supernatural elements get right under your skin, and I was incredibly worried for Ellie's life as she is trying to escape. Descriptions of those who have committed suicide are as grotesque as they need to be to convey the horror of it all, without being exaggerated for any shock value. Ducharme touches on some incredibly hard subjects to write about, and I will definitely be looking out for future stories. I think he succeeds in his goal to address the fascination that has sprung up about places like Aokigahara, and he does it well.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andi Finnell (booknerd_4ever)

    Y'all if you haven't discovered Jayson Robert Ducharme then you're really missing out!! He's an amazing horror writer. This is my second novel by him and so far my favorite. I can't wait to read more! Please go check him out!! In this novella, Ellie is looking for her teenage son who has gone to the Adrienne Forest State Park to committ suicide. But what she finds in the forest I'd nothing that she's prepared for!!! I love novellas because they just get straight to the point and you're hooked! A Y'all if you haven't discovered Jayson Robert Ducharme then you're really missing out!! He's an amazing horror writer. This is my second novel by him and so far my favorite. I can't wait to read more! Please go check him out!! In this novella, Ellie is looking for her teenage son who has gone to the Adrienne Forest State Park to committ suicide. But what she finds in the forest I'd nothing that she's prepared for!!! I love novellas because they just get straight to the point and you're hooked! And the ending...wow!!!! I was not expecting it!!!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Preston

    I gave myself a couple days to breathe and recover after finishing this book. Glancing at my notes and highlights brought Ellie’s world crashing back onto me. I almost closed my book but decided to face the devastation and share my thoughts. Parents, consider this your warning, crushing heartache lies within these pages, alongside the horror from the haunting souls of those who thought suicide was their way to escape...they were wrong. (Mr. Ducharme is respectful and nonjudgmental of those who h I gave myself a couple days to breathe and recover after finishing this book. Glancing at my notes and highlights brought Ellie’s world crashing back onto me. I almost closed my book but decided to face the devastation and share my thoughts. Parents, consider this your warning, crushing heartache lies within these pages, alongside the horror from the haunting souls of those who thought suicide was their way to escape...they were wrong. (Mr. Ducharme is respectful and nonjudgmental of those who have committed suicide.) Brief synopsis -Ellie has gone to find her son, Alan, who she believes has gone to a suicide hot spot, The Adrienne Forest. This is not a book to be read quickly. Immediately there is a somber mood that makes you slow down, look away, work through your emotions and to not get connected...but it is too late. You are engaged from the start. I have been on many hikes in similar settings and I am mentally taking this hike with Ellie. If you listen, there is a soundtrack playing in the background of this book. A lone violin sings out a soulful resonate song. This is where the simplicity of the story ends and the horror begins. There are those in the forest who will help you find what you are looking for, but there is a price to pay. “A place like this forest… it holds a lot of suffering in it. People who carry pain with them bring it here and leave it when they die. All that pain just gathers here, like a cauldron. The more suffering the forest gathers, the more influence it has over people who hold pain in their hearts.” Several scenes really got under my skin and made me glad that I was not camping anytime soon. Toward the end, I was cursing out the author. I had been hollowed out, but still my heart broke, I had been gutted, and yet I still felt nauseous with what I found on these pages. I was frozen from the temperature as well as from fear, knowing that what is hidden in the snow, will Come Forth In Thaw.

  15. 5 out of 5

    tyoung2058

    Wow. This story dives deep into the desperate minds and thoughts of the mental capacity of someone who is contemplating suicide. Beginning with the main character running to a National Forest that people go to commit suicide much like the real one in Japan. She searches for her son to stop him. Which she meets several strange characters that gives her hints of how and where to find her son. Then the story really throws me for a loop. Not going to state what else goes on for I don't like to revea Wow. This story dives deep into the desperate minds and thoughts of the mental capacity of someone who is contemplating suicide. Beginning with the main character running to a National Forest that people go to commit suicide much like the real one in Japan. She searches for her son to stop him. Which she meets several strange characters that gives her hints of how and where to find her son. Then the story really throws me for a loop. Not going to state what else goes on for I don't like to reveal spoilers. I've known several people who had committed suicide. Pls reach out to someone...anyone. National suicide hotline 800-273-8255 I received this as an ARC.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Karla Kay

