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Traveling Light: Releasing the Burdens You Were Never Intended to Bear

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Weary travelers. You've seen them -- everything they own crammed into their luggage. Staggering through terminals and hotel lobbies with overstuffed suitcases, trunks, duffels, and backpacks. Backs ache. Feet burn. Eyelids droop. We've all seen people like that. At times, we are people like that -- if not with our physical luggage, then at least with our spiritual load. We all Weary travelers. You've seen them -- everything they own crammed into their luggage. Staggering through terminals and hotel lobbies with overstuffed suitcases, trunks, duffels, and backpacks. Backs ache. Feet burn. Eyelids droop. We've all seen people like that. At times, we are people like that -- if not with our physical luggage, then at least with our spiritual load. We all lug loads we were never intended to carry. Fear. Worry. Discontent. No wonder we get so weary. We're worn out from carrying that excess baggage. Wouldn't it be nice to lose some of those bags? That's the invitation of Max Lucado. With the Twenty-third Psalm as our guide, let's release some of the burdens we were never intended to bear. Using these verses as a guide, Max Lucado walks us through a helpful inventory of our burdens. May God use this Psalm to remind you to release the burdens you were never meant to bear.


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Weary travelers. You've seen them -- everything they own crammed into their luggage. Staggering through terminals and hotel lobbies with overstuffed suitcases, trunks, duffels, and backpacks. Backs ache. Feet burn. Eyelids droop. We've all seen people like that. At times, we are people like that -- if not with our physical luggage, then at least with our spiritual load. We all Weary travelers. You've seen them -- everything they own crammed into their luggage. Staggering through terminals and hotel lobbies with overstuffed suitcases, trunks, duffels, and backpacks. Backs ache. Feet burn. Eyelids droop. We've all seen people like that. At times, we are people like that -- if not with our physical luggage, then at least with our spiritual load. We all lug loads we were never intended to carry. Fear. Worry. Discontent. No wonder we get so weary. We're worn out from carrying that excess baggage. Wouldn't it be nice to lose some of those bags? That's the invitation of Max Lucado. With the Twenty-third Psalm as our guide, let's release some of the burdens we were never intended to bear. Using these verses as a guide, Max Lucado walks us through a helpful inventory of our burdens. May God use this Psalm to remind you to release the burdens you were never meant to bear.

30 review for Traveling Light: Releasing the Burdens You Were Never Intended to Bear

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fergus

    The gritty details of each of our follies and foibles are the Facts of Our Life to the Prime Mover. So... “After such knowledge, what Forgiveness?” Plenty, as it turns out! Everything’s gonna be OK at last, because it’s: GARBAGE DAY. You know one day, we notice that our step has lost its spring. The sky has lost its blue. Our Memory Book has diminished in volume - and its nice bright pictures are yellow and faded. We didn’t plan for this. It just happened. And we’ve maybe lost our way. We’re at a Dead E The gritty details of each of our follies and foibles are the Facts of Our Life to the Prime Mover. So... “After such knowledge, what Forgiveness?” Plenty, as it turns out! Everything’s gonna be OK at last, because it’s: GARBAGE DAY. You know one day, we notice that our step has lost its spring. The sky has lost its blue. Our Memory Book has diminished in volume - and its nice bright pictures are yellow and faded. We didn’t plan for this. It just happened. And we’ve maybe lost our way. We’re at a Dead End. That’s when we look down and notice something heavy in our hands... a garbage bag filled to capacity. Or maybe two of them. Who gave this crap to us? And HOW do we get rid of it? You don’t see full garbage bags selling easily on eBay. NOBODY wants this crap! You know, Life has a way of unloading garbage on us. It’s the Overwhelming Questions, the Primal Scream from the Soul underneath it all that’s KILLING us. The little things have all made a huge pileup - a blockage in our hearts... Your husband always works late. Your wife keeps bellyaching. Your boss demands WAY too much. Your kids are always whining! The result? A blocked heart. From ALL OUR GARBAGE. Load after load of anger, guilt, pessimism, anxiety, deceit and impatience. It ALL piles up. But now it’s Wednesday morning. It’s... YES - it’s Garbage Day. But - THIS Garbage Day is different. You missed the truck... you slept right through it! Is your body telling you it’s had All It Can TAKE? DRAT! Then, suddenly you hear a gentle knock on the door. ‘Excuse me, sir. It seems you forgot to put out your garbage... ´Is everything OK, sir?’ DOES HE CARE, you think? - SOMETHING’S WEIRD ABOUT THIS! Well, we have a real Friend who asks that question. He knocks at the door. He sees the HEAVY garbage in our hearts. And He asks us to hand over the whole Sheer Dead weight of it - ALL the worthless trash of our past - to Him. And in return... He’ll give us PEACE. Sound like a deal? Buy it! ****** FIVE BRIGHT GOLD STARS for sure for this one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christópher Abreu Rosario

