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30 review for The Storm is Upon Us: How QAnon Became a Movement, Cult, and Conspiracy Theory of Everything

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Thankfully the maelstrom of the Trump years are behind us and hopefully they won’t ever be back. He is still wildly popular there, his supporters see him as some godlike man who can purge American politics of liberalism and Democrats. His influence on American politics though has left a deep and long lasting scar on their country and it is going to take a long time to heal. His 2016 campaign about Making America Great Again along with his popularist pitches reached a lot of people who felt that t Thankfully the maelstrom of the Trump years are behind us and hopefully they won’t ever be back. He is still wildly popular there, his supporters see him as some godlike man who can purge American politics of liberalism and Democrats. His influence on American politics though has left a deep and long lasting scar on their country and it is going to take a long time to heal. His 2016 campaign about Making America Great Again along with his popularist pitches reached a lot of people who felt that they had lost a voice in American politics. He was also attracting the voters who wouldn’t normally be that interested in politics, those that felt that the state had too much power and believed in the myriad of conspiracy theories that have been around for ages. Then in 2017, President Trump made a cryptic remark at a gathering of military officials, describing it as ‘the calm before the storm’ and then refused to explain himself to puzzled journalists. A short time after this, a person identifying themselves as ‘Q Clearance Patriot’ started posting messages of the anarchic message board, 4chan. A follow up post hinted at massive riots taking place across the country. It read like the opening paragraph from a techno thriller and was the beginning of the mother of all conspiracy theories that would become QAnon. Q was claiming to be a high level military intelligence office who was there to tell the people that there was a secret war taking place, the culmination of this would be the end of the child trafficking rings, the end of the deep state, the end of all things evil and the beginning of true freedom. The posts or drops as they became known, were prolific at first, hinting at all manner of things happening, referencing the comment Trump had made earlier and hinting at a ‘mind blowing truth’ that cannot be fully revealed and the hell that was about to unleashed. There was one tiny issue though; none of it was true. People lapped it up though. What was a niche message board became wider known as more people wanted to read these drops for themselves and a whole cabal of people would interpret and reshare these messages across a variety of social media platforms adding to the myth and conspiracy. It didn’t take long for it to become part of the mainstream and QAnon believers to make up a substantial part of the Republican Party now. Its pinnacle though was the Capitol Hill invasion by its supporters eager to unleash the storm and reinstate Trump to the presidency. But what is QAnon? In this book Mike Rothschild takes us through its short, intense and tumultuous history, outlining key moments as it grew into the phenomena that it is now. He systematically analyses the points where it went from being the delusions of a few cranks to a significant force in American politics. He tries to answer the question as to what it actually is, a cult, a political part of even a religion and given how it is driving families apart, makes suggestions on how to deal with those that have been sucked into its sphere. I can’t really say this is a good book, the subject matter is quite terrifying to be honest, but it is a necessary book. Rothschild knows his subject, in particular about cults and the effects they can have of those that believe in them. He writes with empathy about the people that have asked questions about the way of the world and found that QAnon were on the surface, providing those answers to them. There are stories from those that have delved a little deeper into the drop and have come to the realisation that they is no substance to the message. He even goes as far to speculate who the person was who begun this. Well worth reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chris Boutté

    The first thing I must say about this book is that Mike Rothschild is an incredible writer. This is the first book of his that I’ve read, and it’s difficult for me to really get into books like this, but a great writer like Mike can keep me engaged. Rothschild covers everything from top to bottom when it comes to the QAnon movement, so if you’re curious about what it is, how it started, and all of the stories that came from it, this book’s for you. I’ve been following the QAnon news for a long t The first thing I must say about this book is that Mike Rothschild is an incredible writer. This is the first book of his that I’ve read, and it’s difficult for me to really get into books like this, but a great writer like Mike can keep me engaged. Rothschild covers everything from top to bottom when it comes to the QAnon movement, so if you’re curious about what it is, how it started, and all of the stories that came from it, this book’s for you. I’ve been following the QAnon news for a long time and have even done content around some of the stories, so I thought I knew just about everything and figured this book wouldn’t tell me anything new. But I was wrong. There were plenty of stories in this book about QAnon followers that I hadn’t heard before. Although this book didn’t have as much psychology as I typically look for in books, Mike covered some big ideas when it comes to cognitive dissonance, how people get sucked in, and most importantly, how to get a loved one out. So, if you’re curious about learning more about what QAnon is or want to hear some new stories written by a great author, you should definitely get this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    If you have only a vague idea what QAnon is (or none at all), this book is a great introduction. Mike Rothschild does a great job explaining how it started, who may be behind it, why it is such an attractive conspiracy theory and what the real-life consequences of becoming a follower are. If you‘ve been following QAnon for a while, you likely won’t learn anything new, but it’s still a very good read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rebe

