counter create hit Did You Hear What Eddie Gein Done? - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Did You Hear What Eddie Gein Done?

Availability: Ready to download

One of the greats in the field of true-crime literature, Harold Schechter (Deviant, The Serial Killer Files, Hell's Princess), teams with five-time Eisner Award-winning graphic novelist Eric Powell (The Goon, Big Man Plans, Hillbilly) to bring you the tale of one of the most notoriously deranged murderers in American history, Ed Gein. DID YOU HEAR WHAT EDDIE GEIN DONE? is One of the greats in the field of true-crime literature, Harold Schechter (Deviant, The Serial Killer Files, Hell's Princess), teams with five-time Eisner Award-winning graphic novelist Eric Powell (The Goon, Big Man Plans, Hillbilly) to bring you the tale of one of the most notoriously deranged murderers in American history, Ed Gein. DID YOU HEAR WHAT EDDIE GEIN DONE? is an in-depth exploration of the Gein family and what led to the creation of the necrophile who haunted the dreams of 1950s America and inspired such films as Psycho, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Silence of the Lambs. Painstakingly researched and illustrated, Schechter and Powell's true-crime graphic novel takes the Gein story out of the realms of exploitation and gives the reader a fact-based dramatization of these tragic, psychotic and heartbreaking events. Because, in this case, the truth needs no embellishment to be horrifying.


Compare

One of the greats in the field of true-crime literature, Harold Schechter (Deviant, The Serial Killer Files, Hell's Princess), teams with five-time Eisner Award-winning graphic novelist Eric Powell (The Goon, Big Man Plans, Hillbilly) to bring you the tale of one of the most notoriously deranged murderers in American history, Ed Gein. DID YOU HEAR WHAT EDDIE GEIN DONE? is One of the greats in the field of true-crime literature, Harold Schechter (Deviant, The Serial Killer Files, Hell's Princess), teams with five-time Eisner Award-winning graphic novelist Eric Powell (The Goon, Big Man Plans, Hillbilly) to bring you the tale of one of the most notoriously deranged murderers in American history, Ed Gein. DID YOU HEAR WHAT EDDIE GEIN DONE? is an in-depth exploration of the Gein family and what led to the creation of the necrophile who haunted the dreams of 1950s America and inspired such films as Psycho, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Silence of the Lambs. Painstakingly researched and illustrated, Schechter and Powell's true-crime graphic novel takes the Gein story out of the realms of exploitation and gives the reader a fact-based dramatization of these tragic, psychotic and heartbreaking events. Because, in this case, the truth needs no embellishment to be horrifying.

30 review for Did You Hear What Eddie Gein Done?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    4-1/2 stars. Review coming soon through Cemetery Dance

