counter create hit Full Moon Feast: Food and the Hunger for Connection - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Full Moon Feast: Food and the Hunger for Connection

Availability: Ready to download

Full Moon Feast invites us to a table brimming with locally grown foods, radical wisdom, and communal nourishment. In Full Moon Feast, accomplished chef and passionate food activist Jessica Prentice champions locally grown, humanely raised, nutrient-rich foods and traditional cooking methods. The book follows the thirteen lunar cycles of an agrarian year, from the midwinter Full Moon Feast invites us to a table brimming with locally grown foods, radical wisdom, and communal nourishment. In Full Moon Feast, accomplished chef and passionate food activist Jessica Prentice champions locally grown, humanely raised, nutrient-rich foods and traditional cooking methods. The book follows the thirteen lunar cycles of an agrarian year, from the midwinter Hunger Moon and the springtime sweetness of the Sap Moon to the bounty of the Moon When Salmon Return to Earth in autumn. Each chapter includes recipes that display the richly satisfying flavors of foods tied to the ancient rhythm of the seasons. Prentice decries our modern food culture: megafarms and factories, the chemically processed ghosts of real foods in our diets, and the suffering--physical, emotional, cultural, communal, and spiritual--born of a disconnect from our food sources. She laments the system that is poisoning our bodies and our communities. But Full Moon Feast is a celebration, not a dirge. Prentice has emerged from her own early struggles with food to offer health, nourishment, and fulfillment to her readers. She recounts her relationships with local farmers alongside ancient harvest legends and methods of food preparation from indigenous cultures around the world. Combining the radical nutrition of Sally Fallon's Nourishing Traditions, keen agri-political acumen, and a spiritual sensibility that draws from indigenous as well as Western traditions, Full Moon Feast is a call to reconnect to our food, our land, and each other.


Compare
Ads Banner

Full Moon Feast invites us to a table brimming with locally grown foods, radical wisdom, and communal nourishment. In Full Moon Feast, accomplished chef and passionate food activist Jessica Prentice champions locally grown, humanely raised, nutrient-rich foods and traditional cooking methods. The book follows the thirteen lunar cycles of an agrarian year, from the midwinter Full Moon Feast invites us to a table brimming with locally grown foods, radical wisdom, and communal nourishment. In Full Moon Feast, accomplished chef and passionate food activist Jessica Prentice champions locally grown, humanely raised, nutrient-rich foods and traditional cooking methods. The book follows the thirteen lunar cycles of an agrarian year, from the midwinter Hunger Moon and the springtime sweetness of the Sap Moon to the bounty of the Moon When Salmon Return to Earth in autumn. Each chapter includes recipes that display the richly satisfying flavors of foods tied to the ancient rhythm of the seasons. Prentice decries our modern food culture: megafarms and factories, the chemically processed ghosts of real foods in our diets, and the suffering--physical, emotional, cultural, communal, and spiritual--born of a disconnect from our food sources. She laments the system that is poisoning our bodies and our communities. But Full Moon Feast is a celebration, not a dirge. Prentice has emerged from her own early struggles with food to offer health, nourishment, and fulfillment to her readers. She recounts her relationships with local farmers alongside ancient harvest legends and methods of food preparation from indigenous cultures around the world. Combining the radical nutrition of Sally Fallon's Nourishing Traditions, keen agri-political acumen, and a spiritual sensibility that draws from indigenous as well as Western traditions, Full Moon Feast is a call to reconnect to our food, our land, and each other.