    It’s one thing to read in the news that some people believe in the myriad of weird stuff under the umbrella of Q and another thing entirely to have these believers in your life—people around you refusing to get vaccinated because of some nonsensical explanation of the government’s evil intentions with COVID, or expressing election views that sound like some kind of alternative reality. I wouldn’t go so far as to say anyone I know is a full-on Q believer, but I know people who have embraced at le It’s one thing to read in the news that some people believe in the myriad of weird stuff under the umbrella of Q and another thing entirely to have these believers in your life—people around you refusing to get vaccinated because of some nonsensical explanation of the government’s evil intentions with COVID, or expressing election views that sound like some kind of alternative reality. I wouldn’t go so far as to say anyone I know is a full-on Q believer, but I know people who have embraced at least some part of it. I’ve long found these beliefs puzzling and difficult to respond to. So I was really eager to read Mike Rothschild’s book. I first heard of the book during a virtual book fair recently, where I got to listen in on a Q&A with the author. Even in that brief introduction, I understood QAnon much better than before. It also piqued my curiosity about how people could believe these things. The Storm Is Upon Us begins by simply explaining what’s happened: the origins of the conspiracy theory, how it’s grown and why, and what impacts it’s had on the country and on individuals. Most interesting to me was his explanation of what kinds of people are typically most drawn to Q and why. I find it fascinating that it’s able to draw in such a spectrum of followers, from far-right political types to liberal anti-vaxxer mommy bloggers, and now I have a better understanding of why that is. It’s also so interesting to me to see all the influences Rothschild finds behind Q. A lot of the ideas within this new conspiracy theory have actually been around a long time. The author also does some analysis of QAnon, asking questions like, can it be considered a cult? (A more complicated question to answer than I had realized.) He does a little debunking, which is fun, but the book is not primarily a rebuttal to any assertions made by Q or Q followers. That was fine with me, since I am not coming to this book from a place of belief in Q. I also get the impression that a lot of Q believers won’t take debunking arguments seriously if/until they’re ready to listen; until a niggling feeling of doubt is introduced, these believers will have answers ready to defend Q from all angles. That said, there is practical advice at the end of the book for dealing with any Q believers you may have in your own life. Given the prominence of this conspiracy theory in our political landscape at the moment and the deep divide between people who believe it and people who don’t, I can’t recommend this book highly enough. Rothschild does a good job taking a complex and sprawling subject and finding the most important points of discussion. He makes something that I find deeply bizarre and unexpected into something a little easier to understand. He also manages to be respectful and empathetic without pulling any punches about the nature of this conspiracy theory and its impact. He makes a good point that a lot of Q believers are not crazy. They may believe crazy stuff, but, the author asserts (quoting Brian Dunning), “The ordinary conspiracy theorist is an intelligent, sane, and generally rational person.” So I appreciated not just what Rothschild has to say but also how he says it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    While those of us who've been following QAnon for years will not learn much new from this book, it is a well-written, thoughtful but often funny overview of the content and history of this bizarre worldview that presents it as coherently as is possible. While those of us who've been following QAnon for years will not learn much new from this book, it is a well-written, thoughtful but often funny overview of the content and history of this bizarre worldview that presents it as coherently as is possible.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Nykamp