  2. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    I’ll start with a little confession: I spent most of this book reading the dialogue in a Fargo-esque Midwest accent, so I invite you to do the same here. Okee then, let’s go. Schechter and Powell have created something spectacular and horrifying. Their well-researched and narratively-engrossing depiction of Ed Gein & his crimes evokes a range of responses, from pathos and humor on one end to revulsion and horror on the other. The art is perfectly suited to Schechter’s telling of the tale, and Po I’ll start with a little confession: I spent most of this book reading the dialogue in a Fargo-esque Midwest accent, so I invite you to do the same here. Okee then, let’s go. Schechter and Powell have created something spectacular and horrifying. Their well-researched and narratively-engrossing depiction of Ed Gein & his crimes evokes a range of responses, from pathos and humor on one end to revulsion and horror on the other. The art is perfectly suited to Schechter’s telling of the tale, and Powell’s real achievement here is in how he delivers the visual gut punches and portrays the inner workings of insanity. His depictions of Ed Gein’s dippy eye, Hitchcock’s Droopy jowels, and the incongruous features of the townsfolk of Plainview are charming in the light. But under the Wisconsin moon, the horror inside the Gein home is presented in horrifying, unembellished detail. “Wonderful” is the word that comes to mind, but as the people of Plainview might say, that would be a bit odd. All that aside, I know I’ll remember this book for 2 specific moments in particular. [No spoilers; even if you already know the true story, the artistic choices here deserve to be experienced fresh, so I’ll be vague. Also, the authors have a unique take on Gein’s psychosis and seeing their disturbing depiction of his inner thoughts is what really makes this book]. First, the stand-out moment in this book is essentially a terrifying smash-cut between Ed’s inner fantasy and the plain reality of what he was physically doing. It was unexpected and strange, borderline comical right before the smash-cut, but grotesque in the reveal. This is what we call Textbook Horror, folks. It takes dashes of strangeness, familiarity, horror, humor, revulsion and humanity and stirs them all up in a black cauldron. The result, when done right, is… uh… chef’s kiss? The second thing I think will remain burned into my brain like a Junji Ito 2-page spread is the author’s theory on Gein’s psychosis, manifested in Powell’s art. There are several panels that show this in strange and terrifying ways, but one in particular stands as the perfect image of what Gein’s subconscious may have thought of his mother. It’s just so… strange. This book is not a horror show, nor a thriller about the bogeyman next door. It’s a bizarre mishmash of wholesome and horrifying, of sad and sickening. And because of that, it’s deeply unsettling. You start to get a sense of how the people of Plainview must have felt when that oddball Eddy did what he did. If you’re at all interested in true crime, dark psychological stories, or even pulp horror, you will find something to love here—and then some. Highly recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Love

    Powell's art is unique in that most of a panel could be ink wash or pencil strokes with only the most important focus getting inked. His handling of people and their body language is brilliant and rarely matched. The research and how it facts were dramatized by Schechter are interesting choices in what was included. Typically comic writers are warned to stay away from "talking heads" but there are several pages where the team made that choice which puts emphasis on the text instead of the art. T Powell's art is unique in that most of a panel could be ink wash or pencil strokes with only the most important focus getting inked. His handling of people and their body language is brilliant and rarely matched. The research and how it facts were dramatized by Schechter are interesting choices in what was included. Typically comic writers are warned to stay away from "talking heads" but there are several pages where the team made that choice which puts emphasis on the text instead of the art. These are specific times such as interrogations/interviews. The early mention of Psycho and the inclusion of it (and other well known serial killer fiction) essentially bookend this ugly chunk of Wisconsin history. I highly recommend the OGN for those who can stomach the subject matter, but go in with the knowledge that some things are shifted or invented for the purposes of narrative. All that is explained in the first appendix.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    "You can't apply morality to insane persons" (p.8). In a way, this book was a bit of a first for me. I have read graphic novels before, but this was the first which had true events at its heart. And, with those events being truly horrific, I was interested to see how this subject matter would be handled in this genre. Ed Gein is infamous for the crimes that he committed in 1950's America. As the horror of what had happened became known, his crimes went on to inspire pieces of work such as the bo "You can't apply morality to insane persons" (p.8). In a way, this book was a bit of a first for me. I have read graphic novels before, but this was the first which had true events at its heart. And, with those events being truly horrific, I was interested to see how this subject matter would be handled in this genre. Ed Gein is infamous for the crimes that he committed in 1950's America. As the horror of what had happened became known, his crimes went on to inspire pieces of work such as the book "Psycho" (which was then famously turned into a film by Alfred Hitchcock); the killer, Leatherface, from the film "Texas Chainsaw Massacre"; and the character Buffalo Bill from the film "The Silence of the Lambs." With this graphic novel, Schechter and Powell have painstakingly brought into focus Gein as a character, right from his childhood beginnings to his demise. They have also examined the effect that the crimes had on his local town, where a lot of the people who knew him thought him too mild-mannered to have committed such atrocities. I think, for me, because this is a graphic novel, the dichotomy of Gein's character is expertly portrayed. Through the text, but obviously through the artwork, there are times when you see Gein's vulnerability, but then almost in the same breath, you are reminded of just what he had done. The complexities of the psychology behind Gein is definitely handled very well: on the one hand, he has clearly suffered from a toxic childhood, and potential abuse, meaning that he was easily led when being questioned as he seemed to lack a degree of emotional intelligence, but on the other hand, you see the troubled darkness that was within him, and his unnatural desires. I really can't fault this book. Despite the subject matter, there is no salacious treatment to the horrors which took place. The artwork, for example, often leaves a lot to the imagination, but the details that are included are portrayed brilliantly. The detail, and the colouring of greys, white and black perfectly bring this haunting story to life in a way which just wouldn't be possible if it was pure text. For any lovers of horror, true crime, or graphic novels, I would recommend this book completely.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Shuherk