30 review for Full Moon Feast: Food and the Hunger for Connection

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is not a cookbook, and it is not a diet book. If you are going in to it thinking it is either of these, you will be disappointed. It does give some recipes at the end of each chapter, which all deal with a certain lunar period. The book is more about reconnecting with the natural cycles of nature, and instead of focusing on seasonal eating by "Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring" she uses lunar cycles. This isn't "New Age" as I have seen some other comments suggesting. She doesn't talk about ange This is not a cookbook, and it is not a diet book. If you are going in to it thinking it is either of these, you will be disappointed. It does give some recipes at the end of each chapter, which all deal with a certain lunar period. The book is more about reconnecting with the natural cycles of nature, and instead of focusing on seasonal eating by "Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring" she uses lunar cycles. This isn't "New Age" as I have seen some other comments suggesting. She doesn't talk about angels, or spirits, or using quartz crystals to make you feel better. She isn't a mystic, she's a chef. She talks about environmental stewardship, responsible farming, reconnecting with natural cycles, even some pieces on what I considered feminism (how preparing food was traditionally "women's work" because they were tasks you could perform while still caring for children, and women's work was vital and important to the survival of a people, not mocked or derogatory, as it can be now). One of my favorite pieces is when she talks about how people in America are more shocked by not being able to drive than not being able to cook. Cooking is a skill you need to take care of yourself, something I full-heartedly agree with. Women who tell me they "don't cook" say it almost with pride, as if cooking is beneath them. Cooking is beneath NO ONE. It is something we should all be doing. Grinding your own flour shouldn't be considered "hippie" or "foodie", in fact, in Europe, it's commonplace. These are the points Prentice makes, and I couldn't agree more. I wouldn't suggest reading this book cover to cover. As it is December, I started with "Hunger Moon" and then skipped to "Wolf Moon" and read a few other of the cold weather moons before reading the spring, summer, fall ones. Also, Prentice is based in California. You are not going to see Asian recipes, as that would go against her whole approach of eating what grows in your local region. She clearly states this is more suited towards those who also live in the North American region. Nothing she stated seemed like hardcore dogma to be followed, but more like guidelines. I will admit she romanticizes a little, but people have been romanticizing "country life" and "the old days" for a very long time. It doesn't detract from the points she makes about taking care of the land and ourselves through our food systems. Very great book, I will be buying it for myself and others.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    Beautiful exploration of our relationship to food through looking at different eating practices across cultures. Reading this book really gave me a new perspective on a lot of food practices I take for granted, and has given me lots of ideas about what a healthy diet could look like. I felt that, at times, the author romanticized indigenous cultures and "traditional" ways of making food. Although she gave a lot of specific examples of food practices from a wide variety of cultures, she also often Beautiful exploration of our relationship to food through looking at different eating practices across cultures. Reading this book really gave me a new perspective on a lot of food practices I take for granted, and has given me lots of ideas about what a healthy diet could look like. I felt that, at times, the author romanticized indigenous cultures and "traditional" ways of making food. Although she gave a lot of specific examples of food practices from a wide variety of cultures, she also often referred to "traditional" and "indigenous" cultures as if they are unitary groups with a single practice. Also, as my partner remarked when I described the author's complaints about modern food preservation: "Spoken like someone from a culture where food-borne pathogens are no longer widespread." And it sure sounds mystical and magical to grind your own grain... when you don't have to do it every day. I don't disagree with her point - that we've lost our connection to food and the earth through techniques of mass food production - but it is amazing to think how much time and energy are freed up by mass food production. True, that's what allows us to check Facebook and write GoodReads reviews... but it also fuels education, the arts, invention, scientific discovery, and many other exciting and wonderful things about modern life. It seems like there must be a way to preserve these benefits while still re-connecting to our food and our earth.