    This is good explanation of Qanon and the madness taking over the republican party. It's pretty eye opening and terrifying what people believe. These people have isolated themselves and created their own truth. This is good explanation of Qanon and the madness taking over the republican party. It's pretty eye opening and terrifying what people believe. These people have isolated themselves and created their own truth.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    What is QAnon? Where did it come from? And what happens next? Rothschild, a journalist who specialising in conspiracies, investigates the bizarre community of QAnon providing a timeline of the movement and its connections with former President Trump. QAnon started on the anarchic message board 4chan, welcoming all those who questioned authority and distrusted the media and soon QAnon had a “conspiracy theory of everything”. The anonymity on the message board meant people said what they thought, wh What is QAnon? Where did it come from? And what happens next? Rothschild, a journalist who specialising in conspiracies, investigates the bizarre community of QAnon providing a timeline of the movement and its connections with former President Trump. QAnon started on the anarchic message board 4chan, welcoming all those who questioned authority and distrusted the media and soon QAnon had a “conspiracy theory of everything”. The anonymity on the message board meant people said what they thought, which was usually racist and anti-Semitic. In 2017, the President held court with top ranking military officers and their families, plus the press was also in attendance. Trump cryptically mumbles “maybe it’s the calm before the storm” and “you’ll find out”, and while the mainstream media where baffled, Trump admires knew exactly what he meant and QAnon was born. Rothschild explores how the movement grew in size, particularly when older generations joined who were not internet savvy and tended so share fake news. How the likes of conversative comedian Roseanne Barr added her own conspiracies to the mix, and how several scams were developed within the QAnon community. The most unsettling part of this book is how people with no clue cause mass confusion from a small fundraiser in a former mining town to the storming of the Capital Building in Washington on 6 January 2021. This is a well-researched book but I found it a hard slog at times as there is so much detail about QAnon. It will definitely make readers angry and provides a rabbit-hole dive into the movement.

  8. 5 out of 5

    CJ

    This is a fascinating and very accessible explainer of what QAnon is and how it exploded in popularity in such a short amount of time. Great if, like me, you have a passing familiarity with the subject but felt overwhelmed with all the arcane parts of the movement and want something to give you more knowledge. The most interesting (and frightening) part of the book for me was when Rothschild spoke to cult researchers and other experts about what drives people to believe in QAnon and what the mov This is a fascinating and very accessible explainer of what QAnon is and how it exploded in popularity in such a short amount of time. Great if, like me, you have a passing familiarity with the subject but felt overwhelmed with all the arcane parts of the movement and want something to give you more knowledge. The most interesting (and frightening) part of the book for me was when Rothschild spoke to cult researchers and other experts about what drives people to believe in QAnon and what the movement's future could be. I felt like Rothschild drove a good balance between having compassion for the ways people become entangled in QAnon while also being blunt about its roots in antisemitism and the darkest parts of online culture.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Liza

    Excellent book!!! Goes into the whole history and people behind Q and how this is not a movement as much as it is a revamping of old conspiracy theories!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    The fact that Rothschild called “Q”, “Qanon” proves he knows nothing about it. There is no “Qanon”. There’s just “Q”. “Anon” is just short for anonymous and has been used throughout history to describe an unidentifiable person. That’s it. Research the US military. Q Clearance and JFK. “Q” is just a research board. No person, no group. It’s public. It’s hilarious how the Rothschilds and other elite figures like to call it a “cult”. There’s no meetings, no worship, no beliefs. It’s just INFORMATIO The fact that Rothschild called “Q”, “Qanon” proves he knows nothing about it. There is no “Qanon”. There’s just “Q”. “Anon” is just short for anonymous and has been used throughout history to describe an unidentifiable person. That’s it. Research the US military. Q Clearance and JFK. “Q” is just a research board. No person, no group. It’s public. It’s hilarious how the Rothschilds and other elite figures like to call it a “cult”. There’s no meetings, no worship, no beliefs. It’s just INFORMATION. Information that’s already available. When you connect this information, it leads to the exposure and corrupt doings of the Rothschilds and other rich elite that traffic children to embellish themselves and keep nations poor. Oh yes, ROTHSCHILDS, your reign is over! SHEEP NO MORE!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sean Farrell