    A very Graphic graphic novel. The writing is very good and the art is incredible. The blending of true crime, art, and analysis of this famous case is really such well blended project. Gein’s case lends itself to this format more than most other true crime stories, but very intrigued to see if these authors will collaborate more. Do not recommend if you do not like true crime, but if you enjoy the genre, definitely try this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Linds

    The art is pencil and pen and ink in monochrome. This is a graphic novel on the infamous case of Ed Gein from Wisconsin. I forgot some of the more ghoulish details, which would have been better for them to stay forgotten. 🤢

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Leitschuh

    Disturbing, horrifying, well researched.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jason Bovberg

    Proud backer of the Kickstarter that launched this project. Big-time Eric Powell fan, and his art really serves this subject matter well. That being said, I wish the storytelling were a little more dynamic (show don't tell). Some of the imagery, especially toward the end of the book, is rather static and repetitive, as if the recitation of facts held Powell back. Proud backer of the Kickstarter that launched this project. Big-time Eric Powell fan, and his art really serves this subject matter well. That being said, I wish the storytelling were a little more dynamic (show don't tell). Some of the imagery, especially toward the end of the book, is rather static and repetitive, as if the recitation of facts held Powell back.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    I was pretty disappointed when I read a recent volume of Goon that wasn't written nor had art by Eric Powell. It felt like a real low point in the series, and I wondered why he had farmed it out to a creative team who, while skilled in their crafts, couldn't capture the magic Powell injects into Goon. Apparently, it was to put out this. It was worth it. I did't know anything about Eddie Gein before I picked this up. So don't worry if you don't. While I have critiqued a few graphic novel biographie I was pretty disappointed when I read a recent volume of Goon that wasn't written nor had art by Eric Powell. It felt like a real low point in the series, and I wondered why he had farmed it out to a creative team who, while skilled in their crafts, couldn't capture the magic Powell injects into Goon. Apparently, it was to put out this. It was worth it. I did't know anything about Eddie Gein before I picked this up. So don't worry if you don't. While I have critiqued a few graphic novel biographies as being pretty much illustrated wikipedia entries, this particular book is able to pull off both the feeling of a well-researched graphic novel documentary, and a mostly non-fiction piece that reads like fiction, and looks like art. You can go elsewhere for reviews that give you a plot synopsis. I'll just say that if you have any interest in real crime and graphc novels, you need to go out and buy this book right now.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicki

