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Alien (2021-) #1

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THE ICONIC CINEMATIC TERROR MAKES ITS MARVEL DEBUT! Gabriel Cruz gave his life to Weyland-Yutani--In the case of an alien attack he barely survived, almost literally! Recently retired, Cruz is trying to patch things up with his abandoned son with the help of his friend, a Bishop-model android, but his re-entry into civilian life is not going smoothly…and his encounters wit THE ICONIC CINEMATIC TERROR MAKES ITS MARVEL DEBUT! Gabriel Cruz gave his life to Weyland-Yutani--In the case of an alien attack he barely survived, almost literally! Recently retired, Cruz is trying to patch things up with his abandoned son with the help of his friend, a Bishop-model android, but his re-entry into civilian life is not going smoothly…and his encounters with the deadly Xenomorph are far from over. Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Salvador Larroca team up to tell an all-new tale of the titan of horror and science fiction that has scared audiences for decades. No one is safe. No one is innocent. And no one can hear you scream.


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THE ICONIC CINEMATIC TERROR MAKES ITS MARVEL DEBUT! Gabriel Cruz gave his life to Weyland-Yutani--In the case of an alien attack he barely survived, almost literally! Recently retired, Cruz is trying to patch things up with his abandoned son with the help of his friend, a Bishop-model android, but his re-entry into civilian life is not going smoothly…and his encounters wit THE ICONIC CINEMATIC TERROR MAKES ITS MARVEL DEBUT! Gabriel Cruz gave his life to Weyland-Yutani--In the case of an alien attack he barely survived, almost literally! Recently retired, Cruz is trying to patch things up with his abandoned son with the help of his friend, a Bishop-model android, but his re-entry into civilian life is not going smoothly…and his encounters with the deadly Xenomorph are far from over. Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Salvador Larroca team up to tell an all-new tale of the titan of horror and science fiction that has scared audiences for decades. No one is safe. No one is innocent. And no one can hear you scream.

30 review for Alien (2021-) #1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Marvel’s latest licence acquisition is the iconic sci-fi horror franchise Alien. In this new “original” story, a dull old geezer, who dreams about an Alien version of the Borg Queen for some reason, is retiring from Weyland-Yutani and trying to reconnect with his terrorist hippie son who’s against corporations. Which, to be fair, he’s right to be given that Weyland-Yutani is the most absurdly one-dimensionally evil corporation ever - they’re STILL fucking around with xenomorphs for no good reaso Marvel’s latest licence acquisition is the iconic sci-fi horror franchise Alien. In this new “original” story, a dull old geezer, who dreams about an Alien version of the Borg Queen for some reason, is retiring from Weyland-Yutani and trying to reconnect with his terrorist hippie son who’s against corporations. Which, to be fair, he’s right to be given that Weyland-Yutani is the most absurdly one-dimensionally evil corporation ever - they’re STILL fucking around with xenomorphs for no good reason even though it always goes wrong! As exciting as some Alien movies can be, the first issue of this Alien comic is sooooo boring! On the one hand that’s partly because Alien is actually a very limited concept. Only one storyline really works and it’s the Aliens running through vents hissing and eviscerating human victims. Without that, all we’re doing in this issue is waiting for the xenomorphs to appear and start doing just that. I hope I’m wrong, because it’d likely still be repetitive to see for the umpteenth time, but I don’t expect anything new from Marvel either, so that’s probably going to be the case. And on the other hand is the fact that the non-Alien characters - in most Alien movies, but definitely in this comic - are completely uninteresting. I didn’t care about retirement man and his annoying son ranting at each other over some tedious long-past family drama, while Bishop is as placidly anodyne as ever. Not really surprising then that the writer of the dismally-derivative fantasy series The Last God, over at DC Black Label, should produce something as unimpressive and forgettable as Alien #1 (I guess comics is another industry where you fail upwards - that or Phillip Kennedy Johnson has dirt on the Marvel top brass?). Maybe with a good writer this title has a better shot at a decent book sometime in the future but for I think for this arc beginning with Alien #1? Game over, man. Game over!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Marvel's first crack at the Alien license is a bit slow. Not a whole lot happens other than Weyland-Yutani is still up to their old tricks. Salvador Larroca's art is still weird. Ever since Star Wars, he's not been able to draw faces properly or with emotion. Everyone might as well be manikins. Marvel's first crack at the Alien license is a bit slow. Not a whole lot happens other than Weyland-Yutani is still up to their old tricks. Salvador Larroca's art is still weird. Ever since Star Wars, he's not been able to draw faces properly or with emotion. Everyone might as well be manikins.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Al