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    If Anthony Bourdain, Joesph Campbell, and Michael Pollan had a love child, it would be Jessica Prentice. I loved this book. Loved. I want to drive to Richmond and find Jessica and talk to her, see her grain mill, and watch her cook. I know that sounds stalker. Not the goal. It's just that I read this book with so much nodding and "yes!". This book is where I needed In Defense of Food to go. Eating food is a good start, but filling our selves and bellies with connection is the key. I loved the di If Anthony Bourdain, Joesph Campbell, and Michael Pollan had a love child, it would be Jessica Prentice. I loved this book. Loved. I want to drive to Richmond and find Jessica and talk to her, see her grain mill, and watch her cook. I know that sounds stalker. Not the goal. It's just that I read this book with so much nodding and "yes!". This book is where I needed In Defense of Food to go. Eating food is a good start, but filling our selves and bellies with connection is the key. I loved the diversity in this book, both in food, culture, and religion. Some of my favorite quotes: p. 41: "The point is to be wise, not rigid." p. 201: "The knowledge that every animal, plant, person, wind, and season is indebted to the fruit of everything else is an adult knowledge. To get out of debt means you don't want to be a part of life, and you don't want to grow into an adult." This book is amazing. I can't believe I have to take it back to the library!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I admire the ideal that Jessica Prentice is aiming for: a world in which we are able to eat "locally grown, humanely raised foods" prepared via traditional methods. In thirteen chapters, each dealing with a specific kind of food and named after a Native American or other traditional month, Prentice discusses each food, contrasting how it was historically raised and prepared with how we deal with it in our world of large-scale agriculture and convenience foods. She adds bits of her personal histo I admire the ideal that Jessica Prentice is aiming for: a world in which we are able to eat "locally grown, humanely raised foods" prepared via traditional methods. In thirteen chapters, each dealing with a specific kind of food and named after a Native American or other traditional month, Prentice discusses each food, contrasting how it was historically raised and prepared with how we deal with it in our world of large-scale agriculture and convenience foods. She adds bits of her personal history with food and health through the book; a former vegetarian, she eventually began eating meat again, in great part for health reasons. Although she advocates an omnivorous diet, I thought that she was sympathetic to the reasons many people choose vegetarian and vegan diets. My disagreements with this book are the same ones I have with many books of this type. There is no discussion of how to make this lovely local, organic, minimally processed food available and affordable to people on limited incomes. Prentice advocates consuming raw milk; I am not convinced that just raising cows on grass in open pastures would be enough to make this a safe option. The author seems to have an uncritical acceptance of the writers whom she agrees with, and I wondered if there actually were some flaws in their work that should be looked into. She acknowledges that many of the traditional ways to prepare food take time and effort:"Modern women may not relish the thought of spending six hours grinding grain by hand. But I think we should take seriously the possibility that this kind of work can be deeply satisfying and even be a form of expression for the soul." Actually, I do take this possibility seriously, and would love my cooking to be deeply satisfying. But while Prentice is a professional chef, who presumably wants to spend her days working with food, how does this six-hours-or-more-a-day schedule work for people who want to work in other fields altogether? But despite all this, I think Prentice's vision of a closer tie between food and community makes this book a worthy read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    Jessica Prentice is a chef and food activist in the San Francisco Bay area who is an avid proponent for locally grown foods. In other words, she urges us toward tradition. Full