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a great addition to the bookcase it’s a sweet sized hardback Edition. Minimalistic cover only hinting at the depravity within. This Eddie Gein account is beautifully and sometimes grotesquely illustrated by a firm favourite of mine Eric Powell. Harold Schecter describes Ed as a damaged person that ultimately damages other people in the worst way. He shows that when Ed is caught, some people preferred to believe that there had been multiple murders rather than accept that he could have de This is a great addition to the bookcase it’s a sweet sized hardback Edition. Minimalistic cover only hinting at the depravity within. This Eddie Gein account is beautifully and sometimes grotesquely illustrated by a firm favourite of mine Eric Powell. Harold Schecter describes Ed as a damaged person that ultimately damages other people in the worst way. He shows that when Ed is caught, some people preferred to believe that there had been multiple murders rather than accept that he could have desecrated human remains as it was soo ghoulish and unthinkable. It is conveyed that Ed was considered a bit odd but generally a helpful reliable quiet man, which is spooky. His relationship with his mother, well we’ve all seen Psycho or Bates Motel but for me there was one panel that summed it up and I believe Eric Powell is the only illustrator that could have pulled it off! I won’t say which one. This book was a good steady read and at no time did I feel that this true story was being over played / embellished. One of the last lines in this book is - Gein was a calculated Liar, The facts are he killed two women dug up several others and fashioned things out of their skin, the only one who truly knows what went on in that house is Ed Gein. This is a not soo subtle reminder that this is a persons story that should not be Romanticised but is one that should be remembered.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    "Did You Hear What Eddie Gein Done?" is a graphic novel written by Harold Schechter and art by Eric Powell. The true story account of Eddie Gein, a man who appears mild-mannered though a bit slow who in truth had an evil monster lurking within. I jumped on the opportunity to crowd-fund this a couple months ago and have been eagerly awaiting it's release. When it arrived the other day it immediately jumped to the top of my read pile. Eddie Gein is the basis of pop-culture horror icons such as Norm "Did You Hear What Eddie Gein Done?" is a graphic novel written by Harold Schechter and art by Eric Powell. The true story account of Eddie Gein, a man who appears mild-mannered though a bit slow who in truth had an evil monster lurking within. I jumped on the opportunity to crowd-fund this a couple months ago and have been eagerly awaiting it's release. When it arrived the other day it immediately jumped to the top of my read pile. Eddie Gein is the basis of pop-culture horror icons such as Norman Bates (Psycho), Leatheface (Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and Buffalo Bill (The Silence of the Lambs). I find the psychosis of serial killers fascinating. With Gein, you truly wonder how he would have turned out if his parents hadn't been so abusing (both physically and emotionally). I can't imagine the small town learning of what Gein did, especially back in the 1950s - it would rocked the town to it's core. Powell's art captures Gein's creepy and grotesque nature perfectly. I highly recommend this to any true crime fans.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    While reading this book, there were some pages I refused to to take a break on. I didn't want to reopen the book on particular pages because the pictures were just so horrifying. The story of Ed Gein doesn't need to be retold in this review, but this retelling via graphic novel needs to be seen. The dialogue is taken from actual interviews, the illustrations bring the story to alarming life, and the book is just haunting. Recommended for anyone with a true crime fascination. While reading this book, there were some pages I refused to to take a break on. I didn't want to reopen the book on particular pages because the pictures were just so horrifying. The story of Ed Gein doesn't need to be retold in this review, but this retelling via graphic novel needs to be seen. The dialogue is taken from actual interviews, the illustrations bring the story to alarming life, and the book is just haunting. Recommended for anyone with a true crime fascination.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Lalonde