    Single comic issue review- Alien #1 comes out at a good time for me. Marvel now owns the property (and as with Star Wars), this certainly isn’t the first Alien movie franchise comic (Dark Horse had covered it), the change to Marvel promises excitement. A good time because Covid really not only disrupted my comic shopping experience but the comics industry in general. So it’s exciting that DC is doing this big relaunch (Interestingly, Alien writer Johnson is a big part of that taking over the Supe Single comic issue review- Alien #1 comes out at a good time for me. Marvel now owns the property (and as with Star Wars), this certainly isn’t the first Alien movie franchise comic (Dark Horse had covered it), the change to Marvel promises excitement. A good time because Covid really not only disrupted my comic shopping experience but the comics industry in general. So it’s exciting that DC is doing this big relaunch (Interestingly, Alien writer Johnson is a big part of that taking over the Superman titles) and this being a high profile comic coming from Marvel. I have read reviews after reading this issue and I think it’s safe to say this is a bit polarizing. You probably would start with artist Salvador Larocca. The dig on his art is it looks like he is tracing over pictures. Whether that is what he does, that has some advantages and disadvantages. Many people don’t like it. I like it because it does give the comic a movie feel. It also has to be tough theme to pull off. Though I suspect even fans of his style would be forced to admit it doesn’t do a good job with capturing facial expressions and even to a certain extent, characters tend to all look a bit a like. I was more surprised that Johnson’s writing pulled such a mix of raves and boos. I suppose this focuses more on politics than horror. Personally, I liked the story. It’s a great opening issue that sets the stage. There’s nothing new under the sun, of course, but Johnson hits all the right notes - establishing the world quickly, character development and setting up the tension. I’m excited to see where this series goes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    A nice slow burn. We get to know a little of the past, what happened to a crew who went on a mission and ran into some Xenomorphs. The rest of the issue really deals with a broken relationship between a father and son. And it all links to the horrific ending where people try to do things they have no clue what they're doing. Overall, this is a solid entry into the Alien world for Marvel. While not great, and some of the art feels stiff, it seems like a interesting direction. A 3 out of 5. A nice slow burn. We get to know a little of the past, what happened to a crew who went on a mission and ran into some Xenomorphs. The rest of the issue really deals with a broken relationship between a father and son. And it all links to the horrific ending where people try to do things they have no clue what they're doing. Overall, this is a solid entry into the Alien world for Marvel. While not great, and some of the art feels stiff, it seems like a interesting direction. A 3 out of 5.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    A strong start to the the first Marvel Alien book! Really good art and a satisfying story that builds up the tension before getting to the Xenomorphs at the end! Interested to see where this goes!

  6. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Really enjoyed this slow burn. Hopefully gets better from here

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Alien #1 is written by Phillip Kennedy Johnson, art by Salvador Larroca, and colors by Guru-eFX. A Weilad-Yutani security officer retires to Earth to try and reconnect with his son. His son secretly belongs to a faction who is attempting to bring Weiland-Yutani's actions to light. This first issue was a bit of a slow burner but that few pages picked up the action.I thought the art was a little boring- there is very little motion in the art, everyone looks like mannequins. I picked up the first i Alien #1 is written by Phillip Kennedy Johnson, art by Salvador Larroca, and colors by Guru-eFX. A Weilad-Yutani security officer retires to Earth to try and reconnect with his son. His son secretly belongs to a faction who is attempting to bring Weiland-Yutani's actions to light. This first issue was a bit of a slow burner but that few pages picked up the action.I thought the art was a little boring- there is very little motion in the art, everyone looks like mannequins. I picked up the first issue to see if I would be interested in the story. I was intrigued so I will definitely pick up the trade when it is released.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wayne