Moon Feast is a book about food and more with stories from Indigenous cultures of appreciation for what nourishes. It also tells of challenges and confusion related to relationship with food. Jessica advocates for small farmers who choose to uphold commitment and passion toward their way of life. At the same time, she doc Jessica Prentice is a chef and food activist in the San Francisco Bay area who is an avid proponent for locally grown foods. In other words, she urges us toward tradition. Full Moon Feast is a book about food and more with stories from Indigenous cultures of appreciation for what nourishes. It also tells of challenges and confusion related to relationship with food. Jessica advocates for small farmers who choose to uphold commitment and passion toward their way of life. At the same time, she documents methods of modern food production that have lost their humanity and encourage disconnection from our food sources and each other. The author calls us back to a more engaged, mindful way of nourishing ourselves by connecting us to what food once held—the circle of life. She grounds the meaning and timing of food selection by our own natural rhythms and the thirteen lunar cycles. This book comforts and takes back to our roots—easily forgotten in a fast food universe. And it’s full of tempting recipes like Salmon Cured with Maple and Juniper, Summer Berries with Lavender Créme Anglaise or Sourdough Cheese Herb Scones. If you allow it, Full Moon Feast will deepen your appreciation for the food in your life and cause you to start searching out locally grown produce as it did me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    With compelling articles and comprehensive sources, Prentice writes evocatively about our Western shift in diet and the backlash with our health. This book does a good job of balancing the dietary warnings with celebrations of ancient food and the communal practice of collecting and cooking it. She takes examples from all over the world, and clearly spent a long time researching methods and practices of worldwide cultures with regard to certain foods. The recipes look great, and I can't wait to With compelling articles and comprehensive sources, Prentice writes evocatively about our Western shift in diet and the backlash with our health. This book does a good job of balancing the dietary warnings with celebrations of ancient food and the communal practice of collecting and cooking it. She takes examples from all over the world, and clearly spent a long time researching methods and practices of worldwide cultures with regard to certain foods. The recipes look great, and I can't wait to try some of them out- I love when I find recipes that aren't the same thing I've always done, but with a slight variation. She actually provides guidelines on lacto-fermentation, and wort drinks. How cool is that?! If you're contemplating becoming a locavore, growing your own food, trying to get in touch with a healthier and more holistic diet, or have some health problems that you want to try treating with nutrition, I recommend this book. Also, if you're curious about the changes in human diet, the foods that seem to unite us as a species, and some definitely non-Western flavor combinations, I recommend this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    One of my top 10 favorite books of all times. I have just reread this book (although I read it originally back in 2005 or so). For some reason, the second time around is even more powerful. Her words are like getting a full-body massage (deeply nourishing, connecting, and loving). Her book draws on all of our ancestral cultures which followed the cycles of the moon. Each chapter focuses on a particular moon (harvest moon, sap moon, egg moon, etc) with stories, poetry, nutritional advice from acr One of my top 10 favorite books of all times. I have just reread this book (although I read it originally back in 2005 or so). For some reason, the second time around is even more powerful. Her words are like getting a full-body massage (deeply nourishing, connecting, and loving). Her book draws on all of our ancestral cultures which followed the cycles of the moon. Each chapter focuses on a particular moon (harvest moon, sap moon, egg moon, etc) with stories, poetry, nutritional advice from across the globe, along with excellent traditional recipes! Jessica is an excellent writer and passionate about diet, culture, food, and well-being. She is able to tie subtle themes of connection and spirit into the greater foodie movement through her purposeful articulation. All I gotta say is -- Thank you Jessica!!! And, if you are interested in her work on the ground, google search 'Three Stone Hearth.'