    Conspiracy theories are hardly a new phenomena. They have long circulated among the fringes of our society and made appearances in popular lore. Be it around the assassination of JFK, the existence of aliens, or the roundness of the Earth, there have always been some who believe that we are being lied to by powerful forces, that “the truth is out there,” and that they and their fellow believers are the only ones with their eyes open to it. It is not often however, that a conspiracy theory manage Conspiracy theories are hardly a new phenomena. They have long circulated among the fringes of our society and made appearances in popular lore. Be it around the assassination of JFK, the existence of aliens, or the roundness of the Earth, there have always been some who believe that we are being lied to by powerful forces, that “the truth is out there,” and that they and their fellow believers are the only ones with their eyes open to it. It is not often however, that a conspiracy theory manages to spill out of those communities and become so large that it threatens the very fabric of a nation, which is what makes QAnon so dangerous, and so fascinating. In his latest book, The Storm Is Upon Us, conspiracy theory researcher Mike Rothschild tackles the subject head-on, thoroughly documenting its origins and rapid rise to all-encompassing omniconspiracy. Born on the disreputable 4chan website, possibly as a joke, it eventually became too extreme for even that site and moved on to the even seamier 8chan, and then finally when that was shut down to it’s revival as 8kun. Q, the shadowy figure(s) at the center of the whole thing, purports to be someone at the center of Washington power, with access to all manner of State secrets, which they then release in short, cryptic message known as “QDrops.” While they initially predicted pretty specific events, like the arrest of Hilary Clinton on a certain date, when these proved to not be true, they shifted to the more vague proclamations they are known for today. Since then, with the help of the community that has sprung up around them, the core Q mythology has taken shape to encompass nearly every recent conspiracy theory, including the alleged stealing of the 2020 election and more “out-there” ideas like the Democratic Party and Hollywood elites drinking the blood of children. If you come into this book hoping to find out who the real “Q” actually is, you will be disappointed. There are several plausible candidates, and they do get mentioned as such in these pages, but as of yet no one really knows who he or she is or if it’s even one person, and the author doesn’t jump to any conclusions as a result. You will however come to learn about the methods and circumstances that have made this such an appealing ideology for so many Americans (and indeed even for others around the world), and how it is firmly rooted in some of the most pernicious conspiracy theories of the past. Informative, erudite, and written with the briskness of a thriller, it will keep you turning the pages and taking notes throughout.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Probably one of the most eye-opening, frightening and incredibly fascinating books that I've read in a long time. I've always had a fascination with conspiracy theories and also with cults. I'm really interested in how the people behind these movements are able to recruit intelligent, stable people and how they are able to influence the beliefs and decisions taken by so many. Over the years, I've looked at many theories about some of the most famous and infamous happenings in our world. There se Probably one of the most eye-opening, frightening and incredibly fascinating books that I've read in a long time. I've always had a fascination with conspiracy theories and also with cults. I'm really interested in how the people behind these movements are able to recruit intelligent, stable people and how they are able to influence the beliefs and decisions taken by so many. Over the years, I've looked at many theories about some of the most famous and infamous happenings in our world. There seems to be a theory trying to disprove everything; from whether the world is actually circular, to the Twin Tower 911 attacks. It's been fascinating, and I can truly understand how some people can believe what appear to be credible arguments, and evidence to disprove what the world has been told. The QAnon movement does not concentrate on just one thing though, and the way that they create links to things and tell their followers the 'truth' behind quite innocent Tweets and online articles is fascinating. We could just disregard them as crazies, but these people are dangerous, and wide reaching. During the COVID pandemic, I've seen comments from people who I'd guess haven't even heard of QAnon, and don't know anything about them, yet they quote things that were first stated in Q Drops, online. Quoting things that they believe because they saw someone else quote them, and someone else. This is how this works, and it's terrifying. I will be reading this again, most certainly going back to certain chapters when I spot yet another post in a discussion that I think is connected.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thomas A.