    I'm a firm believer that things happen for a reason, that things are presented to you for a reason, that books are read for a reason. This book was meant to be read, and I am so ever grateful that I did. My sister recommended it to me months ago, and like most recommendations I added it to my list but didn't give it any more importance over the other books I had already intended to read. About a month ago my grandmother passed away and on her deathbed I discovered that her favorite passage in th I'm a firm believer that things happen for a reason, that things are presented to you for a reason, that books are read for a reason. This book was meant to be read, and I am so ever grateful that I did. My sister recommended it to me months ago, and like most recommendations I added it to my list but didn't give it any more importance over the other books I had already intended to read. About a month ago my grandmother passed away and on her deathbed I discovered that her favorite passage in the bible is Psalm 23, a Psalm by David which is well known as a universal prayer for the sick and dying. I thought it funny that my grandmother would like this Psalm so much and hearing it in Spanish being recited as her life support was discontinued I thought to myself, how uninspired this Psalm is, it's words do not flow, it's message does not reach me in any other moment outside of this here sad one. At the funeral little plastic prayer cards were printed for all in attendance with Psalm 23 on the back. I took one home as I wanted to honor my grandmother. A week ago I went to my father's house and seeing my sister again I was reminded of this book, this Traveling Light: Releasing the Burdens You Were Never Intended to Bear and not knowing the details of its pages I asked her for it and she gladly handed over her copy. I took it home and cracked to where it explained that it was about Psalm 23. How it would break it down line by line and show me just how inspired and moving this Psalm truly is. Max Lucado is indeed a great storyteller who uses smaller stories as examples of his points in a way that we can understand the message and get a proper grasp of the Love that we don't allow ourselves to see. I can give witness now to how truly inspiring this Psalm is and can understand with deeper insight as to why it was my grandmothers favorite passage in life, and not just one to recite in death. The little plastic prayer card now being my bookmark of choice.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    As a long-time traveler I always felt the advice found in a Spanish proverb was sound, not only for travel but for life in general: Travel lightly, you are not traveling for people to see you. Travel expectantly, every place you visit is like a surprise package to be opened; untie the strings with an expectation of high adventure. Travel humbly,visit people and places with reverence and respect for their traditions and way of life. Travel with an open mind. Leave your prejudices at home. Travel with As a long-time traveler I always felt the advice found in a Spanish proverb was sound, not only for travel but for life in general: Travel lightly, you are not traveling for people to see you. Travel expectantly, every place you visit is like a surprise package to be opened; untie the strings with an expectation of high adventure. Travel humbly,visit people and places with reverence and respect for their traditions and way of life. Travel with an open mind. Leave your prejudices at home. Travel with curiosity. It is not how far you go, but how deeply you go that mines the gold of experience. The proverb always comes easily to mind so while visiting the neighborhood library my attention was drawn to a book by Max Lucado entitled Traveling Light. The writing is based on the promise of Psalm 23. I haven’t read Max Lucado before, but the title and a love of the Twenty-third Psalm drew my curiosity and I carried the book home. I’m glad I did. It’s been over thirty years since I read Phillip Keller’s book A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, and even though the style of writing and stories recounted are totally different, there is much in Lucado’s writing to remind me of the words of wisdom found in Keller’s writing. Both give relevance to the practicality and reassurance of the words as we journey through life as well as to the beauty found within the scripture itself.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Weary travelers. You've seen them; everything they own crammed into their luggage. Staggering through terminals and hotel lobbies with overstuffed suitcases, trunks, duffels and backpacks. Backs ache, feet burn, eyelids droop. We've all seen people like that and at times, we are people like that, if not with our physical luggage, then at least with our spiritual load. We all lug loads we were never intended to carry. Fear. Worry. Discontent. No wonder we get so weary. We're worn out from carryin Weary travelers. You've seen them; everything they own crammed into their luggage. Staggering through terminals and hotel lobbies with overstuffed suitcases, trunks, duffels and backpacks. Backs ache, feet burn, eyelids droop. We've all seen people like that and at times, we are people like that, if not with our physical luggage, then at least with our spiritual load. We all lug loads we were never intended to carry. Fear. Worry. Discontent. No wonder we get so weary. We're worn out from carrying that excess baggage. Wouldn't it be nice to lose some of those bags? With the Twenty-third Psalm as our guide, it lets us release some of the burdens we were never intended to bear. Using these verses as a guide, the author walks us through a helpful inventory of our burdens. May God use this Psalm to remind you to release the burdens you were never meant to bear. This is the first book I have read by Max Lucado but I really enjoyed it! Which pleases me because I have purchased almost every book he has written from different thrift stores, so I am not excited to read the rest of them. Traveling Light basically breaks down Psalm 23 line and by line and it explains it in relation to the above explanation of the book. Just in case you need a refresher: "The Lord is my Shepard, I shall not be in want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside quiet waters. He restores my soul. He guides me in the paths of righteousness for his name's same. Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil. For You are with me. You rod and your staff, they comfort me. You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. Surely goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever." The author breaks this very well known passage down into 18 different chapters. I chose to read one a day, as I find that books such as these are better read like that, so you can truly read and think about each chapter. Lucado talks about how we are all carrying burdens around with us that we don't need to; fear, worry, guilty, discontent, jealousy, etc. And how we will be so much happier if we can just set them down. For the most part, I agreed with everyone he said and I really enjoyed his writing, he's actually really funny. A few of the chapters that dealt with anxiety and depression I don't completely agree with. I am a Christian, but I have also suffered from anxiety, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder for most of my life. And there is a fine line when it comes to discussing how religion can help with mental illness. I find that many Christians and Christian authors believe you can "pray away the disorder" and you can't. Mental illnesses are biological in nature, that's a scientific fact. Anyway, beyond that item, I really enjoyed the book. His writing is excellent and he adds in a lot of personal stories that are easy to relate to and help get his point across. I look forward to reading more of his books in the near future, happy reading!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    (4.5) I found this book so unexpected. With a basis on the 23rd Psalm, the short, succinct chapters pack an effective punch and provided me with a profound new depth of the faith in which I was raised. The author's use of humor to drive points home can at times be purposely over-the-top but mostly it made me chuckle. If you're looking for a non-heavy, to-the-point yet beautifully meaningful dose of spiritual reading this summer, this fits the bill. (A study guide is included.) (4.5) I found this book so unexpected. With a basis on the 23rd Psalm, the short, succinct chapters pack an effective punch and provided me with a profound new depth of the faith in which I was raised. The author's use of humor to drive points home can at times be purposely over-the-top but mostly it made me chuckle. If you're looking for a non-heavy, to-the-point yet beautifully meaningful dose of spiritual reading this summer, this fits the bill. (A study guide is included.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    The Book Man