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christy Peterson

    If this is someone's first book on traditional foods and the evils of modern foodstuffs, then this might be a 4-5 star book. She is Christian, but I still don't appreciate her views on evolution, global warming, petroleum it's a myth that we are running out and sexuality. If it weren't for those, I probably would have given it 4 stars. Food topics are organized and discussed under the season or more specifically the moon, when it has traditionally been harvested. Not a whole lot of new info in th If this is someone's first book on traditional foods and the evils of modern foodstuffs, then this might be a 4-5 star book. She is Christian, but I still don't appreciate her views on evolution, global warming, petroleum it's a myth that we are running out and sexuality. If it weren't for those, I probably would have given it 4 stars. Food topics are organized and discussed under the season or more specifically the moon, when it has traditionally been harvested. Not a whole lot of new info in this for me and still nothing about benefits of eating food in its season. I am officially giving up on finding such info, it isn't that important.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Haliation

    So I'm not 100% finished this book, but I do know that I quite like it so far. It is not solely a cookbook, in fact, I'd say that the bulk of the book is dedicated to explanation. There a lot of things I like about this book, such as NOT lumping Native cultures under "Native Americans", but finding sources and the proper names of bands/tribes, using their languages where she can. Also, there is really good commentary on veganism and Indigenous reality, which might upset some not-so-critically-thin So I'm not 100% finished this book, but I do know that I quite like it so far. It is not solely a cookbook, in fact, I'd say that the bulk of the book is dedicated to explanation. There a lot of things I like about this book, such as NOT lumping Native cultures under "Native Americans", but finding sources and the proper names of bands/tribes, using their languages where she can. Also, there is really good commentary on veganism and Indigenous reality, which might upset some not-so-critically-thinking vegans, but that is not me, and I appreciated it. Everything is cited, and it's just an all around fascinating read so far.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This is a beautifully written book, and a wonderful follow-up to Sally Fallon's Nourishing Traditions. Jessica Prentice truly honors food in its natural state and supports the reader/eater in making the connections between what we eat and how we feel on many levels. This book is not preachy because the author writes honestly about her own transition from being vegetarian/vegan/sugar-free/dairy-free/etc. to an omnivorous existence, and how that transition has allowed her to become more honest wit This is a beautifully written book, and a wonderful follow-up to Sally Fallon's Nourishing Traditions. Jessica Prentice truly honors food in its natural state and supports the reader/eater in making the connections between what we eat and how we feel on many levels. This book is not preachy because the author writes honestly about her own transition from being vegetarian/vegan/sugar-free/dairy-free/etc. to an omnivorous existence, and how that transition has allowed her to become more honest with herself, true to nature, and open to the benefits of comforting, health-building foods.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carlie

    This book was very interesting. The author is some stripe of Christian but, obviously playing with lots of ideas, working to form a synergy of meaning from multiple cultures and traditions and stepping outside of the box. I enjoyed her focus on community, and the social nature of food and eating. I feel the same way and thought many of her philosophical ideas were charming. There were lots of recipes I want to try at the ends of the chapters and I am looking forward to flipping through the seaso This book was very interesting. The author is some stripe of Christian but, obviously playing with lots of ideas, working to form a synergy of meaning from multiple cultures and traditions and stepping outside of the box. I enjoyed her focus on community, and the social nature of food and eating. I feel the same way and thought many of her philosophical ideas were charming. There were lots of recipes I want to try at the ends of the chapters and I am looking forward to flipping through the seasonal sections as the year progresses to remind myself of the food cycles we spin through.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    This is a beautiful book, and it came to me at the perfect time - when I wad ready to give up vegetarianism. It may not jive with others, but this way of eating made complete sense to me and started me on, what to me is, a healthier path. I found the writing to be earnest, but in a heartfelt way. I couldn't say enough good things about this book. Nutrition and diets -they're always personal, touchy subjects, but I'd recommend this book to anyone

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    Read this with a gnarly winter virus and now remember it through the lens of a slightly high fever. A book about the healing power of food seemed like the perfect choice at the time, and I vowed to make several of the inspired recipes included in each chapter-- like egg drop soup. Until now, mostly forgot about adding them to my repertoire. Hm, maybe i should stick this on my 'to do' list of infinity... OR maybe not.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Red

    this book blew my mind. I can't wait to read it again and start to understand some more of it in a deeper way; it totally changed my thinking about how to eat, what to eat, why to eat, and how to make food. I don't pretend that I'm going to be as dedicated and comprehensive in my cooking and eating practices as Jessica Prentice, but this book certainly gets me thinking about how to move in her direction, and it makes me feel excited and connected in doing it. no guilt here!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chrissie

    Absolutely brilliant book! I love her philosophy on food and eating, this is so much more than a cookbook. It is really a wonderful read on this cultural history of food and eating. Her research into the indigenous traditions was just wonderful. It motivates you to really take a deeper look into what we eat and why we eat it. As well as brings to light in a beautiful way the problems with today's eating habits and almost forever lost food traditions.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Recommended by Eve. I intended to just skim through this book so I could talk to Eve about it, after she posted that it was "life changing." But it sucked me in, and I ended up actually reading large sections of it. A fascinating and fun collection of the author's personal food journey, including an eating disorder, cultural myths, legends and stories, essays on the environment and how we can still have hope and find positive actions. A fun journey.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisalis

    I met Jessica Prentice while organizing on a conference. (She was promoting her book at the conference) She gave an amazing talk with David Crow and I decided to buy her book. It's fablous. You really begin to appreciate more and more where our food comes from, who has grown it, picked it and shipped it to you. But also I appreciate our connections to the earth.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    this book really brought home to me the importance of enjoying and appreciating your food. As a culture we are so obsessed with health and trying to correct our body flaws that we look at food as a means to control our bodies, when it is really so much more. This was a refreshing read and really changed the way I look at eating. I'll definitely be reading it again!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ethicurean Reads