    You can tell a large amount of work went into this book. The art is haunting and the backstory thorough. The supporting characters are given as much care as Gein in detail, offering a greater concentration of/for the victims. I could not put this down.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    4.5 A masterful and disturbing biography of the notorious Ed Gein. Eric Powell’s lush ink work here might be the highlight of his career, and perfectly fits the grim, rural horrors of the story. One of the best graphic novels of 2021.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    4.5 well done true crime graphic novel. Really goes into what geins upbringing was like and how he interacted with the community snd how the community was affected by his crimes. Without sensationalizing the story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    If you’ve done a deep dive into Gein’s story before, this probably won’t offer anything new, but for my mild familiarity with the case this graphic novel was a truly horrifying read. Ugh. I need a palate cleanser.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    I think I've been spoiled by Derf's Kent State graphic novel: as much as I liked this book, I wanted more research and more history. (I imagine that finding interview and trial transcripts from that era can be challenging.) The story itself is riveting, and I was fascinated to see how this true crime had ripples through pop culture for decades. The black and white art has the texture of pencil and ink pen, which gives everything a faded, historical vibe (and keeps the graphic depictions from bein I think I've been spoiled by Derf's Kent State graphic novel: as much as I liked this book, I wanted more research and more history. (I imagine that finding interview and trial transcripts from that era can be challenging.) The story itself is riveting, and I was fascinated to see how this true crime had ripples through pop culture for decades. The black and white art has the texture of pencil and ink pen, which gives everything a faded, historical vibe (and keeps the graphic depictions from being too gruesome). The art creates a fine balance between historical reporting and a tense crime story, especially in panels depicting Gein without dialogue. 3.5 stars, rounded up in appreciation of the difficulty of writing about a 60+ year old cold case.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2021/10/0... For my first Halloween read this year, I have chosen the new graphic novel about Eddie Gein who was a necrophile serial killer who inspired Psycho, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Silence of the Lambs! This true-crime story was horrifying, yet of course sickly fascinating. Established author Harold Schechter who has written a previous book about Gein is paired with artist Eric Powell, known for his The Goon and This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2021/10/0... For my first Halloween read this year, I have chosen the new graphic novel about Eddie Gein who was a necrophile serial killer who inspired Psycho, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Silence of the Lambs! This true-crime story was horrifying, yet of course sickly fascinating. Established author Harold Schechter who has written a previous book about Gein is paired with artist Eric Powell, known for his The Goon and Hillbilly graphic novels, and they proved to be a superb team to tell this tale. The story opens with Alfred Hitchcock in 1960 recounting how Psycho was inspired by Gein’s crime, just three years prior. The well-researched story then flashes back to Gein’s childhood in Wisconsin, born to mismatched parents- a weak drunkard father and a strong-willed and religiously fanatical mother. While young his parents move him and his older brother Henry to an isolated farmhouse where the boys can’t escape from their mother’s tyrannical rantings and they become warped by her teachings. Despite this, Eddie develops an unhealthy attachment to his mother, believing all other women are harlots. The story continues chronologically, with the boys aging into strange men, still under the thrall of their mother. The father dies in 1940 and a few years later Henry (perhaps killed by his brother), leaving Eddie happily alone with his mother. A stroke leaves her in a weakened state, and some disturbing pictures show Eddie’s sick delight in helping her with all her personal care. Her eventual death in 1945 leaves Eddie alone to his own devices, and in his grief, he seeks ways to recreate his mother, in shocking ways. Unchecked for a dozen years, Gein committed at least two murders and uncounted grave robbings, in which he then used the women’s skins to make himself a skin suit, facemasks, and other ghastly creations. The evocative art by Powell, done in his trademark black and white illustrations, is inked and shaded to perfection. Each chapter opens with newspapers headlines, that guide you through the story, with the depictions of the Gein family and townspeople very accurate to photos of them and to that era. Some people have a touch of caricature to them, as Gein’s droopy eye and in later pictures, the townspeople sharing their recollections seem exaggerated. In the midst of all this, Powell actually adds some whimsy, in guessing what Gein’s inner thoughts might have been, finding dark humor in Gein’s psychosis. It proves to be an interesting blend of pulp horror and non-fiction. Darkly disturbing, and scarier because it is based on facts, this story is not to be missed for true-crime aficionados!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    “When a homicidal maniac like Gein comes around, the mind just can’t grasp the reality, so he gets turned into a legend.” (165) I think this is a stand-out approach to telling the sad, horrific, and (often) over-sensationalized story of Ed Gein and his crimes. Careful attention and extensive research is paid to addressing many of the underlying mental, emotional, and physical issues that contributed to Ed Gein’s perception of the world. Further, I appreciated how Gein’s crimes were situated withi “When a homicidal maniac like Gein comes around, the mind just can’t grasp the reality, so he gets turned into a legend.” (165) I think this is a stand-out approach to telling the sad, horrific, and (often) over-sensationalized story of Ed Gein and his crimes. Careful attention and extensive research is paid to addressing many of the underlying mental, emotional, and physical issues that contributed to Ed Gein’s perception of the world. Further, I appreciated how Gein’s crimes were situated within not just the community but the time in which they were committed. The concept of a serial killer or a deeply disturbed individual like Gein was not really in the purview of the time. People who did things like Gein were monsters from faraway or mythical places or they were demons from an imagined hell. More, and to the point, they were people who didn’t live in small towns in America like Gein. At least, that’s what people wanted to believe. Gein was not just a man to a lot of people; he was the evil next door. The monster in your own backyard. The scariest thing out there because he looked just like you and me. He proved that monsters can be people — people you know, you live next door to, and who you can’t see the monster beneath the skin until it’s too late. Really compelling story told through meticulous and delightfully gruesome illustrations! Highly recommend! One of my favorite graphic novels this year!

