counter create hit Dreadful Sorry - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Dreadful Sorry

Availability: Ready to download

Seventeen-year-old Molly's recurrent nightmares become waking visions after she nearly drowns at a party. Soon she's witnessing events through the eyes of a girl who lived in her father's house nearly a century before.


Compare
Ads Banner

Seventeen-year-old Molly's recurrent nightmares become waking visions after she nearly drowns at a party. Soon she's witnessing events through the eyes of a girl who lived in her father's house nearly a century before.

30 review for Dreadful Sorry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    As a young child, I was always at the library... always reading. This is one of my favorite novels from my childhood. A decade or two later, I still remember this novel in vivid detail for some odd reason (even though I can't remember anything useful from yesterday). Suffice it to say, this is a great novel for a young child/teenager, highly recommended!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aly. Miller

    I love the suspense and twistd in this book. It was hard for me to put this one down. Now this is a book that'd i like to see get turned into a movie!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Okay, so I actually enjoyed this book despite the rating I gave it. The story was interesting and definitely drew me in. But the beginning of the book was slow. I also feel like the writing wasn't that good. I did like Molly and her dad. Paulette was annoying, but also adorable and waaaay more tolerable than Molly's mother. Overall, not a bad book at all.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Trista

    Oh my darlin’, oh my darlin’, oh my darlin’ Clementine, you are lost and gone forever, dreadful sorry Clementine. Seventeen-year-old Molly has had a recurring nightmare her entire life— she is walking down a long hallway to the end room, where she knows something horrible is happening. She also has an incurable fear of water, and continues to hear that old Clementine song in her head. After a near-drowning experience at a pool party, she leaves to spend the summer with her father in his new hous Oh my darlin’, oh my darlin’, oh my darlin’ Clementine, you are lost and gone forever, dreadful sorry Clementine. Seventeen-year-old Molly has had a recurring nightmare her entire life— she is walking down a long hallway to the end room, where she knows something horrible is happening. She also has an incurable fear of water, and continues to hear that old Clementine song in her head. After a near-drowning experience at a pool party, she leaves to spend the summer with her father in his new house in Maine. But the carefree summer she was hoping for disappears when she goes upstairs in the house and sees the same hallway that has been plaguing her dreams for years. Then Jared, the boy who threw her into the pool, comes to Maine demanding Molly talk to him. Now Molly is experiencing visions of a girl named Clementine who lived in her father’s house a century earlier. As the summer continues Molly stumbles across a series of connections between her and Clementine that begin to form an eerie pattern. Molly’s “visions” begin to feel more like memories— memories that appear to be reliving themselves in her life and Jared’s. Can Molly prevent the past from repeating itself? This book moves slowly at times, so those who need a very fast-paced novel would have a difficult time getting through the slow parts. There are also many predictable aspects about the book, however, overall it is a great read and would appeal to many teenagers and adults alike. I enjoyed the unique plot of the story and liked how it introduces the possibility of both ghosts and reincarnation as an answer to Molly’s nightmares and visions. As is the case in most YA novels, many relationships are examined in “Dreadful Sorry”: Molly deals with her father and his young, pregnant wife; Molly’s relationship with Jared turns from one-sided hatred to friendship to something more; and Molly attempts to mend the multiple broken relationships from Clementine’s life. This supernatural mystery mixed with romantic intrigue demonstrates the power of second chances and was one of my favourites as a teenager. I highly recommend “Dreadful Sorry”. Those with an interest in reincarnation will especially enjoy this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joty