    Chef and passionate food activist Jessica Prentice champions locally grown, humanely raised, nutrient-rich foods and traditional cooking methods. She decries our modern food culture and the suffering—physical, emotional, cultural, communal, and spiritual—born of a disconnect from our food sources. Includes recipes for foods following the 13 lunar cycles of an agrarian year.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    I thought that this book would embody everything that I love about food and counterculture. Alas, the writing was just so painful...the recipes never anything I would make and her awkwardly earnest delivery (quoting her journal from 17 years prior) made it not worth my time.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mika Kafourou

    Extraordinarily beautiful and informative book. Full of wonderful recipes for eating seasonally, locally, and healthily. Learn about the history of the pasteurization of milk. Learn and meditate upon the ways we can eat in balance with our body's needs.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book is transforming the way I think about food.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Lots here to like, and lots to question. I love the idea of a seasonal exploration of food focused around the lunar calendar, and Prentice writes it beautifully. So, too, she lovingly envisions a world where people relate deeply to their food, and, through their food, to each other. On the other hand, she romanticizes and often deeply flattens indigenous cultures. She recommends raw dairy without seriously discussing the risks, which makes me skeptical about her food safety in general. And she r Lots here to like, and lots to question. I love the idea of a seasonal exploration of food focused around the lunar calendar, and Prentice writes it beautifully. So, too, she lovingly envisions a world where people relate deeply to their food, and, through their food, to each other. On the other hand, she romanticizes and often deeply flattens indigenous cultures. She recommends raw dairy without seriously discussing the risks, which makes me skeptical about her food safety in general. And she relies almost entirely on Weston Price for her “science” which is... less than persuasive.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Boersma

    Interesting read that got on my radar via a nutritionist. While a bit of a fluffy title, the content is interesting - rethinking types of foods, food seasons. The recipes are great for anyone looking to really go out of their way to try different types of vegetables, herbs, etc. That said, as some who eats gluten-free, wade carefully through the recipes. Eating healthy doesn't always mean being free of allergens ;) (not the fault of the author! Just a note for potential future readers).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    Loved this book. Picked it up at a whim at my cousin's cookbook shop café Archestratus, and it is a must for anyone interested in the moon, food, and traditions. Each chapter is arranged according to the different moon it can be (according to different traditions) - the milk moon, the mead moon, the sap moon, etc. There is an examination of the history of this tradition, reflections, and some recipes end every chapter. So great!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Di

    I loved this book! No, it's not new age-y, rather it's a meaningful study of nature, timeliness, history, cultures, food and, icing on the cake, a cookbook. I appreciated Prentice's dietary bio and how she got to where she is today (when she wrote this book). I found myself nodding in agreement with her philosophies; eating local, respecting the soil, cherishing the history behind the food. I'm definitely following her so I can read more.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marie Corbitt

    I really loved this book. It taught me about different phases of the moon and how people have traditionally eaten in partnership with the seasons and the earth. I’ll definitely be more mindful and will change some of my eating habits and food choices. Very good!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Loraine