    “Traveling Light” is a book with its foundation based upon Psalm 23. If you’re carrying a lot of extra baggage grab & read this book!!! ~ “You can’t enjoy a journey carrying so much stuff. Why don’t you just drop all that luggage?” ~ “Meet today’s problems with today’s strength. Don’t start tackling tomorrow’s problems until tomorrow. You do not have tomorrow’s strength yet. You simply have enough for today.” ~ “He is NEVER too late or too early, too loud or too soft, too fast or to slow. He has AL “Traveling Light” is a book with its foundation based upon Psalm 23. If you’re carrying a lot of extra baggage grab & read this book!!! ~ “You can’t enjoy a journey carrying so much stuff. Why don’t you just drop all that luggage?” ~ “Meet today’s problems with today’s strength. Don’t start tackling tomorrow’s problems until tomorrow. You do not have tomorrow’s strength yet. You simply have enough for today.” ~ “He is NEVER too late or too early, too loud or too soft, too fast or to slow. He has ALWAYS been and always will be right. He is RIGHTEOUS.” ~ “Don’t measure the size of the mountain; talk to the One who can move it. Instead of carrying the world on your shoulders, talk to the One who holds the universe on His. Hope is a look away. Now, what were you looking at?” “GO. BOW. TRUST. Worth a try, don’t you think?”