    I was introduced to QAnon after my Facebook timeline got snowed under its crazy, crackpot conspiracy theories that a two-second Google search would instantly debunk. And it was so relentless that I temporarily deactivated my account after it became impossible to scroll down a virtual whiteout of political hysteria screaming about the end of the world. As author Mike Rothschild points out in his book, after the COVID pandemic closed so many businesses and forced people to take shelter indoors, the I was introduced to QAnon after my Facebook timeline got snowed under its crazy, crackpot conspiracy theories that a two-second Google search would instantly debunk. And it was so relentless that I temporarily deactivated my account after it became impossible to scroll down a virtual whiteout of political hysteria screaming about the end of the world. As author Mike Rothschild points out in his book, after the COVID pandemic closed so many businesses and forced people to take shelter indoors, the baby boomer generation's cabin fever engulfed their common sense. I couldn't believe the number of "shared" photographs of Obama standing with Dr. Fauci inside an NIH lab in Bethesda, MD (with an Asian-American doctor) suddenly "proved" the former president supervised development of the COVID virus in a Wuhan lab. When I politely challenged some of those conspiracies, family members would instantly forward fanatical Tucker Carlson and Alex Jones videos to my FB Messenger, and of course they were always my older relatives. Full disclosure: I'm also a boomer, but when the author pointed out how my generation and older were MOST responsible for uncritically sharing fake news stories, it came as no surprise. Other reviewers here claim this book never reveals anything new or revelatory, but chapter 12's exhaustive list of Q's failed predictions titled "Mathematically Impossible: Debunking QAnon and its Prophecies" is a very thorough, damning summary.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Valle-Hoag

    As a factual play-by-play history of the Q movement, this books is a success. I’d recommend it to anyone who wants to get caught up with the new reality of the GOP enmeshment with Q. My biggest criticism is that Rothschild fails to identify Q for what it really is - a fascist movement - despite an entire chapter dedicated to that question. This failure to properly identify the goals of the movement cuts the legs out from under the book’s ability to give meaningful answers to the question of *why As a factual play-by-play history of the Q movement, this books is a success. I’d recommend it to anyone who wants to get caught up with the new reality of the GOP enmeshment with Q. My biggest criticism is that Rothschild fails to identify Q for what it really is - a fascist movement - despite an entire chapter dedicated to that question. This failure to properly identify the goals of the movement cuts the legs out from under the book’s ability to give meaningful answers to the question of *why* people believe Qanon aside from vague references to evolutionary desires to “see patterns.” Instead, Rothschild putters around in idealist sympathy for anons and occasionally ventures into “orange man bad” territory when he could have been actually identifying the issue. To be sure, a lot of these people are victims, but you have to focus on the end goals of the movement and it’s adherents - a Christian dominionist, genocidal, ultra conservative, whites-only society. Not every anon is a pure innocent victim of propaganda and paranoia, a lot of them were proto-fascists who were waiting for a push. Overall, I think this is a work of journalism on a topic and in a scope which needs a historical approach. I look forward to the more retrospective books on Q and it’s place in the larger picture of American authoritarian movements.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Grant

    Mike Rothschild has done an impressive job explaining the QAnon phenomenon in a way that is approachable and as evenhanded as one can be about the subject matter. If you've been fascinated by the bizarre and unnerving conspiracy world for some time, there probably isn't a lot of new information here, but it's packaged nicely and still feels worthwhile. The book will be a perfect fit for someone with a mild interest or who has heard only passing mentions in mainstream news coverage. It's difficult Mike Rothschild has done an impressive job explaining the QAnon phenomenon in a way that is approachable and as evenhanded as one can be about the subject matter. If you've been fascinated by the bizarre and unnerving conspiracy world for some time, there probably isn't a lot of new information here, but it's packaged nicely and still feels worthwhile. The book will be a perfect fit for someone with a mild interest or who has heard only passing mentions in mainstream news coverage. It's difficult to fully judge the book, since who knows when the print deadline was. Rothschild does a great job capturing everything up to and including the aftermath of January 6th. However, I feel like some small pieces of his political analysis/predictions miss the mark. While he's forgotten more about QAnon than I'll ever know, I do feel like he underestimates how much it has already permeated the Republican Party, not so much as a cohesive worldview, but in terms of its constituent parts and how many people believe some degree of 'the cabal', military junta-like politics, etc. He mentions that it will take several election cycles for us to see how it plays out, but one can make the argument that it's already quite evident and that QAnon-style thinking is clearly a huge part of the ongoing 'stop the steal' and voter disenfranchisement movements.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Viola