    This was one of the books I got when I was younger at a book fair. It's the most tattered book on my bookshelf simply because I keep going back to it whenever I have a chance. It's a simple read, I finish it within the day. But it's a good book to read whenever I want to re-visit my childhood favorites.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    This book kept me hooked from start to finish. I loved the mystery of it, and Molly's fears were so irrational but felt so real. Even though I was sure no harm would come to her in the water in the beginning bits, each encounter with it made me scared for her. The mystery of things moved along at the right pace--enough to keep me wanting more, but not slow enough to bore me. My one complaint with it has to do with the label on the book itself, saying this is part of a Time Travel mystery series. This book kept me hooked from start to finish. I loved the mystery of it, and Molly's fears were so irrational but felt so real. Even though I was sure no harm would come to her in the water in the beginning bits, each encounter with it made me scared for her. The mystery of things moved along at the right pace--enough to keep me wanting more, but not slow enough to bore me. My one complaint with it has to do with the label on the book itself, saying this is part of a Time Travel mystery series. I can kind of see why it falls under that series name, but it was also misleading, as I could kind of see where the book was going with Molly, but then I thought I was missing a piece because the time travel had yet to come into it. I mean, there are a few bits you can claim are time travel-esque, but it had more to do with mental things rather than time travel. Aside from that one problem, I loved this book. It's one that has been sitting on my shelf to read for years, and I wish I had picked it up sooner. The characters were great, the mystery and reveal of it all was great, and I loved how everything tied together. SPOILERS BELOW!!! I just had to mention Clementine. I feel so bad for her, how she was a slave in all but name, but then I feel bad for the people she used. Hob and Abner didn't deserve the way she lied to them and manipulated them. Yet, I can't blame Clementine for her doing all she could to be free. It wasn't too hard to guess her fate, but a part of me wanted her to survive and live out her dreams. I almost want a sequel book, about the adventures she goes on--and her learning to care about others. Maybe she could have ended up finding a guy and having a kid of her own--and then she could have gone back to the village, and apologized to those she had hurt. But this is no longer a review. This is just a story that can't happen, no matter how much I would like to read it. So, overall, I loved the book, and I think it will stick in my head for awhile.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    Here is another annoyance. In pretty much all the YA mystery/thriller books I've read lately, there is a super annoying mother. And for some reason it's always the mother. The father either completely backs up the mother or else the father is the "understanding" parent but for some reason can't overthrow the mother's wishes. In every one of these books, the mother is a cold, SUPER practical person who reacts violently to their child's experiences, saying that their child is either lying or imagin Here is another annoyance. In pretty much all the YA mystery/thriller books I've read lately, there is a super annoying mother. And for some reason it's always the mother. The father either completely backs up the mother or else the father is the "understanding" parent but for some reason can't overthrow the mother's wishes. In every one of these books, the mother is a cold, SUPER practical person who reacts violently to their child's experiences, saying that their child is either lying or imagining things, and REFUSES to even listen further, even going so far as to yelling at the child and/or punishing them. In this book the main character is deathly afraid of water, and rather than being understanding, the mother is dismissive and cruel. When the main character almost drowns, the mother is even more heartless, saying that she needs to face her fear and tells her she can't do anything else until she learns to swim. WTF? The mothers in these books are so completely unrealistic. They are only in the story to move the plot along, to set up roadblocks for the main character from investigating whatever it is they are trying to find out. It's really really annoying, and it's gotten old. I don't know any real life mother who is like this. This book was pretty bad. I figured out what happened halfway through the book and then basically skimmed through the rest to confirm my guess. Other than the horrible mother, there is once again the unrealistically sensitive yet hunky high school boy who helps the main character solve her mystery. Actually every character was totally stereotypical. This is a must-skip book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melody Mirage

    The first time I read this book, I was completely captivated by Dreadful Sorry and the story of Clementine Horn. This time around, I found the beginning of the book hard to get through. It's pretty much just Molly, the main character, having vague nightmares and whining about swimming lessons. I was thoroughly annoyed with her and her controlling mother throughout the first several chapters. The story really picks up when Molly goes to visit her father and stepmother in Maine and discovers the h The first time I read this book, I was completely captivated by Dreadful Sorry and the story of Clementine Horn. This time around, I found the beginning of the book hard to get through. It's pretty much just Molly, the main character, having vague nightmares and whining about swimming lessons. I was thoroughly annoyed with her and her controlling mother throughout the first several chapters. The story really picks up when Molly goes to visit her father and stepmother in Maine and discovers the home they bought is the same one from her nightmares. From there, she starts to have descriptive visions of a time a century before of the life of Clementine Horn. Her stepmother proposes this is a form of reincarnation and her father is hoping it's a ghost so they can attract more tourists to their soon to be bed and breakfast. My problem with this is they were both way too accepting of this situation. Why was no one a bit more concerned about Molly's mental condition? Molly's dad suggests in the beginning that she should see a psychologist about her fear of water but later on when she's having visions, random breakdowns, and knowledge of things she shouldn't, he suddenly thinks it's a silly idea? This just did not make sense to me. As the story goes on, you start to see many of the things from the Clementine visions start to happen in Molly's life along with clues of why this is all happening in the first place. The whole thing is quite mysterious but I think the author did a great job of leaving no questions unanswered. This is a fascinating account of what someone will go through to right the wrongs of their past.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vee