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Boyd

    No wonder life's seemed so heavy lately. Every burden described in this book, I've been carrying: worrying that my God is a lesser God, self-reliance, discontent, weariness, worry, hopelessness, guilt, arrogance, the grave, grief, fear, loneliness, shame, disappointment, envy, doubt, and not enough heaven-homesickness. Any of these sound familiar? This book is for you! It should be a requirement for every Bible study and devotional group! No wonder life's seemed so heavy lately. Every burden described in this book, I've been carrying: worrying that my God is a lesser God, self-reliance, discontent, weariness, worry, hopelessness, guilt, arrogance, the grave, grief, fear, loneliness, shame, disappointment, envy, doubt, and not enough heaven-homesickness. Any of these sound familiar? This book is for you! It should be a requirement for every Bible study and devotional group!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    A great study, with many fabulous thoughts...but a bit too much advertising in the end pages.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dan Almeida

    Quick read and every chapter has enough material for someone to prepare the structure of a whole sermon, talk or lesson. Very enjoyable and inspiring read, I feel like I can travel much lighter in life after this read. This is the first time I read Lucado, and it was a friend's reference, I appreciate his writing style, references, stories, and inspiring words, but I would have preferred if one Bible version/translation was used throughout the book, but Lucado uses a few versions, depending on t Quick read and every chapter has enough material for someone to prepare the structure of a whole sermon, talk or lesson. Very enjoyable and inspiring read, I feel like I can travel much lighter in life after this read. This is the first time I read Lucado, and it was a friend's reference, I appreciate his writing style, references, stories, and inspiring words, but I would have preferred if one Bible version/translation was used throughout the book, but Lucado uses a few versions, depending on the verse he is quoting, I guess that is the conservative side of me, and it might not be relevant for most.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Max Lucado is one of my favorite inspirational writers. He has a marvelous ability to take a topic and explain it with simple stories and examples. It's like sitting down with a trusted friend to discuss what's in your heart and on your mind. This time he takes one of the most beloved passages in the Bible - the 23rd Psalm. He talks about how the Psalm speaks about releasing your burdens to the Lord - worry, hopelessness, guilt, grief, disappointments, envy, doubt. When you can trust that God is Max Lucado is one of my favorite inspirational writers. He has a marvelous ability to take a topic and explain it with simple stories and examples. It's like sitting down with a trusted friend to discuss what's in your heart and on your mind. This time he takes one of the most beloved passages in the Bible - the 23rd Psalm. He talks about how the Psalm speaks about releasing your burdens to the Lord - worry, hopelessness, guilt, grief, disappointments, envy, doubt. When you can trust that God is in control, then you can travel lightly through life. This book like most of Lucado's works also contains questions and passages for further reading and examination. Quotes to remember: Traveling light means trusting God with the burdens you were never intended to bear. You have a God who hears you, the power of love behind you, the Holy Spirit within you, and all of heaven ahead of you. If you have the Shepherd, you have grace for every sin, direction for every turn, a candle for every corner, and an anchor for every storm. You have everything you need. Meet today's problems with today's strength. Don't start tackling tomorrow's problems until tomorrow. You do not have tomorrow's strength yet. You simply have enough for today. We laughed, the three of us did. And in the laughter, for just a moment, Carlos was with us. For just a moment there was no leukemia, syringes, blankets, or chemotherapy. There was no stone to carve or grave to dig. There was just Carlos. And Carlos was just dancing. But then the video stopped, and so did the laughter. And this mom and dad resumed their slow walk through the valley of the shadow of death. Why does grief linger? Because you are dealing with more than memories - you are dealing with unlived tomorrows. You're not just battling sorrow - you're battling disappointment. Rather than focus on the fear, focus on the solution. And tomorrow, when out of habit you pick your luggage back up, set it down again. Set it down agin and again until that sweet day when you find you aren't picking it back up.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    First, I gave this two stars because I thought it was ok (I had to start with that because I didn't think this book was bad, but I also didn't think it was anything monumental). This book talks about burdens through the lens of Psalm 23. If you are considering reading this book I'll try to help you, but if you just want a summary you could probably skip my review. I went through this book with a small group and the reading was a good foundation for discussion, but the reading itself was a bit to First, I gave this two stars because I thought it was ok (I had to start with that because I didn't think this book was bad, but I also didn't think it was anything monumental). This book talks about burdens through the lens of Psalm 23. If you are considering reading this book I'll try to help you, but if you just want a summary you could probably skip my review. I went through this book with a small group and the reading was a good foundation for discussion, but the reading itself was a bit too fluffy for me. Lucado made an effort to keep the metaphor of traveling and personifying burdens as different kinds of luggage when traveling. Sometimes this just made it take too long to make a point. Q:Do you need to read this book? A: [If] you really enjoy Psalm 23 and want to take a closer look at it in a simple, life applicable way than read this. If you struggle with things like worry, shame, grief, fear, self-reliance, than this book will be very helpful for you, read it. If you just struggle with a few of those things, than maybe pick it up and just read those chapters devoted to it. [If] you are looking for a more profound, heady, theological breakdown of Psalm 23, this is not the book for you. If you are looking for a book on prayer, pursuing God, or understanding the person of Christ, this isn't really that either. If you feel like you've mostly already released your struggles to the Lord, than this book is not for you. Conclusion: I found that many of the chapters covered things I don't really struggle with, hence I fount myself finishing them just to "complete the reading" for the week. *Spoiler alert* This book essentially took 164 pages to tell you to read Psalm 23, consider yourself a sheep, release your burdens to the Lord (your shepherd), trust Him with them and don't try to pick those burdens back up once you've set them at His feet. If you feel that you already have accepted and applied this idea than you can leave this book on the shelf.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Carter