    Note author interviewed Yeah Nah Pasaran! Episode #078 w Mike Rothschild on ‘The Storm is Upon Us’ : July 22, 2021 https://www.3cr.org.au/yeahnahpasaran Yeah Nah Pasaran! On Thursday July 22nd 2021 Mike Rothschild interviewed about his book The Storm Is Upon Us: How QAnon Became a Movement, Cult, and Conspiracy Theory of Everything (Hachette Australia, 2021) — which is pretty much what it says on the tin. https://www.hachette.com.au/mike-roth... See also : What Makes a Cult a Cult?, Zoë Heller, Th Note author interviewed Yeah Nah Pasaran! Episode #078 w Mike Rothschild on ‘The Storm is Upon Us’ : July 22, 2021 https://www.3cr.org.au/yeahnahpasaran Yeah Nah Pasaran! On Thursday July 22nd 2021 Mike Rothschild interviewed about his book The Storm Is Upon Us: How QAnon Became a Movement, Cult, and Conspiracy Theory of Everything (Hachette Australia, 2021) — which is pretty much what it says on the tin. https://www.hachette.com.au/mike-roth... See also : What Makes a Cult a Cult?, Zoë Heller, The New Yorker, July 5, 2021 | Why Does the QAnon Conspiracy Thrive Despite All its Unfulfilled Prophecies?, Time, June 30, 2021 | QAnon and on: why the fight against extremist conspiracies is far from over, Tim Adams, The Observer, June 20, 2021. Also (July 15) Hear 👂 Talia Lavin, the author of Culture Warlords, interviewed about the January 6 Capitol riot/insurrection and https://www.deplatformhate.org/ (July 8) Dr Kaz Ross interviewed about Steve Bannon. 4.30pm, Thursday, July 22, 2021 /// @3CR /// 855AM / streaming live on the #3CR website www.3cr.org.au Yeah Nah Pasaran. Source https://slackbastard.anarchobase.com/...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Whitham (curled_up_with_a_good_book)

    This is an interesting book that will definitely get you thinking. It looks into Q – who they are, how they started and how they’ve escalated, as well as looking at stories of those who are family members of people who follow Q or who themselves, have abandoned the ideas. Split into three sections it covers the origins, the escalation and the fallout. I’m aware of the conspiracy theories believed by followers of Q but when reading this wanted to remain completely impartial. It’s always good to lo This is an interesting book that will definitely get you thinking. It looks into Q – who they are, how they started and how they’ve escalated, as well as looking at stories of those who are family members of people who follow Q or who themselves, have abandoned the ideas. Split into three sections it covers the origins, the escalation and the fallout. I’m aware of the conspiracy theories believed by followers of Q but when reading this wanted to remain completely impartial. It’s always good to look at both sides of an idea/argument. I found this to be well written and thoroughly intriguing, and enjoyed seeing things from a different perspective. It definitely got me asking questions and pondering the answers. If you’re a follower of Q then you won’t like this. If you have no idea of who Q is then this will make for an eye opening and intriguing read. And if you’re like me and have an idea of Q and their ideals but are open minded and willing to look at both sides then you should read this. If you’re into conspiracy theories – and I have to say most people I know are at least intrigued by them – then this is worth checking out!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    An interesting book that dives further into the psychology of Q and the movement that spread rampant across America during the Trump years. I was first drawn to this after watching Into the Storm on HBO. I wanted to see if there were other takes on the subject. I was happy with the way this book narrated the minds of Q believers, with how many different interviews were used to show all the sides. The book even ends on a note of warning on do's and don'ts now that we're past Trump and some of the An interesting book that dives further into the psychology of Q and the movement that spread rampant across America during the Trump years. I was first drawn to this after watching Into the Storm on HBO. I wanted to see if there were other takes on the subject. I was happy with the way this book narrated the minds of Q believers, with how many different interviews were used to show all the sides. The book even ends on a note of warning on do's and don'ts now that we're past Trump and some of the Q followers are starting to wake up to the fact that nothing Q foretold ever came to be. If you are interested in QAnon and the followers of it you should enjoy this read. It gave me a few new things to consider when I try and understand what happened and what led to this. 4 stars!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy W