    This is literally the 6th time I have read this book!!!! It's a great book about a girl who starts remembering her past live and you start to see the links between both her lives. As the book pulls you in you start to connect all these pieces together and realize that there is a reason she has started to remember and it is not just for love. This book takes place in a quaint little town on the water in main and you fall in love with it wishing you could visit and meet the other characters for real This is literally the 6th time I have read this book!!!! It's a great book about a girl who starts remembering her past live and you start to see the links between both her lives. As the book pulls you in you start to connect all these pieces together and realize that there is a reason she has started to remember and it is not just for love. This book takes place in a quaint little town on the water in main and you fall in love with it wishing you could visit and meet the other characters for real. It is a good love story not only between soul mates but between family.It shows how ties and bonds that are formed can last through a person's life. It also shows how strongly family can influence you life in good and bad ways. Please if you pick up any of Kathryn Reiss' books please read this one. It is one of my favorites from her. I have also read her book "Time windows" just as many times as I have read this one and highly recommend it as well. Also "Paperquake" I have read at least twice now as well which is another fabulous book by her.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    This is the first book I have read in a while that I actually can say I really enjoyed. In the beginning, I wasn’t too sold on it - but just like any book based in Maine, it pulled me in and made it difficult for me to put down. I was even satisfied with the ending, which is rare for me. I always like to ridicule the thought process behind a good books bad ending. But this book was great.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Arabella

    I read this book for school, so I had to read it in a 6-week time period instead of like 2 weeks or something. It's a really good book! Even though it is gothic, it still also doesn't feel too gothic and towards the end of the book, there were so many connections! Some parts were kind of creepy, but for the most part I love this book!!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tammie

    A good creepy ghost story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maxine Clark

    This book is just the right combination of creepy, romantic, and sad. I have heard of fear of water but i never imagined that her fear would turn into such an amazing story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Chivington

    The last third of the book is easily the best---but the story leading up to that feels clunky and awkward. Unfortunately there are quite a few cliches that feel like you've been clobbered over the head, which made it difficult for me to be immersed in the story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Flores

    Don't you hate that feeling when you wake up in a cold sweat from a dream you thought was real? Dreadful Sorry by Kathryn Reiss is about Molly, a young teen terrified of the water, struggles to keep reality and her dreams of Clementine (a girl who Molly believes she has reincarnated into) separate from each other. Hints and clues along the shoreline of her father's beach house lead her to expect that reincarnation and reliving someone else's life is able to happen. Molly is a seventeen year old Don't you hate that feeling when you wake up in a cold sweat from a dream you thought was real? Dreadful Sorry by Kathryn Reiss is about Molly, a young teen terrified of the water, struggles to keep reality and her dreams of Clementine (a girl who Molly believes she has reincarnated into) separate from each other. Hints and clues along the shoreline of her father's beach house lead her to expect that reincarnation and reliving someone else's life is able to happen. Molly is a seventeen year old who has nightmares and visions of a girl named Clementine. Molly soon discovers that her and Clementine take the same footsteps in life, but Clementine takes them just a hundred years before. Molly finds herself falling for the same kind of boys and most importantly, having a petrifying fear of water similarly to Clementine. Throughout the book the visions and "memories" constantly bring up the song "Oh My Darling". Molly figures out that Clementine drown with her lover Hob. Molly worries on that the same will happen with her and her boyfriend, Jared. One scene from the book I thought was good was when Jared pushed Molly into a pool at a summer party. The author created this eerie mood to go along with this event and hinted that they knew each other somehow, but without even meeting in the first place. I overall enjoyed this book because of the suspense and the genre of the novel. Being a mystery, this book allowed me to infer and make assumptions about what was going on and going to happen in the plot.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Dreadful Sorry was a fantastic read! The character-Molly is passionate, caring, and carries the story well. Weiss weaves other great and memorable characters in through many different relationships: mother, friend, romantic interest, stepmother, father. Also, the storyline itself is hooking and and consistent of fantastic variety. Dreadful Sorry contains adventure, fright, love, desperation, and care, and is an overall enveloping read that will keep one reading until it's done.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    I read this when I was eleven or twelve, and it got stuck in my head. I'm not sure why, because it's not a spectacular story. I had to track it down once I joined BookMooch and reread it, and I enjoyed the nostalgia.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Angie Gerardo