  20. 4 out of 5

    David

    This one is so hard to rate. One thing I've learned is themes I would never partake in motion picture medium, I seem to greatly enjoy, maybe even more, in comic form. I will NOT watch horror, but horror comics I devour. When it comes to serial killers... Well, it's still true, but it was harder to get away from the real world biased of the subject matter, which left me feeling like I had to dislike the book somehow... Even now I'm discussing more the duplicity feelings coming from the topic than m This one is so hard to rate. One thing I've learned is themes I would never partake in motion picture medium, I seem to greatly enjoy, maybe even more, in comic form. I will NOT watch horror, but horror comics I devour. When it comes to serial killers... Well, it's still true, but it was harder to get away from the real world biased of the subject matter, which left me feeling like I had to dislike the book somehow... Even now I'm discussing more the duplicity feelings coming from the topic than my thoughts on the book. So, let's do that. This book really had me in to the origin, and I knew no background outside of the crimes, so I was enthralled to see the upbringing story. Another aspect going a long way, I never felt the book was overly grotesque, playing up the subject matter, or exploitative of the topic at hand, when it easily could have been. I love the art style, and it perfectly captured real life without going for too much realism. I also greatly appreciated how it felt they were trying to posit theories and thoughts without forcing it on you. Overall, really great, just walked away feeling a bit disturbed and uneasy, especially given having had a 'good' read from it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Hinton

    I don't think I can come up with words to describe this book. Obviously it was going to be a winner with Harold Schechter behind it, he is my favorite true crime writer. This is by far the best piece of Gein media I have ever consumed, and now that I think about it, I have consumed a lot of stuff about Gein. Powell's artwork fits the story nicely. The subtle changes in Ed's face during the interrogation sequence were remarkable. Its hard to read something about someone so evil and obviously so s I don't think I can come up with words to describe this book. Obviously it was going to be a winner with Harold Schechter behind it, he is my favorite true crime writer. This is by far the best piece of Gein media I have ever consumed, and now that I think about it, I have consumed a lot of stuff about Gein. Powell's artwork fits the story nicely. The subtle changes in Ed's face during the interrogation sequence were remarkable. Its hard to read something about someone so evil and obviously so sick as Ed Gein and still have sympathy for him and the life he lived. I think that both Schechter and Powell have bridged that duality well, and I will make sure to recommend this book to any true crime fan or fan of graphic novels.

  22. 4 out of 5

    eric garza

    For all the comics/true crime heads out there. It’s a graphic novel that tells the story of Ed Gein and all the horrific stuff he done. Reader beware, not for the faint of heart. It’s one thing to hear about the stories and inspiration Gein sprung over some of our biggest pop culture boogeymen, and another to see it visualized. You almost feel sort of desensitized to “the facts,” but all credit to Powell as it packs a different punch when you see the horrors illustrated as beautifully macabre as For all the comics/true crime heads out there. It’s a graphic novel that tells the story of Ed Gein and all the horrific stuff he done. Reader beware, not for the faint of heart. It’s one thing to hear about the stories and inspiration Gein sprung over some of our biggest pop culture boogeymen, and another to see it visualized. You almost feel sort of desensitized to “the facts,” but all credit to Powell as it packs a different punch when you see the horrors illustrated as beautifully macabre as he does here. Almost feels dangerous like you’re looking at crime photos, or some dark web shiz you shouldn’t have access to. Strange to say it’s a great read, but it is.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I’m not going to rate this book. It’s gruesome, as it should be. The art is well done, the pacing and detail are great. It also pathologizes the trans experience. Exploits it to further the horror of Ed Gein. I understand this book was written with actual quotes and source material from the 40s and 50s. It also has a less partial narrator who chose “transsexual” as a descriptor and created a full page of illustrated panels where Gein struggles to cut off his genitals with scissors. When he can’t I’m not going to rate this book. It’s gruesome, as it should be. The art is well done, the pacing and detail are great. It also pathologizes the trans experience. Exploits it to further the horror of Ed Gein. I understand this book was written with actual quotes and source material from the 40s and 50s. It also has a less partial narrator who chose “transsexual” as a descriptor and created a full page of illustrated panels where Gein struggles to cut off his genitals with scissors. When he can’t, he finds another grave to rob for his skin suit. There is no source material supporting that storyline. So I won’t rate this title.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marlowe