    The book was very informative and Mike is a great writer. The subject of QAnon, like most cults, is extremely fascinating (and sad and frustrating). My only issue with the book is how many errors and typos are littered throughout it. Other than that, the research and writing are great and draw you into the subject.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    The author did a good job explaining the origins and key beliefs of the Q-anon movement. Examples of the destroyed relationships left in the movements wake helped in understanding the hold this movement has on its most loyal followers. Frightening that so many people fell for the nonsense and its lasting effects on politics in the U.S. is still to be determined.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    A straightforward, accessible explanation of the Q phenomenon. Rothschild is an excellent writer and takes care to not belittle or mock Q beliefs, but rather traces their origin and attraction and situates how a “conspiracy of everything” caught on in a fractured country—or world—looking for easy answers and punished enemies.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chami Krueger

    Holy shit. I got this book in an attempt to understand QAnon, much like I do with any cult or conspiracy theory I come across, but really I bought this book in an attempt to understand my father. Instead I learned that I can't understand. There is no single thread here, only webs. Only more webs. Holy shit. I got this book in an attempt to understand QAnon, much like I do with any cult or conspiracy theory I come across, but really I bought this book in an attempt to understand my father. Instead I learned that I can't understand. There is no single thread here, only webs. Only more webs.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    It's like any book written about the Trump presidency, really. All things 'Q' are plucked from the drip drip of the daily news cycle and compiled, forming a depressingly stupid narrative of our times. It's like any book written about the Trump presidency, really. All things 'Q' are plucked from the drip drip of the daily news cycle and compiled, forming a depressingly stupid narrative of our times.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark Lawry

    If one is going to write about quackery and nonsensical ramblings it is probably not going to be the best of books. I have no doubt Rothschild is a brilliant and yet a very capable writer. That being said, I fear the book is not necessarily the best of books for said reasons.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Johnson

    The audiobook narrator brought the snark in this book to LIFE, such a fun and terrifying listen. I enjoyed it immensely and it's fascinating that some of the Q conspiracy stuff has made it's way all the way over here to Italy even though I doubt anyone is aware that's where it originated... The audiobook narrator brought the snark in this book to LIFE, such a fun and terrifying listen. I enjoyed it immensely and it's fascinating that some of the Q conspiracy stuff has made it's way all the way over here to Italy even though I doubt anyone is aware that's where it originated...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    Review to come

  27. 5 out of 5

    T.J. Hoffpauir

    Pretty much everything you need to know about Q and the certain climate that it got started.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Jeffrey

    A great primer on the latest evolutionary form of conspiracy culture.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Fascinating, horrifying, & easily digestible, Mike Rothschild details the creation & evolution of the QAnon movement. I appreciate his approach: he does not simply call its followers idiots or quacks. Rather, he explains how it is natural for humans to search for answers & develop conclusions. Sadly, others prey on this tendency, exploiting a wide range of people, including Evangelical Christians, the digitally illiterate, & stay-at-home moms. It is definitely scary that these (largely) well-mea Fascinating, horrifying, & easily digestible, Mike Rothschild details the creation & evolution of the QAnon movement. I appreciate his approach: he does not simply call its followers idiots or quacks. Rather, he explains how it is natural for humans to search for answers & develop conclusions. Sadly, others prey on this tendency, exploiting a wide range of people, including Evangelical Christians, the digitally illiterate, & stay-at-home moms. It is definitely scary that these (largely) well-meaning people can be lost "down the rabbit hole" or even weaponized.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    This book was very interesting to help those of us outside of the Q-sphere understand what it is and how we got here. It's eye opening and upsetting that so many people have fallen into this hole. This book was very interesting to help those of us outside of the Q-sphere understand what it is and how we got here. It's eye opening and upsetting that so many people have fallen into this hole.

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