    "There comes a point when something can affect you so profoundly that it takes everything from you." I shared this quote from Pg. 94. I would have loved to share the whole paragraph, but then that would be revealing too much. I felt it so deeply, I had to stop and just breathe. This was not an easy read, it's dark and heartbreaking. But the fact that it is such an important subject, one that many would like to avoid, it's not something to be ignored or exploited. The authors goal was to bring att "There comes a point when something can affect you so profoundly that it takes everything from you." I shared this quote from Pg. 94. I would have loved to share the whole paragraph, but then that would be revealing too much. I felt it so deeply, I had to stop and just breathe. This was not an easy read, it's dark and heartbreaking. But the fact that it is such an important subject, one that many would like to avoid, it's not something to be ignored or exploited. The authors goal was to bring attention to the exploitation of the infamous suicide forest and call out the fact that suicide , mental illness and trauma should never be glorified. These are tragedies and cause deep suffering for those left behind. Although this is a work of fiction, there is so much to be recognized in these pages. A mothers love for her child, her suffering and pain. Her character called out to my soul. The 'Tinker' is dark, creepy, and at times terrifying. Because he is more than meets the eye. Watch out for him. I understood exactly what he was. Part 2 completely broke me, I cried through the sadness and pain, and in the end, there was hope. And that's truly what is wanted, hope, for a better understanding, a better future, and for those that are suffering to find peace and happiness. "What is hidden in snow will come forth in thaw." I was given a complimentary copy of this for an honest review. Thank you so much for the opportunity!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Braedon Riddick

    In Come Forth in Thaw, we follow tormented Ellie in search of her son Alan into the Adrienne Forest State Park — a place where good people go to do bad things. “By all accounts, the Adrienne Forest State Park was a painfully average destination in a state that was oversaturated with parks. The only unique thing about it was that roughly between thirty-five and fifty people on average entered the park to take their own lives annually. It was the most well-known suicide hotspot in northern New Eng In Come Forth in Thaw, we follow tormented Ellie in search of her son Alan into the Adrienne Forest State Park — a place where good people go to do bad things. “By all accounts, the Adrienne Forest State Park was a painfully average destination in a state that was oversaturated with parks. The only unique thing about it was that roughly between thirty-five and fifty people on average entered the park to take their own lives annually. It was the most well-known suicide hotspot in northern New England.” An early encounter in those woods sets the stage, and propels the easy turning of each page. I had no trouble relating to — and rooting for — dear Ellie. But really, wouldn’t it be almost inhuman not to root for an afflicted mother who is merely hoping to find her son before he kills himself? “An impulse came over her. She dug into the front of her coat and pulled out a small silver locket. It had been a gift from her brother Emmanuel during a baby shower at the old apartment in Quincy a few months before Alan was born. Within it was a small photograph of her son, before the darkness had come and taken him away.