    Well I saw a number of reviews of this issue that claimed it was slow and boring. I totally disagree. It included some intriguing set up, and made me excited for the next issue. That said I love a good set-up, and have no problem at all keeping the monsters in the shadows as long as possible. In truth I'm a little concerned that the series won't do more than we got in the better movies (i.e. mystery leads into horror leads into few survivors in a final showdown). But I'll keep reading for now. Od Well I saw a number of reviews of this issue that claimed it was slow and boring. I totally disagree. It included some intriguing set up, and made me excited for the next issue. That said I love a good set-up, and have no problem at all keeping the monsters in the shadows as long as possible. In truth I'm a little concerned that the series won't do more than we got in the better movies (i.e. mystery leads into horror leads into few survivors in a final showdown). But I'll keep reading for now. Oddly, my favorite comics right now are this and the Blade Runner series from Titan comics. Good 80s properties stretching their legs!

  9. 4 out of 5

    True Sankofa

    Marvel's debut of the iconic Xenomorph from the Alien franchise delivers with a solid story provided by Johnson and the perfect artist in Larroca. Nice homages or references to the first 2 classic movies as well. Marvel's debut of the iconic Xenomorph from the Alien franchise delivers with a solid story provided by Johnson and the perfect artist in Larroca. Nice homages or references to the first 2 classic movies as well.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sheldon

    This is not art. When you open up the book and page two is this composite mess This is not art. When you're paid by Marvel to illustrate their debut Alien comic and you start off by Google image search of alien background And tint it blue Then you proceed to dump in various photoshop dumps of Alien action figures and Lilith out Diablo. This is not art. Alien hive walls are hard. And Google image search is easy. This is not art. Without photoshop and Google Salvador Larroca wouldn't have a career. I This is not art. When you open up the book and page two is this composite mess This is not art. When you're paid by Marvel to illustrate their debut Alien comic and you start off by Google image search of alien background And tint it blue Then you proceed to dump in various photoshop dumps of Alien action figures and Lilith out Diablo. This is not art. Alien hive walls are hard. And Google image search is easy. This is not art. Without photoshop and Google Salvador Larroca wouldn't have a career. I find it staggering how someone can be paid to crap out this lazy work. Salvador Larroca is not an artist, he's a digital scrapbook creator. His work on Star Wars was derided and somehow Marvel editorial continue on with this digital plagiarism. I can't wait for issue #2 and not for the reason Marvel would like. Respect to [actual artist] Tristan Jones for initially highlighting this crap.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Horror DNA

    I keep trying to get into Alien and I can't seem to figure out the franchise. I just don't get the hype. I was hoping that Marvel's take on it might be my way in, but Alien #1 is another in a long line of examples that seem complicated, yet follow the same basic formula. Someone finds a Xenomorph egg and puts it where it doesn't belong. The egg hatches and face-hugs someone. Big alien comes out. People die. Rinse. Repeat. The difference in this series is that there are some folks fighting back a I keep trying to get into Alien and I can't seem to figure out the franchise. I just don't get the hype. I was hoping that Marvel's take on it might be my way in, but Alien #1 is another in a long line of examples that seem complicated, yet follow the same basic formula. Someone finds a Xenomorph egg and puts it where it doesn't belong. The egg hatches and face-hugs someone. Big alien comes out. People die. Rinse. Repeat. The difference in this series is that there are some folks fighting back against Weyland-Yutani. Of course, they're the ones that inadvertently set the formula in motion. You can read James' full review at Horror DNA by clicking here