    Traveling Light by Max Lucado is a book that is based on the 23rd Psalm. It states that each and every day we walk around with unseen baggage. Baggage you say? Surely not! But it is true, hurt, sadness, regret, jealousy just to name a few. We can be free of that baggage if we take the time to stop and travel lightly by listening to what David wrote in Psalm 23. The first few words are so powerful "The Lord is my Sheperd," A sheperd is someone who cares for, protects, loves and provides for his f Traveling Light by Max Lucado is a book that is based on the 23rd Psalm. It states that each and every day we walk around with unseen baggage. Baggage you say? Surely not! But it is true, hurt, sadness, regret, jealousy just to name a few. We can be free of that baggage if we take the time to stop and travel lightly by listening to what David wrote in Psalm 23. The first few words are so powerful "The Lord is my Sheperd," A sheperd is someone who cares for, protects, loves and provides for his flock. We are all God's sheep. He loves us unconditionally, he will provide for us if we allow him, he protects us. We need to turn toward God each and every day and thank him for all he has done for us and all he continues to do for us. He is a good and righteous God, who will care for his sheep even when they stray or carry around extra baggage. God has told us repeatedly in the bible to lay it at his feet and he will take our burdens, but how often do we really do this. Max Lucado is known for his writings. He is a talented author who touches the lives of his readers with his work. I assure you that you will find this to be the truth when you read this book. I recommend this book to be used by individuals, by Sunday School classes, a group of friends who want to enjoy this book and discuss it. I promise you will not be disappointed.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    If you've ever felt lonely, hurt, like you've failed or messed up; if you've lost someone or been devastated by traumatic events; or if you have a hard time getting through each day because of physical, mental, or emotional reasons, this would be a good book to read. It's an easy book to read because it is powerfully gentle and written simply. If you've ever felt lonely, hurt, like you've failed or messed up; if you've lost someone or been devastated by traumatic events; or if you have a hard time getting through each day because of physical, mental, or emotional reasons, this would be a good book to read. It's an easy book to read because it is powerfully gentle and written simply.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Beadle