“ There’s a quiet confidence in the way the Author walks with his prose, a subtle strut in his stroll, if you will. He constructs taut phrases with ease, avoiding superfluous language, and I can’t recall him ever wandering off into that wordy writer’s paradise they call Verbosity — these are traits found only in the prose of true Pros, and Mr. Ducharme demonstrates such with style, grace, and an obvious dedication to his craft. While reeling in the relaxed but gripping narrative, I sensed the need to be on the lookout for subtleties — eyes open and alert, head on a swivel, if you’ll pardon the linebacker lingo. Needless to say, this premonition proved fruitful. Mr. Ducharme does a great job of presenting the Reader with plenty of questions early on, and those questions continue as the narrative unspools increasingly disquieting developments. Indeed, there were instances along the journey that did make me wonder exactly where the Author is leading us; encounters with — oh, how to put it? — rather bizarre characters that certainly furrowed my brow initially. Of course, soon after we are met with the tearjerking twist of a revelation that explains everything; whereupon we might be forced to put the book down for a spell to collect ourselves and think about the poignant shot to the heart we just endured. That unforeseen development is no doubt the crux of the story, and this is only strengthened by the emotional depths fathomed right up to the dread-inducing denouement — when you can sense that the score will be settled soon, one way or the other, at that precarious point of no return where the final battle — and the war itself — is lost or won. What makes this story great, now perhaps more than ever, is its undeniable relevance. Suicide is that ugly elephant in the room, and the spectrum of mental illness is the hand that often feeds it. No doubt these subjects are far from easy to broach, but this is an outstanding example of how the deed is done in dark fiction. On a professional level, I’d like to thank the Author for taking the bull by the horns and leading by example. While on a personal level, I’d like to let him know he has a fan in me. With Come Forth in Thaw, Jayson Robert Ducharme comes forth with a winner, demonstrating tactful storytelling on the most sensitive of subjects, offering a gentleman’s hand for guidance down a humanizing path of horror.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    ✨🌲 Book Review - COME FORTH IN THAW by Jayson Robert Ducharme ( @americanhorrorfiction_author )🌲✨ *Thank you to the author for this arc I'm exchange for my honest review. 📘Pub Date: 2.2.21 🤯Oh my goodness..wow. This book really blew me away and made my cold dead heart feel the feels. Yes it's shorter but it's not too often I read a book in just one sitting--it captivated me and I had to finish immediately!🖤 It's about a mother going to a national park in NH to try and stop her teenage son from killi ✨🌲 Book Review - COME FORTH IN THAW by Jayson Robert Ducharme ( @americanhorrorfiction_author )🌲✨ *Thank you to the author for this arc I'm exchange for my honest review. 📘Pub Date: 2.2.21 🤯Oh my goodness..wow. This book really blew me away and made my cold dead heart feel the feels. Yes it's shorter but it's not too often I read a book in just one sitting--it captivated me and I had to finish immediately!🖤 It's about a mother going to a national park in NH to try and stop her teenage son from killing himself. Once she gets into the forest crazy things happen. That's all I can really share without spoiling anything but wow..it's good. It definitely had the subtle horror sprinkled throughout, more thrilling moments than I was expecting and really good twists. There is also a little bit of magical realism which was a nice element to the storyline. I couldn't help but put myself in the main characters shoes considering I also have a son (though he's one right now) and the rollercoaster of things she goes through--I was quick to feel her feelings if that makes sense. This book shows the strength and obsessions some parents can go through with/for their children. It had its heartbreaking moments as well as happy ones--all the things you can go through as a spouse and parent. I loved all the depictions of this even though it was hard to read at times. The author based this fictional story off the "suicide forest" in Japan and was hoping to "elevate the setting and give it something meaningful to say"--well Jayson I think you hit the nail on the head with this one. Good job. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael Goodwin