  12. 4 out of 5

    Voltago

    Story - 9 von 15 Punkte Philipp Kennedy Johnsons Story beginnt solide, bildet jedoch nichts weltbewegendes. Es ist die übliche Geschichte, dass der Weyland-Yutani Konzern Experimente mit Alien-Überbleibseln macht.  Das ist alles andere herausfordernd. Der Story spielt im Jahr 2200, 78 Jahre nach dem originalen Alien-Film. Die Welt hat sich weiterentwickelt und das erweckt Erwartungen. Dass sich Gabriel von seinem Sohn so an der Nase herumführen lässt, finde ich nur bedingt glaubwürdig, daher gibt Story - 9 von 15 Punkte Philipp Kennedy Johnsons Story beginnt solide, bildet jedoch nichts weltbewegendes. Es ist die übliche Geschichte, dass der Weyland-Yutani Konzern Experimente mit Alien-Überbleibseln macht.  Das ist alles andere herausfordernd. Der Story spielt im Jahr 2200, 78 Jahre nach dem originalen Alien-Film. Die Welt hat sich weiterentwickelt und das erweckt Erwartungen. Dass sich Gabriel von seinem Sohn so an der Nase herumführen lässt, finde ich nur bedingt glaubwürdig, daher gibt es hier etwas Abzug. Auch das naive Herumgeballer der Einbrecher in die Epsilon-Station finde ich ehr unrealistisch. Das Ende war natürlich Voraussehbar, ebenso voraussehbar ist die aufgebaute Spannung, welche sich daraus ergibt. Die Story gibt daher solide 9 Punkte. Zeichnungen - 13 von 15 Punkte Die Zeichnungen von Salvador Larroca sind sehr detailliert und wirklich hochklassig. Da lässt sich kaum etwas aussetzen. Größtenteils am Computer entstanden, fehlt es Gelegentlich den Gesichtern an Kontur bzw. die Augen sehen immer gleich aus, nur mit anderen Farbtönen. Hier macht sich dann doch ein gewisser Zeitdruck bemerkbar. Dennoch 13 Punkte dafür. Farben - 10 von 15 Punkte Der Farbmix kommt eher dunkel und mit sanften Übergängen daher. Die Melange aus Blau, Grün, Orange und Schwarz erzeugt eine düstere Stimmung. Farbtöne und Schattierungen setzen die düstere Atmosphäre passend in Szene. Daher 10 Punkte von mir. Irgendwie fehlt noch das gewisse Extra in ihnen. Atmosphäre - 10 von 15 Punkte Diese ist sehr düster, was schon gleich mit der Doppelseite des Aliens beginnt. Im Grunde ist das keine sehr lebensbejahende Stimmung, welche durch Zeichnungen und Farben erzeugt werden.  Das Kopfkino wird jedoch recht gut durch Zeichnungen und Dialoge getriggert – vor allem durch Larrocas detaillierte Zeichnungen. Aber das Kopfkino funktioniert bei mir auch deshalb so gut, weil ich alle Aliens-Filme zigfach gesehen habe. Daher gibt es hier nur 11 Punkte von mir.   Story-Zeichnungen 8 von 15 Punkte Hier geht es mir um das gewisse Extra eines jeden Comics: Stellen die Panels nur dar, was in den Dialogen geschildert wird, oder bieten die Panels mehr, bieten mehr Details als notwendig? Lassen einen noch etwas länger in jedem Panel verweilen und nach versteckten Details suchen? Beispielsweise Bishops Büro: Es ist wirklich karg ausgestattet. Ein paar Details fehlen dann doch. Oder das Interieur der Autos: Es ist zwar klar gezeichnet und durchaus detailliert, aber eben nur das für die Szene Notwendige. Auch die Wohnung von Gabriel enthält fast keine Einrichtungsgegenstände. Schade, denn Larocca kann so gut zeichnen, hier wird sehr viel Potenzial einfach verschenkt. Ein Ergebnis des Zeitdrucks? Daher vergebe ich nur 8 Punkte. Charaktere - 5 von 15 Punkte Das ist das große Trauerkapitel, in welchem der Comic die meisten Punkte liegen lässt. Die Charaktere werden gar nicht vorgestellt, sie bieten keinen Einsatz zur Identifikation. Einzig Bisop kennen wir aus den Filmen und aus früheren Dark Horse-Comics. Er sorgt für einen kleinen Aha-Moment. Aber ansonsten lassen mich die Figuren kalt. Vielleicht ist noch die Frage interessant, was es mit Gabriels Alpträumen auf sich hat. Kommuniziert etwa das Alien versteckt mit ihm? Immerhin. Daher vergebe ich nur 5 Punkte. Ich hoffe, die Figuren gewinnen in den kommenden Ausgaben noch an Schärfe. Die Bewertung wird am Ende eines jeden Arcs nochmals überarbeitet. Innovationen - 2 von 5 Punkte  Die Wertungen Innovation & Service sollen die Spreu vom Weizen trennen, es soll verhindert werden, dass einfach nur perfekte Story + Zeichnungen für eine Bestnote reichen. Nein, bis hierhin sind nur 90 Punkte zu holen. Bei der Innovation dreht sich alle um die Frage, welchen neuen Beitrag der Comic dem Genre bieten kann, oder ob es einfach die zigste Neuerzählung derselben (Superhelden-)Story ist. Das Alien-Universum ist groß, es wurde schon unglaublich viel erzählt, da kann aktuelle Story natürlich nicht übermäßig Punkten. Immerhin bietet die Story Potenzial und wir haben eine Ongoing-Serie vor uns. Das ist schon mal vielversprechend und gibt daher 2 Punkte. Service - 2 von 5 Punkte Beim Service geht es um die Extras für den Leser: Zusatzinfos, Einführung in die Story, Leserbriefe, Worte der Autoren. Alles, was zusätzliche Informationen oder Unterhaltungswert bietet. Hier gibt es leider nicht viel, aber das braucht es auch nicht unbedingt – Aliens sollte jeder kennen und eine Kurzeinführung ist immerhin vorhanden. 2 Trostpunkte daher. FAZIT - 60 von 100 Punkte Insgesamt ergibt das 60 von 100 Punkte. Das ist schon etwas enttäuschend. Ein gewisses Potenzial bei den Charakteren und der Story ist vorhanden. Doch selbst wenn es hier noch steil nach oben geht, könnten wir am Ende vielleicht bei 70-75 Punkten landen. Eine klare Empfehlung spreche ich erst ab 75 Punkten aus. Darunter ist es nur für Genre-Fans interessant. Das könnte passieren, wenn Larroca bei den Details noch ordentlich nachschärfen würde, was ich jedoch für unwahrscheinlich halte. Aber ich bin gespannt.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy Walker - Trans-Scribe Reviews