    This book was written for anyone who worries too much about anything. Homesickness, dying, loneliness, the future...it is so well written and really easy to read!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kristy Loeks

    Beautifully written. The author does such a wonderful job of weaving his knowledge of scripture and of history into this message that meets me right where I am today. The book feels like a conversation with someone who loves me very deeply. This will be staying on my nightstand, where I can easily access it on a regular basis.

  16. 4 out of 5

    diann bryan

    Loved the Audio and the message ❤️ Inspiration at it’s Best! Max Lucado ❤️

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    This book isn't really full of profound words that will make you impressed and feel scholarly for your reading endeavors. If you're looking for those results, I wouldn't recommend Max Lucado's work. I was looking for a bit of lighter, yet encouraging, reading during a train trip on the back side of India...and I found the perfect book. This author speaks frankly, and in words of the common man (or woman, as is my case) without finger pointing, or shaming the reader. This book is filled with beau This book isn't really full of profound words that will make you impressed and feel scholarly for your reading endeavors. If you're looking for those results, I wouldn't recommend Max Lucado's work. I was looking for a bit of lighter, yet encouraging, reading during a train trip on the back side of India...and I found the perfect book. This author speaks frankly, and in words of the common man (or woman, as is my case) without finger pointing, or shaming the reader. This book is filled with beautiful reminders of what David actually meant when he wrote the 23rd Psalm. We've all read and quoted those verses so much that we can become a bit jaded as to what the words even mean. If you are a sometimes-weary traveler, this book is for you. If you sometimes feel as if you walk the road alone, this book is for you. If you just need somebody to remind you there is so much more than this - then read this book. Sometimes you need to be reminded that you are a sheep, in the loving care of a holy and all-knowing Shepherd. Sometimes you need to be reminded of His faithfulness to others - and this book will do both. Go to this passage (Psalm 23) and this book when you're seeking comfort for a weary traveler. When everything just seems to be too much. When you start doubting yourself, God, and what you're even doing here... This book is a field guide to point you back in the right direction. The author describes many different burdens (or "luggage") that we can find ourselves carrying on any given day. Once you learn to see the burderns all as actual luggage, you'll wonder how you actually felt cheated buying the last plane ticket when they allowed you so few checked bags or carry-ons...but didn't count your other "luggage" you carried aboard. I didn't even realize just how much I've been carrying around. This book isn't a full-course meal, it's water to a parched throat and an energy bar that will carry you until you get to the real feast. I was blessed by this book and highly recommend it without reservation. It's PERFECT for a train ride across India, in shorter increments on the New York rail system, or just sitting at home.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brittney

    The message of this book was heartfelt, but the tired metaphors combined with the paternalistic and pompous language made it occasionally irritating to read. It's a decent book if you want to scrape the surface, but don't expect too much depth or fresh insight. I'd recommend it more for a quick read or a reminder than for a deep soul-searching. Update: I had initially given this book a 3-star rating, but I went ahead and updated that to 1-star because: (a) GoodReads' rating system is subjective a The message of this book was heartfelt, but the tired metaphors combined with the paternalistic and pompous language made it occasionally irritating to read. It's a decent book if you want to scrape the surface, but don't expect too much depth or fresh insight. I'd recommend it more for a quick read or a reminder than for a deep soul-searching. Update: I had initially given this book a 3-star rating, but I went ahead and updated that to 1-star because: (a) GoodReads' rating system is subjective and is based on how much you like the book, rather than the actual quality, and (b) I recently discovered that Lucado is one of the more vocal anti-gay marriage preachers. Everyone is certainly welcome to their own opinion, but he should at least make sure that his arguments are causal rather than merely correlational. He quotes Stanley Kurtz, who draws a connection between Scandinavians' failing marriages and the legalization of gay marriage; obviously this has been scientifically proven, right? Oh...it hasn't? Hmm... Lucado himself states, "If they recognize gay marriage, what will keep them from the next step? Who's to say that one man can't marry five women? Or two men and two women? How about a commune marriage? Or a marriage between a daddy and a daughter or a woman and a giraffe?" In response, I recommend that he listen to Garfunkel and Oates: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXPcBI...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lainie