    An excellent and chilling story about mental health In this story we follow Ellie as she looks desperately for her son Alan, who has gone missing. She fears the worst: that her son has gone off into the woods to commit suicide. Mental illness is a difficult subject to approach for some, but Ducharme takes it head on with subtlety and respect. Through the use of strong imagery and gentle foreshadowing, we are brought into Ellie's journey of grief, despair, fear and discovery. Her journey is also on An excellent and chilling story about mental health In this story we follow Ellie as she looks desperately for her son Alan, who has gone missing. She fears the worst: that her son has gone off into the woods to commit suicide. Mental illness is a difficult subject to approach for some, but Ducharme takes it head on with subtlety and respect. Through the use of strong imagery and gentle foreshadowing, we are brought into Ellie's journey of grief, despair, fear and discovery. Her journey is also one of strength and acceptance, with a heart-wrenching end that highlights how trauma affects us all in different ways. This is the best piece I've read from Ducharme yet, and is very well and insightfully written. I am grateful that he shared this story with me in exchange for a review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Josh Keown | Night Terror Novels

    Originally posted over at my personal blog site, Night Terror Novels “These, the things the dead leave behind.” – Jayson Robert Ducharme, Come Forth in Thaw 🏞️I received both an e-Book and physical ARC of this story in exchange for a fair review!🏞️ When I saw that Jayson Robert Ducharme was advertising for involvement in his launch team for this book, I knew I absolutely had to try to get onboard! His works had been on my radar for a long time through social media, so I was extremely excited to rece Originally posted over at my personal blog site, Night Terror Novels “These, the things the dead leave behind.” – Jayson Robert Ducharme, Come Forth in Thaw 🏞️I received both an e-Book and physical ARC of this story in exchange for a fair review!🏞️ When I saw that Jayson Robert Ducharme was advertising for involvement in his launch team for this book, I knew I absolutely had to try to get onboard! His works had been on my radar for a long time through social media, so I was extremely excited to receive both a digital e-Book copy and a physical edition of this, his latest project, titled Come Forth in Thaw. I’m even happier to report that this book not only lived up to my expectations, but totally smashed them. In the foreword for this book, Ducharme describes how in many ways, Come Forth in Thaw was a response to the public and media attention surrounding Aokigahara forest in Japan, and the tragedies that have taken place there over the years. I personally think that he makes an extremely valid point on this matter; the way certain media platforms and individuals have treated the incidents that have happened there have been highly disrespectful and insensitive. The Forest (2016) film, for example, was just a shameful attempt to cash in on the tragic events that continue to take place in Aokigahara to this day. And whilst I’ll try to refrain from saying too much on the subject – partly because it’ll send my blood pressure soaring, and partly because I don’t want to give the vile cretin any more publicity – internet ‘celebrity’ (used in the absolute loosest term possible) Logan Paul’s videos taken in the forest were abhorrent and disgusting, and he should have been wiped clean off of the face of social media for it. As such, it was important that a story so directly inspired by said events was compassionate and diplomatic in regards to the sensitive themes, and this novella succeeds in that respect. Come Forth in Thaw follows mother Eleanor Jackson as she attempts to find her troubled teenage son Alan in the Adrienne Forest State Park before he harms himself. Much like its real world equivalent, the fictitious Adrienne Forest in New Hampshire is a popular destination for tourists, hikers, and even weddings – and like its counterpart, is notorious as a location for suicide attempts. Along the way, Ellie meets some otherworldly inhabitants of the forest, and witnesses the aftermath of its sordid history firsthand. There was something of a dreamlike quality to the way this narrative played out, and to the characters that Ellie encounters whilst searching for Alan. It really conjured up, for me, strong similarities to Guillermo del Toro’s Pan’s Labyrinth (2006), particularly in regards to the story’s more mysterious and fantastical elements, and I just loved that so much. Ellie made for a very sympathetic lead, and it was easy to empathize with her escalating sense of fear during her hunt for her son in the ill-famed forest the story takes place in. I’m not going to spoil anything regarding the extended cast, but the other two major figures in the plot were incredibly interesting and unique: they were so characterful, and the way Jayson described them made them so easy to visualize. From the outset, I had no idea where this story was headed, and in the latter stages the plot went in a completely different direction than I had anticipated it would, which I really enjoyed. The ending also took me completely by surprise, but in the context of the story worked so well and served to enrich and strengthen Come Forth in Thaw’s central themes. Depression is a really difficult subject to write about in any capacity, and it is so important to be respectful – but I’m very glad to say that Ducharme more than manages to do so. Discussion and openness on this issue is the most important thing, and its always nice to find a work such as this that shines a delicate and understanding spotlight on it. This was actually my first time reading Jayson’s work, but it certainly won’t be the last. I’ve got his earlier release, Alessa’s Melody (2020), queued up on the Kindle for the near future, and am looking forward to seeing what he produces going forward. If it’s anything like this, I reckon he’s going to have a very bright future as an author. VERDICT: This is a story that achieves that rare quality, of being both unsettling and very emotionally affecting. Ducharme takes a tough but ever-present topic and explores it with tact and sincere resonance through Come Forth in Thaw. This novella manages to offer both a creepy narrative, and a genuine and heartfelt examination of trauma and depression. This is an easy recommendation from me, and I urge you to check it out as well come release day. It’s an extremely well earned and deserved ⭐⭐⭐⭐💫/⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ from this reviewer, and a humongous thank you to Jayson Robert Ducharme for not only providing a digital and physical ARC and giving me the chance to read and review it early, but also for including me in the acknowledgments section of Come Forth in Thaw too! Book Information Title(s): Come Forth in Thaw Author(s): Jayson Robert Ducharme Publisher(s): Self-published Original Publication Date: 2nd February, 2021 Page Count: 110 pages Format Read: Digital & Physical Advance Review Copy (Y/N): Y Website(s): https://www.jaysonrobertducharme.com/

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pan | Book Reviews and Recommendations