    With the Disney Corporation buying Fox it was only a matter of time that the decades long partnerships between the Alien and Predator franchises came to an end with Dark Horse Comics, a company who have been producing successful and popular entries to both worlds (and their shared cross-overs) for as long as I can remember. Not only does Marvel face the daunting prospect of producing a well made and well received Alien comic, they have to compete with what came before and win over the fans of Da With the Disney Corporation buying Fox it was only a matter of time that the decades long partnerships between the Alien and Predator franchises came to an end with Dark Horse Comics, a company who have been producing successful and popular entries to both worlds (and their shared cross-overs) for as long as I can remember. Not only does Marvel face the daunting prospect of producing a well made and well received Alien comic, they have to compete with what came before and win over the fans of Dark Horse's works. Not an easy feat by any means. The comic follows Gabriel Cruz, a Weyland-Yutani security chief who's retiring from company life following a career that has caused him damage to his family relationships, the loss of friends, and some pretty deep and dark trauma. We see brief flashes of Gabriel's past scattered throughout the issue, of a time where he seems to have been on a failed mission where most, if not all, of his team were killed by Xenomorphs. The details on this are still very light on the ground, and I expect that the slow revelation of this information will be an important point for this story. The information we do get is fairly interesting, however, as it seems Weyland-Yutani sent their team to capture a Xenomorph in their continued effort to weaponize the creatures. There's also hints that there was something inside the hive that we've never seen before, some kind of bio-mechanoid like woman who bears a striking resemblance to H.R. Giger's Li 1 painting. It's not clear if this is some kind of new Xenomorph variation that we've never encountered, or a strange kind of hybrid, or even possibly an hallucination, but it does look like Wey-Yu are experimenting with Xenomorph hybrids later in the issue so it could all very well be related. What I really liked about this mystery back story, however, was that it was being explored in a way where we could see how it was affecting Gabriel, how it all still haunts him. Through conversations he has with his psychologist, a Bishop model android, we get to get inside his head and see that inner workings of a man who I'd imagine doesn't normally open up much.  The issue isn't all about Gabriel though, as we also meet his now grown up son Danny. Danny visits his father once he's back on Earth, and we see the very strained and damaged relationship between the two of them. Danny also uses this as an opportunity to steal his fathers access to the orbiting research station Epislon. We discover that he and his girlfriend are opposed to Wey-Yu, and are something like activists and corporate terrorists, and that they believe the company is up to no good (spoiler alert, they always are). Once on board the station Danny and his friends expect to find a server farm, but instead find a lab filled with bizarre Xenomorph experiments and hybrids, and as you should expect from a story like this, things go wrong and the creatures begin to escape.  I'm very much expecting that the relationship between Gabriel and Danny will be a big part of this story, and that Gabriel will either have to go to Epsilon to save his son, or ends up joining with the anti-Wey-Yu faction if Danny ends up dying on the station. Either way, I think this relationship is going to be a major catalyst for bringing Gabriel into conflict with the Xenomorphs, and probably the company too. I liked that the book put Weyland-Yutani front and centre in things, that it wasn't just a shadowy group pulling strings in the far background like in the original trilogy of films, but an active participant in events. Decades after the events of the films they've finally managed to get their hands on the creatures they've wanted, and seem to be getting away with their dangerous experiments. Fans of the series have always been told how bad it would be if they ever got hold of an alien, but now we're actually going to see it unfold, and I'm definitely okay with that kind of story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ian Sharman