    A Dreadful Sorry is a really mysterious horror book, I love the whole conflict between the main character Molly and her fear of swimming. It’s so suspenseful that I really loved reading it and finding out what would happen next. As well as the added song of Clementine repeating in Molly’s head. The allusion to look back at the song is a great idea to relate to the story. The dreams Molly has are just so scary and I felt like it was foreshadowing for Molly of what could happen to her. Molly then A Dreadful Sorry is a really mysterious horror book, I love the whole conflict between the main character Molly and her fear of swimming. It’s so suspenseful that I really loved reading it and finding out what would happen next. As well as the added song of Clementine repeating in Molly’s head. The allusion to look back at the song is a great idea to relate to the story. The dreams Molly has are just so scary and I felt like it was foreshadowing for Molly of what could happen to her. Molly then has the intention to stop it. Overall the book was very good and I would definitely recommend it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laura Lynn

    I first read this book many years ago when I was a kid (probably in the 90s), but I found it in my personal library and thought I'd read it again, because I couldn't remember it. While the plot did hold my attention, there were some annoying characters (or at least certain things that they did that were annoying), which took away from the enjoyment of the book. Still, it was a good mystery and I wanted to know how it ended. Overall, I enjoyed it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kyrie

    A Classic I read this story years and years ago as a child. Now at 33, I had this random desire to read it again. I couldn't remember the author or the title, thank God for the internet! Still just as fun and twisty as I remembered!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Celina

    Quite a quick read. The writing is not the greatest. However the story draws you in. You’ll be turning pages till the last one hoping for more.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Good mystery.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Doud

    Reread Read this book as a teen and read it again now years later and still ended it quite a lot.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I liked the overall concept and all the interconnected clues but found the book just OK.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Dreadful Sorry is astonishing. How Clementine has visions of a girl that lived in that past house andher at that time. They intertwine and leaves you craving to read more.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hailey

    Not much to talk about here. Just a super quick, mindless read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amani