    Jayson Robert Ducharme's new novella, 'Come Forth in Thaw' took me on an emotional roller-coaster and left me in awe of his writing skills. Jayson was awesome enough to send me a copy of his book for review. The story follows Ellie's desperate effort on a race against time to reach her son Alan and stop him from putting an end to his own life. She saw the early signs; the depression, lack of interest, low performance at school but after discovering his journal she knew she had to act. Alan was on Jayson Robert Ducharme's new novella, 'Come Forth in Thaw' took me on an emotional roller-coaster and left me in awe of his writing skills. Jayson was awesome enough to send me a copy of his book for review. The story follows Ellie's desperate effort on a race against time to reach her son Alan and stop him from putting an end to his own life. She saw the early signs; the depression, lack of interest, low performance at school but after discovering his journal she knew she had to act. Alan was on his way to Adrienne Forest park.The Suicide Forest. A place with the terrifying statistic of 35-50 people ending their life there, per year. What Ellie meets in the forest will not only try and deviate her from the task of finding her son, but also make her question her own reality and sanity. 110 pages were enough to compile a terrifying read. One that will haunt me for a long time. Not only because I am a parent, but because the storytelling was so damn good. I finished the book in two sittings and it kept me at the edge of my seat as I was eager to find out if the protagonist will succeed in finding her son on time while being terrified by the eerie 'Suicide Forest' and the creatures that reside there. The beautifully crafted story, is a race back to the safety of any source of light and away from the growing darkness where dead things come back to life. Page 51 was a slap on the face. A terrific and terrifying sequence of horrors made of the wildest nightmares. My face froze for several minutes and my jaw dropped to the floor upon reading a scene made from pure nightmarerish material in the form of a... (no spoilers) By page 74 my heart sunk in my chest and I couldn't fight back the tears as what followed was the hard slap of reality. From that point onwards, the story took a whole now approach and elevated the feelings of true horror to a new level. After finishing this truly fantastic book I did two things. 1)Hugged my baby daughter and told her I love her (in tears), 2) Ordered Alessa's Melody and Ceremony of Ashes (also by Jayson Robert Ducharme) This is a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ read, out of February the 2nd. Highly, highly recommended 🖤🤘

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maralie Toth

    This one really was a great read, there were so many twists and unexpected turns within this story that, it really kept me guessing as to what was going to happen next. This story really shed a lot of light on the unspoken and hidden truths that surround how one may experience mental illness, in its many forms, but specifically the challenges that goes with the loss of a child, something I wouldn't wish on my worst enemy, truly would be the worst thing to happen to a person. I think what pulled m This one really was a great read, there were so many twists and unexpected turns within this story that, it really kept me guessing as to what was going to happen next. This story really shed a lot of light on the unspoken and hidden truths that surround how one may experience mental illness, in its many forms, but specifically the challenges that goes with the loss of a child, something I wouldn't wish on my worst enemy, truly would be the worst thing to happen to a person. I think what pulled me in initially was the over all esthetic of the novel itself, the combination of the cover of the book, mixed with the small blurb on the back, and then of course having just finished the newest story After Me, The Great Flood, I had to read this one, to see if the gripping story telling continued, and this one did not disappoint at all. I really like how this one was written as it spoke and went through the tale of an area of great joy and yet sorrow, without the need for graphic blood and gor. I found his descriptions and ability to make you feel like you are standing right there within the story, pretty amazing, as I could easily place myself within the story, watching as things began to unfold. My heart absolutely was pulled in and ached as I followed along with the main character Ellie as she travelled a great distance in the search for her missing son, just to discover more both about her son and herself. I felt that the back story and lead up of everything was really well done and over all left me with a sense of conclusion when the story came to a close, rather than wanting to know more or wanting the story to continue. I really feel this one had a good beginning, middle and end ... I really look forward to seeing what Jayson comes out with next! Highly recommend checking out this one and his newest one, and I will be diving back into his previous works as well, so those reviews will be soon to come, in the near future! Happy reading!! Find my YouTube version below! https://youtu.be/saSt00KeNN4