    Set after the events of Alien and Aliens, this book sees the estranged son of a retired Weyland-Yutani security chief steals his access codes and, along with a group of fellow anti-corporate activists, uses them to break into what they believe to be cyber warfare facility...but is, in fact, a bio-weapons lab. And if you're familiar with the Alien franchise, you know what that means. I'd worried that this book would leap straight into man vs alien action, and eschew the slow build up and character Set after the events of Alien and Aliens, this book sees the estranged son of a retired Weyland-Yutani security chief steals his access codes and, along with a group of fellow anti-corporate activists, uses them to break into what they believe to be cyber warfare facility...but is, in fact, a bio-weapons lab. And if you're familiar with the Alien franchise, you know what that means. I'd worried that this book would leap straight into man vs alien action, and eschew the slow build up and character moments that characterise the best entries in the movie series, but thankfully that's not true. The xenomorph only really appears in flashbacks, and all we really get is a little face hugger action at the end...and that's exactly as it should be. The main focus is on Gabriel Cruz, the aforementioned retired security chief, who's plagued by nightmares of unspeakable bio-mechanical horrors...which seem to be inspired by an incident from his past...which possibly included the death of his other son. Many questions are asked but, given that this is just the first issue, inevitably answers are in short supply. There's a creeping sense of dread throughout the issue, and the use of a Bishop series android actually adds to this. It's a familiar face for fans, but also not quite the character we know. Larroca's art is Larocca's art. Personally I preferred his art before he started heavily using photo reference, but I only found it to not quite work on one early double page spread. Your mileage, no doubt, will vary. But the fact that his Bishop looks exactly like Lance Henriksen is a plus as far as I'm concerned. Mostly the art gives the book a cinematic feel, but I can understand people not liking it. Overall this is an outstanding start to the series and to the new Marvel era of Alien comics.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    I've read a handful of compendiums and graphic novels, but this will be the first real comics series I've ever read, so I'm probably not the best reviewer for this. This first volume of Marvel's newly-licensed Alien series seems like a good start. I see a lot of other reviewers taking it to task for being too slow, but to me it both sets the stage for a crackerjack xenomorph story and gets in a lot of character development for Gabriel Cruz, a recently retired Weyland-Yutani defense commander, an I've read a handful of compendiums and graphic novels, but this will be the first real comics series I've ever read, so I'm probably not the best reviewer for this. This first volume of Marvel's newly-licensed Alien series seems like a good start. I see a lot of other reviewers taking it to task for being too slow, but to me it both sets the stage for a crackerjack xenomorph story and gets in a lot of character development for Gabriel Cruz, a recently retired Weyland-Yutani defense commander, and his son, an anti-corporate terrorist who unwittingly lets loose a gaggle of face huggers. I'm looking forward to reading this one as it comes out.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carolina Casas