    *Minor spoilers* I was originally excited by the concept of this story but ultimately feel that it was poorly executed.  I didn't enjoy the author's writing style at all; it seemed more descriptive rather than creative, like it would have been more suited to non-fiction. The dialogue was so bad that it in places became unintentionally comical; the exchanges between Molly and her crazy, swim lesson-obsessed mother spring to mind. The Edwardian dialogue seemed plain incorrect, I struggled to imagine *Minor spoilers* I was originally excited by the concept of this story but ultimately feel that it was poorly executed.  I didn't enjoy the author's writing style at all; it seemed more descriptive rather than creative, like it would have been more suited to non-fiction. The dialogue was so bad that it in places became unintentionally comical; the exchanges between Molly and her crazy, swim lesson-obsessed mother spring to mind. The Edwardian dialogue seemed plain incorrect, I struggled to imagine that I was actually in the 1910s when reading Clementine's chapters.  Oh and characters themselves were horrible. It seemed a strange decision to make half of the book centre around a character as painstakingly unlikeable as Clementine. Hob, though relatively innocent, just made me cringe with his every word. And don't make me bring up that ridiculously badly written mother again .  The story, unfortunately, was predictable from start to finish. The reason I didn't give the book 1 star was because it did manage to keep me hooked in the sense that I kept on racing through the pages in the hope that there would be a twist or surprise at the end, but I was of course proved wrong. In fact, I'm still not sure what the whole point of the story was? From early on it was building up the fact that there must some mystical reason that all this was happening to Molly, but in the end it didn't seem that there was any sort of significant answer to any of it. And lots of things didn't make sense to me. For example, why was Abner for the most part indifferent to Molly where Mrs Wilkins was borderline obsessed with Jared? There was no reason for the connection of the latter two to be stronger considering the strength of Abner's feelings for Clementine.  Unfortunately this book, in my opinion, was simply a waste of what would have been a great idea. I've seen that a common theme in the reviews is that a lot of people (unlike with a lot of other YA fiction) actually did read this one when they were at school. So I suppose there's the possibility that I would have enjoyed this book more if I had read it 10 years ago.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Whenever I see an old building or structure I often ask myself what life was like when it was first constructed. What were the people like a century ago? Did they walk down the same road that I took and think the same things that I was thinking? Were they happy or sad? Did they find their life partner and have kids or maybe regret not finding that special someone? This book is about a young woman that experiences something similar to what most people have felt every now and then. It is about Mol Whenever I see an old building or structure I often ask myself what life was like when it was first constructed. What were the people like a century ago? Did they walk down the same road that I took and think the same things that I was thinking? Were they happy or sad? Did they find their life partner and have kids or maybe regret not finding that special someone? This book is about a young woman that experiences something similar to what most people have felt every now and then. It is about Molly, who for quite some time has been reliving another person's life. That life took place 80 years ago. Along with struggling to find her own identity she must unravel the life that is haunting her. Is she this person and if she was this person why does she not like her? Is she being punished for something that happened years ago or is it just a desperate lost soul that needs help? I honestly was not sure if I was going to like this book. I am a huge fan of paranormal anything, so I thought this might be something up my alley. At first the story was a little slow for me and the main character was incredibly whiny. All teenagers think that their problems are the end of the world, but this girl was becoming a head case. I chose to stick it out and am glad that I did. The story allowed the girl to grown in character and loose just about all of her annoying features; which was the books saving grace for me. I don't want to go into too much detail and give anything away. I will say that I strongly recommend this book, but am giving it a 4 out of 5 stars due to is being a little slow for the first half of the book. I also feel the author could of added a little more back story to the past life. I felt short changed and rushed on that part.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I normally don't like reading older YA books (I stick to older middle grade generally) but I didn't realize this was YA until I started. I've been wanting to read Kathryn Reiss's Sweet Miss Honeywell's Revenge: A Ghost Story & Time Windows, but I haven't come across them yet. I came across a copy of Dreadful Sorry, and recognizing the author, I decided to try it. It's not bad. I don't have a lot to say about this book. If you want a plot description, other reviews have written that up, so I won't I normally don't like reading older YA books (I stick to older middle grade generally) but I didn't realize this was YA until I started. I've been wanting to read Kathryn Reiss's Sweet Miss Honeywell's Revenge: A Ghost Story & Time Windows, but I haven't come across them yet. I came across a copy of Dreadful Sorry, and recognizing the author, I decided to try it. It's not bad. I don't have a lot to say about this book. If you want a plot description, other reviews have written that up, so I won't bother. Like I said, this book isn't too bad. I'd prefer to read a more modern YA, to be honest, but this wasn't too dreadfully dated. There are obviously no cell phones, which will date any book, but there weren't any awful pop culture references. It is slightly jarring, however, to have characters talk about people who were living in the 1910s and just assume they're still alive - that's when you realize this book is over 20 years old. This book is YA, but it reads more like an older MG. I don't think anyone over the age of 14 will like this book much, especially considering the more modern paranormal YAs out there. There's nothing really inappropriate in this book, save for a brief mention of alcohol (don't worry, adults were there!) and some serious events, such as death (however, all the deaths happened about a century ago). I'm giving this book 3 stars. It was solid, for what it was, but I don't think I'd read it again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Runa

    Read this one a few years earlier, still as amazing as ever. It's not my favorite of Kathryn Reiss's books, but they're all so ridiculously good! Mystery with every bit of suspenseful goodness, history, and a touch of romance and psychological thriller, all in one great book. Not sure how she does it, but she does. Reiss' stories are always full of the randomest [and BEST] plot twists, never predictable and never repeated. You really can't listen to the "Clementine" song the same way ever again Read this one a few years earlier, still as amazing as ever. It's not my favorite of Kathryn Reiss's books, but they're all so ridiculously good! Mystery with every bit of suspenseful goodness, history, and a touch of romance and psychological thriller, all in one great book. Not sure how she does it, but she does. Reiss' stories are always full of the randomest [and BEST] plot twists, never predictable and never repeated. You really can't listen to the "Clementine" song the same way ever again after reading this book. [Not to mention, I finally learned that the phrase 'lost and gone forever' was from that song, fancy that!] As for characters, Molly's mom is an idiot. Molly was kind of annoying, but not nearly as annoying as Clementine. Molly definitely had it right about that girl being the epitome of spoiled. Then you've got Hob and Jared. I felt like there was little [or pretty much NO] difference between the two characters, which bothered me, but not too much, cause they both worked in their respective stories. I wish we'd seen more of Ms. Wilkins and Abner, they seemed like they had more to tell. Paulette and the baby were a good twist and that storyline had me horribly worried until the very end [didn't want history repeating itself there!]. Molly's dad was also highly underdeveloped, with a lot of potential. Overall, I give it 4.5/5 stars. There were some descriptive bits that bugged me, because they were the kind that seemed to be inserted just for the sake of having description instead of adding to the story, and they were overly rambly fluffy blahness.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.