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    As mentioned in the author’s note, the Aokigahara Forest in Japan has become notoriously famous in books, movies and, even games as a the “suicide forest”. In this book Mr. Ducharme gives us a fictional American version of the same. Eleanor Jackson watched helplessly as her son began to change at the age of eight. No longer was he the happy child who enjoyed friends and play. At seventeen, he left home. No one took Eleanor’s fears seriously so she had to take matters into her own hands and go int As mentioned in the author’s note, the Aokigahara Forest in Japan has become notoriously famous in books, movies and, even games as a the “suicide forest”. In this book Mr. Ducharme gives us a fictional American version of the same. Eleanor Jackson watched helplessly as her son began to change at the age of eight. No longer was he the happy child who enjoyed friends and play. At seventeen, he left home. No one took Eleanor’s fears seriously so she had to take matters into her own hands and go into the frightful Adrienne Forest State Park to bring her son back before he does the unthinkable. I am not an outdoorsy person, so first off, the setting of this novella was enough to send chills up my spine. Add to that the theme of losing a child – every parent’s worst nightmare – and this horror was hitting close to home already. The encounters in the story? Well, Mr. Ducharme I envy you your imagination but not your nightmares! This is definitely a horror story but it is also a sympathetic and compassionate look at mental health and the topic of suicide. Whether you have read the book already or are thinking about picking it up (which I highly recommend) pay close attention to the discovery of the hanging body. I hesitate to use the word “beautiful” when discussing such a horrific topic but it’s the only description I can think of to describe Ellie’s thoughts. If you read carefully, there are a few things in this book that will make you question what you’ve read. No worries as the story takes a totally unexpected (to me) turn at the end to give the reader a very satisfying ending. This book releases today, February 2, 2021 and is a free kindle download until February 6, 2021. I do highly recommend you pick it up. * I received this book at no charge from the author in exchange for an honest review. This in no way influenced my thoughts.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam Vine

    Moving and terrifying. The story is about a mother searching for her son in a haunted forest in the mountains of New England where people go to commit suicide, but whose souls are then unable to find rest. It delivers on much more than its initial promise of retelling the suicide forest trope that has become a mainstay of horror in recent years from a more compassionate angle. The book is short, only 100 pages, and I read it in one sitting (it is that good; I never read anything in one sitting, Moving and terrifying. The story is about a mother searching for her son in a haunted forest in the mountains of New England where people go to commit suicide, but whose souls are then unable to find rest. It delivers on much more than its initial promise of retelling the suicide forest trope that has become a mainstay of horror in recent years from a more compassionate angle. The book is short, only 100 pages, and I read it in one sitting (it is that good; I never read anything in one sitting, even my friends' social media shit). So rather than risk spoiling anything with a poor synopsis other reviewers will no doubt write better than me anyway, I will just write my thoughts after finishing this brief, but incredible and tear-jerking journey. Mr. Ducharme released a note shortly before ARCs of the book went out discussing his reasons for writing this story; in part, he said, it was because the books and films about Aokigahara Forest have felt too exploitative. For the .001% of you reading this review who don't know about Aokigahara Forest, it is a sprawling wilderness at the foot of Mount Fuji where dozens of people from Japan go every year to commit suicide. This story is not set in Aokigahara, but a fictional equivalent in the Northeast United States. For the record, I wholeheartedly agree with Mr. Ducharme on this. Way back before it sucked ass, VICE News released a documentary about Aokigahara Forest on YouTube that received (at the time of writing) 21 million of views. I watched it maybe a year or two after it came out and was heartbroken by it. According to that film, a famous fictional couple in Japanese pop culture chose to end their lives together in Aokigahara in a suicide pact, thus making it the most romanticized - and popular - place in the world to take one's own life, with many more suicides per year even than San Francisco's infamous Golden Gate Bridge. Suicidal ideation is, unfortunately, part of being human. It is perhaps the most noxious type of thought-cancer that blooms in the damaged spaces of the human mind left by depression, abuse, grief, addiction, and the deep psychological valleys of our impersonal and often completely inhumane modern way of living (there are probably many more, but those are the first that leap to mind). And everyone who knows someone who has battled this demon, or who has battled it themselves, knows this is a subject that requires us to treat it with the utmost dignity, mercy, honesty, and compassion. And yet somehow, society still produces individuals like Logan Paul who travel to Japan to film in the very forest of mention, Aokigahara, so he can disrespect human remains for teh likes on YouTube. Our culture needs stories like "Come Forth in Thaw." No. Logan Paul won't read it. But maybe the producers of the shit-tier movies that treat suicide with the same sentiment and populate our zeitgeist with this type of shit-tier thinking might. And even if they don't, maybe someone in the next generation of producers who take their jobs in the coming years will. At least, they should. If I had my way I'd make it required reading for anyone who wants to write or make films about this topic. This is a subtle and deeply affecting story. It holds a mirror up for the reader to gaze into his or her own thoughts, experiences, and biases concerning mental illness; and, I donno how important that is to you, but In January 2021 it seems pretty important to me - understatement. Fiction is only a compass, but this particular compass points true. Oh yeah, and it is also scary as fuck.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Read with Kaylie Seed