    The artwork is really solid in this one - a good mix of realistic (especially when depicting real people) and artistic. It's a good use of the medium. The storytelling is interesting. I like that the narrative kept the remove of non-fiction, using interview-style panels to mark out conjecture as opposed to facts confirmed with direct sources. Overall an neat concept. I don't think I've seen a non-fiction comic quite like this before. And it managed to convey quite a bit of information while still The artwork is really solid in this one - a good mix of realistic (especially when depicting real people) and artistic. It's a good use of the medium. The storytelling is interesting. I like that the narrative kept the remove of non-fiction, using interview-style panels to mark out conjecture as opposed to facts confirmed with direct sources. Overall an neat concept. I don't think I've seen a non-fiction comic quite like this before. And it managed to convey quite a bit of information while still being rather entertaining.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachel S.

    Before reading this, I didn't know much about Ed Gein. I knew he was a serial killer, but I learned much more from this graphic novel. I was impressed with the references to Psycho and Norman Bates and mother. There were some similarities. It was well documented and the details were horrific. He was considered mentally ill, but I believe his murders were premeditated (proven in court) and he got off easy. He was a pathological liar and pure evil at the core. Maybe the authors wanted us to feel s Before reading this, I didn't know much about Ed Gein. I knew he was a serial killer, but I learned much more from this graphic novel. I was impressed with the references to Psycho and Norman Bates and mother. There were some similarities. It was well documented and the details were horrific. He was considered mentally ill, but I believe his murders were premeditated (proven in court) and he got off easy. He was a pathological liar and pure evil at the core. Maybe the authors wanted us to feel sorry for Gein, but I did not.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Wesley

    Easily the best book I have read this year and one of the best comics I own, this story winds around not just Gein’s actions but the investigation and the fallout from said itself. The authors did a nice job of drawing a line between what is known and what is speculative and what was pure hearsay from the townspeople of the time, all while keeping the story entertaining. It’s certainly graphic, so it’s definitely not for the squeamish, but I couldn’t put it down.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Zeki Czen

    Schechter and Powell make an unstoppable team. Powell's artwork brings to life the quality of research that made Schechter's "Deviant" such a true crime classic. Gein's well known story (to true crime aficionados) really benefits from the stark and regularly bleak illustrations. But the eye Powell has for scenes really enhances the emotionality, making Gein both more relatable and more objectionable. Schechter and Powell make an unstoppable team. Powell's artwork brings to life the quality of research that made Schechter's "Deviant" such a true crime classic. Gein's well known story (to true crime aficionados) really benefits from the stark and regularly bleak illustrations. But the eye Powell has for scenes really enhances the emotionality, making Gein both more relatable and more objectionable.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    Beautifully weird. Highly recommended for fans of true crime, serial killer bios, and Eric Powell’s artwork, which is a perfect match for the subject matter. I’m glad I was able to back the Kickstarter campaign for this hardcover original graphic novel signed by Harold Schechter and Eric Powell. It’s a work of art.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Franklin

    This was disturbing and fascinating all at once. Eric Powells artwork is as always the star of the show. However if you are looking for a gore fest you will be sadly disappointed. I appreciate the respect that was shown to the victims of his crimes by limiting the visual representations to a minimum.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jared

    A haunting examination of the infamous American killer who spawned the slasher film and sparked mainstream fascination with mental illness, thoroughly researched, and illustrated masterfully in bleak gray tones which evoke a milieu that most of us would rather see confined only to pages in a book or a box of fading photographs.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.