    "By that moment only one bag will remain. Not guilt. It was dropped at Calvary. Not the fear of death. It was left at the grave. The only lingering luggage will be this God-given longing for home. And when you see him, you'll set it down. Just as a returning soldier drops his duffel when he sees his wife, you'll drop your longing when you see your Father. Those you love will shout. Those you know will applaud. But all the noise will cease when he cups your chin and says, "Welcome home... and with "By that moment only one bag will remain. Not guilt. It was dropped at Calvary. Not the fear of death. It was left at the grave. The only lingering luggage will be this God-given longing for home. And when you see him, you'll set it down. Just as a returning soldier drops his duffel when he sees his wife, you'll drop your longing when you see your Father. Those you love will shout. Those you know will applaud. But all the noise will cease when he cups your chin and says, "Welcome home... and with scarred hand he'll wipe every tear from your eye. And you will dwell in the house of your Lord- F o r e v e r."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Schurter

    This book gives a whole new light to the 23rd Psalm. I always associated it with funerals and death but it is so much more relevant to our every day lives than that. Now whenever I am struggling with ANYTHING, I think of the 23rd Psalm and it comforts me. <

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chad Brady

    I needed this book in my life more than anyone can know! I wish it was 1,000 more pages... I still could use it...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Travis Bow

    It was OK - some decent advise loosely related to the 23rd Psalm, but a lot more cutesy than practical or moving.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Onisim Pînzariu

    Finished another awesome work from Max and wow! Yes, I've read books written after this one that are definitely better as a writing style, but that counts less when reading motivational books. The message in Travel Light touched my heart in so many ways and it gave me a better understanding of Psalm 23, a psalm I didn't find very expressive before, given its popularity. Now I got to a point where I see things differently and I kinda got to love it. I love so many things about the way Max Lucado pr Finished another awesome work from Max and wow! Yes, I've read books written after this one that are definitely better as a writing style, but that counts less when reading motivational books. The message in Travel Light touched my heart in so many ways and it gave me a better understanding of Psalm 23, a psalm I didn't find very expressive before, given its popularity. Now I got to a point where I see things differently and I kinda got to love it. I love so many things about the way Max Lucado presents his ideas in his books, from his sense of humor to the comparisons between material and spiritual lives. He always gets me laughing in the beginning of a chapter and then weeping by the end of it. Those are some good words he's putting out there!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter Holford

    Yes - classic Max Lucado. I read this book the first time nearly 15 years ago and enjoyed it, but picked it up off the shelf again earlier this year. It's the title that got me thinking again. The need to travel light through this life. I like his subtitle: 'Releasing the burdens you were never intended to bear'. It's essentially a series of reflections on the 23rd Psalm, and THAT is always worth coming back to. One part that I had forgotten was the closing chapter, 'Almost heaven'. I've been th Yes - classic Max Lucado. I read this book the first time nearly 15 years ago and enjoyed it, but picked it up off the shelf again earlier this year. It's the title that got me thinking again. The need to travel light through this life. I like his subtitle: 'Releasing the burdens you were never intended to bear'. It's essentially a series of reflections on the 23rd Psalm, and THAT is always worth coming back to. One part that I had forgotten was the closing chapter, 'Almost heaven'. I've been thinking about the need to focus on 'dwelling in the house of the Lord' a bit lately. Max puts it nicely: 'The twists and turns of life have a way of reminding us--we aren't home here. This is not our homeland. ... And, you know what? That's OK.' (p. 153). Well worth dipping into.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Josie