    *Content warning: suicide, suicidal ideation, self-harm, graphic scenes Jayson Robert Ducharme’s latest novella Come Forth in Thaw attempts to tackle the stigma around mental illness and suicide while also being a dark read. Come Forth in Thaw takes place in the Adrienne Forest State Park where Ellie is trying to find her son to change his mind before he attempts suicide. This dark fantasy takes the reader through multiple twists and turns in a very short read. The first half of the story is inte *Content warning: suicide, suicidal ideation, self-harm, graphic scenes Jayson Robert Ducharme’s latest novella Come Forth in Thaw attempts to tackle the stigma around mental illness and suicide while also being a dark read. Come Forth in Thaw takes place in the Adrienne Forest State Park where Ellie is trying to find her son to change his mind before he attempts suicide. This dark fantasy takes the reader through multiple twists and turns in a very short read. The first half of the story is interesting enough albeit slightly repetitive, and the second half of Come Forth in Thaw is fast paced and engaging, the issue with this is that the story doesn’t flow as well as it could. While novellas are meant to be short, there still felt like something was missing from the overall plot leading the reader to be slightly underwhelmed in the end. Ducharme gracefully brought up difficult topics while still making them dark. This was nice to see because often times it doesn’t feel like writers want to dive that deep into these taboo topics and just scrape the surface. Ducharme could’ve went deeper with the themes of mental illness and pushed boundaries even more, but it should be noted that his writing was respectful of their difficult demeanour. The overall story can feel rushed, and that could be due to it being a novella, this also leads the reader to maybe not forming a strong connection with Ellie. Thank you Jayson for the gifted copy in exchange for an honest review!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer *Last Book on the Left*

    This novella covers some dark and heartbreaking subject matter. Suicide, depression, mental illness, suffering and how media has a way of seeming uncaring to it all, turning a tragic place into the location of a scary movie or video game and never really thinking about the lives that have been lost or why they went there in the first place, or the trauma to the people that were left behind. The famous Japanese suicide forest has been a theme in many movies and always comes across as spooky and w This novella covers some dark and heartbreaking subject matter. Suicide, depression, mental illness, suffering and how media has a way of seeming uncaring to it all, turning a tragic place into the location of a scary movie or video game and never really thinking about the lives that have been lost or why they went there in the first place, or the trauma to the people that were left behind. The famous Japanese suicide forest has been a theme in many movies and always comes across as spooky and we worry more about the paranormal then about what would cause a person to go there in the first place.  The author wanted to elevate that setting and make it more meaningful. This book changes the Japanese forest to the Adrienne Forest State Park which is a fictional forest in New Hampshire where many suicides have taken place. Ellie has come to this forest to find her son before he follows in their footsteps. She comes across a creepy man named Tinker who tries to keep her from finding her son and comes across some truly horrifying places within the forest.   I don’t want to say more because of spoilers. There are twists and turns that I don’t want to ruin for you. Don’t be dissuaded by the subject matter. The author goes about telling this story in a way that is respectful and does not try to make a spectacle out of it all. This is a fantastic story and you can tell that the author put a lot of thought and time into writing it. Definitely go pick this one up! A warning though, if you are a parent (which I am not) it might be a bit much, just something to consider before reading. I received an ARC of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I was gifted this book by the author for an honest review. A desperate, devastated mother arrives in a New Hampshire state park in order to find her missing son who she suspects has come here to commit suicide. This heart wrenching, grief heavy tale is one you won’t soon forget. Your heart will be heavy, if not completely ripped out by the time you reach the end. In this novella, we travel along with a grieving mother searching for her son, but we also delve into a struggle of what depression ca I was gifted this book by the author for an honest review. A desperate, devastated mother arrives in a New Hampshire state park in order to find her missing son who she suspects has come here to commit suicide. This heart wrenching, grief heavy tale is one you won’t soon forget. Your heart will be heavy, if not completely ripped out by the time you reach the end. In this novella, we travel along with a grieving mother searching for her son, but we also delve into a struggle of what depression can do to a person mentally and physically. Depression isn’t the only mental health theme in this story, but you will see once you read this for yourself. Do you have what it takes to pick this up and travel with this grief stricken mother? This dark horror/fantasy will blow you away in ways you didn’t know you could be blown away. This is a novella that should not be ignored. It slaps the hell out of the old taboo of “don’t ask, don’t tell” and not talking about things. This is the second story I have read by Jayson, and I honestly am blown away by his talent. I can’t wait to see what he does next. The novella packed a punch where every word counts. The description was beautiful.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jacob DeCoursey