    I've erred on the side of generosity in rating Full Moon Feast . . . since there isn't the option of a half-star. I loved the organizational principle of the lunar cycles, with each of the 13 chapters for one of the moon months. Prentice chose these traditional names for each of the moons: Hunger, Sap, Egg, Milk, Moon of Making Fat, Mead, Wort, Corn, Moon When Salmon Return to Earth, Blood, Snow, Moon of Long Nights, and Wolf Moon. (I especially enjoyed reading her thoughts about worts--more com I've erred on the side of generosity in rating Full Moon Feast . . . since there isn't the option of a half-star. I loved the organizational principle of the lunar cycles, with each of the 13 chapters for one of the moon months. Prentice chose these traditional names for each of the moons: Hunger, Sap, Egg, Milk, Moon of Making Fat, Mead, Wort, Corn, Moon When Salmon Return to Earth, Blood, Snow, Moon of Long Nights, and Wolf Moon. (I especially enjoyed reading her thoughts about worts--more commonly known as potherbs today--and the traditional notion of "drinking the garden.") Don't read this book with the idea that you're going to be introduced to lots of recipes--this is not a standard cookbook. Rather, it's Ms. Prentice's attempt to share the wisdom of eating locally, cooking from scratch, getting back into sync with Mother Earth. I also appreciated her desire put her readers on a pathway to connection. One thesis may be that "we can learn from the wisdom of traditional cultures without romanticizing them. Looking at life through a different lens helps us to recognize subjective biases, and to consider alternatives." (p. 275) However, the book suffers from an uneven editorial hand. For example, Ms. Prentice does does seem to romanticize indigenous ideas. And she draws so many threads from so many traditions into the warp and woof of her story that the text can feel chaotic. Still . . . she's on to something, and is heartfelt in her effort to share it with the larger world. Plus, there are some gems among the 75 recipes she presents, especially when it comes to fermenting foods.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laylah Hunter

    Two stars feels a little unjust when there are things about this book that I will probably come back to, but apparently two stars is "okay" per GR's system, and that is about how I feel. There are some good thoughts here about seasonal meals, and I like the conceit of organizing around the lunar calendar; some of the meditations on how that moon's food connects to the current growing and harvesting conditions are lovely. I want to try some of the recipes she suggests for the summer months in part Two stars feels a little unjust when there are things about this book that I will probably come back to, but apparently two stars is "okay" per GR's system, and that is about how I feel. There are some good thoughts here about seasonal meals, and I like the conceit of organizing around the lunar calendar; some of the meditations on how that moon's food connects to the current growing and harvesting conditions are lovely. I want to try some of the recipes she suggests for the summer months in particular. But it also felt like a number of the chapters got... meandery? Like Prentice wasn't sure how she wanted to focus that one, and decided to just do a little with all of her ideas. And while perhaps I should have been expecting a healthy dollop of "we're doomed, we suck, our culture is off the rails," I somehow wasn't, and that made this more of a downer than I was looking for. ...Also I think there should be a limit to how many times you can reference Weston Price in a book that is not directly about him. Ten, maybe? Would that be a good compromise? Probably that limit ought to apply to any precursor one is citing, but this isn't the first time I've seen one of Price's devotees do it, and after a while it starts to sound a little too cultish. "The great man says...." Surely there must be someone else doing research that supports these principles? Possibly someone more recent than 80 years ago, and/or with a medical specialty more immediately relevant? I'm just saying. A broad base of supporting research makes a more solid foundation.

  30. 5 out of 5

    jen

    This book looked like it might have some interesting recipes for fermented foods and new takes on traditional foods. Unfortunately the book was so off-putting that I don't want to revisit it to find out. First of all, the tone of the writing is way too new-agey for my tastes (and I am sure many others, as I will put up with a bit of this is the content is good). Second, the author makes the assumption that because she did not feel well eating a vegetarian diet that everyone should eat a heavily This book looked like it might have some interesting recipes for fermented foods and new takes on traditional foods. Unfortunately the book was so off-putting that I don't want to revisit it to find out. First of all, the tone of the writing is way too new-agey for my tastes (and I am sure many others, as I will put up with a bit of this is the content is good). Second, the author makes the assumption that because she did not feel well eating a vegetarian diet that everyone should eat a heavily meat and animal product based diet. She embodies all of the bad aspects of the modern-day followers of Weston Price. Prentice purports to have a great enthusiasm for the food of traditional cultures, but seems to completely ignore Asian food traditions in favor of those that are meat- and dairy-based and fit nicely with her theories. If you are looking for source for recipes using fermentation techniques, I would recommend instead Sandor Katz's "Wild Fermentation."

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.