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Britain's Coast at War: Invasion Threat, Coastal Forces, Bombardment and Training for D-Day

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The whole of Britain's coastline was involved in the struggle against the Nazis. In the early days invasion was the main threat and the Channel counties and cities such as Plymouth, Portsmouth and Brighton suffered grievously from aerial attack. Dover and the 'Hell Fire Corner' in the South East were shelled by German coastal batteries. In the North, Greenock, Gourock and The whole of Britain's coastline was involved in the struggle against the Nazis. In the early days invasion was the main threat and the Channel counties and cities such as Plymouth, Portsmouth and Brighton suffered grievously from aerial attack. Dover and the 'Hell Fire Corner' in the South East were shelled by German coastal batteries. In the North, Greenock, Gourock and the Scapa Flow saw training of troops for Norway, D Day and other campaigns and the return of rescued crews of sunk vessels of both sides. The East Coast was pivotal to North Sea operations against enemy mining and E boat operations. The Western ports, particularly Liverpool, were crucial to the vital Atlantic convoys and the defeat of the U-boat threat. Preparation for D-Day centred on the South Coast both in terms of planning, training and deployment. The Slapton Sands disaster is covered. Inevitably the crucial role of Britain's coastal ports attracted enemy bombing and V rocket attention and changed the character of its cities and towns. All this and more is brilliantly described in words and images in this superbly researched work.


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The whole of Britain's coastline was involved in the struggle against the Nazis. In the early days invasion was the main threat and the Channel counties and cities such as Plymouth, Portsmouth and Brighton suffered grievously from aerial attack. Dover and the 'Hell Fire Corner' in the South East were shelled by German coastal batteries. In the North, Greenock, Gourock and The whole of Britain's coastline was involved in the struggle against the Nazis. In the early days invasion was the main threat and the Channel counties and cities such as Plymouth, Portsmouth and Brighton suffered grievously from aerial attack. Dover and the 'Hell Fire Corner' in the South East were shelled by German coastal batteries. In the North, Greenock, Gourock and the Scapa Flow saw training of troops for Norway, D Day and other campaigns and the return of rescued crews of sunk vessels of both sides. The East Coast was pivotal to North Sea operations against enemy mining and E boat operations. The Western ports, particularly Liverpool, were crucial to the vital Atlantic convoys and the defeat of the U-boat threat. Preparation for D-Day centred on the South Coast both in terms of planning, training and deployment. The Slapton Sands disaster is covered. Inevitably the crucial role of Britain's coastal ports attracted enemy bombing and V rocket attention and changed the character of its cities and towns. All this and more is brilliantly described in words and images in this superbly researched work.

3 review for Britain's Coast at War: Invasion Threat, Coastal Forces, Bombardment and Training for D-Day

  1. 5 out of 5

    John Purvis

    Author and historian Neil R. Storey published the book “Britain’s Coast at War: Invasion Threat, Coastal Forces, Bombardment and Training for D-Day” in 2021. Mr. Storey has published more than 20 books. I received an ARC of this book through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this book as ‘G’. The book tells the story of Britain’s Coast at war during WWII. Included are all sorts of activities on or near the coast. The book covers many different aspects o Author and historian Neil R. Storey published the book “Britain’s Coast at War: Invasion Threat, Coastal Forces, Bombardment and Training for D-Day” in 2021. Mr. Storey has published more than 20 books. I received an ARC of this book through https://www.netgalley.com in return for a fair and honest review. I categorize this book as ‘G’. The book tells the story of Britain’s Coast at war during WWII. Included are all sorts of activities on or near the coast. The book covers many different aspects of the British coast at war. The coastal response to Operation Dynamo, the Dunkirk evacuation, has a prominent place. Next comes the preparations made to repulse the expected Nazi invasion. The cross-channel artillery duels between occupied France and Britain are covered. The impact of the many Luftwaffe air raids on British ports is described. The author discusses the impact of the German vengeance weapons, the V1s and V2s. The role of the British lifeboats and rescue craft are covered. Also included are the contributions by the minesweepers. Finally are the preparations made for the landing in Normandy. I enjoyed the 8.5+ hours I spent reading this 272-page WWII history. The book includes several first-hand accounts. It is a very readable history though it contains many details. The book is an interesting and different look at Britain at war. I like the selected cover art. I rate this book as a 4 out of 5. You can access more of my book reviews on my Blog ( https://johnpurvis.wordpress.com/blog/).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Louise Gray

    History buffs will know that there is so much more to understanding the events of WWII than what we see in popular films and documentaries. The impact was so far reaching, both in terms of geography and human experience and it is hard to imagine an impact area which has not been explored. England was devastated by the war and the impact was felt beyond the battlefields of Europe. This book shines a spotlight on the impact on the coastal regions of England and the people who lived, and died there History buffs will know that there is so much more to understanding the events of WWII than what we see in popular films and documentaries. The impact was so far reaching, both in terms of geography and human experience and it is hard to imagine an impact area which has not been explored. England was devastated by the war and the impact was felt beyond the battlefields of Europe. This book shines a spotlight on the impact on the coastal regions of England and the people who lived, and died there. The author does a good job in presenting this perspective in such a way as to make it both an interesting one off read for any reader as well as a detailed exploration for the WWII history buff. Great job.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ron Baumer

    An interesting look at the coastal war in Britain during WW2. Good first hand accounts and stories makes this a good historical read. Thank you to #NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

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