    I just finished this book last night, having had the privilege of receiving an advance print copy. It was captivating. I couldn't put the thing down. The structure, oddly enough, reminded me of a survival horror video game--with a main quest punctuated by side quests dictated by a surreal cast of characters. Now, it would be easy to mess that up, make it feel cheesy and formulaic, but Ducharme approaches it with a freshness and attention to little human details that keeps you turning page after I just finished this book last night, having had the privilege of receiving an advance print copy. It was captivating. I couldn't put the thing down. The structure, oddly enough, reminded me of a survival horror video game--with a main quest punctuated by side quests dictated by a surreal cast of characters. Now, it would be easy to mess that up, make it feel cheesy and formulaic, but Ducharme approaches it with a freshness and attention to little human details that keeps you turning page after page. Admittedly, the second half felt a little less impact than the first half, though also admittedly the most nuanced and heartfelt depictions of pain and loss are located in that latter section, so maybe that 's really just my own personal taste. Regardless, the book as a whole is SOLID. Well worth the price tag, and well worth the time invested from the first sentence to the final paragraph. As far as indie authors go, Ducharme is a rare talent who has a promising future ahead! I can't wait to read whatever he releases next.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kristyn

    Eleanor is going to the Adrienne Forest State Park to find her son, Alan, who has gone there to end his life. This is an interesting take on mental illness, specifically depression and suicide. I feel Ducharme wrote a horrific and dark story while still handling the subject matter tactfully. There is definitely a fantasy aspect to this, but the story is quite grounded in reality. I liked the Tinker character, not because he was a nice character, but because I understand what he was meant to repr Eleanor is going to the Adrienne Forest State Park to find her son, Alan, who has gone there to end his life. This is an interesting take on mental illness, specifically depression and suicide. I feel Ducharme wrote a horrific and dark story while still handling the subject matter tactfully. There is definitely a fantasy aspect to this, but the story is quite grounded in reality. I liked the Tinker character, not because he was a nice character, but because I understand what he was meant to represent and I thought that was very clever. This is a heartbreaking read especially if you or someone you are close to battles with depression and suicidal ideation. I do wish it had been a bit longer and went more into what Ellie was experiencing emotionally. Overall, this is a good novella with a spin on the suicide forest as well as someone battling with mental illness. One last thing, I wish Ducharme had put a note encouraging people to reach out or call the suicide hotline or a help text line if they are feeling suicidal or like they can't go one. If you are feeling that way, please reach out to someone, to me, to anyone. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is: 1-800-273-8255.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hayla

    Come Forth In Thaw is a novella that will stick with each reader. I had to take some time to reflect on exactly what I wanted to say in my review. In such few pages, Ducharme examines suicide and uncovers the intrusive thoughts and mental illness that lies underneath in an empathetic and emotional way. It’s a powerful story, made more so I think because of the way hope shines through all the ugliness. I’m glad to have experienced an uplifting story involving mental illness and emotional trauma. Come Forth In Thaw is a novella that will stick with each reader. I had to take some time to reflect on exactly what I wanted to say in my review. In such few pages, Ducharme examines suicide and uncovers the intrusive thoughts and mental illness that lies underneath in an empathetic and emotional way. It’s a powerful story, made more so I think because of the way hope shines through all the ugliness. I’m glad to have experienced an uplifting story involving mental illness and emotional trauma. I think the novella is best experienced without much information given, so I encourage perspective readers to dive right in. Yes, there are a few characters that could have been more developed. And I think the cover art is a bit too “sensationalized” - using the hanging suicides as an eye-catcher - for the meaning Ducharme intends readers to take away. But the heart of the story is what readers are ultimately here for, and that’s gold. Thank you for this book, Jayson Robert Ducharme. You’ve made something special.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.