    Good book based upon the 23 Psalm... Laying down the burdens of life that we were not designed to carry. Chapter 11 dealing with the loss of a loved one is very good if you have that weight on your shoulders. Would recommend to anyone that is burdened by this world. We are sheep, we weren't designed to carry the load. I have been trying for a long time to lay these things down and this book is a helpful tool. Good book based upon the 23 Psalm... Laying down the burdens of life that we were not designed to carry. Chapter 11 dealing with the loss of a loved one is very good if you have that weight on your shoulders. Would recommend to anyone that is burdened by this world. We are sheep, we weren't designed to carry the load. I have been trying for a long time to lay these things down and this book is a helpful tool.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Novlette Gooden-Castillo

    A must read! You do not realize how much "baggage" you are lugging around that affects your relationships and perspective on life. This book is funny yet realistic and Max Lucado dissects the 23 Psalm in a way I have never seen it before. A must read! You do not realize how much "baggage" you are lugging around that affects your relationships and perspective on life. This book is funny yet realistic and Max Lucado dissects the 23 Psalm in a way I have never seen it before.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Baker

    This is hands down my favorite devotional.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    This book spoke to my soul. It offers peace and encouragement to grow closer to God. Wonderful book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    "Come to Me, all who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest." Matthew 11:28 This book went through Psalm 23 line by line and shared how each invites us to lay a burden down. Burdens like weariness, guilt, fear, loneliness, etc. I needed to hear this message. "Come to Me, all who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest." Matthew 11:28 This book went through Psalm 23 line by line and shared how each invites us to lay a burden down. Burdens like weariness, guilt, fear, loneliness, etc. I needed to hear this message.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Traveling Light is mostly about letting go of burdens, mostly disappointments, fears, or anxieties that weigh us down in our spiritual lives. Each person's walk with Christ is different, so I mostly read through the sections that were pertinent to me. I think that using this book as a starting point and finding verses would be even more helpful. I went to the Bible because I needed to understand the verses. Some of us get distracted by past burdens. Some of us embrace our burdens. Some of us acc Traveling Light is mostly about letting go of burdens, mostly disappointments, fears, or anxieties that weigh us down in our spiritual lives. Each person's walk with Christ is different, so I mostly read through the sections that were pertinent to me. I think that using this book as a starting point and finding verses would be even more helpful. I went to the Bible because I needed to understand the verses. Some of us get distracted by past burdens. Some of us embrace our burdens. Some of us accumulate more to the load. Spiritual hoarding is a real issue. I have done this. It is a terrible way to live, but the misery entices me to accumulate more grief by holding on to it than to heal with Jesus. I am to renew my mind every day. Reading the Bible always helps me because my Father's words encourage me. *Spiritual warfare is a battle of the mind. When people struggle with burdens, it is common sense to find solutions. Satan, the father of lies, encourages people to accept beliefs that sound rational and attractive. I see the feel-good, feel-better self-help articles these days. I don't think anyone should try to "feel better" by comparing their spiritual life with other people's lives. If people desire to "feel better about themselves", then sin is considered acceptable because those beliefs encourage people to exalt themselves at the expense of other people. Many people (usually a non-Christ follower) think that they are not as sinful as the other people. This is going back to the idea that sin is acceptable or even required to "feel better"; sin and repentance must be addressed in a Biblical manner. Psalms 23 is all about the shepherd (Jesus) who leads his flock and provides them with what they truly need, not everything that they desire. *Doing good works, similarly, isn't supposed to be done to feel better because it is exalting the self (or to look religious to gain acceptance by other Christians; God sees the heart); doing good work isn't a remedy for sin. Taking the sin to Jesus, however, is where people will find true and lasting healing. ***Disclaimer* * * *I lovingly discuss situations that I saw in-person which affected my spiritual well-being. I try to understand others because EVERYONE is in need of Jesus. I think that the source of the behavior comes from self-help articles, under the guise of "Christian" spiritual guidance, that teaches people to feel better at the expense of others, which is probably why some people treat people badly when they spot a flaw or sin. Many also hear (and believe) the motivational, "prosperity gospels" online or in print; these gospels don't lead to the repentance of sins or ask people to follow Jesus! I hold on to my disappointments, but I must place my hope in Jesus. This book has great examples in overcoming disappointments and anxiety. I also find that reading the Bible is also interesting and nourishing to my life challenges.

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