    It is off to a good start It has a good drama to it that is reminiscent of Ellen Ripley and her lost daughter and newfound daughter (with Newt in "Aliens") but since it was too short I can only give it four stars instead of five. I'm looking forward to volumes 2 and 3. As an additional note, I did like the inclusion of twisted new Weyland Yutani experiments and potential new Xenomorph variants. It is off to a good start It has a good drama to it that is reminiscent of Ellen Ripley and her lost daughter and newfound daughter (with Newt in "Aliens") but since it was too short I can only give it four stars instead of five. I'm looking forward to volumes 2 and 3. As an additional note, I did like the inclusion of twisted new Weyland Yutani experiments and potential new Xenomorph variants.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Quinton Baran

    This is an interesting kick off issue from Marvel. I really like Larroca's artwork. The storyline seems to have promise - I am interested in seeing where this goes. The story went by so quickly, I am looking forward to the next issue. I believe that the Alien world could have a persistent story line, with characters entering and exiting the series. I wonder if this has ever been seriously considered. I say that knowing that many of the Dark Horse series are connected together in some form. This is an interesting kick off issue from Marvel. I really like Larroca's artwork. The storyline seems to have promise - I am interested in seeing where this goes. The story went by so quickly, I am looking forward to the next issue. I believe that the Alien world could have a persistent story line, with characters entering and exiting the series. I wonder if this has ever been seriously considered. I say that knowing that many of the Dark Horse series are connected together in some form.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meesh

    first issue of marvel’s entry into the “alien” universe, not really sure what is going on at the moment but it’s an interesting use of familiar references that seem to be setting up a bigger story arc to come in future issues.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stuart Barr

    Definitely not Disney's Alien Decent start to a new comic book Alien story, largely character based. Enough here to make me get issue 2 Definitely not Disney's Alien Decent start to a new comic book Alien story, largely character based. Enough here to make me get issue 2

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Could be worse. As a lifelong Alien and Predator fan I can see some potential here. We'll just have to see where the story goes. Could be worse. As a lifelong Alien and Predator fan I can see some potential here. We'll just have to see where the story goes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Siddall

    Stunning Very entertaining and I don't know what to say about it other than I thought it was a great book. Can't wait for the next one. Stunning Very entertaining and I don't know what to say about it other than I thought it was a great book. Can't wait for the next one.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Logan

    Dry Good I enjoyed this a lot as a Alien fan and always welcome a good new read. Will be reading the next.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adam Scott

    This was a nice surprise Came across this by pure chance. And now I can't wait for the second. I was worried that marvel would hold back. NOPE. This is how it should be. This was a nice surprise Came across this by pure chance. And now I can't wait for the second. I was worried that marvel would hold back. NOPE. This is how it should be.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adam Spanos

    Strong art. Characters have potential. Willing to take its time and set the stage. Satisfying mix of xeno-types crawling around in the hive. Over too quick, but that's a good sign. Strong art. Characters have potential. Willing to take its time and set the stage. Satisfying mix of xeno-types crawling around in the hive. Over too quick, but that's a good sign.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Zeman

    Feels like a true sequel to Aliens the movie.

  26. 4 out of 5

    David

    Good start. Run of the mill story, but could lead to interesting story lines. Perhaps we could have gone awhile without the Alien...I know I know, but slow build?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Grubbs

    3.5

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex Devero

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gus213

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